How Procurement Will Get Its Mojo Back At Next Level

Today’s procurement space is rapidly changing, yet something is amiss. Join us as Next Level keynote speaker Sigi Osagie describes how Procurement will get its mojo back.

Sigi Osagie

Procurement is rapidly evolving from what was once a manual laden process, to one where technology is enabling practitioners to deliver enhanced value contribution to overall business success.

Becoming a value creation function involves change. So how does Procurement manage change successfully and gain a better reputation across the wider enterprise?

To answer this question, SciQuest selected leading procurement effectiveness expert and writer, Sigi Osagie, for one of the keynote sessions at Next Level 2016.

Sigi knows a thing or two about procurement success. He wrote ‘Procurement Mojo – Strengthening the Function and Raising Its Profile, where he shows how to get a Procurement function firing on all cylinders.

Roberta Patterson checked in with Sigi to get a preview of what he will be talking about during his presentation.

I love the name of your book, Procurement Mojo. Has Procurement lost its mojo?

From the perspective of Procurement’s positioning in the enterprise way back when a move into the “Purchasing Department” was, in effect, a relegation to the backwoods of organisational existence, you’d have to say Procurement has come a long way.

Today, some Procurement functions are doing a fantastic job supporting the profitability and strategic goals of their organisations.

But if I aggregate my experience with clients, discussions with Procurement people in different regions and insights from trade articles, online forums, blogs, etc., it’s clear that many Procurement functions are still struggling.

Quite often the difficulties that hinder their success are “soft” issues – organisational challenges like senior executives who just don’t “get it,” territorial stakeholders, or ineffectiveness within the Procurement function itself.

Such Procurement functions lack a credible “Procurement brand.” Unless they change their approach, their Procurement mojo will remain a mirage.

During your Next Level session, you are going to speak about change management. That seems like a tall order. Do you have any tips on how a Procurement department should start?

The most fundamental requirement is effectiveness; which is more important than efficiency. You can be very efficient at the wrong things. A bit like the guy who’s very fast at climbing up a ladder, only to get to the top and discover that the ladder is leaning against the wrong wall.

Focusing on Procurement effectiveness forces us to think about what the department wants to achieve and the requisite actions to attain those end-goals.

Getting from where you are today to where you want to be is where change management comes in. Many of us in Procurement are versed in the technical aspects of the job but often lack change management know-how.

Our ability to navigate our way through change, against a backdrop of the organisational dynamics I mentioned earlier, is crucial for Procurement’s success and reputation in the wider enterprise.

So Procurement functions must centre their efforts on effectiveness and leverage robust change management. It’s impossible to do this without sound leadership. A fish rots from the head down; so having an effective Procurement leader is key – leadership is the glue that binds everything else together.

How do you build a Procurement brand?

In Procurement Mojo I use real-life examples to explain the four foundational actions Procurement functions must take. The first is building an effective organisation. It’s paramount, because people are the fundamental creators or destroyers of performance success.

The other key actions are deploying enablers (processes, systems and tools) that are fit for purpose, managing the supply base robustly, and applying an appropriate performance management framework. Everything we get right in these four areas helps nurture our Procurement brand.

Additionally, it is imperative to foster positive perceptions of Procurement in stakeholders’ consciousness, through effective communications, good (internal) customer relationship management, and smart PR.

Combining the four foundational actions with these stakeholder management approaches is how we build and sustain a great Procurement brand.

What are your suggestions for making the case for technology investment and getting executive buy-in?

Sigi MojoA solid business case is vital, but it’s not just about data and facts. It’s really about selling, and being organisationally savvy. You’ve got to read the organisational landscape and identify the right “hooks” that will resonate with executives.

Getting executive buy-in is part of good change management, thus getting your Procurement mojo back! I’m looking forward to sharing more about this at Next Level 2016.

Sigi Osagie is a featured speaker appearing on Monday, August 22 at Next Level. Follow him on Twitter!

Social Enterprise Creating Oases in Food Deserts

The concept of food deserts is nothing new. However, it’s presenting ongoing opportunities for social enterprises to make a real difference.

Food Desert Store

Food deserts are not a modern phenomenon – the concept has existed for the better part of 20 years. However, efforts to eradicate these deserts have stalled somewhat, and there are now calls for more work to be done to eliminate them entirely.

The food desert concept was first introduced by the UK Department of Health in 1999. They defined it as, “areas of relative exclusion where people experience physical and economic barriers to accessing healthy foods.”

Put simply, these deserts exist where access to affordable, healthy food is either restricted or non-existent for consumers. This would be due to the lack of stores or supermarkets in the area, within convenient travelling distance.

A report by the US Department of Agriculture in 2009 estimated that 2.3 million people in the USA were living in food deserts. This is the equivalent of 2.2 per cent of the entire population. However, it’s difficult to fully gauge the impact of food deserts, as global figures are less well documented.

Measuring Food Deserts

Food deserts have traditionally been measures as the distance from households to their nearest supermarket. The original measure, still used by the US Department of Agriculture, is for low income households living more than 1 mile (urban), or 10 miles (rural), away from their nearest supermarket.

The map below shows how that looks across the USA today:

Food Deserts in the USA Based on Traditional Measures (Source: USDA Economic Research Service)
Food Deserts in the USA – Source USDA Economic Research Service

However, there is little consensus on which measures should be used to define food deserts. Some studies have used the measures of the type and quality of food available to purchase, while others have focused on the ability or inability of consumers to purchase them.

Other issues lie in the categorisation of stores. In parts of the USA, small retail outlets that sell food are classed in the same category as larger supermarkets. This is done even when the retail outlet in question sells limited, or predominantly junk, food. This has led to concerns that some food deserts are being missed entirely.

Access Only Part of Problem

Controversy also surrounds the simplification of food deserts as an issue over access to low-cost, healthy foods. Critics have argued that proximity alone would suggest that nearly all of rural America would be classed as a food desert.

In one study in Flint, Michigan, even when a local grocery store was introduced to a food desert, community attitudes and practices didn’t change. In fact, the amount of prepared and fast foods consumed during the 17 month study period actually increased.

Other factors that experts have argued for the inclusion of include poverty (it’s widely acknowledged that low income and poor nutrition are directly attributable), and education or attitude to foods (the fact it’s often cheaper to buy chocolate than an apple).

In the UK particularly, there is still a perception that healthy foods are more expensive. There are also concerns that as confidence and skills in creating meals from scratch decrease, junk food habits will rise further.

Social Enterprise Solutions

Definitions aside, it’s clear action needs to be taken in order to combat the issue of poor nutrition.

There are a number of small businesses and social enterprises in both the UK and USA helping to bring affordable, healthy food to communities.

Fresh Range

Bristol, in the UK, is one place affected by food deserts. Although the city has been awarded a silver ‘Sustainable Food City‘ award, there are still areas suffering from a lack of access to healthy food.

In light of this, in 2015, small company called Fresh Range was formed. Fresh Range sources directly from producers, enabling them to charge lower prices for fruit, veg, and meat. It even offers doorstep delivery for £1 on orders over £20.

On top of this the produce is all locally sourced, meets sustainability and the highest animal welfare standards. The company also re-uses and recycles packaging in order to keep running costs down.

Fare & Square

In the USA, the baton for combatting food deserts has been picked up by social enterprises. The two which have received the most support and airtime are Fare & Square in Chester, Pennsylvania, and The Food District in Columbus, Ohio.

Both are non-profit organisations, however they offer slightly different services.

Fare & Square is a crowd-funded grocery store operating in a food desert. It has committed to charge 8-10 per cent less for produce than other stores. It also offers a further 7 per cent discount for customers meeting poverty guidelines.

The Food District also offers access to affordable healthy food. As well as creating jobs and ensuring that produce is sourced locally, the Food District offers community education and training programmes to overcome all the causes of food deserts.

Time for Action

There are plenty more social enterprises around the world helping to tackle the problem of food deserts. However, the issue of food deserts is still on the rise. And it’s clear that more needs to be done to help everyone in the world have access to healthy, affordable food.

Why not have a look into what’s happening in your local area? You could help out with, or donate to, your local food bank. Or help local charities who are delivering food to people who can’t get out themselves.

If you have a social enterprise in your area, contact them and see what you, or your company, could do to help? If we all take action now, collectively we stand more chance of eradicating food deserts for good.

Brexit Presents Export Opportunities for UK Business

Could an increase in export opportunities be a silver lining among the Brexit clouds for UK businesses?

UK Export Market

Much of the reporting in the business world on the Brexit has focused on the potential negative impacts. However, there could be benefits for British businesses, including SMEs, in an increase in exports opportunities.

The weakening of the pound is believed to be a contributing factor to this growth. This has made British products and services cheaper overseas. As a result it’s provided British manufacturing with an opportunity to compete in foreign markets.

UK “Needs to Improve” in Export Market

The Flash UK Purchase Managers Index (PMI) has revealed export business rose for the second straight month, and to the greatest extent in two years.

Additionally, a recent survey by the Federation of Small Businesses suggested that the number of small businesses exporting could double, due to the drop in sterling value. This could potentially help to cushion the economy from the uncertainty of leaving the EU.

However, it’s not all positive. Despite the potential boost for exports from the drop in the value of sterling, Britain is still significantly behind the government target of £1 trillion of exports by 2020.

The recently appointed Trade and Investment Minister, Lord Price CVO, stressed: “The UK punches well below its weight in the export market and badly needs to improve.”

Increasing Overseas Tenders

Procurious caught up with Stuart Brocklehurst, CEO of Applegate, to ask him what the key factors are in export decisions. Since the result of the EU referendum, Applegate PRO, has experienced a 20 percent increase in overseas tender requests.

Brocklehurst commented, “With concerns over domestic demand, exports offer a great diversification of revenue for UK businesses. The decline in sterling means our goods and services are around a tenth cheaper for overseas buyers. This presents a significant opportunity for UK businesses.”

It’s worth looking at the situation from 2 sides when it comes to procurement – UK and non-UK based. For non-UK based procurement, the UK has become a lower-cost manufacturing option. There is a significant opportunity to make savings, as the goods and services in the UK are now 10 per cent cheaper.

Inside the UK, however, it’s a different story for procurement. As the prices fall in the UK, many procurement organisations will be faced with a tricky decision. Should they re-shore their supply chain or not. For example, manufacturing businesses currently planning to make capital investment priced in US dollars have seen the real-cost price increase by 10 per cent.

There’s also a question of currency stability. The pound may drop further in the coming months, so what can procurement do? Brocklehurst stated, “Companies can either mitigate this risk by purchasing derivatives, or purchase locally in order to avoid the volatility altogether.”

SMEs Uncertain on Exports

One interesting point that Stuart Brocklehurst makes comes in contrast to the positive note sounded by the Federation of Small Businesses. Brocklehurst argues that, although there has been a strong increase in overseas orders and export opportunities, many SMEs still don’t want to get involved in exports.

“When it comes to SMEs and exports, nothing is guaranteed. Some SMEs don’t want to get involved in exports, particularly where there are concerns about red tape. They’re hesitant to proceed where there are administration overheads, as they’re worried about getting it wrong,” says Brocklehurst.

Brocklehurst also believes that if there is a UK slowdown, this will be a benefit for businesses exploring export opportunities. Nevertheless, it shouldn’t be taken as a certainty that exports will completely offset the effect of falling currencies on purchases, and a potential economic slowdown.

In 2008, at the height of the Global Financial Crisis, many believed that the export market would help the UK economy. However, due to recessions in many other countries, demand for UK exports actually weakened, and the recovery took longer than expected.

Realising the Opportunities

Whatever the UK economy looks like in the coming months, it’s clear that the Brexit isn’t all bad. It’s also undeniable that it has presented clear export opportunities for UK businesses.

However, many companies remain uninterested in exporting, even with the potential revenue and business growth opportunities. It’s down to business leaders to help drive this strategy through.

Equally, for procurement, it’s time to decide how sourcing will look in the coming months, and ultimately when the UK leaves the EU.

Applegate PRO is the UK’s foremost sourcing database, helping to link buyers and suppliers, and streamline the eProcurement process.

The platform is being utilised by a wide range of companies across the world, including Airbus, SpaceX, General Dynamics, NATO headquarters and The White House.

US Intelligence to Aid Supply Chains Against Cyber Attacks

A new US Intelligence campaign is set to help supply chains defend themselves against cyber attacks.

Cyber attacks

As businesses and supply chains grow increasingly more global, inevitably risk increases at the same rate. One of the most high profile risks for supply chains currently is are cyber attacks and hacking.

With each passing year, the cyber attacks get bigger. In June, the Democratic National Committee was breached by Russian hackers, and 20,000 e-mails, linked to Hillary Clinton’s Presidential campaign, were posted online.

In March, the Bangladesh Federal Reserve lost $100 million to hackers, with only $20 million recovered so far. Over 4,700 cyber attacks have been reported in the US alone since 2005, impacting hundreds of millions of people.

However, organisations with cross-border supply chains are about to get a helping hand in the fight against cyber attacks.

Cyber Attacks & Vulnerable Supply Chains

The National Counterintelligence and Security Centre will provide sensitive information, including classified threat reports, to companies about the risks of hacking in their supply chains.

The move is part of an effort to increase responsibility and education for organisations for supply chain security. It has previously been highlighted that there is a lack of understanding in US companies that having international suppliers makes supply chains vulnerable to cyber attacks.

“The supply chain threat is one that’s the least talked about but is the easiest to manipulate for all aspects of our daily lives,” said NCSC Director, William Evanina.

Domestic & Foreign Threats

The NCSC campaign will initially focus on supply chains linked to both China and Russia, the alleged sources of previous hacks. However, it will also be aimed at domestic hackers, criminal enterprises, and even disaffected former employees.

The campaign will prioritise telecommunications, energy and financial services corporations first. This is in part due to the nature of the business, but also their strategic importance to US national security.

And as well as cyber attacks, the NSCS will also be providing information and advice on so-called “hands on” crimes, such as stealing of classified information, or destruction of sensitive equipment.

Procurement Must “Play Full Part”

As part of the efforts to reduce cyber attacks, the key role of procurement has been highlighted. Evanina emphasised that procurement need to be fully integrated with other areas of the organisation to help mitigate risk.

He highlighted the role of ongoing due diligence to support initial investment in cyber security software and programmes. This would be carried out by procurement, but in partnership with the other areas of the business.

Evanina expands on the role of procurement in this video. He states that research into suppliers, and their own supply chains is critical in mitigating the risk.

Wider World

Although the work to be carried out as part of the campaign is primarily aimed at US companies, the applicability is there for all global supply chains.

Many US-based companies will purchase goods from overseas suppliers, and at the same time there will be companies purchasing from US suppliers. The inter-connected nature of the supply chain, as well as increased connectivity across technological platforms, increases the risk to organisations.

Carrying out due diligence on suppliers, knowing the full supply chain, and, perhaps most importantly, ensuring procurement plays a full part in organisational security, is a way to help mitigate this risk.

Will your organisation be taking advantage of the advice from the NCSC? Will you be impacted by any changes that take place? Let us know in the comments below.

Want to know what’s happening in the world of procurement and supply chain? Well, we’ve picked out the key headlines from the past week to keep you up to date…

Verisk Maplecroft Releases Modern Slavery Index
  • Global Risk Analysts, Verisk Maplecroft, have released their latest supply chain modern slavery index.
  • According to the Index, modern slavery constitutes a ‘high’ or ‘extreme risk’ in 115 countries worldwide.
  • Major exporters China and India fall again into the extreme risk category. The UK is one of only four countries seen as ‘low risk’
  • The report notes that most countries have some form of anti-slavery legislation or framework in place, but lack the resources to enforce these laws.

Read more at Forbes

African Countries Ban Secondhand Clothing Imports
  • A ban on imports of secondhand clothing is to be implemented by the Governments of the East African Community.
  • The group, including Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, proposed the ban in order to stimulate the apparel industry in their countries.
  • It is hoped that the measure will also create jobs and bolster the countries’ economies.
  • The rise of ‘fast fashion’ has led to a dramatic increase in the region’s secondhand clothing imports over the past decade.

Read more at Sustainable Brands

Scotland Launches Brexit Stimulus Fund
  • The Scottish Government has announced plans to create a stimulus fund following the UK’s decision to leave the EU.
  • The fund will add an additional £100 million to capital spending to support Scottish businesses.
  • Funds will be allocated to projects based on jobs creation and impact on the overall supply chain.
  • The Government also announced the creation of Business Information Service to support businesses affected by vote.

Read more at Supply Management

Shipping Industry Struggles Continue
  • As the results for the first half of 2016 are released, the struggles in the shipping industry look set to continue.
  • Hapag-Lloyd and Orient Overseas have both reported first half losses for 2016, with Maersk expected to do likewise this week.
  • Decreasing freight rates and over capacity have been blamed for the current plight in the industry.
  • Hapag-Lloyd plans on acquiring United Arab Shopping Co., a deal that could deliver $400 million in savings annually.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal

Procurement Turns to Supplier Relationships for Innovation

As procurement seeks to increased its involvement in innovation, it’s turning to its supplier relationships to drive change.

Supplier Relationships

This article was written by Daniel Ball, Director at Wax Digital.

Wax Digital’s Procurement Innovation Pathway research is based on 100 interviews with the UK’s senior procurement professionals, to canvass their opinions of the key topics in the profession.

Previously, we highlighted that procurement wants to be more involved in innovation. However it is the risk averse nature of procurement that appears to be holding it back.

In this article, we assess the importance of good supplier relationships.

Mutually Beneficial Relationships

Achieving effective, mutually beneficial relationships with suppliers can be a great way for procurement to drive positive change. That’s just one reason, according to new research, why procurement professionals are prioritising suppliers in their quest to innovate.

In fact, Wax Digital’s research showed that procurement’s top two innovation areas relate to working with suppliers.

In first place, 57 per cent cited supplier relationship management as an area that can aid innovation. Sourcing suppliers for product innovation came in second, with 49 per cent. Reducing supply-chain risks also scored highly.

Turning to Supplier Relationships

Compared to lower scoring areas, like automating processes to save time/resource, and improving spend management by empowering people, the supplier is clearly where procurement is turning its attention to innovate.

New ways of engaging with suppliers, through self-service portals for instance, and ensuring supplier compliance through automated contract management, are key priorities.

But it’s equally about what suppliers can do for procurement. There’s a desire to find partners who can be a catalyst for innovation at the core of the organisation’s products and delivery.

Technological Investment

These priorities remain the focus into 2017 too. This means the future could see an even more supplier-focused innovation mind-set in the procurement function.

Adding weight to this, the two most commonly used procurement technologies are also heavily supplier-focused. 51 per cent of organisations favour supplier information management, while 49 er cent are looking to contract management systems.

And the most common technology investment planned for the coming 12 months is supplier relationship management (SRM) tools. Procurement is clearly doing more than talking the talk on supplier innovation.

Challenge of Involvement

The future looks promising in this regard but there are challenges ahead. Procurement sees the value of supplier focused innovation but it is not always in control of it.

84 per cent of respondents said they were currently involved in innovations around supply chain collaboration. However, less than half of these, 40 per cent, said that they were leading it. Although this figure rises to 50 per cent in the future, there’s still some way to go before procurement fully takes the reins of innovation.

Now that many procurement professionals have already achieved some of the more transactional and process based quick wins, it’s natural that we see more and more looking to strategic supplier management as the next frontier to conquer.

Building better relationships with the right suppliers, whether existing or new, is clearly uppermost in their thinking.

The Innovation 2016 research was conducted by Morar Consulting. The research involved 100 interviews to canvass the opinions of UK senior procurement professionals, working in small to large UK enterprises.

You can find out more about the research, and download the report, by visiting the Wax Digital website.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #9 – Help Inspire Millennials

Lucy Harding has called on procurement leaders to help inspire Millennials by inviting them to thought leadership events.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Help Inspire Millennials

Lucy Harding, Partner and Global Head of Practice, Procurement and Supply Chain at Odgers Berndtson, challenged CPOs to open up access to events, such as the Big Ideas Summit, to the Millennials in their organisations.

Lucy argues that such events can inspire Millennials. By accessing thought leadership and innovative events, it can encourage them to sell key message to their generation in their organisations.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 16,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

7 Key Objectives for Procurement Success

Global procurement professionals are attempting to find new ways to create cost savings, as well as create value. Help is at hand with these 7 key objectives for success.

Key Objectives

ProcureCon Europe is back for it’s 17th consecutive year, answering your challenges in procurement and the future direction of the industry.

As businesses emerge from the recent recession into a fragmented ecosystem, a normal approach to creating value through cost saving is no longer relevant.

Instead, businesses are tasking procurement to effect enterprise-wide change, including implementing process improvement, and operating beyond the contract with suppliers to co-create value, and exploring payment innovation.

ProcureCon Europe has put together seven key procurement objectives you can’t afford to ignore, in order to create an efficient, cost saving and interactive procurement department.

#7: Talent Development

Talent development obtained the least amount of votes in our survey. However, there are few procurement executives who would argue against the importance of having a plan in place to develop the procurement leaders of the future.

#6: Responsible Sourcing

How is this made, and where does it come from? These are important questions on the lips of both procurement professionals and the general public.

Although perhaps less in the spotlight than it was 18 months ago, especially in the public sector, responsible sourcing remains a central pillar for Indirect Procurement.

#5: Taking Advantage of Digitisation

Organisations are rapidly digitising across the board. Procurement is attempting to make the most of the operational advantages implicit in this change.

The move to digitise in many cases means completely overhauling established business processes. This presents a significant opportunity for improvement, and is an essential element of a successful future for Indirect Procurement.

#4: Innovation in Services

Procurement seeks to lead innovation in the way that an organisation uses services, from HR, to IT, Marketing and beyond.

This is an area in which Procurement has the potential to add real value. The fresh availability of external services can mean easy, and comparatively cheap, solutions with minimal risk, which is great for growing companies.

#3: Operational Efficiency

While driving down costs can be done by negotiating better deals, there is also some considerable importance placed on increasing operational efficiency. Doing so means making better use of available resources and ultimately saving money.

#2: Value Delivery

Just like beauty, value is often in the eye of the beholder. That being said, those with a progressive approach to indirect procurement increasingly look to consistently add tangible value to the categories in which they work, and actively measure themselves on their ability to do so.

#1: Cost Leadership

Perhaps unsurprisingly the number one area of importance for Indirect Procurement is in the area of cost leadership. A strong stance on cost leadership can help to drive significant improvement to the bottom line. This is key when Indirect Procurement is expected to demonstrate its ability to drive meaningful savings.

Agility and Technology

These 7 key procurement objectives provides companies with guidance, in order to have an effective procurement department.

However, procurement must stay agile. Factors such as innovation and digitisation are constantly changing. Procurement professionals, particularly those in growing companies, should be taking advantage of available technology to further their reach.

The ProcureCon event series brings together a unique blend of Procurement, Purchasing and Supply Chain experts from across all industries to share their experiences and knowledge with a team of people who truly embrace the strategically important field of Procurement.

Find out more about how ProcureCon Europe is helping procurement professionals to solve their main challenges at on the event website. You can also follow ProcureCon Europe on LinkedIn and Twitter.

Throwback Thursday – How to Avoid Procurement Corruption and Fraud: The Fraud Triangle

Benjamin Franklin said, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” When preventing procurement fraud, the Fraud Triangle is an organisation’s key tool.

The Fraud Triangle

The Petrobras scandal in Brazil has shown the potential for corruption and fraud in procurement. In light of this, our Thursday throwback takes us back to Hillary Ohlmann‘s article on preventing procurement fraud and corruption using the Fraud Triangle.

Corruption & The Fraud Triangle

In light of the Petrobras corruption scandal in the headlines this week, our Thursday throwback this week

Donald Cressey is credited with creating the fraud triangle, which outlines the theory behind why people commit occupational fraud. Cressey identified the three legs of the fraud triangle as pressure, opportunity, and rationalisation.

The Fraud Triangle

Let’s take a look at steps your organisation can take in order to address these three areas and avoid procurement corruption and fraud.

Pressure

The pressure factor is essentially what motivates someone to commit fraud. Usually the motivation is financial in nature, and falls under one of two categories: personal or professional.

Personal pressure examples:
  • unpaid personal debts
  • desire for status symbols (money, house, car, etc.)
  • inability to pay bills
Professional pressure examples:
  • need to meet productivity targets
  • need to prove financial gains
  • feeling job is at risk

How to mitigate pressure:

1. Adequate compensation

While adequate compensation will depend on the organisation, country, and individual employee, procurement employees should not be at the bottom when it comes to compensation.

Procurement professionals, at all levels, require a specific skill set to effectively do their job, and their compensation should reflect the value they bring to the company.

2. Realistic performance KPIs

This requires good communication with all stakeholders. Set KPIs and then review them frequently to make sure your procurement goals are realistic.

3. Adequate procurement budget

One way to avoid procurement corruption and fraud is to make sure your procurement department has sufficient funds for staffing, tools, and training. Being forced to cut corners can quickly lead to unethical decision-making.

4. Company-wide no gift policy

Suppliers often give gifts to procurement as a way to build relationships and show goodwill. Yet, these gifts may make it hard for procurement officers to remain entirely neutral. If Procurement is not allowed to accept gifts, enact the same policy for all departments as a way to reinforce a company-wide ethics policy.

In some parts of the world, it may be difficult to go 100 per cent no gift. If you do decide to allow Procurement to accept certain gifts, such as lunch or small tokens under a specific dollar amount, make sure the policy is crystal clear and communicated to all employees.

5. Recognise employee value

Adequate compensation is one way to recognise employee value, but other signs of appreciation can also go a long way. If your company has a no gift policy, perhaps set aside a portion of the budget for a procurement dinner, or event to celebrate when certain objectives are met.

Opportunity

The opportunity to commit fraud has to meet two basic standards. The person must have the technical know-how to take advantage of the system, and the ability to keep it a secret. You can decrease the opportunities for fraud by:

1. Implementing a transparent procurement process
  • Adopt an e-procurement solution – E-procurement software is the best way to make sure your procurement data is transparent and easily accessible for audits. You can also assign permissions within the tool, making it easy to allow top management access to all processes, while also limiting who can add suppliers, change supplier contact information, make awards, etc.
  • Educating your employees about the process and how to identify red flags – While it may be a given buyers within the procurement department understand the sourcing and purchasing process, buyers on the outside may not have such a clear understanding. Anti-fraud measures require all hands on deck.
  • Monitor the data in the system – Implementing e-procurement software is just the first step to a transparent procurement process. You’ll need to continuously monitor the data in your chosen e-procurement solution and the ERP to look for any irregularities.
2. Segment purchasing responsibilities

Divide responsibilities to keep any one person from having too much power over purchasing decisions. You may also find it beneficial to rotate responsibilities on a regular basis, but when you do so, make sure to update any employee permissions in your e-procurement solution.

For example, some companies rotate procurement employees between categories to avoid any one person having too much close contact with suppliers.

3. Adopt a four-eyes rule for approvals

Schoolyard bullies use “four-eyes” as an insult, but when avoiding corruption and fraud, the four-eyes strategy is best practice. More eyes on decisions means it’s harder for would-be fraudsters to keep their crimes secret.

4. Perform regular and surprise internal and external audits for all purchases

Audits are not a sign of mistrust. Consider them more like a doctor’s check-up. You should hope that everything checks out, but if you note any irregularities, you can take action to straighten them out before significant damage is done.

5. Manage both suppliers and their subcontractors

Your supply chain doesn’t stop with your suppliers. It’s likely they’ve hired subcontractors. The business practices of these subcontractors will reflect on your business.

Unfortunately, many companies have learned this the hard way. Your company should have a Supplier Code of Conduct, and signing off on it should be mandatory for all suppliers and their subcontractors.

Rationalisation

Rationalisation is the process of excusing one’s acts, and finding ways to justify behaving in a way that you know to be unethical or criminal.

It can take a number of forms:

  • An exaggerated belief in one’s value (e.g. I’m entitled to this because I work hard.);
  • A belief in a greater good (e.g. I’m doing this for my family.);
  • Dissatisfaction with the company (The company is cheating others, so I can cheat the company.);
  • Or comparisons with others (Everyone else has nice things. Why can’t I?).
How to avoid the pitfalls of rationalisation
1. Hire ethical employees

This one looks like a no-brainer, but it’s easier said than done. However, if ethics are important to you (as they should be), they need to be discussed from the very first interview. Research your potential employees like you research potential suppliers. Step away if anything looks fishy.

2. Model ethical behaviour at the top and reinforce it through company-wide policy

It’s all about company culture. How can you expect employees low down on the ladder to behave ethically if the top management is constantly cutting corners and making ethically dubious decisions? Don’t fall into a “do as I say, not as I do” mindset. Give your employees a good model to follow.

3. Adopt a zero tolerance policy for fraud and corruption

There’s the carrot, and then there’s the stick. Just as you would outline expected behaviour, so, too, should you outline punishments for breaking the rules. Also, don’t make idle threats. If you have a zero tolerance policy, then it should be zero tolerance. If you’re not prepared to follow through, adjust your policy to reflect the true consequences for fraudulent actions.

Part of procurement corruption and fraud prevention should be based on the realisation that, yes, it can happen to your organisation. No company is immune.

However, those companies with the lowest cases of fraud and corruption have taken steps to prevent it before it happens. If you’re waiting for a big scandal to break before mitigating this risk, then you’re already too late.

Loud and Proud: Displaying Accreditations on Social Media

Displaying your accreditations on social media? It’s a tribal thing.

Tribes and Accreditations

I’ve noticed recently that more people are displaying professional accreditation after their names on social media.

At first, I was confused by those jumbles of letters that mean so much to people in the procurement world, but so little to anyone else. On Procurious alone we have hundreds of MCIPS, FCIPS, CPSMs and CPPOs. But why do people put their credentials up in lights?

Pack as Much Information Into Your Name as Possible

There’s a lot of information available about optimising social media profiles to make them attractive to potential business partners, recruiters, corporate headhunters and so on.

LinkedIn has a pretty sophisticated profile builder that guides you through the steps to raise your profile to “superstar” status. This includes adding all sorts of detail, ranging from experience and education, to recommendations, skills and even influencers.

The reality is, however, that unless there’s a good reason to do so, people aren’t actually going to click on your profile very often. In fact, you can ‘connect’ with people on LinkedIn, and here on Procurious, without even visiting their profile. Simply clicking on their face does the trick.

This means there’s not much value in diligently adding your accreditations to your profile page if you don’t also display it next to your name.

A Picture Says a Thousand Words

So, if people aren’t going to see your profile, what do they see?

Well, first (and arguably foremost), they’ll see your profile picture. It’s important to have one, and it needs to look professional.

Secondly, they’ll see your name. On Procurious that’s all, though LinkedIn shows a very brief job and company description. It’s not much – and you’d really be flattering yourself if you think people will want to view your profile just for your good looks or interesting-sounding name.

You need to pack more into the limited space available, and an accreditation does the trick.

Why? Because, for those who understand what accreditations actually entail, it says so much about you.

It signals that you’re backed and accredited by a respected professional organisation. It means that you’ve got industry experience, up-to-date qualifications, and are engaged with peers in your profession. It’s like a shorthand version of a CV, which you can expand into more detail in your profile itself.

Professional Accreditations Trump Academic Qualifications

As any frustrated job-seeker knows, experience is everything when it comes to getting hired.

You might be academically qualified up to the eyeballs, but your average recruiter is more likely to be interested in the practical skills you learned as Junior Shift Manager at McDonald’s. And this (sadly) is what the interview will focus upon.

This experience ‘Catch-22′ has led to the situation where unpaid internships have become almost mandatory in many professions, in order to get some experience under your belt and improve job prospects.

That’s where professional accreditations come in. As a general rule, they can’t be gained without having spent at least three years in the industry. They therefore flag to colleagues (and potential recruiters) that you do at least have a few years’ experience.

Some accreditations require both experience and tertiary qualifications. ISM’s CPSM, for example, requires three years “full-time, professional supply management experience, with a regionally accredited bachelor’s degree,” or 5 years’ experience without a degree.

This seems fair to me, as it gives some level of recognition to the bachelor degree (not a completely worthless piece of paper after all!), while still leaving the door open to those who choose not to attend tertiary education.

That being said, there’s a fair share of Bachelors, Diplomas and especially MBAs on display after people’s names on social media.

You’ve Earned It, So Why Not Flaunt It?

Why not? It’s good to be proud of your achievement and important to visibly support your professional association.

Jim Barnes, Managing Director for ISM Services, agrees that displaying your accreditation sends a signal to your peers. “ISM’s CPSM certification helps others identify that the person displaying the credential has deep knowledge, and can apply it.”

There’s also the tribal factor. People love to identify with different ‘tribes’ or groups. Having your professional membership or accreditation on display helps others identify you as “one of us” – a group of professionals who have all been through the same accreditation process, and therefore have the same knowledge and experience to draw upon when dealing with shared challenges.

Procurious itself is one such large ‘tribe’ of connected procurement professionals, further broken down by the members themselves into groups and sub-groups.

On a side note, accreditations have been proven to translate into real-world rewards. ISM produces a salary survey that consistently shows CPSM-accredited professionals earn salaries approximately 7 per cent higher than non-CPSM’s.

“The higher salary demonstrates that having an accreditation carries practical benefits, as well as credibility”, says Barnes.

Show Your Currency

Imagine you’re a recruiter. You’ve been trawling social media for the ideal candidate, and you hit on what looks like a perfect fit. They’re in the right industry, their experience looks good, and they have a postgraduate degree in supply chain management…completed in 1989.

You’d be hard-pressed to find someone who will agree that procurement is the same now as in 1989. And if you can’t find any evidence of more up-to-date education, you click on the next candidate.

Accreditations highlighted on social media profiles (and indeed on CVs) would have reassured the recruiter, because most credentials require recertification. This means that you’re forced to stay up-to-date and valid.

The CPSM, for example, has to be maintained. It automatically expires every three years unless holders complete 60 continuing education hours, which may include sitting exams, conference attendance, corporate training or contributions to the profession.

Do you think a comment posted on social media by a professional with their credentials on display has more “weight” than other comments? Share your thoughts below.

Procurement Professionals Going Mobile with Procurious App

Procurement isn’t 9-5 any more. Stay connected with all the major issues on the go with the new Procurious App.

Procurious App

In today’s modern, and highly connected, world, big issues like Brexit and supply chain disasters don’t neatly end at 5pm with the working day.

Whether at their desks or on the road, procurement and supply chain professionals need to stay on top of the latest challenges and opportunities, and take action 24/7.

But, now these dedicated individuals can relax (at least a little!) thanks to the new Procurious app. With a few taps, Procurious members can easily gain insights from their colleagues, invite their peers to get involved, stay in touch with suppliers and customers, make decisions and add value to their organisations, at home or away.

A Mobile Profession

“Today’s procurement professionals are always on the hot seat, managing business-critical issues,” said Tania Seary, Founding Chairman of Procurious.

“At the same time, these professionals, and especially millennials, are increasingly mobile, preferring to network, work and engage from their phones. The new Procurious app responds to growing demand from our members to support them wherever they are. It helps to provide them with the insights and collective experience of a worldwide procurement community.”

From e-learning videos to discussion groups, the app is easy to navigate and puts all of Procurious’ resources for networking, skill development and career advancement in the palm of members’ hands.

Download – Get Involved

The Procurious app brings all the functionality and great content of the Procurious site to your finger

Download the mobile app to:

  • Network with 16,000 curious, ambitious procurement professionals from around the world.
  • Discuss everything from achieving social responsibility goals to choosing contract document assembly software through lively forums.
  • Read our Blog to access more than 800 insightful posts. From the latest market intelligence and opinions, to tips from some of the top influencers around the world, we have it all!
  • Learn a new skill! Find dozens of e-learning videos on crisis management, winning the war for talent, negotiating, and more.
  • Messaging—Connect privately to build relationships, arrange discussions or share information with your peers.
  • Join a Group, from the Institute for Supply Management® (ISM®) to IT Buyers & Category Managers.
  • Shape the future of procurement by sharing your ideas at digital events like the Big Ideas Summit. Or mark your calendar to participate in our upcoming Boot Camp, an exclusive podcast series with daily insights to help procurement professionals get in the best career shape of their life.

If you’re a curious, ambitious procurement professional, don’t let travel slow you down! Download the Procurious app through the Apple App Store. Stay involved and in touch no matter where in the world you are.

If you want to see more of the Procurious app, stay tuned next week…

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