How to minimise export risks and protect human rights

An innovative pairing of government and tech are working together to protect human rights abroad. 

Protecting human rights abroad. Image Jeremy Schultz

The UK government has published its first ever cyber security guidance that provides advice on how to manage export risks, thus leading the way in ethical business export practices.

‘Assessing Cyber Security Export Risks’ is the first tech sector guidance of its kind in the world. It provides cyber security companies of all sizes with actionable advice, to help identify and manage the risks of exporting their products and services. It gives detailed background information and a framework to help companies develop their due diligence processes, manage human rights risks and identify national security risks. This reduces the likelihood of a buyer being able to use their technology to help perpetrate human rights abuses. It also reduces the likelihood of reputational damage to British companies.

Sounds a bit too UK-orientated. Why should I be interested in this?

On the face of it the guidance is catering for a suitably British audience, but let’s not downplay the importance of this publication. Guidance of this kind is truly a watershed moment – hopefully providing impetus, inspiration, and paving the way for similar initiatives.

Cyber security capabilities are used around the world to strengthen the integrity of critical national infrastructures, prevent the theft of corporate and personal data, and tackle fraud. Their export presents the UK with a significant economic opportunity. HM Government has recognised this and is working with industry through the Cyber Growth Partnership to help companies realise this growth, with the aim of increasing UK cyber security exports to £2bn by 2016.

Most often cyber security capabilities are used only to defend networks or disrupt criminal activity. However, some cyber products and services can enable surveillance and espionage or disrupt, deny and degrade online services. If used inappropriately, they may pose a risk to human rights, to UK national security and to the reputation and legal standing of the exporter.

Ruth Davis, Head of Cyber, Justice and Emergency Services, techUK said: “The advice in this document is designed to help companies reduce reputational risk and to have confidence in the deals they make. We believe that ethical business practice is key; human rights and a vibrant British cyber sector are two sides of the same coin.”

The Guidance sets out a risk assessment process that helps companies to: 

  • Look at the capabilities of the product or service they want to export and how it could be used by purchasers.
  • Examine the places where they are exporting to including their political and legal frameworks, the state’s respect for human rights and potentially vulnerable people.
  • Assess who the end purchaser of the product is and how they intend to use it.
  • Evaluate potential business partners and re-sellers.
  • It also provides advice on how to mitigate and build risk management clauses into the contract.

Dibble Clark, Cyber Lead at 3SDL, a Malvern Cluster cyber security company commented: “Recent events have put the human rights responsibilities of cyber export companies in the spotlight and there is particular scrutiny on our sector, both from governments and NGOs. The responsibility to respect human rights is something no company can ignore, whether large or small.

Rt. Hon Baroness Anelay, Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs said: “This groundbreaking guidance will help cyber security businesses manage human rights risk by adopting effective due diligence policies and enable them to respect human rights wherever they operate.”

The building of Telstra man James Chalupa

Telstra man James Chalupa has taken deliberate steps to look more closely at his personal brand and what it means to him.

James Chalupa of Telstra

Taking his own brand more seriously has not only helped him network with a bunch of hugely influential industry colleagues, he’s also shared and picked up useful new snippets of information that has helped him tackle his role, too.

The Senior Vendor Management Specialist for the country’s major telco agrees that procurement professionals need to consciously consider how their own brand affects their ability to tackle their role.

“When I first started down this path, I started taking LinkedIn more seriously, extending my network as I met someone I wanted to stay connected with. I’m always trying to finesse information on LinkedIn and make sure it’s up to date and accurate. It’s just a really great tool for people to learn more about what I’ve done and what I’m working on now,” James says.

He’s also paid for higher LinkedIn subscriptions from time to time to further build his network.

James also makes sure he’s across relevant industry news and articles and is an active part of the broader procurement profession, fronting up to networking functions and industry events whenever possible, including The Faculty roundtable events.

“I’ll head along to breakfast events, where I’ll be rubbing shoulders with other procurement professionals from major brands. It’s extremely valuable to be at those events, because you’ll always meet someone interesting or learn something new.”

And while attending industry events isn’t specifically part of his job, he thoroughly enjoys the prospect of sharing thoughts and experiences with his industry colleagues.

“I’m a bit of an extrovert, so I really enjoy these sorts of opportunities. For me, personal branding is about being an active part of the broader profession. It’s about connecting with people and sharing your experiences of procurement. People I meet will share information about what they’re working on, and I’ll talk a little about what I’m working on too, within reason,” he says.

“When some of us get together and start to talk about what’s holding us back when it comes to technology, for example, and we’re all contributing to that conversation, you can get a very effective outcome pretty quickly. Someone will always know something that you didn’t know about a certain area.”

Taking a considered approach to personal branding has been hugely beneficial not only to his ability to connect with others, but his ability to do his job, James says. A recent conversation with a procurement professional working for a global FMCG brand about global sourcing initiatives revealed a new approach that fitted well with what Telstra was already working on, which prompted the company to look into more closely.

Black Friday/Cyber Monday: the real effect on supply chains

They say this is the most wonderful time of the year – but the growing transatlantic popularity of this sales phenomenon won’t just put strain on cash registers… The frenzied (sometimes violent) stampede of bargain hunters will undoubtedly place strain on supply chains and logistics networks too.

The effect of Black Friday on supply chains

According to Visa, £360,000 is expected to be spent every minute on Black Friday (28th November) – with a further £281 million forecast to be spent on the busiest day for online shopping; Cyber Monday.

Black Friday has long been established as a traditional sales bonanza in the US, and is predicted to see $2.48 billion spent online this year, up by 28 per cent. Meanwhile the more recent eCommerce follow up Cyber Monday is expected to increase by 15 per cent to $2.6 billion, and Thanksgiving Day itself has been predicted to see online sales of $1.35 billion, up 27 per cent.

Global IT services company IT Infotech have shared with us its thoughts on why retailers, logistics and delivery firms should be prepared for extra pressure through Black Friday to Cyber Monday.

The American tradition has been an increasingly popular import in the UK, with leading retailers including Amazon, Argos and John Lewis offering sales both online and in-store.

“UK retailers are already bracing their logistics operations to handle the Christmas rush, which can see as much as 70 per cent of yearly sales volumes achieved in the last two weeks of December”, says Venkata V, who works with some of the top retailers around the globe.

“However, with the US expecting one of the biggest sales periods in history this Thanksgiving, the UK should be prepared to see a spike in demand and more strain on their logistics. Even retailers not offering specific Black Friday discounts themselves can expect more demand as shoppers are inspired to hunt for Christmas bargains.”

The rapid escalation in demand created by sales events like Black Friday can be extremely lucrative, but also cause havoc on unprepared supply chains, as demonstrated by China’s recent “Single’s Day” event. The country’s biggest sales event saw the e-commerce leader Alibaba rake in sales of over £9 billion, but the day has previously slowed down delivery times from two days to over a week.

Saravana Kumar who heads Supply Chain consulting in ITC Infotech says: “Marketing, production and logistics teams should work closely together to make sure their operation can handle increased demand on the 28th of November, especially as they are likely to already be stretched by the Christmas period. Flexible retailers have a strong opportunity to capitalise on the sales event by reacting to demand and adjusting their pricing strategy on the fly, increasing and lowering prices as needed”.

“The increased complexity of omni-channel retail has made the supply chain more challenging, also presents an opportunity for well-prepared operations. Capacity should be available to quickly move stock for the most popular products around to meet increased demand online or in particular stores.”

Further comment is offered from Paul Doble, chief sales and marketing officer at DX, a leading independent mail, parcels and logistics end-to-end network operator:

“Throughout the busy Christmas trading season retailers must try to forecast as accurately as possible the volumes that will need to be sent, and then communicate these expectations to their logistics partners, who will take up a huge percentage of this volume. The alternative is the situation many retailers have faced in previous years, where through a combination of inaccurate planning, poor communication and unanticipated weather conditions, demand outstrips capacity and leaves retailers unable to meet their promises to online shoppers.”

Doble continues: “It’s a problem that is often exacerbated when retailers try to maximise the online shopping window, pushing back their Christmas order deadlines and thereby drastically increasing the risk of delayed deliveries when bad weather and other factors disrupt the supply chain.”

Doble concludes with a thought-provoking double-header: “Ultimately, when Christmas presents fail to arrive, it will be the retailer that bears the brunt of disgruntled Customers and negative publicity. As such, retailers need to be asking themselves the question: just how robust are my Christmas delivery plans?”

How to get the most out of Procurious

Want to make more of an impact on the Procurious network? We’ve compiled a handy checklist to help you make the most out of our online community.

So if you’ve ever caught yourself asking “How do I…?” Read on for our Procurious tips.

Frequently asked questions - Procurious

How to add a profile picture

Procurious is a place to share your knowledge, grow your network, learn from your peers and make meaningful connections. Surprisingly enough, one of the easiest ways to do this is by adding a picture to your profile. Learn how.

How to complete your Procurious profile

Nobody likes to leave a job half-done… This also rings true on Procurious where profiles are sometimes being left incomplete.
Do it now
.

How to grow your network and invite people

Whether it be inviting people using the ‘Build your network’ tool, LinkedIn, or personalised email link – you’ll be expanding your Procurious network in next to no time. Get building.

How to choose which updates you see

Procurious provides you with a choice of viewing modes; choose to view updates from the ‘Whole Network’ or ‘My Network’. Make a decision.

How to add a question on the  Discussions page

The ‘Discussions’ area on Procurious is buzzing with inquisitive minds. Go ahead and ask the community! Riddle me this.

How to learn a new skill

Procurious isn’t just a place to network – you can delve into our learning resources and teach yourself a thing or two in the process. We offer both free and paid learning materials, take a look.

How to tag Procurious members in your status and posts

You’re probably already familiar with tagging from using it on the likes of Facebook and LinkedIn… Well here’s how to use tags on Procurious. See how.

How to add additional email addresses to your Procurious account

Signing-up to Procurious to grow your professional network is all well and good, but what happens when you change your contact details, land a new role, or leave a company? Find out how.

How to RSVP to an Event

Our Events page contains both upcoming and past engagements. Here you’ll find essential info like the programme, speakers, fee, and other Procurious members who might be thinking of attending. Get your diary in order.

How to use Procurious on your smartphone or tablet

If you’re just visiting Procurious via your PC, laptop, or Mac, you’re missing out… Discover how to go mobile.

How to subscribe to the latest procurement and supply chain news

We want to make Procurious part of your daily online routine, so we’ve added a curated ‘News’ service . Get your daily news fix.

For more tips and tricks check out our expanded Frequently Asked Questions page.

Your job role might be obsolete by 2020 – will you be sustainable?

Many of the job roles we know today will be obsolete in 2020. 

If you are a meter reader, a telemarketer or a computer operator, your days are surely numbered.  Fortunately, the need for procurement management skills will not decline, but the requirements will definitely change.  Employers will be looking for those with new skills such as understanding the triple bottom line.  Will you be ready?

What will your job be in 2020?

Understanding the sustainability agenda

Job descriptions for chief procurement officers (CPOs) and senior managers in 2020 will include responsibility for sustainability strategies.  These leaders will need to define the value that sustainable procurement brings to a business as well as being able to implement the best tools and leading practices.

What is Sustainable Procurement?

The Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply (CIPS) says that it isn’t simply about being “green”, it’s about:

  • Socially and ethically responsible purchasing
  • Minimising environmental impact through the supply chain
  • Delivering economically sound solutions

Sustainable Procurement will aim to achieve a balance between the three pillars: people, planet and profit.   Your challenge will be to address them all without affecting costs and damaging supplier relationships.

What role should procurement play?

We have to:

  • reduce costs through saving water and energy,
  • promote the re-use of products and recycle,
  •  minimise packaging and transportation

And most of all, we must question why we need the product or service at all.  We need to be aware of be aware of environmental factors like emissions to air, land and water, climate change, biodiversity, natural resource use and water scarcity.

Where will the jobs be?

Many large international organizations such as Unilever, MacDonalds, Sodexo, Mattel and Alstom already have policies in place.   L’Oréal is a leader in this field.  These types of companies may become employers of choice for those people keen to follow a career in this new area.

Global not-for-profit organizations such as the United Nations and Oxfam are leaders in the public sector where it is taking hold faster than in the private sector.

Jobs that exclusively focus on sustainable procurement are rare, for the moment, but they are coming.  Within a few years, more organizations will have a dedicate person designing and managing their sustainability agenda.  A recent job advertisement for a dedicated sustainability procurement manager promised the successful applicant both an influence on strategy and a remuneration package in excess of £50 000, plus benefits.

In the retail environment and fast-moving-consumer-goods (FMCG) sector, consumers’ preference for healthy and fair-trade products and services will force companies to rethink their agendas.     Reputational risk and brand damage are real threats to global businesses.

What skills will you need?

Stakeholder management skills and the ability to develop good relationships at all levels, both internally and externally will be vital.  Other requirements will be those common to any senior procurement job, e.g.  influencing and persuasion skills and problem solving.

People with solid experience in managing categories such as facilities management and essential services will be in demand.  Right now, most of us are too busy doing our day jobs to worry about some of these critical issues.   Read widely, take some time to absorb the discussions and keep up-to-date with developments.

Could you become a specialist in sustainable procurement? 

China’s supply chain infrastructure is full of Eastern Promise

This news blast has a distinctively oriental flavour – with a brief stopover in Ottawa (Canada), and Vietnam (once part of Imperial China) for good measure.

Oriental Pearl Tower - procurement in China

DHL Supply Chain to invest 173 million in logistics infrastructure in China

  • DHL Supply Chain has announced it will commit a further £90 million in China as its strategy gains traction. This is on the back of £83 million that was committed in 2013, bringing the total committed to £173 million.
  • The funds will support the expansion of its network across China and in particular, six additional state-of-the-art logistics facilities scheduled for completion by 2020. The confirmed locations are Guangzhou, Hangzhou, Wuhan, Shenyang, Shenzhen and Shanghai Waigaoqiao Free Trade Zone.
  • Oscar de Bok, Chief Executive Officer of DHL Supply Chain Asia Pacific, said: “By working closely with our customers who provide us with their demand forecast, we have a clear roadmap of the locations we need to be in; as well as the level of the services required. In China alone, DSC will expand its warehouse facilities and transport capacities by 50 percent over the next three years.”
  • DHL recently opened its state-of-the art Chengdu Logistics Centre facility in western China. Located in Xindu district, the Chengdu Logistics Centre is a key strategic investment by DHL Supply Chain to support continued economic growth in the western region.

Read more at Supply Chain Digital

World supply chains under most threat from economic risk 

  • CIPS’ Q3 2014 Risk Index has found that while supply chain risk in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa has increased, neither the Ebola outbreak nor the advance of the Islamic State has led to a significant increase in international supply chain risk. Instead, it is the economic slowdown in Germany and China that could jeopardise supply chains, it found.
  • However, the index, which analyses socio-economic, physical trade and business continuity, also found that supply chain risk has reduced for the twelfth consecutive month to 77.9 in Q3 from 78.1 in Q2. The index reached an all-time peak of 82.4 in Q3 2013. Supply chain risk has thus far been checked by the relative economic stability of the world’s three most important contributors to world supply chains, the USA, China and Germany, but that could change in Q4 as the economies of both Germany and China look increasingly fragile.
  • The combination of Russian sanctions, the rise of Euro-scepticism and a reduction in demand for German products, could see Germany lose its position as the most reliable component of world trade, the index suggested.
  • Concerns are also growing in China over an economic slowdown, with the World Bank urging the country to slash its growth target for 2015.  Local government and industrial sectors in the country are struggling to pay back loans taken out during the 2008-09 crash.

Read more at Supply Management

Ebay signs deal with Shanghai logistic provider

  • Global e-commerce giant eBay has signed a strategic agreement with Shanghai-based logistics service provider Winit Corporation to allow Chinese vendors to easily sell to overseas buyers.
  • Winit will provide eBay sellers with one-stop cross-border supply chain services to allow quicker delivery from overseas warehouse to buyers. This comes as a result of cross-border e-commerce transactions picking up in recent years.
  • John Lin, Vice President of eBay and Managing Director of eBay China, including Hong Kong and Taiwan, said: “Through our collaboration with Winit we hope Chinese exporters can leverage the comprehensive warehousing service to play a more important role in global trade and to better connect Chinese exporters with global buyers.
  • The “shipping first, selling later” model enables Chinese sellers to compete with overseas counterparts by improving delivery efficiency and save logistics costs and customs clearance trouble. After Chinese sellers’ merchandise is shipped to an overseas warehouse, local buyers can select their own courier services to have their packages delivered to their doorstep. 

Read more at Digital Supply Chain

China makers Bitland, BYD to join Chromebook supply chain in 2015

  • Following China-based application processor (AP) supplier Rockchip’s entry into the Chromebook industry, China-based end device makers are also expected to join the Chromebook supply chain, according to information Digitimes Research has collected from the Greater China supply chain.
  • China-based Bitland and BYD will start producing Chromebooks for brand vendors in 2015 and they will be among only a handful of makers capable of making the device. Digitimes Research believes Google’s recruitment of Rockchip into the Chromebook camp is meant to expand the the device’s supply chain.
  • Currently, most non-Samsung Chromebooks available in the market are produced by Quanta Computer, while Compal Electronics has a small amount of orders from Acer and Lenovo. Samsung Electronics manufactures its Chromebooks in house.
  • In 2015, Google is looking to relax the entry barriers to its Chromebook supply chain by expanding its partnerships with chipmakers and manufacturers. Bitland and BYD are both expected to enter the Chromebook supply chain because of Rockchip. Lenovo is also expected to launch products using their platforms.

Read more at Digitimes

News from elsewhere in the world…

Vietnam becoming vital link in supply chain

  • With a booming manufacturing market, Vietnam has rapidly become a crucial link in the Southeast Asian air cargo supply chain, with 25 percent of its exports being shipped via air cargo.
  • This week, businesses in the developing country sent a message that they are ready to compete on the world stage by launching a new cargo airline and moving forward on a new cargo handling facility. Ho Chi Minh City-based Vietjet Aviation has announced the start of its new affiliate, Vietjet Air Cargo, which it says will operate 28 routes by the end of this year and increase that total to 39 in 2015.
  • At this stage, Do Xuan Quang, managing director of Vietjet Air Cargo, said the new carrier does not own any planes but is negotiating with other interline carriers to offer charter cargo services domestically and internationally. “There is a huge potential for air cargo in Vietnam,” he said. “Currently this service is mainly offered by international airlines.”
  • Currently, the parent company, three-year-old VietJet, operates sixteen A320-200 aircraft, with firm orders with Airbus for another 63 planes in the A320 Family. The carrier said it plans to operate about thirty A320s by the end of 2015.

Read more at Air Cargo World

Defence procurement staff struggle with burnout

  • Public servants overseeing billions of dollars of military equipment projects are facing burnout and poor morale and could be prone to error due to overwork, documents obtained by the Citizen reveal. In addition, some 18 per cent of the civilian workforce in the Department of National Defence’s procurement branch is eligible to retire by the spring, without penalty. That potential exodus of skilled employees “creates a significant risk to program execution,” the documents note.
  • There are slightly more than 2,600 DND staff handling military procurements; future projects range from the acquisition of new search-and-rescue aircraft to ships and armoured vehicles. The Conservative government plans to spend tens of billions of dollars on new gear for the Canadian Forces over the coming years. But the procurement branch’s human resources plan for 2014/2015 outlines the problems the group faces.
  • “Heavy workloads, long-term high stress levels and waning morale, resulting in increased sick leave usage (and) employee burnout increase error rate and labour relations issues,” noted the plan.
  • A limit on the ability to hire new staff is another problem.

Read more at Ottawa Citizen

Mystery shopper drafted in to probe VAR’s procurement gripe

  • A controversial IT tender is being investigated by the government’s mystery shopper scheme after a small reseller criticised the procurement process for being unfriendly towards SMBs.
  • Last week, CCL’s managing director Dennis Armstrong branded the government’s IT procurement process “outrageous” after being presented with an Invitation To Tender (ITT) document which was 92 pages long despite being for a relatively small deal of £10,000. He claimed that reams of red tape are cutting SMBs out of government deals, which was echoed by other smaller firms.
  • At the time, the government admitted there is more to be done to improve procurement for SMBs but insisted it was cutting the amount of administration involved. After seeing the CRN article, the government contacted Armstrong and asked him to take part in its mystery shopper scheme in order to investigate the tender in question.
  • The scheme was set up in 2011 and aims to investigate procurement across the government and to help suppliers that have experienced poor practice. It claims that SMBs in particular have made “good use” of the scheme and that 79 per cent of the cases it investigated resulted in a positive outcome.

Read more at Channelweb

24 of the most influential people in procurement

Whether you’re new to Procurious, or you’ve been one of our #firstmovers, chances are you are looking to grow your network and connect with likeminded professionals.

Most influential people in procurement on social media

As we’re the helpful sort, we’ve compiled a list of the people we think you should be connecting with. Many are already frequent visitors to Procurious; some will be on Twitter too (in these instances we’ve also provided their handle).

How to grow your Procurious network

You can jump straight to a member’s profile by clicking on the links we’ve provided, alternatively try searching for them using the Procurious search bar. Click the green ‘Add to network’ button to request their friendship.

You can keep track of any invites you’ve received by looking in your Notifications area.

Don’t forget to take advantage of the super-useful ‘Build your network’ tool on the site too.  Here you can filter members by country, industry, and category (if you so choose).

Read more: How to build your Procurious network quickly and easily

Find out who we think you should be making introductions to, and the reasons why below:

Helen Clegg 

Helen is the Knowledge Director for the Procurement & Analytic Solutions’ Practice of A.T. Kearney, an international management consultancy. She also compiles and hosts the ‘Wave of the Future’ podcast that aims to keep you on top of the topics and trends that matter in procurement.

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/helen-clegg
@HClegg on Twitter

Kate Lee

Kate boasts nearly 20 years of domestic and international experience and is part of Fronetics – a management consulting firm which focuses on strategy and inbound marketing for the logistics and supply chain industries.

The Fronetics’ Twitter account is both super-active and full of fascinating insights related to the profession which is reason-enough to welcome Kate as one of our newest contributors.

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/kate-lee
@Fronetics on Twitter

Paul Snell

Paul is the acting managing editor of Supply Management and Supply Business magazines. If you want to keep on top of the latest CIPS developments, Paul is your man!

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/paul-snell
@procurementpaul on Twitter

Elaine Porteous 

Elaine is a published writer and editor. She has a passion for supply chains and careers, writing mainly on the ins and outs of supplier relations, strategic sourcing and managing talent. Her work has appeared in such luminaries as Supply Management and Entrepreneur among others.

You’ll be able to read some of Elaine’s work on Procurious in the near future.

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/elaine-porteous
@elaineporteous on Twitter

Jon Hansen

Jon is the editor and lead writer for the PI Social Media Network’s Procurement Insights Blog. He also hosts a popular podcast on Blog Talk Radio (out of 15k hosts, Jon is ranked in their top 300). We think it’s high time you give him a listen!

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/jon-w-hansen
@piblogger1 on Twitter 

Cindy Dunham

Cindy is a General Manager and oversees Global Process Architecture at Rio Tinto. She is also one of Procurious’ most-active (and well-connected) members with 500+ connections in her network. Follow Cindy’s example, head to the Discussions area and get involved.

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/cindy-dunham

Hal Good

Harold (or Hal to his friends) owns the Procurement Pros LinkedIn group.

He has also amassed a sizable 13.6k followers on Twitter. No mean feat.

On Procurious
@Hal_Good on Twitter

Stephen Ashcroft

Stephen is a blogger, speaker, and author. He is part of Brian Farrington Ltd, a long-established procurement and supply chain consultancy and training specialist.

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/stephen-ashcroft
@ProcureChange on Twitter

John Viner-Smith

John is a procurement-focused manager, consultant and commercial negotiator. What John doesn’t know about negotiation isn’t worth knowing… He’s also very kindly agreed to impart his knowledge to the Procurious community via a monthly blog series.

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/john-vinersmith
@vinersmith on Twitter

Sergio Giordano

Sergio was one of Procurious’ earliest flag bearers – this happy Italian has 30 years of expert industrial procurement knowledge under his belt, and nothing makes him happier than helping organisations to drive down their costs.

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/sergio-giordano/
@GiordanoProcOut on Twitter 

Gordon Donovan

As well as being a fellow of both CIPS and the Australian Institute of Management, Gordon acts as a principal consultant for The Faculty.

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/gordon-donovan
@gdonovan1971 on Twitter

Local Producer

AKA Brian Heinen – Brian is one of the driving-force’s behind LinkedIn’s biggest groups for supply chain and sourcing professionals (Procurement Professionals). With member numbers nearing 290k and soon-to-be launching into the Events space, Brian is definitely someone you should add to your network.

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/local-producer/
@ProcurementProf on Twitter

Helen Mackenzie 

Helen is in a senior managerial position in Scottish government and offered the Procurious community a valuable insight into Scottish procurement policy during the referendum earlier this year. Helen is fascinated by procurement that is seen to be pushing the envelope – drop her a message, or find her over in our Discussions area.

On Procurious
@SuperstarHelen on Twitter

Tania Seary 

Tania is the founding chairman of three companies specializing in the development of the procurement profession, namely: The Faculty, The Source and Procurious. Got a question for Tania? She’d love to hear from you!

On Procurious https://www.procurious.com/user/tania-seary
@taniaseary on Twitter

Who to connect with on Twitter

What makes some Twitter accounts stand out from the others? Due to the nature of Twitter, tweets can be made instantaneously in real-time – therefore you’ll gain more benefit from following those accounts that Tweet frequently. Nobody wants to follow an account with long periods of inactivity. We’ve included some of our favourite Twitter personalities below, along with some useful publications.

PPN

PPN has been formed out of Accounts Payable News (APN) and now includes procurement, supply chain and shared service information and news. Publish great daily updates and content across a variety of relevant topics.

Go to their website, or connect on Twitter: @p2pnetwrk

Adrian King

Tweets about management, supply chain management & IT consulting. 104k followers.

@adrian_king on Twitter

Chadwick Halse

Chadwich specializes in web design and marketing but also tweets about fashion, leadership, and how to increase your social influence. 81.4k followers.

@ChadwickHalse on Twitter

InventoryNinja

If you hadn’t guessed, the Ninja shares inventory management best practices for small businesses. 49.5k followers.

@Inventoryninja on Twitter

Supply Chain Matters

A useful resource of supply chain news and insight from Bob Ferrari. 20.4k followers.

@SC_Matters_Blog on Twitter

Logistics Management

Logistics Management provides editorial content to executives, managers and other professionals in the field of logistics and supply chain management. 21.6k followers.

@LogisticsMgmt on Twitter

Procurement Cat

AKA Catherine Lauder – the content and community manager at Procurement Leaders. 431 followers.

@ProcurementCat on Twitter

Supply Chain Digital/Sam Jermy

Provides news, info and events for supply chain executives. 14.2k followers.

@SupplyChainD on Twitter

SCMR

The official Twitter account for the Supply Chain Management Review magazine. 13.7k followers.

@SCMR on Twitter

Buyers Meeting Point 

Buyers Meeting Point is an online knowledge, networking and professional development resource for procurement and supply management professionals. 2673 followers.

@BuyersMeetPoint on Twitter

Tim Hughes

Tim numbers in the top 35 of UK bloggers, he’s also a speaker, market influencer, and feature’s in the Forbes Top 100. 81.9k followers.

@Timothy_Hughes on Twitter

Who have you been connecting with recently? Recommend other Procurious members in the comments below, or tag them in a status!

Stay up-to-date with Procurious



VOTE FOR PROCURIOUS IN THE UK BLOG AWARDS 2014 #UKBA14


Procurement at forty thousand feet – Qantas in the spotlight

Qantas has a fleet of procurement professionals keeping the iconic Australian brand in the air, and Cassie Mackie is a key part of that team.

Cassie Mackie from Qantas Airlines

As Portfolio Category Manager – Aircraft Cabin, she’s responsible for the end-to-end procurement and lifecycle management of Aircraft Cabin product categories including seats, inflight entertainment, connectivity, cabin electronics and cabin interior.

It’s a mammoth role, which puts her in charge of procurement on behalf of the Qantas Group Aircraft, including Qantas Domestic, Qantas International, Jetstar Branded businesses and other Qantas Group airlines.

The Sydneysider is in charge of a team of category management professionals, who all work with her to develop and deliver on all aspects of the source-to-contract and contract-to-supplier relationship management processes.

Cassie has been with Qantas since 2008 in a range of procurement roles.

“I can see a tangible connection that my role has on the business and specifically on our customers. I love that no day ever feels like ‘groundhog day’ and that I’m constantly challenged. Most of all, I love that I work with a diverse group of people that are incredibly talented at what they do and are always in pursuit of excellence.”

Like many, Cassie fell into procurement when living in London. She had the experience to consider a job in the field, with a Bachelor of Arts in Asian and International Studies under her belt. She also speaks Mandarin Chinese.

“I distinctly remember seeing a job advertised on the Australian High Commission website for a Procurement Officer with Defence Material Organisation. At the ripe old age of 20, I phoned Dad back in Australia, and asked him what procurement was. He told me it was basically like shopping, and that was it. Now, 10 years later, I’ve never looked back.”

She credits her parents for mentoring her and always being there to remind her that the world is her oyster. “They’ve always told me that as long as I work for it, I can have whatever I’ve ever wanted. I’ve had formal and informal mentors and inspirational people who have helped me to progress through my career and contemplate the future. I’ve also had some not so inspirational leaders in past experiences that have helped me see exactly what I don’t want to be, which I’ve learned from.”

She advocates the importance of good relationships with business partners and suppliers, and says some of the most challenging and difficult negotiations have ended up being the most rewarding.

Podcast: Social Media for Procurement

ATK helps put procurement in the drivers’ seat with social media

Social media in procurement podcast. Image Pixabay

A.T. Kearney’s Knowledge Director, Helen Clegg, is spearheading the discussion for educating the procurement profession on the benefits of social media.

Hear my interview with Helen http://bit.ly/14VDC1x where I share how to leverage social networks, from building relationships with suppliers to receiving real-time news about supply chain disruptions.

On the topic of risk, I share with Helen my view that there are more risks to procurement professionals for NOT being connected with social media, than there are to being involved.

I also share my top tips for building a social media presence, as well as recommending that everyone finds a millennial mentor!

If you find it useful, I would love you to share it with your Procurious network, on LinkedIn or over Twitter?!

How to detect fraud in your organisation

This is a guest article from Visna Lampasi, The Faculty’s 2014 Chief Procurement Officer of the Year (Asia Pacific).

How to detect fraud in your organisation

With the growing emphasis placed on the CIPS Ethical Mark, we quizzed Visna Lampasi – Global Chief Procurement Officer & Procurement Thought Leader on how to detect fraud in your organisation.

Procurious asks: Do you believe fraud has become a bigger issue for Procurement in recent years? And if so, why? 

Visna answers: The number of instances in procurement fraud and corruption is increasing and becoming a far bigger issue than previously for organisations globally.

Whilst some industries have imposed pay freezes and pay cuts over the last number of years, the living costs have been rising and during a time when the jobs market has been stagnant.

If you couple this with an organisation who has poor procure-to-pay controls, then this will unfortunately reveal opportunities to defraud.

Procurious: From a  procurement perspective, what do you see as the most common examples of unethical conduct  are in the supply chain today?  (bribery; misconduct by suppliers; misappropriation of company funds etc.)

Visna: There are many types of procurement fraud, which can be committed across the entire source-to-settle core process not just procure-to-pay.

The ones that I have come across the most throughout my procurement career are: – 

·         Fictitious suppliers and sub-contractors
·         False, inflated or duplicate invoices
·         Unjustified sole source awards
·         Bribery and kickbacks

·         Undeclared Conflicts of Interest
·         Purchases for personal use or resell
·         Split purchases

Procurious: What do you believe are the most important activities for detecting and deterring fraud in the business?  

Visna: The simplest way to prevent procurement fraud is to: – 

1)      ensure that you have robust “Procurement Policies & Procedures” in place and that these are reviewed regularly to ensure that they are effective,

2)      proactively drive organisational “Compliance” against these policies and procedures,

3)      ensure appropriate “Segregation of Duties” – ensure that the person who can set-up a supplier, issue purchase orders, and process an invoice for payment is not the same,

4)      ensure tight controls within your “Procure-to-Pay” process as a minimum, with appropriate checks and balances in place.

Don’t forget to address your “Source-to-Contract” process as well, which is the front end of the Source-to-Settle process and more often than not is disregarded.

Procurious: Government Procurement have long had strict gift and hospitality policies in place and the private sector are increasingly following suit. Do you think there’s such a thing as ‘going too far’?

Visna: There needs to be a balance here and one that takes into account different cultures and customs that an organisation is going to encounter when doing business both locally and overseas.

The important thing here is that an organisation has a policy in place around gifts, meals and entertainment and that is being followed by its employees.

Full transparency is key and will assist to address questions around reasonableness and perception prior to acceptance.

Procurious: Western countries often have quite different beliefs and practices around what constitutes unethical behaviour.  Do you have any tips for dealing with suppliers in other countries which may take a more lax attitude towards gifts and payments?  

Visna: My suggestion would be to look to your organisation’s corporate values and Code of Conduct for guidance around expectations of ethical behaviour and determine if these align with the country you are seeking to do business with.

Many organisations also have lists of embargoed countries, which will also assist in identifying whether the country is approved to do business with.

Procurious: If businesses are serious about taking a ‘zero tolerance attitude’ towards corruption, what policies, procedures and employee training will be fundamental?   

Visna: Robust procurement policies and procedures are fundamental, supported with regular communications and on-going training to increase awareness and build capability.

Current members of The Chartered Institute Procurement of Supply can complete an eLearning  module on Ethical Sourcing, which incorporates elements around procurement fraud and corruption.

A license can also be purchased for the Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply Anti-Procurement Fraud Training,  which will allow organisations to deploy this online training to all of their employees globally.