‘Weak’ UK supply chain is holding back investment

The British are coming! Controversial acceptance speeches, staunch warnings, and more – feature in our weekly news blast.

Twilight of supply chain
If quality doesn’t improve, could this be the twilight of the UK’s supply chain?

 

Business calls for measures to boost supply chain

  • Weaknesses in the UK’s supply chain are holding back industrial investment, according to British business. Industry is calling on the government to help boost competitiveness with measures to incentivise innovation, improve financing and resolve a crippling skills gap.
  • Close to 80 per cent of companies say improving the quality of Britain’s supply chain will be crucial to future growth, according to a study published on Monday by the Confederation of British Industry and consultants AT Kearney.
  • Industry’s call is made more urgent after the Bank of England’s chief economist Andy Haldane last week warned that productivity remained 15 per cent below pre-crisis levels despite unprecedented declines in wages.
  • Yet in a blow to the CBI’s findings, some global manufacturers said Britain’s relatively high costs would remain the biggest deterrent to investment. “It’s far more expensive . . . here,” said Neeraj Kanwar, managing director of India’s Apollo tyres. “The UK as far as manufacturing is concerned is not lucrative at all.”

Read more at FT.com

Top transport, logistics, supply chain operators in Malta honoured

  • Noel Ellul, an expert in transport and logistics in Malta with a career spanning over 40 years, was awarded the ‘Outstanding Achievement of the Year’ honour at the first TransLog Awards to be held.
  • Key transport, logistics and supply chain stakeholders operating in Malta were recognised with awards in 12 different categories at the TransLog Awards presentation ceremony held at the Intercontinental Hotel.
  • Organised by Support and Supply Management Group (SSM) and marketing communications agency BPC International, and supported by HSBC Bank Malta, the TransLog Awards attracted nominations from both Maltese and regional businesses operating in Malta.

Read more at Times of Malta

Osborne poaches Balfour Beatty supply chain manager for director role

  • Mr Robeson joins Osborne from Balfour Beatty Construction Services UK, where he worked in supply chain management until September 2014, according to his LinkedIn profile. He has also worked for Wates Construction and Berkeley Homes.
  • Osborne said Mr Robeson would bring experience and expertise in supply chain relationship development, procurement best practice and added value realisation.
  • Osborne Construction managing director Andy Steele said: “I am delighted to welcome John to the Osborne Construction Leadership Team. John will help us improve on stakeholder engagement and further us to increase our operational excellence agenda.”

Read more at Construction News

Stirling Prize winner hits out at UK procurement

  • Stirling Prize winner Steve Tompkins has criticised the UK’s procurement system for freezing out young practices.
  • The Haworth Tompkins director contrasted the “increasingly bureaucratic” British system unfavourably with that found overseas where greater weight is often placed on talent and ideas.
  • He said his own practice had struggled to break into new typologies because PQQs in this country so often demand prior experience. “The whole procurement structure in this country is increasingly bureaucratic,” he told BD after scooping the Stirling Prize on Thursday night for the Everyman Theatre in Liverpool. “The number of hurdles you have to pass through to get a commission is daunting and the amount of design work you have to do is daunting, demoralising and very wasteful.
  • He continued: “It’s increasingly hard for young practices to get in at all. I wish that was a debate we could have with the procurement process.”

Read more at bdonline.co.uk

Supply chain boost with new Discovery Sport

  • The first Land Rover Discovery Sport has rolled off the production line at Jaguar Land Rover’s (JLR) Halewood site, with the UK supply chain benefiting from £3.5bn in contracts from the new vehicle.
  • The latest model in the range has created 250 manufacturing jobs in Halewood as the result of a £200m investment.
  • Fifty-five suppliers have also secured a total of £3.5bn in contracts to support production, which has led to the safeguarding and creation of more than 1,000 UK jobs, JLR said.

Read more at Insider Media Limited

Germany wants cleaner, kinder textiles supply chain

  • Gerd Müller, Germany’s Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), launched a new Textiles Alliance in Berlin late last week. Its goal is to help move the international textile supply chain toward better labor and environmental practices.
  • Müller’s ministry wants to see improvements at every link in the supply chain – from the cotton fields through the textile dyeing and clothing production process to distribution and retail.
  • Among other aims, the Textiles Alliance seeks decent wages, an end to forced labor and child labor, respect for safety standards, and a stop to the use of certain particularly environmentally toxic chemicals in the textiles supply chain.
  • Membership in the alliance is voluntary, however, and while the ministry reported that 29 textiles companies and associations had joined the Textiles Alliance in time for the launch, many key industry players and associations in Germany gave notice that they would not join.

Read more at Deutsche Welte

HGV driver shortage may affect UK supply chain

  • Members of the British International Freight Association – who tend to be truck hirers delivering container and trailer imports from ports to distribution centres – have reported significantly increased waiting times for an available vehicle, much higher costs from haulage companies and surcharges from some shipping lines.
  • The implementation of the new HGV driver regulations – the Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC) – in September has already contributed to a lack of new drivers within the logistics and distribution sector, and the shortage of drivers has been compounded by the imports forecast, as well as the earlier-than-expected peak season.
  • BIFA director general, Robert Keen said: “New HGV drivers are urgently required in the UK logistics business to help alleviate the problems caused by the current shortage, which is leading to significant pressures on logistics costs.”

Read more at Supply Management

Are we in the Golden Age of Procurement?

Rio’s CEO says it’s time “to meddle in the middle”

Rio Tinto’s CEO Sam Walsh put a spotlight on the value that can be delivered by both the C-level and procurement shifting their focus from the top and bottom-line to the “middle line”, when he spoke at the CIPS conference in Sydney last week.

Sam Walsh - CEO Rio Tinto

He said most companies were not making the most of the possibilities of procurement. In fact, research showed that when it comes to procurement, 50% to 90% of companies recognise that they do not employ best practices. This is despite research also showing that companies who get their procurement operations to the standard of the best – can increase their profit margins by 15 per cent.

“Shift your perspective.  Instead of spending your whole time obsessing only about the top line, and the bottom line, focus on the middle line as well.”

Even though turnover and profit are critically important, you don’t hear many people talking about the cost of sales or improvement in their working capital. Have you ever turned on Bloomberg in the morning and heard them say, “Today, Unilever’s cost of sales went up by 3.5%?”

“The middle line is frequently where you can make most difference, securing your competitive advantage, proving your value, showing your mettle,” said Sam.

In encouraging the procurement profession to seize the opportunity, he said “And if the middle’s in a muddle? Meddle! You won’t regret it! You might just make a tonne more money.”

In his speech “The golden age of procurement“ Sam shared some of his thoughts about the importance of procurement from the perspective of a global chief executive. In opening, he mused that there has never been a more exciting or important time to work in procurement. Sam cemented the fact that a lot has changed since he first started out, and went on to praise today’s women and men that are pushing forward, making businesses more innovative, productive, and creating the partnerships that will see us into the future.

One of the areas highlighted for “meddling in the middle” was to focus on innovation.

“You need to collaborate to compete,” said Sam.

Rio Tinto has a whole raft of strategic partnerships that are incredibly beneficial. Strategic partnerships with academic bodies, research institutes, as well as suppliers.

Working closely with key partners, Rio Tinto has established a great record in innovation. Its ‘Mine of the Future’ programme has been developed working with companies like Hitachi, Atlas Copco, Komatsu, Bridgestone, and General Electric. All of which are producing stunning results.

“You might have read about driverless cars in the papers. Rio Tinto already has 53 driverless trucks operating in the Pilbara. Collectively they’ve driven 3.9 million kilometres, and are all operated remotely using GPS,” Sam said.

Another area recommended for “meddling in the middle” was sustainability.

“So the saying goes, we are what we eat. In business, we are what we buy,” he said.

Rio Tinto spent around US$26 billion dollars last year. The decisions it make about where and how it invests this spend can have a huge impact. An important part of its approach is to source locally, and it applies this same approach in other markets as well. For example, at Rio Tinto’s new mining lease area in South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal region, the company is investing time, money and skills as one of the major employers in the region to develop lasting community businesses that can supply the mine.

Sam reminds us however that all of this doesn’t come without effort; that it’s about getting the skills right too. He says that today’s procurement professionals require a much wider skills-set than was needed when he first started as a trainee buyer at General Motors Holden.

“Today’s procurement professionals need to work smarter, harder and faster.  Procurement used to be predominantly focused on achieving security of supply. Today, we’re operating in a business environment that is far more volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous than it was when I started out,” he said.

“We’re getting increasingly used to economic, political, and environmental shocks. As procurement professionals we need to be on top of these changes as and when they happen, we need to negotiate contracts that can withstand sudden and dramatic economic change.”

Meet the woman who’s lighting-up procurement

The ability to transition from procuring cosmetics to lighting products for a hardware retailer makes Natasha Ryan a diverse type of woman.

Natasha Ryan - Bunnings

As the national buyer for the lighting category for Bunnings, her role allows her to source, create and deliver products that customers tell her they want.

“It’s a vibrant role that involves a deep understanding of the fashionable on-trend products within decorative interior lighting, as well as working with technical products.”

Natasha has been in her role since 2009. Previously, she was the national garden décor buyer for Bunnings.

“It’s a privilege to work for a great brand that’s deeply authentic and such a powerful category leader. Bunnings has an incredible strong relationship with Australian consumers that has been built upon trust. People understand and love our brand, and appreciate our low prices and wide product range.”

Natasha has also worked for John Danks, where she revitalised the outdoor furniture and lifestyle products. Prior to this she was hired by Cosmopak to revamp and relaunch redundant teen cosmetic brand KISS.

She has travelled extensively for Bunnings, either buying, sourcing or developing products with manufacturers anywhere from Europe to Asia.

The travel has been a real eye-opener. During her early trips to China, many of the factory owners she visited seem surprised to see a woman in her role.

“My early trips to China were mostly spent in a car travelling long hours to factories. The trips were always exhilarating, driving licenses for the masses were just becoming available as the Chinese became more affluent, traffic lights considered merely a suggestion and new roads being built so quickly that no-one really ever seemed to know which side of the road they should be driving on,” she says.

“I’m very lucky to have met and worked with incredibly talented manufacturers, who have taught me a lot about negotiations, relationships, buying and manufacturing.”

Natasha says that the best thing about working in procurement is bringing products to market and making a difference, adding that it’s all about market disruption.

“I’m passionate about creating products, delivering it to the shop floor and ultimately carving out great customer experiences.”

The Apprentice: A lesson in how not to market yourself

It’s been billed as the “job interview from hell”… 

To our UK, US, and AUS readers, any mention of The Apprentice will unilaterally  send shivers down your spine and cause a gleeful smile to creep across your face. For the rest of you, sit back and prepare to get schooled in the art of bad self-promotion…

The Apprentice (UK) - worst quotes

Every year sixteen of the UK’s most promising businessmen and women (see also: misguided marketeers/shifty salespeople/glamour-model in disguise) compete in a gruelling twelve week process to be named Lord Sugar’s Apprentice. It’s a format borrowed from the hugely popular US Donald Trump iteration. The difference being, the victor gets to to win the top prize: a business investment of £250k, with Sugar retaining 50% of the company.

With the exception of a winning handful, Lord Sugar (along with his two politely patient aides) observe these candidates through weeks of ingenious tasks to test their sales and negotiation skills, marketing savviness, entrepreneurial drive, and procurement acumen.

Are you often surprised by your own brilliance?

We’ve gathered some of the finest utterances to fall out of their mouths in the series’ 10-year history for your enjoyment. As you can see, if you get someone to talk about himself or herself – it has the tendency to bring out the very worst in people… If you plan on going further in your professional career, take heed, don’t commit the mortal sin of repeating any of the following!

“Everything I touch turns to sold” Stuart Baggs (2010)

“I can sell ice to the Eskimos” – Melissa Cohen (2010)

“Don’t tell me the sky’s the limit when there are footprints on the Moon” – Melody Hossaini (2011)

“I’m a ‘Great’ of my generation. I’m an innovator and leader in business. I take inspiration from Napoleon” – Zeeshaan Shah (2013)

“As a salesperson, I would rate myself as probably the best in Europe” – Jennifer Maguire (2008)

“I’m like a shark, right at the top of the food chain. I take what I want, when I want. I truly am the reflection of perfection” – Ricky Martin (2012)

“My first word wasn’t mummy, it was money” – Shibby Robati (2010)

“There are two types of people in the world: Winners and… I don’t know how to say the word, I can’t say it” – Ian Stringer (2008)

“I have the energy of a Duracell bunny, sex appeal of Jessica Rabbit, and a brain like Einstein” –  Luisa Zissman (2013)

Now we’ve armed you with inspiration, we want to hear the very worst examples you’ve encountered in your careers. Can you beat these?

Stay up-to-date with Procurious




The best way to negotiate

Welcome to the third article in a monthly series from John Viner-Smith.

How to negotiate effectively

If you’re a student of negotiation (and, as a procurement professional, how could you not be a student of negotiation?) then you should have a well-thumbed copy of Richard Fisher and Bill Ury’s “Getting to Yes” within easy reach on your bookshelf. Fisher and Ury literally wrote the book on what is termed “principled” or “interest-based” negotiation (often simplified to “win-win” negotiation). When asked “what’s the best way to negotiate?” most academics will point you to this approach.

How to negotiate - getting to yes

There are five central guiding principles to this approach.

  1. Separate the people from the problem. In other words, seek to decide issues on their merits rather than the emotions, fears and egos of the negotiators
  2. Focus on interests, not positions. Fisher and Ury assume that almost all disputes can be resolved with principled negotiation because, when you cut through the positions adopted by negotiators to their actual interests, they are often more easily reconciled
  3. Invent options for mutual gain. By working creatively and collaboratively around the interests, negotiators can achieve outcomes that deliver gains to both sides.
  4. Insist on objective criteria for decisions. The classic examples quoted here are the purchase or sale of something like a house or a car, where there will be plentiful benchmark data available pointing to the “fair” price for the item being traded or an independent appraisal can be carried out.
  5. Know your BATNA (best alternative to a negotiated agreement). Your BATNA is the best outcome you can achieve if you don’t do this deal. If the proposal on the table is as good as or better than your BATNA, the deal is worth doing. If it isn’t, it’s not.

There are definite advantages inherent to this approach. If you genuinely have scope to negotiate this way you can engineer “all gain” deals which add value to both sides. In some cases, correct and thorough preparation on both sides and conscientious commitment to maintaining an atmosphere of curiosity, creativity and collaboration can result in deals which represent increased value to both sides and are the foundation of strategic partnership in business.

In a previous Procurious article I wrote that “win-win” is a myth, so you may be wondering how I reconcile that view with the idea of engineered, all-gain deals. “Win-win” is a term that is bandied about so much it has lost all meaning. All too frequently it’s used by one side or the other when they’re winning something, but haven’t given any real thought to what the outcome does for the other side. Engineered, All-Gain deals are only possible when both sides are genuinely curious enough to understand the other side’s underlying interests and candidly share their own. Sharing that information makes both sides vulnerable to the other, so an environment of trust and authentic commitment to the long term is vital. Business relationships like that are like marriages, and it is no more appropriate to talk about who won what in such a relationship than it is to call a winner in a marriage.

So is interest-based negotiation the best way to negotiate? My answer would be “sometimes”.

Let’s start by looking at this idea of calling interest based negotiation “principled”. Does that imply that all other kinds of negotiation are unprincipled? That’s a dangerous value judgement to make! Let’s use an example to explore this question. “Joe” is buying a house.

  • Joe’s budget is £500,000
  • The asking price for the house is £510,000
  • The vendor (unbeknownst to Joe, of course) needs £455,000 from the sale
  • The identical house next door sold last week for £489,000

Getting to yes-style, “principled” negotiation theory dictates that Joe should work with the vendor to find the deal that best suits both their interests and is fair to both, possibly taking market benchmarks into account. Under these conditions, you might consider that a settlement around £490k is fair and principled.

Instead of doing that deal, Joe uses an array of questioning skills, market knowledge and tactics to establish that the vendor could do the deal at £455k and wants money fast.  Joe then uses that information to apply pressure on the vendor to close the deal for £460k, thirty thousand pounds less than the “objective”, “fair”, benchmark price. Recognising that he’s never going to see the vendor again and therefore there is no value in a warm or trusting relationship, Joe uses every available lever to push the vendor down to a price that is closer to their walk-away point than the middle of the range.

Joe’s negotiating methodology is the antithesis of Fisher and Ury’s approach. He deliberately makes the person the focus by using the pressures on the vendor to create leverage. He focuses that leverage entirely on meeting his own interests to the greatest degree at the expense of the vendors’  and makes no attempt to come up with options for mutual gain. He ignores the objective criteria, focusing instead on the subjective pressures in the vendor’s head. Finally he closes a deal, keeping the lion’s share of the value in the deal for himself. So does that make Joe unprincipled?

If you’re tempted to say “yes”, ask yourself why. Certainly Joe is unlikely to enjoy a warm relationship with the vendor after the deal but why should that matter? He’s never going to see the vendor again. So if you did answer “yes”, is it possible that you just don’t like Joe? Maybe he seems greedy. Maybe you have some sympathy for the vendor. Viewed in isolation, Joe’s approach might seem aggressive and selfish. But let’s say Joe has a family, ask yourself this; who has more right to Joe’s £30,000; the vendor or Joe’s kids? They can’t both have it. Viewed that way, you might conclude that by pushing the vendor to accept the lowest possible price and saving himself enough money to put one of his kids through University without debt, Joe’s actions are entirely principled.

Life (personal and business life) is complex. We all balance complicated and often conflicting principles and duties and it is tempting, in the stress of negotiation, to lose sight of who’s interests you are there to serve. As a matter of principle you owe yourself the best deal possible. You owe your stakeholders the best deal possible. You owe your counterparty only what the circumstances of the deal at hand dictate that they are due, at the lowest possible cost to yourself.

Saying “It’s always best to adopt an interest-based approach to negotiations…” is correct in academic terms, but in the real world you have to qualify that by adding “…when you can”. As a negotiator you have other options available to you and they will be valid some of the time. In selecting which approach you adopt, I offer you a single guiding principle that works for me;

“Adopt the approach that will deliver the greatest benefit to yourself and the interests you represent”.

If circumstances allow an interest-based approach, this one principle will guide you to that approach. If not, this principle will help to focus you on doing what is necessary.

One of Australia’s top procurement job goes to…

Today marks a big day.

Procurious member, and reigning Asia-Pacific CPO of the Year, Visna Lampasi has been announced as Head of Group Procurement at Australia’s largest retailer, Woolworths Limited.

Visna Lampasi Woolworths

In what was no doubt a hotly contested role, Visna will lead the procurement of all goods not for resale across the Woolworths Limited brands including Woolworth Supermarkets and Petrol, Liquor Group, Big W, Masters Home Improvement, ALH Hotel Group, Woolworths Money, Everyday Rewards and Ezibuy.

For those unfamiliar with Woolworths Limited, the group of companies has approximately 200,000 staff Australia-wide with an annual revenue of $60 billion – one of Australia’s leading groups.

If anyone is up for the task of delivering commercial value in such a high profile role, Visna is having taken out the title of The Faculty’s CPO of the Year 2014 earlier this year.

Visna’s career background spans across a number of procurement roles, most recently operating as infrastructure company Leighton Contractors’ Chief Procurement Officer where she established an award winning social procurement program.

Procurement veteran and Procurious founder Tania Seary welcomed the announcement: “I haven’t had the opportunity to work closely with the Woolworths Procurement team, but I understand they have been through various transformations.

“Within the Australian procurement landscape, the team would be regarded as a mature procurement function,” said Seary.

“Having gotten to know Visna over the years, I know she’s a very talented and tenacious procurement professional who will undoubtedly identify a multitude of sources of untapped value within the organisation.”

Industry peer and Rio Tinto’s General Manager of Global Process Architecture, Cindy Dunham echoed Seary’s sentiments:

“I’ve had the pleasure of working with Visna on a number of procurement professional bodies and know that she’ll bring a great depth of knowledge and experience to the Woolworths Group.

“Visna’s large network is complemented by her industry leadership, influencing skills and dedication. I look forward to her continued commitment to raising the profile of procurement in Australia.”

The Faculty’s CPO of the Year judging panel chairman Dr. Karen Morley also congratulated Visna on the new role.

“Visna’s track record of achieving commercial outcomes, leading cultural change, and balancing social outcomes in tough project management environments sets her up well for further success.”

From the team here at Procurious we’d like to congratulate Visna!

For those wanting to know how she does it, stay tuned for some exclusive procurement advice from the woman of the hour coming soon.

Risk of business disruption has increased by a fifth – which countries are affected?

A new report reports that a fifth of the world’s countries are at risk from business disruption… this and more in our weekly news blast:

Supply chains at risk from civil unrest and war

Risk of business disruption has increased in a fifth of countries

  • The risk of business disruption due to civil unrest has increased in a fifth of countries over the past quarter, according to a report.
  • The ranking of 197 countries, which assesses the likelihood of strikes, protests and ethnic and sectarian conflict impacting business operations, includes 11 states that are considered to be “extreme risk”. These include Syria at number one, followed by the Central African Republic, Pakistan and Sudan.
  • Maplecroft’s Civil Unrest Index shows risk has increased most in Hong Kong over the past three months, due to the pro-democracy demonstrations. This was followed by Liberia where there has been mounting unrest as a result of the Ebola virus outbreak.
  • Maplecroft said firms operating in and sourcing from these countries “faced severe disruptions”. Factories in Vietnam were forced to suspend production during anti-Chinese protests in May 2014, and anti-government protests in Thailand, culminated in a coup and “shut down much of the country’s commercial centre”, halving projected GDP growth to 2.5 per cent.

Read more at Supply Management

World Bank to launch procurement app

  • The World Bank plans to release a mobile application that will give users access to comprehensive procurement data from 2004 to 2014.

  • The new app, which is being rolled out amid an ongoing controversial procurement reform process within the institution, aims to provide more transparency and accessibility to donors and recipients. Once downloaded, the app will be fully functional offline, allowing those in the most remote places full access, according to Joao Veiga Malta, practice manager at the bank’s Governance Global Practice. “What we wanted to do was to be able to provide you the procurement information that the bank had with an easy reach [so] that you did not necessarily need a masters in statistics in order to be able to do an analysis.”

  • The app, Veiga Malta explained, will show the distribution of awards by country and can be organized by civil works, goods, consulting services and nonconsulting services. Users can search by fiscal year, economic sector, donor country or recipient country, and will be able to see graphs, pie charts, ratios, trends and rankings.

Read more at Devex.com

New Spanish brand enters the hot fast fashion market

  • When most people think of European clothes, they immediately think of haute couture creations from Paris with astronomical price tags. If not that, there are the giant label’s prêt-à-porter incarnations which fetch similarly high prices. So the idea of clothes from sunny Spain with price tags on T-shirts at P299 can be a surprise.
  • Those T-shirts come from Sfera (pronounced es-fera), a fast fashion brand from the Spanish company Grupo El Corte Ingles. The company is the largest department store chain in Spain, and under its umbrella, it has travel agencies, convenience stores, and home and DIY stores.
  • Sfera opened its first Asian venture in SM Makati, right inside SM’s department store. “We believe that [the Philippines] is a very mature market, and [it] can give us feedback… [on] the behavior and the Asian taste of the customer,” said Guillermo Lopez Garcia, an international manager from Sfera, as he discussed why the brand decided to bring its fashions here. “We believe that if we can compete and succeed in the Philippines… we can succeed anywhere.”

Read more at Business World Online

Supply chains conservative about 4G handset development in China during 4Q14

  • Handset supply chain makers are continuing to see the effects of lagging 4G handset sales in China as vendors clear out reserves of 3G units.
  • Both vendors and retailers in China are still clearing reserves of 3G handsets as sales have been stagnating following decisions by major China-based telecom providers to end handset purchase subsidies.
  • The subsidies spurred a wave of handset purchasing throughout 2013 into 2014 and were expected to continue for 4G units. However, most telecom providers have limited or even stopped such moves and have yet to reissue new plans for helping to push 4G handsets in China.
  • Panel makers and touch panel makers have seen the brunt of the situation in 2014 and expect conservative orders to China during the fourth quarter of 2014 as a result.

Read more at Digitimes

Kaiser moves to remake its supply chain

  • Kaiser Permanente is trying to remake the hospital supply chain, Forbes reported.
  • The California-based integrated provider is using new software to try and make the ordering and use of supplies for its 38 hospitals, 9.5 million members, 17,000 physicians and 48,000 nurses more efficient and less costly, according to Forbes contributor Steve Banker.
  • That’s a change from Kaiser just five years ago, when nurses and other frontline healthcare workers were responsible for tracking down and ordering supplies, which were often siloed in multiple locations throughout the system. Recalled or expired supplies had to be discovered and returned in a virtually manual process. That form of supply chain management often meant that providers had time taken away from caring for patients.

Read more at Fierce Health Finance

Thyssen to manage Airbus Helicopters supply chain

  • German industrial group ThyssenKrupp  has agreed a deal with Airbus to manage the supply chain of metallic raw materials for Airbus Helicopters.
  • ThyssenKrupp said its Aerospace division would manage procurement, logistics, quality assurance and fine-tuning the management of blanks – unfinished metal that is stamped out of larger pieces of material – for Airbus Helicopters worldwide. It said the cooperation would take place for the “coming years”, without being more specific.
  • ThyssenKrupp Aerospace is part of the group’s Materials Services division, which distributes materials and provides technical services for the production and manufacturing sectors.

Read more at Reuters.com

Initiative to reduce fertilizer use for commodity grain crops launched in US

  • Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) has launched a new, collaborative initiative to eliminate fertilizer pollution as a major environmental concern in the United States. The effort will engage farmers and businesses throughout the supply chain to transform the way fertilizer-dependent grain crops are grown and sourced.
  • “If we’re going to meet food demands for a growing population, we’ve got to decouple production from pollution as soon as possible,” said David Festa, EDF vice president. “The most promising way to accomplish this essential task is by collaborating with decision makers at every point in the U.S. grain supply chain — from retailers and food companies to agribusiness and farmers.”
  • “Our long-term goal is to make the entire U.S. grain supply sustainable — good for farmers, good for the climate and good for our waterways,” said Suzy Friedman, director of EDF’s Sustainable Sourcing Initiative.

Read more at OCJ.com

Rollin’ – this procurement professional keeps you on the road

Emily Hall hit a cross-road in her early 20s when a manager gave her something of an ultimatum.

Emily Hall

After participating in the National Championships for five years in the junior ranks, the keen softballer approached her manager about taking a couple of weeks off to partake in a major tournament. She also indicated that she might need to leave work on time to attend training twice a week.

“He told me that I would have to make a choice – sport or career. I chose career, and have no regrets.”

Emily’s decision has seen her rise through the ranks at Australian corporate giants like Coles Supermarkets, technology giant IBM and Ford Motor Company, among others.

These days she’s leading a team at international toll road owner and operator Transurban in three key areas – sourcing, procurement operations and corporate services (facilities and corporate travel management).

She’ll spend this year embedding the relatively new procurement team into the business, overseeing the deployment of new technology solutions that will increase automation and improve work flows. She prides herself on always delivering results and leaving a legacy.

“Like most, I fell into procurement. My first job was on a graduate program which involved rotations through the broader business. My second rotation was in purchasing, and I ended up in that role for two years. I did a small stint in sales and marketing before coming back to procurement, and have now been in the profession nearly two decades.”

Emily isn’t one to plan too far into the future, which has worked well for her to date.

“I want to continually position myself to learn, improve, deliver results for the organisation I work for, and grab the right opportunity when it comes my way.”

Emily’s sporting abilities haven’t faded completely. She still likes to have a hit of hockey or perhaps basketball on weekends, and doesn’t mind a bit of cycling. But she leaves the sporting tournaments to the next generation, reserving her leadership prowess for work hours.

UK public procurement organisations praised for insurance framework project

It’s a win for Procurious-favourites YPO (and partners)

A collaboration between the largest public procurement organisations in the UK to reduce duplication of effort and achieve savings has taken home the Best Public Procurement Project gong at the CIPS Supply Management Award 2014.

CIPS Supply Management Awards 2014

What was the idea?

The joint venture was headed by the Crown Commercial Service, and YPO, ESPO and NEPO. It provides the public sector with quick and easy access to a wide range of insurance services, including property, liability and motor cover. Since its launch in February 2013 it has already been used by over 260 customers from across the public sector, delivering savings of some £7.6m. It’s also worth noting that individual customers such as local authorities have saved over half a million pounds on their insurance costs.

Of the 29 suppliers on the agreement, a healthy percentage – over 25 per cent are SMEs. This goes some way to demonstrating how the Government’s commitment to improving public sector business opportunities for smaller businesses is working.

The CIPS judging panel said:

“The team demonstrated a creative approach to a category in which procurement can find difficulty gaining traction in.  There is evidence of not only real cash savings but a team that engaged widely with stakeholders and the wider market to deliver outstanding results”.

On the win Sally Collier, CEO of the Crown Commercial Service exclaimed: “I am absolutely thrilled. This is a tremendous accolade for our highly successful collaboration with YPO, ESPO and NEPO. It recognises our commitment to delivering savings for the taxpayer and improving efficiency by working closely with customers and constantly innovating to meet their needs.” 

Paul Smith, Procurement and Supply Chain Director of YPO offered: “The award is a fantastic recognition of the hard work and commitment of all collaborative partners. The aim was to deliver a single approach to insurance procurement across the public sector, streamlining processes and achieving efficiencies. I am delighted that this has been realised and many organisations are already reaping the financial benefits.”

Paul Smith and YPO previously featured in our ‘Is the UK more risk averse than the rest of Europe?’ article. Read it here.

Procurious is heading down under… come and meet us

Procurious is hitting the road (well sky…) throughout the month of November, and we want to see your faces!

Donuts down under

Lend us your ears, open your minds, and get ready to download key learnings that can help give you a competitive advantage in the procurement marketplace.

Procurious is going to Australia

Who’s going?

Procurious’ very own tech wunderkind Jack Slade – Product Manager, social media guru, and entrepreneur,  is coming along for the trip. Also joining Jack is Lisa Malone – who not only serves as our fabulous European General Manager, but can talk to you about developing your personal brand and tackling procurement’s outdated image problem.

Procurious will also be meeting with The Faculty Roundtable members in Melbourne, Perth, Brisbane and Sydney to discuss how social media is impacting procurement and the benefits of online collaboration.

You can Tweet along with us during the session using the hashtag #webringthedonuts

Social Media and Procurement – Leadership & Networking Procurement Breakfast 

Alternatively, why not do breakfast?

Come along to a networking breakfast to learn about opportunities for procurement to achieve its agenda using social media; networking with Roundtable members, FLiP Alumni and other procurement professionals.

We’ll be in Melbourne – Friday 14 November, 8am
Where: The Faculty, 502 Albert St

And also Sydney – Thursday 20 November, 8am
Where: Sydney CBD – TBC

To register to attend the Leadership & Networking Breakfast email Belinda Toohey belinda.toohey@thefaculty.com.au

Anything we’ve forgotten?

We expect each session to last between 45 – 60 minutes. That should allow us plenty of time to discuss:

  • Digital procurement and how everything is connected
  • Benefits of connecting and collaborating online for procurement; suppliers; to drive social value; personal branding and Employee of choice
  • What is Procurious? An Introduction and how to get the most out this network
  • Discussion: Smart  social media behaviors
  • Q&A

Availability of sessions will be subject to change.

So mark a date in your diary, gather your team and get Procurious in for a session,  remember #webringthedonuts!