The Big Ideas Summit 2016 Is Underway!

We’re off and running here in London but there are still ample opportunities to get involved in Big Ideas Summit as a Digital Delegate!

Big Ideas Summit Speaker Banner

It feels like revisiting an old friend – familiar faces in the room, influencers and keynote speakers, a fabulous location at the Soho Hotel, and a buzz of excitement for things to come.

Yes, that’s right, the Big Ideas Summit – the world’s largest procurement online think tank event, is back and after weeks of planning, discussions and anticipation, we’re less than half an hour from our first keynote of the day.

With a nutrition-free breakfast now packed away (or do danishes and coffee count as ‘clean eating’?), Procurious’ Founder, Tania Seary, is welcoming our delegates, setting the ground rules and pointing our delegates towards the Procurious iOS App so they can engage with you – like, right now!

Setting out our Stall

As with the Big Ideas Summit 2015, there are just 50 Top Influencers here at The Soho Hotel. However, the unique nature of this online event means that all 13,500+ Procurious members are invited to shape the agenda, steer the conversations and share their own Big Ideas.

Conversations among Digital Delegates have already been lively with procurement pros the world over submitting questions for our Influencers via Twitter and sharing their own Big Ideas 60 second video challenges on Procurious.

Here in London, we’ll be tackling the thorniest issues for procurement, from the true cost of retail fashion supply chains, to procurement’s blind spots, and why traditional models of leadership are failing us.

We have an amazing speaker and influencer line-up for 2016, with thought leaders, senior executives and experts from world-renowned organisations.

I had the chance to catch up briefly with IBM’s Mike Murphy O’Reilly – one of the first movers on Procurious nearly two years ago – and no prizes for guessing he’s most excited to hear from Elizabeth Linder, Facebook’s Government Communication specialist.

“Like Social Media, Procurement, continues to evolve and the importance of collaborative sharing  events like Big Ideas allows us to harness the collective knowledge and information to further their careers and the function,” Mike told me over coffee before revealing his own Big Idea will be on The Information of Everything!

(Remember: You’ll be able to catch Mike’s and all our Top Influencers’ Big Ideas videos on Procurious in the coming days)

How can I Participate?

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If you’ve got any questions for any of the influencers here or your fellow Digital Delegates, get in touch and we’ll do our best to get you an answer. We also have a number of other ways that you can get involved:

  • Download the App – By popular demand, we’ve just launched the Procurious iOS App! It’s  available free through the iTunes store so you can stay up to date with Big Ideas and connected with Procurious on the go!
  • Keep your eyes peeled – The group will be the place for a digital delegate to get updates from London as they happen.
  • Check out our Twitter feed – We’ll be live-tweeting from the event all day, keeping you up to date with all the discussions. Join in and Tweet us your questions and ideas @procurious_ using #BigIdeas2016
  • Like our Facebook page – If you’re a keen Facebooker, you can get all the day’s updates via our Facebook page, including photos of behind the scenes action as our Influencers take to the Big Ideas film studio. If you haven’t already, you can like Procurious on Facebook here.
  • Follow us on LinkedIn – If LinkedIn is your platform of choice, you can follow Procurious, and join our company Group too. We’ll be sharing our content on LinkedIn with our followers and looking for even more people to get involved.

We’re looking forward to a great day – we hope you are too!

Showcasing Your Big Ideas – Volatility as an Opportunity

Kicking off the day of the Big Ideas Summit, we’re looking at another of your Big Ideas. Mike Robertson shares his thoughts on why volatility represents an opportunity to procurement.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016 today, we will be asking our speakers and attendees to record their ‘Big Ideas’ live on camera for the whole of our Procurious community to see.

But we also believe that every single procurement and supply chain professional has a unique vantage point in the industries, communities and businesses they work in. Thank you to all who have submitted their Big Ideas to us – we think they have been great!

Mike Robertson, CEO of POD Procurement

According to Mike, markets are more volatile than ever before, and this volatility is now impacting bottom line profits. Traditionally, procurement has looked at volatility as a risk within contracts.

However, Mike’s Big Idea focuses on changing the way procurement addresses volatility, from viewing it as a risk, to viewing it as an opportunity.

How to Submit Your Big Idea

There’s still time for you to send us your Big Idea for procurement! We don’t mind if you film your submission on your phone, tablet, laptop or PC. However, to help you out we’ve compiled a list of some of our recommended methods for reaching out.

Once you’ve completed your film, you can reach us by email (Procurious@Procurious.com); on Twitter (@procurious_) or via Google Drive or Dropbox (using Procurious@Procurious.com).

You can find all the information you need on recording and submitting your Big Idea here.

You can still register for the Big Ideas Summit 2016, which takes place today! Visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register now!

Why Procurement Should Invest In Social Enterprise?

Have you ever bought the Big Issue? Watched Jamie Oliver’s Fifteen? Shopped at a Co-op?

These are social enterprises which are in our communities, on our high streets; and range from coffee shops and cinemas, pubs and leisure centres, to banks and bus companies.

social enterprise

What is a social enterprise? The simple answer is an organisation that seeks to be financially successful while creating social and/or environmental impact. Social enterprises can be structured as a for-profit or non-profit, and may take the form of a co-operative, mutual organisation, a social business, or a charity organisation.

As the diagram below indicates, what differentiates social enterprises from other businesses is that their social mission is at the core of their offering, with profits reinvested in the company or local communities.

Social Enterprises
Social Enterprise Structure

 

The unique structure of social enterprises means that a financial goal may not exist to benefit investors, but rather local communities and social activities.

Social Enterprises in Action

Social enterprises are an integral part of the United Kingdom. The Key Fund is the biggest UK regionally-based social investor, operating across Northern England. The Key Fund focuses on supporting disadvantaged communities, offering to invest in community projects which aim to have an impact on the local community and the environment.

Other examples of social enterprises in the UK include:

  • Higher Rhythm Ltd – a not-for-profit company established in 2001 to offer high quality musical, media and creative services, and  opportunities to local communities.
  • The Create Foundation – a debt information provider aimed at helping people get themselves out of debt and living a normal life, free from financial problems. Their social goal is to provide education on finance and making informed decisions with money.
  • Refurnish – a company which aims to reduce landfill waste by providing both new and pre-owned furniture and electrical goods to the community.

Social Enterprises UK is the national trade body for social enterprises. Members comprise of social enterprises, private businesses, charities and public sector organisations, who all support the vision of a world where social enterprise involvement in business is common practice.

Society Profits: Social Enterprise UK 

Peter Holbrook & Social Enterprise UK

Peter Holbrook is Chief Executive of Social Enterprise UK. Social Enterprise UK’s key activities centre on informing and influencing the policy agenda, promoting the benefits of social enterprise, and undertaking research to expand the social enterprise evidence base.

Holbrook says that, through Social Enterprises UK, “we have a unique opportunity to promote an economic model that can change not only the way we do business, but also society at large.”

The Guardian has highlighted Peter Holbrook’s innovative, community-led approach to regeneration, tackling health inequalities, and providing public services in some of the UK’s most deprived regions. This has also lead to a host of admirers, including the former prime minister, Gordon Brown, and current Prime Minister, David Cameron.

Timo Worrall & Social Impact Through Procurement Initiatives

Timo Worrall is responsible for the procurement of Facility Services at Johnson & Johnson. He is a key driver in implementing the ‘Social Impact Through Procurement’ initiative in the UK, and introducing social enterprises into the facilities supply base.

In 2012, the UK passed a law designed to transform the way public bodies buy services. It required all relevant organisations in England and Wales to consider how the services they commission and procure might improve the economic, social and environmental well-being of an area.

One way for companies to meet this legal obligation is by working with social enterprise suppliers. J&J choose to buy from social enterprise suppliers, as it aligns with the company’s initiatives of backing supplier diversity, improves the company’s reputation, and can potentially increase revenue over time.

J&J are leading the way in taking these steps, and ensuring that their procurement activities generate positive social impact. Commercial Procurement Lead at J&J, Hugh Chamberlain, stated that they are taking action and supporting people often termed “furthest from employment”. The ‘Social Impact through Procurement’ initiative aims to create at least 150 jobs for these people by 2020.

“From a procurement perspective it means we can help people to lead happier, healthier lives simply by the way we spend money in our supply chain,” Chamberlain  says. “We can provide a holistic healthcare solution and play our part in things that we wouldn’t normally. It’s a tremendous opportunity and it really resonates with procurement folks.”

J&J’s current social enterprise suppliers include film company Inside Job Productions, and grounds maintenance and facilities services supplier Blue Sky, both of which support ex-offenders. Another is Haven Products, which employs disabled people and provides contract packing, quality inspection, secure storage, printing and mailing.

Why should procurement invest in social enterprise?

An increasing number of organisations are ‘buying social’ and bringing social enterprises into their supply chain.  By procurement investing in buying goods and services from the social enterprise sector it will improve the company’s overall social and environmental footprint.

There are 70,000 social enterprises operating in the UK across almost every industry. They are reinvesting their profits for good, benefitting the people and the planet. When a social enterprise profits, society profits.

Social enterprises, and procurement’s role in supporting them and creating social value, will be a key theme at the Big Ideas Summit 2016.

There’s still time to register for the Summit! Visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas in Procurement in Asia-Pacific

With a huge geographical area and diversity of cultures and industries, procurement in Asia-Pacific is both highly complex and fascinating.

Procurement in Asia-Pacific

Ahead of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st, we are taking a look at the key issues facing procurement in the coming years. We have asked experts and influencers in our community to share their Big Ideas on the themes we will be discussing on the day.

Here, experts who work in procurement in Asia-Pacific, share their thoughts on the Big Ideas impacting organisations and industries in Procurious’ second largest market.

Gordon Donovan, Procurement & Supply Chain Manager, Metro Trains

Gordon DonovanTalent – With the release of the recent Deloitte CPO survey, attention has once again fallen on talent – acquisition, developing and retaining.

Over 60 per cent of CPOs feel that their teams do not have the skills needed to perform their roles. However training budgets have largely stagnated, if not fallen.

There is a feeling that the traditional methods of training are not delivering the results required, therefore the onus now falls on more applied learning programmes that have a direct correlation to the workplace.

The big idea here is to focus on these types of learning activities which will deliver an immediate ROI as well as taking the theory from the classroom to the application.

Supplier Pre-qualification – Procurement needs to be agile in responding to its stakeholders, both internally and externally. Procurement also needs to “get more done with less”. Therefore, attention is turning to dealing with a set of suppliers who have already passed the hurdles required to supply to an organisation.

The need to ask the same question multiple times adds to the lack of turnaround time in procurement, and frustrates suppliers. Pre-qualification allows these questions to be answered once, and also will allow procurement to have pass fail/rates for areas such as supply chain transparency and accreditation.

Accreditation – Accreditation of your supply chain is becoming the hot topic in procurement. Do you know who you are dealing with and how your suppliers operate? Are we are aware of the ethical and sustainable issues within procurement and within the wider supply chain?

The hot topic now for procurement in Asia-Pacific, and across the globe, is how do we accredit our suppliers/supply chains and how do we ourselves gain accreditation for our policy and process to deliver value to our organisation.

Madeleine Tewes, Project Manager, Australian Maritime Safety Authority

Madeleine TewesInternationalisation – Traditional, family-controlled businesses across Asia are increasingly choosing to internationalise. Some Governments are supportive of this internationalisation. For example, one of the core tenants in China’s 2016 – 2021 Five-Year Plan is internationalisation, with many Chinese companies expected to ‘go global’ in this period.

As part of this process, many businesses are now looking to American, European and Australian consultancies and technology providers to radically overhaul their business functions and processes including procurement.

The overhaul includes tasks like introducing business English into meetings and contracts, expanding supplier bases, implementing technology to automate processes and provide greater spend visibility and even setting up procurement teams where before all that existed was purchasing clerks within a Finance team.

Mark Gibbs, President of SAP Greater China, notes that China is SAP’s second home, and that the trend of internationalisation is continuing to support the “massive cloud computing and e-Commerce expansion” that has been in progress over the past few years.

Innovation driving competitive advantage – Singapore has a focus on pioneering advances in innovation and driving competitive advantage for growth according to Teo Lay Lim, MD, Accenture Singapore and ASEAN.

More broadly in Asia, innovation is increasingly being recognised as the key to sustainable growth by companies around the world and as Capgemini research points out, innovation has evolved from a purely internal capability, to a collaborative process with the external network of supply partners.

Therefore, the ability of procurement to work with suppliers to identify and execute innovation within existing contracts, and to stimulate innovation outside of existing arrangements, is a key part of the procurement value proposition.

Some simple observations from Singapore include having incentive schemes in place relating to innovation in supplier contracts, having innovation as an agenda item on regular meetings with key suppliers as well as internal stakeholders, and having KPI’s in place which reward procurement team members for focusing on innovation, rather than relying purely on traditional savings or throughput metrics.

Corporate Social Responsibility – Research conducted by the Harvard Business School found that organisations who focus on corporate social responsibility (CSR) significantly outperform their competition in terms of stock market and financial performance.

One Singapore-based organisation, Fuji Xerox, describes their view of CSR very clearly, “…forging a link between long-term competitiveness and the sustainable development of society and the company…”. This seems to be a view echoed by a growing number of organisations across Asia.

Each of these organisations will have a different ways of using their procurement team to support their organisation’s focus on CSR. However, an IBM IBV CPO study found that 97 per cent of successful and influential procurement teams are significantly involved in their organisation’s CSR initiatives, compared to 61 per cent of average procurement teams.

Regardless of the current maturity of a procurement team though, or if it is the organisation driving these initiatives or procurement lobbying for them, clear KPIs (results driven rather than process orientated ideally) will allow procurement to demonstrate the value it is providing to the organisation.

Do you work in procurement in Asia-Pacific? What’s your Big Idea for the future of the profession? Let us know and we could be discussing them on April 21st.

Want to know more about Big Ideas 2016? Then visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

How Technological Megatrends Are Transforming Manufacturing

Technological megatrends are leading to major disruptions in manufacturing. And it’s affecting the way procurement and supply chain professionals plan for the future.

Technological Megatrends

It wasn’t that long ago that manufacturing was a noisy and dirty process that involved huge numbers of staff and required significant factory floor space.

But that’s all changed. A number of megatrends have disrupted the manufacturing sector at a rapid rate, which Paul Markillie, Innovation Editor at The Economist, has documented in a number of articles and papers.

Given their disruptive nature, these technological megatrends are of significant interest to the procurement and supply chain professionals. Paul has been invited to speak on these mega-trends, and other technological advancements, that are disrupting and transforming manufacturing, at the Big Ideas Summit 2016.

“I’m particularly looking forward to the Big Ideas Summit because many of the things I talk about attract interest and curiosity. That can lead to some lively interaction, from which I often learn things from people who are already having to confront profound changes to the way they will do business in the future,” Markillie writes.

During his keynote, Paul will explain how manufacturing is going digital and how that will disrupt the conventional economies of production, and overturn established supply chains. He’ll also explain how companies are responding to these trends.

Changing the Manufacturing Rules

According to Paul Markillie, a handful of industrial revolutions have occurred, depending on who you ask. And, as has happened in other industries, such as publishing, music, films and electronics, the move to a digital world in manufacturing changes the rules comprehensively.

Developments like new materials, robotics, 3D printing, and computer-aided design and simulation, replace the old notions of economies of scale. This changes not just where companies locate factories, but also how they organise themselves, and arrange their procurement and supply chains.

As part of his work, Markillie has documented the dramatic pace of change in manufacturing around the world. This includes the carbon-fibre composites making light work of aeroplanes, and now cars too. BMW’s car factory in Leipzig produces a variety of vehicles, with a group of robots in one area moving in perfect synchrony as they assemble body section, with a precision no human could hope to match.

But there’s no thundering metal-stamping machines or showers of welding sparks here, as he documents. Instead, these car parts are black, and made from a composite material called carbon fibre. And by the mid-2020s, carbon fibre will be widely adopted in car making, he says. And this is just one of the technological megatrends we need to be keeping track of.

Advanced Manufacturing Methods

There’s many other examples of major innovation in the car industry in other parts of the world, too. Researchers in Tennessee have created an automated system endearingly known as Big Areas Additive Manufacturing (also known as a 3D printer), which is used to print cars.

The researchers work at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is exploring a number of advanced manufacturing methods. In one experiment, it made most of the body and chassis for an electric replica of a classic 1960s sports car, and took just six weeks to design, print and assemble the car.

The dramatic pace of change proves that first-tier suppliers will need to work much closer with companies in the development process. While this already occurs to some extent, there will be huge opportunities for companies further down the supply chain to innovate.

For example, second-generation robots are more affordable for medium and small companies, while 3D printing processes are less wasteful of raw materials and allow greater production flexibility at lower volumes.

There are plenty of other new approaches to manufacturing, which give procurement professionals plenty of food for thought, likely to be explored by Markillie at the Big Ideas Summit. No matter how you look at it, manufacturing is a world away from yesteryear, he says.

Paul Markillie will discuss these disruptive technological megatrends in greater detail during his keynote at the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st.

Want to know more about Big Ideas 2016? Then visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Creating our Vision: Why Procurement Needs an Avenger

Procurement needs a vision to help it overcome the challenges facing it. And this is why Procurement needs to be an Avenger rather than an ageing Godfather to survive.Procurement Vision & Avenger

Since being asked to attend the Big Ideas Summit 2016, I’ve been thinking about my own big ideas. I’ve drawn on my own experience, reviewed the ideas submitted in 2015 and for the 2016 summit, and read a range of materials, including the book ‘Thinking the Unthinkable’ which I would highly recommend to everybody.

Having reflected on all this information, I’ve got a couple of ideas of my own that I look forward to discussing with you all in person next Thursday. Before then, I have one that I want to offer for discussion amongst the Procurious community.

My big idea is simple. Procurement is simply not thinking big enough! As a function, we appear constrained and timid in our outlook, believing ideas that have been circulating over the last decade to be the strategic answers that will propel us forward into the next decade.  Procurement must demonstrate greater ambition towards its future role than it does today. 

We need a Procurement Vision!

it-took-35-hours-every-day-to-transform-paul-bettany-into-the-vision-character-for-the-avengers-sequel

Just as The Vision emerged in The Avengers to defeat Ultron, Procurement needs its own vision to help guide it through the challenges it faces.

Procurement’s vision needs to be ambitious and practical, demonstrating to the senior leaders of an organisation a clear sense of purpose and direction that shows how Procurement will benefit the organisation.

If this vision exists, I believe that initiatives such as SRM, Innovation, Collaboration and Big Data, all areas that have been discussed in countless articles in recent years, will realise their intended benefits, as their aims and objectives will have been clearly explained and understood by all participants to support the most successful possible implementation.

If no vision exists, how can we succeed? It may seem simple, but clearly articulating this vision can prove difficult for organisations. I am shocked when I talk to organisations today to hear that they are unable to tell me their organisational objectives or why they implemented a particular solution. Colour simply drains from the faces of individuals when asking them to try to quantify some form of business benefit achieved from an investment in a particular solution or project.

When I speak at Universities and business schools around the World, the role of Procurement is confused. Students are unclear on what it actually represents, whilst academics provide a wide range of explanations of what Procurement is, usually including it as a minor topic within Supply Chain discussions.

Unless Procurement Leaders, be they Public, Private or in connected areas such as media, show a clear sense of direction and unity on what Procurement is, the function could easily disappear.

Remember the scene from ‘The Godfather Part 3’ where Michael utters what are probably the most memorable lines from that film:

Pull me back in

Michael and the Corleone family have allowed themselves to become constrained by the expectations that others have for them.  Any intent to move forward is being hampered by the legacies and expectations from their past.

Procurement faces a similar challenge. If it lacks a vision on its future direction, it runs the risk of always being portrayed as a back office compliance function, simply ensuring adherence to purchase orders. Please don’t misunderstand me. These are important activities that need to be done properly. My point is that when no vision exists, attempts to implement new strategic initiatives will be thwarted, because organisations may not allow us to move beyond the self-imposed boundaries that Procurement has established for itself.

A limited historic scope for Procurement will not inspire the next generation of potential talents to come and work within our function. When talking about Procurement at Universities and Business Schools, current students already assume a number of our historic activities to have been automated and are certainly not seeking to join organisations if their immediate future is spent ensuring contractual compliance or managing tail-spend.

The next generation is interested in how Procurement shapes Sustainable Sourcing strategies, how Procurement supports top-line growth initiatives and how Procurement provides a platform to a wider career in an organisation.

Creating the Vision

How can we create this vision? A simple idea would be to imagine that Procurement did not yet exist. How would you create it today? What would you want to include in its remit? Where do you believe you should focus your biggest minds, and what could be automated?

Clarifying how Procurement will operate both in the short and longer term within your organisation will start to create a vision behind which your team can unite and move together. This will require Leadership to seek new opportunities for Procurement to drive and manage opportunities. It may require Procurement Leadership to conduct some ‘skunk-work’ initiatives, dedicating resources to ideas that they believe will benefit the organisation in the medium to long term.

I believe that establishing a vision is equally applicable to both Public and Private Sectors. I remember witnessing some of the earliest work on sustainable sourcing, ethical purchasing and talent diversity emerging in the public sector and student unions.

Procurement has the ability to devise a very bright future in terms of areas of responsibility and contribution to organisational growth. Let us ensure that we build the future we want to participate in, rather than face a future whose boundaries and expectations have already been determined for us.

Mark will be discussing procurement vision and clarifying the role of procurement during one of our panel discussions at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st.

There’s still time for you to get involved with Big Ideas, by visiting www.bigideassummit.com, joining our Procurious group, and Tweeting your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

ISM: One CEO, $1 Trillion in Procurement Power

The Institute for Supply Management (ISM) represents 50,000 supply managers responsible for US$1 trillion in procurement power. Procurious talks to the man in charge, CEO Tom Derry.

ISM Mastery

ISM has been the hand at the tiller of the US procurement and supply chain profession since 1915, setting the standards as the responsibilities and expectations of procurement professionals grow at an incredible pace.

Since 2008, ISM has trained over 60,000 professionals in more than 30 countries. But in an ever-changing environment, the skills and capabilities that make procurement professionals successful today will not be the same as those required to be successful in the future.

No-one knows this better than ISM CEO and Big Ideas Summit keynote speaker Tom Derry. Tom joined ISM in 2012, and is charged with ensuring that the Institute moves forward at the same pace as the procurement profession.

Leveraging the Platform Economy

ISM’s knowledge programme has become increasingly agile in order to meet the needs of professionals in a continuously evolving business environment. And that’s where the ISM/Procurious partnership comes into play.

ISM is excited to partner with Procurious to bring their ground-breaking think-tank event, the Big Ideas Summit, to procurement professionals around the world on April 21st 2016. This unprecedented digital forum will enable Procurious’ 13,000+ members to innovate and crowdsource ideas with the most successful executives and thought leaders in the profession.

ISM’s partnership with Procurious is part of its strategy to leverage the ‘platform economy’, and to dramatically upskill the procurement profession. The rate at which technologies and the markets move now means we need to be constantly upskilling just to stay up to speed.

Tom is a major advocate for the use of social media within procurement. In the future, he sees it as a key tool for the profession in order to connect, collaborate and share knowledge.

Tom states, “I honestly I don’t see how anybody could plan to be an effective professional in our field without using the social media tool kit. Social media is a vital part of the way we work – the opportunities for procurement and supply chain professionals in social media are huge.”

Critical Skills for future CPOs

And as the profession expands its role and responsibilities, procurement teams will require the right skills to make sure they can succeed in this environment. And, of course, this will be led from the top by the CPO.

At the organisation’s centenary celebration last year, Tom launched the ISM Mastery Model, using the 100-year milestone to create a model that will drive standards into the next millennium.

The Mastery Model is designed to standardise roles and drive procurement success by deepening a team’s expertise and increase employee engagement through a clear career path to procurement mastery.

“It’s time to change the ‘soft skills’ label to ‘critical skills’ to reflect the importance of hard-to-learn competencies, as you’ll absolutely need these skills to advance in modern-day procurement,” Tom says.

Tom is a towering figure in global Procurement, and a major advocate for the profession. He talks passionately about bringing more young people into the profession, and how we can best engage Millennials. “If I was 25 again, I couldn’t think of a field that I would personally find more fascinating than a corporate career in procurement and supply chain.

“Here’s an opportunity to be based in almost any region you choose. You’ll learn new cultures and dramatically impact the success of the business that you work for. You’ll be working on some of the most interesting and creative projects your firm is involved in.

“In the past, procurement and supply chain have been seen as backward-looking functions. It was our job to get the most effective pricing put in place to support the existing legacy business processes.

“Now we are thinking about and acting on the future of our businesses. Business acumen, understanding and strategic planning are three skills that I believe are critical for successful procurement professionals.”

Tom DerryTom Derry will discuss driving procurement success and ensuring teams have the necessary skills to succeed during his keynote at the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

5 Big Reasons to Register for Big Ideas 2016

If you’ve not yet had a chance to register for Big Ideas 2016 on the 21st of April, don’t worry, you still have time!

Register for Big Ideas 2016

There are so many ways for you to get involved with the Big Ideas Summit as a digital delegate. We want your input so you can help to shape the agenda and amplify your Big Ideas for procurement through our global procurement community.

The more people that are involved, the better and more meaningful our discussions will be. Together, we can drive change.

If you’re still not quite convinced that this is the event for you, take a look at these five compelling reasons to register for Big Ideas 2016 right now!

  1. Hear from our Top Speakers

When you join the Big Ideas Summit Group on Procurious, you will automatically register for Big Ideas 2016 and gain access to exclusive discussions and footage from the event. You’ll be able to hear from some of the most influential thought-leaders in procurement, supply chain and media.

We’ve secured a high calibre of thought leaders and keynote speakers, including:

  • Chris Sawchuk, Principal and Global Procurement Advisory Practice Leader, The Hackett Group
  • Gabe Perez, Vice President, Strategy & Market Development, Coupa Software
  • Paul Markillie, Innovation Editor, The Economist
  • Lucy Siegle, Journalist, Broadcast and Writer

You can find out more about our speakers here.

  1. Get Your Questions Answered

Take advantage of this unique opportunity to submit your questions, again via our Big Ideas Summit Group, to our influencers and see how they tackle your toughest challenges on the spot.

On Twitter? You can also submit your questions by tweeting us @procurious_ using the hashtag: #BigIdeas2016.

  1. Expand Your Global Network

The value of networking with your global peers shouldn’t be underestimated. There’s someone out there who knows the answer to your most pressing procurement questions. And they are waiting to share their experience and knowledge with the community.

They’ve walked in your shoes, so why not tap into their experience? The Big Ideas Summit is as much about championing the use of social media as it is the big issues.

If you’re new to our community and haven’t yet got involved, this is the perfect opportunity to do so.

We’ll be on the lookout for the digital delegates with the biggest and best ideas. And by leveraging our network of thought-leaders, we can work together to develop these ideas, introduce influential contacts to your network, and help make them a reality.

  1. Tell Us Your Big Idea

As well as hearing our influencers’ Big Ideas, by registering you’ll be able to submit your own. We believe everyone has a unique vantage point in the industries, communities and businesses they work in. So here is an opportunity to get your Big Idea across, and boost your own personal brand.

Procurious wants you to share your ideas with our community by creating a 60 second video. It’s super easy to do this on your computer, laptop or phone – whatever works for you! We’ve provided some more detailed advice here on how to submit your Big Idea.

  1. Access Exclusive Content from the Day

Expand your knowledge, stay informed, and be inspired through swathes of exclusive content only available to Procurious members.

On the day we’ll be updating the Group Page with photos from the event, highlights from our sessions, and updates on the discussions. In the days following you’ll be able to watch full videos from our think-tanks, as well as hear all of our influencers’ Big Ideas, digest articles and interviews from those who were in attendance.

So what are you waiting for? Even though there are just 3 days to go, you still have time to take advantage of everything the Big Ideas Summit 2016 has to offer.

Register for Big Ideas 2016 at www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Autism Works for Johnson & Johnson

Big Ideas can help provide greater benefits than cost savings. Timo Worrall tells Procurious how Johnson & Johnson are working with organisations like Autism Works to help a wider community find work.

Timo Worall - Autism Works

For people with autism, finding a job can be a near-impossible task, with recruitment processes stacked against them from the very beginning.

However, Johnson & Johnson, one of the world’s leading consumer healthcare organisations, is supporting organisations like Autism Works, proving that thinking outside of the box to include the people farthest away from employment opportunities is achievable. 

This Big Idea is part of J&J’s ‘Social Impact through Procurement’ initiative, which has committed to spend £15 million with social enterprises, like Autism Works, by 2020.

Timo Worrall, Senior Category Manager (FM EMEA) at J&J, heads up the team responsible for driving this procurement-led initiative through the J&J business in the UK.

At the Big Ideas Summit, Timo will join a high-profile panel to discuss social and sustainable procurement and ethics, their impact on the procurement profession, and what procurement leaders could and should be doing to embed these practices.

Procurious caught up with Timo ahead of the Big Ideas Summit.

I am excited to meet with people who may already be or are open to working with Social Enterprises. I hope by the end of the meeting everyone feels the same.

Tell us a bit about Yourself

I am a father of two boys, and live with my family in Woking. We have just started to renovate our 1950’s bungalow, and are presently living on a building site. The kids seem to like it more than my wife and I do, but we are looking forward to the end result!

What are the main challenges that face social enterprises in the UK?

Making the connection to companies who don’t yet know the value of working with Social Enterprises. Once they find these opportunities, how they can meet our sometimes complex requirements, and then grow in a sustainable manner that works for us both.

Can you tell us a bit more about Johnson & Johnson’s work with social enterprises?

We have a program called Social Impact through Procurement. Our goal by 2020 is to spend £15 million with Social Enterprises and create 150 jobs for those people furthest from the jobs market. We are presently working with a wide range of Social Enterprises across many categories.

One of these companies is Autism Works, who we made a video with to show how this particular social enterprise helps those with autism and other autism spectrum conditions.

What should procurement leaders be doing to help drive the social and sustainable procurement agenda?

Firstly understand it and tell your business stakeholders the benefits of doing this. Give your teams a little extra time to look for good social enterprises, and work with them to build sustainable solutions. Then tell the good news stories and build on the success.

Timo Worrall will talk about these topics in more detail during one of our panel discussions at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Don’t Get Left Out of the Global Digital Brainstorm

It’s just days away now! Join the global digital brainstorm at the Procurious Big Ideas Summit on April 21, and make your ideas heard.

Global Digital Brainstorm

Attention, procurement and supply management innovators – stake your claim in the future of your profession!

Time is running out to add your voice to the Procurious Big Ideas Summit, an unprecedented global digital brainstorm and think tank event scheduled for April 21. Make sure your ideas are heard as Procurious connects 50 top executives, with its 13,000 worldwide members to solve thorny issues and harness new opportunities – together.

“Procurement professionals are at the centre of the Big Ideas Summit, driving and shaping this global digital brainstorm,” said Tania Seary, Founding Chairman of Procurious, the leading free online business community for the procurement and supply management profession. “We are forging a new kind of innovation movement, where everyone has equal power to ignite significant change.”

Sponsored by IBM, the Institute for SupplyManagement (ISM), The Hackett Group, and Coupa, the free Summit will feature several provocative sessions. Leaders from these organisations as well as AstraZeneca, The World Bank, and more will address the mega-trends, disruptions, blind spots, risks, and technologies that are already leading to a “procurement revolution”.

Getting Involved

With so much at stake, the conversation is already beginning, as delegates submit advance questions for the speakers, discuss everything from supplier management to sustainability, and share videos with their own big ideas.

On April 21, the dialogue will be amplified as delegates log onto Procurious for digital and video updates, and engage on other social media channels to become even more involved. They will be checking out the action on Twitter, staying up-to-date with live tweets from the event, and tweeting back @procurious_ using the hashtag #BigIdeas2016. LinkedIn and Facebook will also be rich sources of event news and discussions.

From April 22 onward, the dialogue will continue as Procurious shares speakers’ and influencers’ Big Ideas videos, footage, blog posts, and more.

Last year’s event generated close to one million impressions, as the worldwide procurement community woke up to the power of collective innovation.

To join this year’s event now, go to www.BigIdeasSummit.com, where you will be able to register for free membership on Procurious, join the Big Ideas Summit group and shape the future of procurement by getting involved in what promises to be a fantastic global digital brainstorm.

Tweet this: Help innovate procurement at #BigIdeas2016Summit, April 21 www.bigideassummit.com

We’ve also been keeping an eye on all the procurement and supply chain headlines this week…

Japanese Earthquake Supply Chain Disruption

  • Two earthquakes in Japan at the end of last week, tragically killing 41 people, are set to cause major disruptions to Japanese and global supply chains.
  • Toyota are one of a number of manufacturers who will be suspending production at facilities in southern Japan due to a shortage of parts or factory damage
  • Organisations in Japan have been making changes to their supply chains to mitigate risks from natural disasters following the earthquake and tsunami in 2011.
  • It is thought that the current disruptions will test these changes, and new measures put in place to help mitigate these risks.

Read more at Reuters

Cybersecurity Worker Shortage

  • According to a recent survey, nearly two-thirds of Millennials were unaware they could pursue a career in cybersecurity.
  • This has raised concerns that there could be a shortage of cybersecurity workers in the coming years.
  • The survey, commissioned by Raytheon and the National Cyber Security Alliance, also showed that 58 per cent of the Millennials surveyed were not taught about ways to stay safe online.
  • Universities and colleges are now working to introduce programmes which integrate cybersecurity into existing computing and computer science courses.

Read more at Government Technology

SMART by GEP Contracted

  • SMART by GEP®, has been selected by a leading provider of building maintenance and facility services across North America.
  • Enterprise sourcing and procurement teams at the company will use SMART by GEP to streamline and automate their entire source-to-pay (S2P) workflow.
  • SMART by GEP provides complete source-to-pay functionality in one unified cloud-native platform.
  • SMART by GEP hosts $50 billion spend per year across 140 countries, for organisations such as AstraZeneca, DuPont and Maersk

Read more at SMART by GEP

H&M Releases 2015 Sustainability Report

  • H&M published its Conscious Actions Sustainability Report 2015 late last week, highlighting the actions the retailer has taken during the 12 month period on supply chain sustainability
  • The report shows a steady increase of sustainably sourced materials, and progress when it comes to the use of renewable electricity.
  • H&M now sources 20 per cent of its materials sustainably, as well as using 78 per cent renewable energy sources for its global electricity usage (up from 27 per cent in 2014).
  • The report also highlighted the signing of the Global Framework Agreement with IndustriALL Global Union and IF Metall, aimed at working towards payment of fair living wages

Read more at Business Wire