Celebrating 10,000 Members – Procurious Power Profiles – Part 2

We’re continuing our series of articles celebrating reaching the milestone of 10,000 members on Procurious. 

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In case you missed it, you can catch up with Part 1 of our Procurious Power Profiles here.

We want to recognise some members of our community who are using Procurious to its fullest and hope to inspire the community to all get involved with sharing their knowledge and experience working in procurement and supply chain around the world.

Nausheen Aullybux, Marketing and Communication Lead, Ecovadis

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Nausheen only recently joined Procurious, but has already become a highly active member of the community. Nausheen was attracted to Procurious by the opportunities to connect with procurement practitioners, keep a pulse on how decisions are made and see how sustainability is fitting in to global procurement functions.

Nausheen would recommend Procurious to other professionals for the endless, global networking opportunities, sharing of insights, opinions and resources, and hopes in the future to keep connecting with like-minded people and have more conversations about their experiences in merging sustainability and procurement functions – goals, challenges, how they were overcome, collaborations, innovations.

Tom Derry, CEO, Institute for Supply Management

Power Profiles - Tom DerryAs CEO for a global organisation like ISM, Tom knows what works for procurement and supply chain. For him, Procurious enables professionals to leverage the immediacy of a social network in an appropriate medium, while adding value through allowing members to build their knowledge base, as well as their professional brand.

Tom’s favourite area of the site is the Discussion board, where he feels there is strong, practical value in the communications. Members are able to leverage the experience of their peers to facilitate real results.

As ISM becomes more engaged with Procurious, Tom hopes that more of its own members will get involved. The ability to connect to each other, as well as other non-members already on Procurious, opens up great opportunities for potential collaboration.

Elaine Porteous, Senior Associate, Caliba Group

Power Profiles - Elaine PorteousTo begin with, Elaine wasn’t convinced that Procurious would work, but gave the site a chance, and has helped to grow the community in her native South Africa, as well as writing original content for the site too.

Elaine believes the strength of Procurious lies in it not having an allegiance to any organisation or group, allowing a wide range of opinions and discussions to thrive on the site. These discussions help to provide learning opportunities for the network on trends and burning issues, plus help and advice from a global community.

Building on this in the future, Elaine hopes to see more learning opportunities on the site, as well as the members collaborating across borders and cultures, to allow procurement professionals to learn from others with different experiences.

Chris Cliffe, Senior Procurement Category Manager, Circle Housing

Power Profiles - Chris CliffeChris first joined Procurious after seeing the team at an event in London during 2015, and was inspired by the message of the benefits of social media in procurement to register, and to use social media more.

For Chris, the biggest advantage of the site is that it enables procurement professionals to connect with like-minded peers, and share experience and best practice. Chris believes the best thing about Procurious is the learning section, which has the potential to foster a profession-wide team spirit, regardless of organisation or geography, through the sharing of best practice.

Helen Mackenzie, Head of Procurement, Scottish Local Government

Power Profiles - Helen MackenzieHelen has been one of Procurious’ biggest advocates since joining the site, helping to spread the word across the public sector in Scotland. Helen initially came to Procurious to find an online platform to engage with people who shared her passion for procurement.

Since joining the site, Helen says the best thing about Procurious is the sense of community, of people helping others, commenting on posts and sharing advice. Helen has had people share their templates and experience with her and has also been able put people in touch with each other, most recently someone looking for advice on mobile phone procurement.

Helen says that Procurious is “a brilliant thing to be part of and very inspiring.”

Eddie Gibson, Senior Manager, East of England Local Government Association (EELGA)

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Eddie works for the EELGA, a group working on behalf of the 52 local councils in the East of England to harness collective strength across the organisations, including in procurement. Eddie found Procurious through the videos and content from the Big Ideas Summit 2015, resources that he believes are the best thing about the site.

Eddie believes that the biggest advantage of being part of the Procurious community is that the network is more focussed than sites like LinkedIn, that new content is being posted every day, and because it’s dedicated to procurement, individuals know they’re sharing with and talking to like-minded professionals who they can expect to be helpful and supportive.

Corruption Perceptions Index – A Procurement Must-Read

The Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) is a must-read annual report for procurement professionals that source internationally.

Bribery

Why? Because with a greater focus on risk, you need to know if your supply chain is contributing to the serious corruption problems, endemic in so many of the world’s poorest countries.

Clean vs. Dirty

There’s a running joke in Paraguay about the country’s entrenched corruption problem, exposed and broadcast year after year by Transparency International’s Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI). With a score of 130 out of 168, it’s one of the most corrupt countries in the world, but locals say that the reason it didn’t come in last is because “somebody must have bribed the judges”.

Corruption-Map

Transparency International ‘Corruption Heat Map

Highlights from the report include the top ten “cleanest” countries. It’s important to note that no single country anywhere in the world is corruption free:

  • 1. Denmark
  • 2. Finland
  • 3. Sweden
  • 4. New Zealand
  • 5. Netherlands, Norway
  • 7. Switzerland
  • 8. Singapore
  • 9. Canada
  • 10. Germany, Luxembourg, UK

It’s no surprise that the lowest-scoring countries include war-torn states that have suffered from decades of conflict, such as Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan.

  • 150 – Burundi, Cambodia, Zimbabwe
  • 153 – Uzbekistan
  • 154 – Eritrea, Syria, Turkmenistan, Yemen
  • 158 – Haiti
  • 159 – Guinea-Bissau, Venezuela
  • 161 – Iraq, Libya
  • 163 – Angola, South Sudan
  • 165 – Sudan
  • 166 – Afghanistan
  • 167 – North Korea, Somalia

Other interesting results include the USA in 16th place; Australia slipping to 13th place; Greece improving its performance to reach 58th place (in all likelihood due to international scrutiny during the Greek financial crisis); and China in 83rd place.

Exporting Corruption

Northern European countries were ranked as the “cleanest” states, most free of corruption. However, Transparency International suggests that their records aren’t as clean as the scores would indicate, and it’s all down to sourcing from corrupt countries:

“The OECD Anti-Bribery Convention, adopted in 1997, requires each signatory country to make foreign bribery a crime for which individuals and enterprises are responsible. The Convention is a key instrument for curbing the export of corruption globally because the 41 signatory countries are responsible for approximately two-thirds of world exports and almost 90 per cent of total foreign direct investment outflows.

“Foreign bribery is not an abstract phenomenon; it has damaging consequences in the form of contracts not going to the best qualified suppliers, prices often being inflated to cover bribe payments, environmental requirements not being enforced and taxes not being collected.”

The CPI report shows, however, that half of all OECD countries are violating their international obligations to crack down on bribery by their companies abroad. This includes the cleanest countries identified in the report, such as Sweden (3rd place), which is facing allegations that it paid millions of dollars in bribes in Uzbekistan (153rd place).

Procurement’s Role

Procurement professionals who source internationally have the power to halt the flow of cash moving from the cleanest to most corrupt countries, feeding the corrupt states and locking the world’s most vulnerable people into a cycle of impoverishment.

Here are three steps you can take, as a procurement professional, to ensure you do not source from a corrupt state:

  1. Be informed – read reports such as the annual CPI and research the countries you are dealing with.
  2. Understand the OECD Anti-Bribery Convention, and remember that individuals can be held responsible.
  3. Lobby your government to put in place legislation that will steer the profession away from corrupt, immoral or illegal sourcing activities. There has been some excellent progress in this area internationally, such as the US Congo Conflict Minerals Act 2009, or the UK Modern Slavery Act 2015.

The Power of Networking

Networking is a breeze thanks to the proliferation of social media platforms out there, but when it comes to networking in the flesh, some of us freeze. Here’s how to handle it like a pro and make the most out of the opportunity. 

Networking-Event

Depending on your point of view, networking events can either be viewed as a waste of time, or present a huge opportunity for procurement professionals. While you may not always be in the mood for heading out to a networking event, there’s no denying that a good reliable network of contacts is various industry groups is paramount.

Sydney PR professional Catriona Pollard says some people are a little nervous about networking because they’re not entirely sure what is expected of them.

“Bear in mind that networking isn’t about going in to the centre of a room armed with a megaphone and blindly talking about yourself. Networking is about building relationships, not just promoting what you do. Remember, people are more likely to do business with people they trust.”

Facilitate the Introductions

Focus on building relationships and think about how you might be able to help others. For instance, if someone you’re talking to is struggling with AdWords and you know a great contact, you can introduce them. This will pay back in kind, Pollard says.

“It’s as simple as asking a series of open questions so that people talk about themselves, she says. Get the ball rolling by asking how their week has been and what they’re doing on the weekend, and go from there,” Pollard says.

Also be sure you’re turning up to an event that will provide you with maximum networking opportunities.

Think about it from a marketing perspective to consider who your audience is and whether you want to align with peers or potential business targets. If you’re more likely to pull out at the last minute, set yourself some networking intentions to get along to one event a week, or month. Also set some intentions about the event, such as having five good conversations and exchanging business cards, or meeting at least one person you want to have a follow-up coffee with, Pollard says.

“You need to apply some strategic thinking to find the events that will best meet your own business targets. Look up the website and look at their past events, the type of audience the event usually attracts, how many people usually attend, the style of the event and who’s hosting it, Pollard says.

Importance of Networking Diversity

Janine Garner, CEO of The Little Black Dress Group agrees.

A like-minded networking event limits the breadth of conversation, she points out. Ideally, you want to be in a room with a diverse network that consists of people with differing levels of expertise, age, gender and experience, she says.

“Lawyers sit in a room with lawyers sharing their legal experience from the industry of law. CEOs play golf with CEOs, fashion industry PR experts mingle with other fashion industry PR experts.

“Imagine instead, the colour of the conversation if instead you had lawyers, accountants, creatives, athletes, marketers and business owners discussing the various solutions to a problem. Imagine the different perspectives shared, the varying insights, the depth of conversation that would stretch thinking and push perspective wider,” Garner says.

Meanwhile, remember that going along with a friend isn’t a good idea, because you’re more likely to spend the entire event catching up rather than networking.

Leave Your Comfort Zone

People are very open to approaches when you’re alone, because everyone is generally in the same boat at a networking event. This can play to your advantage, points out the managing partner of Brown & Chase Talent Acquisition & Advisory in Australia, Nerissa Chaux.

“Attending events alone also pushes you out of your comfort zone and you don’t waste the opportunity by spending the entire event chatting to your friends,” Chaux says.

She’s attended hundreds of events, and says you can get the best out of networking by making sure that you’re attending events where people will generally be similarly-minded and your interests align, she adds.

“Also, arrive on time. It’s always great to be the first one at an event, as you have the best opportunity of meeting everyone who comes through the door.”

Also, don’t wait for others to introduce themselves, Brent Duffy, director of Sydney leadership consulting firm, Maximus International.

“Be genuinely interested in others. It should be an equal 50/50 conversation. Treat the event as if your CEO was in the room, and see it as an opportunity to learn and hear about different perspectives rather than trying to gain quick wins for yourself, Duffy says.

“People love to share their learnings. Asking for advice demonstrates humility, your ability to listen and be open minded,” Duffy says.

“It’s more important to be an attentive listener who comes across as authentic and trustworthy, rather than someone who speaks candidly or excessively about themselves or their business. True listeners are rare, and people will remember you for this,” he says.

Remember the Follow-Up

The follow-up is crucial to ensure actually attending the event was worthwhile. This can take many forms, depending on the connection that you’ve had.

Janet Culpitt has been networking as a small business owner of www.focusonwealth.com.au for 16 years, and now teaches others how to get the most out of networking.

She recommends connecting on social media the same day of the networking event. Also check out any other social media groups they’re involved with, and request to join those if they’re relevant to you.

Culpitt will choose to send an ecard, a handwritten note, send a text message or sometimes she will make a phone call to their office to leave a message of thanks for talking the other day with their receptionist.

“Emails are fine, but they’re so common these days that I like to mix it up with other communication tools.”

What Tinder Can Tell Us About Job Hunting – Part 3: Playing the Game

Tinder can be a whole lot of fun. Like Snap, but infinitely more stimulating. But it’s not a game, and needs to be treated with the respect it deserves, or people can be left hurt and disappointed.

Tinder-Game-Match

Read Part 1 and Part 2 of this series.

This series of articles was co-authored with Andy Storrar, Digital Marketing Specialist.

Your search for a new job is the same. Like Tinder, you could take a YOLO approach, frantically swiping right on everything and waiting to see how many matches you get, but I wouldn’t recommend it. Recruiters and Employers keep databases of candidates. You don’t want your earlier flurry of applications for completely inappropriate jobs to undermine your chances of an interview for the perfect one next week.

So act with consideration, select your targets carefully, and the validation you gain from achieving a fantastic match will be all the greater. And you know that feeling of “Tinder Remorse” that can occur if you’ve swiped left too quickly (or swiped right without thinking properly)?

Well, it’s worse when it’s being pointed out to you by a recruiter that you’re not appropriate for this role either. So slow down, and give careful consideration to what you want from that big next step.

Stay Organised

Now, nobody’s suggesting you’re going to be as active as my friend Robin. She’s pretty much a Tinder pro. Last time I asked her, she was averaging 3 first dates and the same number of follow-ups each week. She barely has to buy dinner, let alone drinks, and is the proud owner of an insanely long list of matches, even after deleting the ones who open their messaging with “Hi, how are you?”

The number of dates she goes on is limited only by the miserly 7 days in each week and her own level of tiredness. But how does she keep track of where she is in these multiple simultaneous processes?

Robin keeps a spreadsheet. No, seriously. As a procurement professional, you’ll probably have come across one or two of these. I’d hazard Robin’s is a little less numerical than some, but the principle is exactly the same. It’s helped Robin keep track of conversations, venues, insights and key facts about her suitors, and helped her avoid embarrassing situations relating to her busy social life.

Robin may be an extreme example, but the tangled web that we can weave in online dating can often be reflected when job hunting. It’s quite usual to be chatting to and meeting several people in the same month through Tinder, and just as likely that you’ll be wooing several different employers simultaneously, and at varying stages of each relationship.

A simple spreadsheet can be an effective and diplomatic way of managing your information. You should be making notes of your conversations with recruiters anyway, but putting them all into a single document with sensibly indexed and easily referenced categories is a move you won’t regret.

Do Your Research

Information isn’t just gained from meeting a date or a potential employer, of course. Research is key too. We’ll deal with that in another article, but remember that it works both ways. Google will likely lead you to a wealth of insight about a prospective employer.

It will also allow them (like a Tinder match who knows your surname) to find out an awful lot about you. Remember your digital footprint, and consider restricting public access to any social media accounts that might not represent you in the best light.

There’s more than one game in town too. Tinder is certainly one route to meeting people, but if you’re looking for a partner you definitely shouldn’t restrict your search to Tinder alone. Apart from an ocean of different dating websites, you know that friends, colleagues, social activities and even chance encounters are all chances to ‘match’.

Vary Your Habits

And so it is that varying your job searching habits can reap rewards too. You won’t always find your perfect match via the search engines and even the most successful and broad-ranging of the job sites can only individually claim market coverage of a fraction of the whole.

Employers’ websites, industry publications and blogs, direct approaches and your own trusty network are all capable of revealing unadvertised opportunities. You’ve just got to make sure to keep your eyes open, remain alert to all of them, and be capable of managing the process efficiently and sensitively when opportunities appear.

The search for a new job can be a heady and exciting business – as of course can the fast-moving search for romance on Tinder – but you need to understand the rules, and learn the subtleties and complexities of the whole process, if you’re going to play this game well.

Celebrating 10,000 Members – Procurious Power Profiles – Part 1

All the team at Procurious HQ would like to thank each and every one of our members for helping us grow our network and reach the milestone of 10,000 members.

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We’re so excited about reaching the milestone as it represents a landmark number for us that we have reached less than two years after we launched the site. It’s fantastic to see our community grow and evolve, and to watch all our members grow their networks, build their own brands on social media, and use what Procurious has to offer in order to develop professionally.

As part of our celebrations for reaching this milestone, we’ll be using this article, as well as one other later in the week, to recognise some members of our community who are using Procurious to its fullest and should inspire you to do the same!

Helen Rees, Procurement Manager, Mid & West Wales Fire & Rescue Service

Power Profiles 1 - Helen ReesHelen was one of the first movers on Procurious and has helped to promote the community from the beginning. Helen says she is a great believer in the power of networking (and has a network of almost 4,500 herself on Procurious), which was the main reasons she signed up to Procurious in the first place, as well as what she sees as the biggest advantage of the site.

Helen is an avid reader of the Procurious blog and thoroughly enjoys reading about other people’s experiences. She feels it is an excellent form of personal development as you learn about things that you may not have encountered within your own working environment. To find out more about Helen’s experiences, you can read her article on what procurement is like in Wales.

Bertrand Maltaverne, Senior Business Consultant, POOL4TOOL/Alengis

Power Profiles 1 - Bertrand MaltaverneBertrand highlights wanting to keep up with the current issues and challenges in the procurement space as the reason he joined Procurious, and felt that Procurious was the place for this as the first open, online, global community dedicated to the profession.

The people who make up the community, and their willingness to contribute and share, are what Bertrand enjoys the most about Procurious, with the global nature of the network bringing a diversity of perspectives that gives access to opinions from practitioners from all over the world. And, as Bertrand says, if you’re not a member now, then soon you might be the only procurement professional who isn’t!

Georgia Brandi, Category Lead, Newcrest Mining

Power Profiles 1 - Georgia BrandiGeorgia was attracted to the concept of Procurious as the initial setup of the site called for input from procurement professionals, highlighting that the functionality and focus reflected expectations and requirements of the community. Georgia has helped to shape the site with her fellow professionals, and continues to reap benefits from being part of the community.

The relevance of the content, news and discussions are what keep bringing Georgia back to the site, as well as why she would recommend it to others. She says that there isn’t the same dilution of the message due to irrelevant content, and the dedication to procurement has actually enabled her to solve a work-related issue through an answer she received in the Discussion forum.

Just the sort of success story in knowledge sharing that Procurious was built for!

Justin Plokhooy, Director of Procurement, USAA

Power Profiles 1 - Justin PlokhooyJustin is one of the more recent members of the community, but has certainly gotten involved whole-heartedly, particularly in the Discussion forum, which he says provides an invaluable learning experience for both him and the community, due to the ability to interact with other Procurement professionals in real time on real world topics.

A community of like-minded professionals who he could leverage and share with was what attracted Justin to Procurious, and he says other professionals should get involved because having access to a true community of professionals, all facing the same problems as you, plays a big part in the value you can bring to your organisation and, ultimately, to your career.

Anna Spady, Marketing Manager, RFP365

Power Profiles 1 - Anna SpadyAnna is one of the many providers into the profession who have joined the Procurious community but are also giving back by sharing their experience from the supplier side of the table. Connecting with, and learning from, the procurement community and influencers, as well as accessing thought leadership and joining discussions were the key reasons Anna joined Procurious initially.

Anna says that the biggest advantage of the site is the knowledge shared through the articles and posts, as well as the helpfulness and eagerness of the community to get involved, answer questions and share their insights. In Anna’s words, the best thing about the site is knowing “that there is a one-stop-shop for procurement.”

Kevin Collon, International Procurement Consultant, APIBS

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Kevin has been an active member of the community for a while now, regularly contributing to discussions, as well as sharing content for the Procurious blog. Kevin enjoys the most that Procurious brings together people starting out in their career and experienced senior members all in one place.

Kevin finds Procurious to be a great place to share or discuss ideas with these like-minded professionals, in a thoughtful and respectful community, dedicated to Procurement. He also says he recommends Procurious to all procurement professionals if they haven’t already joined the site, as it’s a good place to pick up the latest news and trends and connect with others anytime and any place.

Make sure you check out our Power Profiles in the community and connect with these guys. Plus, stay tuned, as later in the week, we’ll be showcasing some more Procurious Power Profiles.

10,000 Reasons to Join Procurious

Procurious is celebrating its 10,000th member months ahead of its second birthday in a milestone that has surpassed all expectations.

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We’re delighted to make this announcement and want to take the opportunity to thank all of our members for helping us to build and grow such a fantastic community.

When we launched in May 2014, we wanted to provide a hub for members to advance their careers, develop their skills and expand their professional networks. We like to think that the growth in the community suggests that we’re making a difference for procurement and supply chain professionals.

Shifting Procurement Landscape

A huge shift is in the making within the procurement/supply management profession. While cost remains important in the procurement function, professionals work at the interface of an extended global supply chain and are responsible for an ever-growing corporate spend.

Increasingly, Chief Procurement Officers (CPOs) command a seat next to the CEO in the boardroom, and successful supply management practices are seen as pivotal to corporate growth. As a result, demand for new talent is soaring, and so are advancement opportunities.

Against this backdrop, Procurious broke new ground in May 2014, when it launched as the first free online global business network for curious, ambitious procurement and supply management professionals. Building on its mission to strengthen the global supply chain community, Procurious has become a vital source of knowledge, connections, news, and advancement opportunities.

Unlike other communities, Procurious offers a powerful combination of career advancement, skill development, and professional networking, all on one platform. With more than 80 eLearning videos, discussions on everything from commodity indices to procurement systems, and a wealth of guest writers adding their voices to a twice-daily blog, Procurious is at the epicenter of the industry

Flexing Collective Muscle

“The complexities of procurement and supply management are a world away from what they were a decade ago. Executives realise the huge risk posed to their business if there are supply chain disruptions, or costly reputational damage caused by bad management and supply chain practices,” said Ms Seary.

“This means that organisations of all shapes and sizes are placing a far greater emphasis on procurement professionals, who are commanding a seat right next the CEO at the boardroom table.

“It’s a world away from the procurement function within organisations a decade ago, when procurement was still considered a backroom function. Back then, buyers struggled for influence over corporate spend, typically buying from large suppliers and sticking with long-term contractors, with the primary focus on cost.

“Many of the issues the profession faces are too big for any one person or company to address alone. It’s exciting to think what our global procurement community can achieve as we flex our collective muscle.”

Engaging the Community

Procurious members engage with the site daily to find a daily stream of highly relevant and credible procurement news and information and broader business and tech/digital news that can be difficult to locate among the noise on LinkedIn.

Procurious member, Chetan Shetty of Productivity Champion Advisory Services in New Zealand, said the site contributes to their business network efforts. “The site is very different and a refreshing approach to connecting with like-minded professionals.”

Members hail from over 140 countries and represent some of the largest organisations in the world including Visa, BHP Billiton, British Airways, Apple, IBM, Shell, HSBC, Unilever, NHS and Deloitte.

You can join the Procurious community for free today by registering at Procurious.com.

To celebrate our milestone, we’ve created a neat infographic to illustrate just how far our 10,000 members could take us…

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Meanwhile, here are some of the key headlines from procurement and supply chain this week…

Child Labour Concerns in Battery Supply Chain

  • A new report from Amnesty International and African Resources Watch has raised concerns about child labour in the battery supply chain
  • The report states that “very few” companies are taking the required steps in due diligence, particularly in relation to the mining of cobalt
  • Amnesty accused major global organisations, such as Apple, Samsung and Sony, of “failing to do basic checks to ensure that cobalt mined by child labourers has not been used in their products”
  • Cobalt is not currently covered under the US Dodd-Frank Act, which is limited to tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold

Read more at The Financial Times

First Stage of “Space Data Highway” Launched

  • A node was launched into space on the back of a communications satellite on Friday, which was the first part of Europe’s new space “data highway”
  • The European Data Relay Satellite (EDRS) has been planned as a way to increase the volume and speed of data transmission, as it doesn’t require the relay from an Earth-based ground station
  • EDRS-A node will relay data, including picture and radar images, that will be used to monitor floods, sea ice and oil spills
  • The system, costing Euro 500 million ($545 million; £380 million), will also be available to paying customers once it is fully operational

Read more at Business Standard

Peugeot Signs Iran Manufacturing Deal

  • PSA Peugeot Citroën has signed a deal which will mean that three of its current models will be manufactured in Iran over the next five years
  • The deal, a Joint Venture between PSA and Iran Khodro, is expected to invest up to €400m over the next five years in manufacturing and R&D
  • Manufacturing of the latest Peugeot 208, 2008 and 301 models will take place in Tehran, with the first completed vehicles expected in 2017
  • It comes just a week after economic sanctions against Iran were lifted, and means a return for Peugeot to the country where it manufactured vehicles up until 2012

Read more at Supply Management

Google Plans to “Beam 5G” Using Drones

  • Google is building and testing a fleet of solar-powered drones capable of beaming 5G signals for mobile phone networks
  • Codenamed “Project SkyBender”, the drones will be able to transmit data up to 40 times faster than standard 4G, through the use of cutting-edge wave technology
  • The drones are being manufactured by the Google Titan part of the organisation, formed following Google’s acquisition of Titan Aerospace in 2014
  • It is hoped that these drones will enable Google, and other providers, to bring the internet to remote areas around the world

Read more at The Verge