Super Bowl XLIX: did it pay off for the advertisers?

Feeling a bit tired this morning? You might be one of the estimated 4 million Brits who watched the Super Bowl last night? Don’t worry, no spoilers here for those who have recorded it!

Super Bowl 2015 - how did the advertisers do?

If you did watch the game, or have been following the coverage over the last week, you will have heard almost as many stories about the adverts as you have about the game itself.

The NFL’s marquee event boasts an estimated 112 million viewers worldwide and, with breaks in play every few minutes and an extended half-time interval (complete, this year, with Katy Perry), the 30-60 second advertising slots are like gold dust.

What’s the big deal?

The size of the audience, profile of the game and the advertising tradition are just part of the attraction for big companies. Several studies have proven that 50 per cent of the Super Bowl audience tunes in just to watch the adverts.

Big names this year included Budweiser, Victoria’s Secret, Doritos and many more. From a marketing point of view, there isn’t another event anywhere in the world that gives companies an opportunity to get their brand into the public consciousness in the same way.

Conversations about adverts start weeks before the Super Bowl when the advertising line up is announced, and can last for weeks or months after, particularly if you nail the advert. Check out which adverts have gone down this year here.

Facts and Figures

  • $359 million – the estimated value of all the advertising for the Super Bowl this year.
  • $4.5 million – the cost for a 30-second advertisement at any time during the game. Divide it down and that’s an eye-watering $150,000 per second!
  • $42,000 – what the cost was during the first Super Bowl in 1967. Costs are increasing year on year at a massive rate.

And these costs are only for purchasing the slot from the network. Companies have to factor in creating the advert, with some going really overboard.

Does it pay off?

That’s the $4.5m question and the answer might be yes. In the coming weeks, the best adverts will be featured and shown in full on TV shows, blogged about, discussed and re-watched on YouTube. The PR value generated from this can quadruple the media cost for the advert.

In 2014, a survey of 37,440 U.S. consumers by the tech firm BrandAds found that the average Super Bowl ad increased viewers’ likelihood of buying the product by 6.6 per cent. Larger brands like Hyundai and Budweiser saw increases of 39.5 per cent and 37.8 per cent respectively.

Other companies have seen similar sales increases. Audi, with advertising slots during the Super Bowl since 2006, have doubled their market share, while Skechers (26 per cent) and Chrysler (54 per cent) have seen big increases in sales.

Worth the risk?

It’s still debatable even with figures like those above. There’s no guarantee that your advert will be a success and no guarantee you’ll see similar sales bumps.

But, even with that in mind, would you want to be the one name that wasn’t at the biggest party of the year?

The Super Bowl in Numbers

  • $10 million – the cost of the half-time show, paid for by the NFL. Artists aren’t paid but can expect considerable sales on the back of an appearance.
  • $58,780,000 – the sum total of the basic salaries of the highest paid players for the New England Patriots and Seattle Seahawks
  • $8 billion – the total gambled on the game (worth noting that in most states gambling is illegal)
  • 325 million gallons – the volume of beer drunk during the game
  • 1.23 billion – the number of chicken wings that were eaten in the US yesterday

Read on for more of the biggest stories commanding headlines right now:

Qatar Airways acquires $1.7 billion stake in IAG

  • As part of efforts to enhance operations and strengthen existing commercial ties initiated through codeshare agreements with IAG as well as its membership of the oneworld alliance, Qatar Airways has acquired a 9.99 per cent stake in IAG.
  • Non-EU shareholders of IAG including Qatar Airways are subject to an overall cap on non-EU ownership as a result of the requirement for EU airlines to be majority owned by EU shareholders. Qatar Airways may consider increasing its stake further over time although this is not currently intended to exceed 9.99 per cent.
  • Akbar Al Baker, Group Chief Executive of Qatar Airways, said: “IAG represents an excellent opportunity to further develop our Westwards strategy. Having joined the oneworld alliance, it makes sense for us to work more closely together in the near term and we look forward to forging a long-term relationship.”

Read more at Supply Chain Digital

Ex-Zomato CMO’s Yumist raises $1 million from Orios to deliver food efficiently

  • Yumist, a food delivery startup that started operations in Gurgaon in October 2014 has raised it’s first round of funding from Orios Venture PartnersYumist was founded by Alok Jain, a technology entrepreneur and ex-CMO at Zomato along with Abhimanyu Maheshwari, a seasoned F&B entrepreneur. to provide easy access to tasty and homely daily-meals.
  • A combination of food, logistics and tech, Yumist owns the entire delivery supply chain. It allows customers to place orders in a few seconds through it’s Android app and the meal is delivered hot in under 30 minutes.
  • The investment will be used by Yumist to grow it’s team, expand geographically and build it’s production, technology and delivery infrastructure.

Read more at YourStory

Walmart and Target move forward joint supply chain initiative

  • Walmart, Target and NGO Forum for the Future (FFTF) have set up three working groups to take forward actions agreed at last year’s beauty and personal care product sustainability summit. The groups will focus on aspects of chemicals in products, says Michelle Harvey of the Environmental Defense Fund, co-chair of two of them.
  • During the summit in September, priority chemicals and transparency emerged as one of the main issues to work on, according to an FFTF report. Delegates identified five areas for action. These included:
    • Making disclosure easier and more consistent, building trusted relationships along the supply chain and facilitating a willingness to share information.
    • Reaching alignment on the process of prioritising chemicals.
    • How to facilitate more research and development into alternative chemicals.
    • Exploring what stakeholders can do to contribute toward the industry’s sustainability efforts.
    • Engaging and educating consumers on the science behind priority chemicals in a way that is meaningful and accessible.

Read more at Chemical Watch

DWC unveils plans for aerospace supply chain facilities

  • Dubai World Central’s (DWC) Aviation District has announced the development of new aerospace supply chain facilities as part of its efforts in shaping a comprehensive ecosystem dedicated to the aviation industry.
  • Located at the DWC Aviation District – a 6.7 square kilometre master planned district adjacent to Al Maktoum International Airport – the development will include three facilities spread across an area of 45,000 square metres.
  • Estimated to cost $32.6m (AED 120 million), the project will feature a multi-purpose building for tenants that are a part of the aerospace supply chain and is scheduled for completion in Q1 2016.
  • Tahnoon Saif, vice president, Aviation District, commented: “This project marks the latest milestone in our journey to create value-added infrastructure for players across the aerospace supply chain spectrum.

Read more at Arabian Supply Chain

Packing for the future: big trends, digital print, sustainability

Stuart Kellock, Owner of Label Apeel shares his thoughts on digital print, the next big trends and whether being sustainable is still crucial for business.

Future of packaging

What is next for digital print?

In labels and packaging the next step has got to be educating the end user, the marketeers and the brand owners about what is available to them.

Pumping the market with presses does nothing for the innovation being applied. For me, it will be those who can apply themselves to new and innovative applications that will be the winners. Those who are merely using digital presses to produce labels that could be done using conventional, will find that the unseen costs quickly catch up with them, and that the competition very quickly becomes a bit hot to justify the expenditure. We have already seen this model play out in the commercial sheet fed world with disastrous outcomes for some of the less innovative businesses.

Has personalised packaging had its day?

No, personalised packaging is here to stay. With any amount of luck we can all stop treating it as the be all and end all of what digital has to offer. Yes, coke and Absolute Vodka have done some smashing stuff with personalisation, but is it really innovative? I remember 12 years ago turning up to an event and being presented with a bottle of personalized beer. Personalisation is not innovative; the scale of the personalisation that these companies demonstrated was innovative. Digital has so much more to offer and it is only once we can get past personalization, will we start to develop and understand what that is.

Three big packaging trends and techniques for 2015?

I think that 2015 will see a return to fantastic photography being used in packaging. The last few years we have seen bold colour stamping the mark of brands, I think we could see a return of photographic imagery. The challenge for printers will be to get the consistent reproduction quality that is going to be demanded of the designers.

Digital moving in to wide web packaging is going to be something that will be great to watch for those of us not involved and a challenge for those in the market. A continuation of the drive for tactile finishes and added decoration will be how brands make themselves stand out from the crowds.

Is social media having an effect on the print industry?

Social media is having less effect directly on printers than it is having on our customers. This is particularly true of printers like us, who work with small batch exclusive brands. Prior to digital, these brands could not afford the labelling and packaging of the big boys. Now their packaging looks amazing, fresh and desirable. This in conjunction with far reaching social media as a sales tool means that smaller niche brands are having an impact on the market place.

It is no coincidence that we see large brewers launching their own craft breweries or the distillers doing short run exclusive lines. The little guys are having an impact and eroding the big boys market, they are being forced to respond. Social media is allowing this to happen.

Sustainability – is it still a crucial battleground or are brands less worried about their green credentials?

Brands were ever so worried about their green credentials while it was the printer and other suppliers picking up the tab. Then, came the financial downturn of 2008 and the focus was taken elsewhere.

We have seen a return to a concern for sustainability over the past two years and I think now that concern is far more effective. It comes from a real and pragmatic position, rather than a dictatorial (because the marketing bod says we have got to.) Printers now recognise that by reducing waste and by buying sustainably they are able to improve their own business while delivering the real change the planet needs.

We no longer have half-hearted conversations about recycled paper. Our conversations now are about reducing packaging, reducing waste, eliminating landfill and reducing energy consumption from a position that creates a win for all the stakeholders.

The benefits of social networking

Networking… It’s a maligned term that often sits alongside exercising and dieting as things that we know in our hearts we should do, but never seem to get around to. 

Guide to using social networking in the job hunt

Well, we’re here to tell you it needn’t be so. In this post we are going to point out some simple tips that will make your networking efforts more effective and less cringe-worthy.

We’re all in this together

It’s important to remember that on social media platforms and at face-to-face events, everyone is there for the same purpose… To network.

People don’t attend events with the intention of sitting silently in corner, not communicating or not learning. Similarly people don’t join Procurious or LinkedIn to avoid contact with other members.

So the next time you approach someone for networking purposes, remember they are coming from the same place as you. They want to network as well!

Ask for help

As US president Barack Obama once said:

“Asking for help isn’t a sign of weakness, it’s a sign of strength because it shows you have the courage to admit when you don’t know something, and that then allows you to learn something new.” 

Asking people for help should be an active part of your networking strategy as it actually solves two problems.

The first is clear; asking for help will enable you to find solutions to your problems. Not sure who the best procurement recruiter in New York City is? Ask someone! Trying to determine if a CIPS qualification is worth the investment? Ask someone!

The second benefit that comes from asking for help is less apparent but just as important. A study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison found that workers who help others, feel happier about their work than those who decide not to help.  By asking someone for help, you give them the opportunity to display their skills and knowledge and at the same time give their self-esteem a boost.

“Our findings make a simple but profound point about altruism: helping others makes us happier. Altruism is not a form of martyrdom, but operates for many as part of a healthy psychological reward system” – University of Wisconsin-Madison professor Donald Moynihan.

If the person asking the question wins and the person answering the question wins, what’s stopping us from asking more questions?

Now back on the Barrack Obama thread, the Economist magazine recently reported that during his time as a US Senator, Barrack Obama, a man who I think you’ll agree has amassed an impressive network over the years, asked more than one third of his fellow Senators for ‘help’.

Be targeted in your approach

No one likes spam. Not in their email accounts, not in their sandwiches and certainly not when they are networking.

When you are looking to connect with people, be genuine not generic.

If you have a particular person you want to meet at an event, it pays to take some time to research them and their interests. The background work you do will not only spark your targets interest but also help to break the ice.

When connecting with people on social media sites try to send personalised messages rather than the default settings of the platform. It doesn’t have to be much but “Hey, I noticed you also work in advertising procurement, lets connect” is infinitely better than “I’d like to add you to my LinkedIn network”.

Don’t ask for a job

It’s true that social platforms like Procurious and LinkedIn are effectively online CV repositories, and that these platforms are increasing being used by companies and recruiters to fill vacancies.

However, the direction of this flow should not be turned around. Job seekers should avoid directly soliciting for jobs or big-noting themselves to hiring managers through social media platforms or at networking events.

The key here is subtly; it’s OK to ask someone at an event for advice, an opinion or even to meet up for a drink after the conference. However, by asking for a job, you end up alienating yourself from the very person you’re trying to impress.

Keep going, it’s important

Whether it makes your toes curl or not, networking is important. People who network find better jobs more easily than those who don’t.

The Guardian newspaper recently reported that a staggering 90 per cent of UK employers use social media a means to find staff.

The importance of networking is magnified as you progress through your career. A large portion of senior positions are never formally advertised, with firms preferring to rely on references and people they ‘know’ to fill important roles. The question is will they ‘know’ you?

The importance of networking stretches beyond finding your next job. Networks can be a source of inspiration. They can provide you with information and insight you would have never otherwise encountered. Effective networking may help you find your next mentor, role model or god forbid even a friend!

So get out there and network!