For Procurement to Fly, You Need The Right Team Onboard

Digital Transformation is critical to the future performance of any procurement department… But you need the right team on board to truly fly!

In case you hadn’t noticed, the old approach to Procurement no longer works. Following a strict sourcing process, beating suppliers for extra margin and imposing strict controls on employees is simply not a viable strategy to meeting Procurement’s new objectives. Procurement today is expected to still manage costs, but also manage risk, drive innovation and revenue, improve cash flow and increasingly consumerise the experience for employees. That much is broadly acknowledged. But how?

A new model for Procurement

To meet the growing risk of objectives and enable companies to thrive in today’s highly uncertain market, Procurement leaders are actively evolving their organisations. They are becoming smarter, freeing capacity for more strategic work, leveraging information better to make more informed and timely decisions, and better measuring Procurement’s performance and value contribution. They are becoming more agile, driving digital transformation initiatives and ensuring they can adjust to a rapidly evolving market. And they are becoming more collaborative, working with diverse groups of internal and external stakeholders in very different yet scalable ways. A tall order indeed. Even the best admit a long way to go.

It’s still about the people

Digital Transformation is critical to the future performance of any Procurement department. Technology plays a key and growing role, as innovations leveraging AI and other advanced technologies come to market to empower such transformation. Procurement leaders must stay abreast of the innovations that are truly creating value, but the people are the real heroes. As Ivalua CMO, Alex Saric puts it, “let’s not become so enamoured by technology that we discount the human contribution (and effort) involved.” Innovation won’t start until the right people are in place, with the right teams. That is when technology can truly empower these teams so that they can start to bring about change, often starting at getting the basics right.

Swissport takes off with help from Procurement

An example of this is the work Ivalua’s customer Swissport is doing. You can read about this in Supply Chain World Magazine. As the world’s largest provider of ground and cargo handling services in the aviation industry, Swissport provides services on behalf of some 835 client-companies, handles around 230 million passengers and 4.1 million flights (movements) per year.

When Marianna Zangrillo, SVP and Group CPO at Swissport, took over, she had to build everything from scratch. Under her leadership her team has grown and, as she says “we need talents to improve every one of those business areas and therefore work closely with our HR departments to get the right people onboard, (…) Recent studies show that 70 percent of the current procurement resources won’t be able to do what procurement will need to do as the world moves forward.”

Renier Orth has led the team that has centralised all Procurement for nearly everything the company buys – including cargo-handling equipment, food and drinks for airport lounges and office supplies. We are proud to also say that Swissport brought in Ivalua to digitise the source-to-pay process and optimise performance. Ivalua has brought efficiency to the different stages of the source-to-pay workflow in a single tool, which is a new, but very welcome change to Swissport.

Swissport’s Procurement team has built a Procurement organisation from scratch and earned a seat at the board level to be part of the future conversation of the business direction of Swissport. “We think of procurement as integrated into the business organisation,” Zangrillo says. “We are going to support many important decisions using the talents of a still too often underestimated department.”

Continue your Journey with Ivalua

If you’d like to hear directly from Reiner Orth, CPO at Swissport, and other leaders transforming Procurement, join us at Ivalua’s first conference in London, Ivalua NOW LondonThe event will take place on the 13th March, at Kings Place, near King’s Cross. The theme is “the Voice of Procurement” as we intend to look at innovation through the lens of the leaders truly driving change. How are they upskilling their teams to lead a digital transformation? What unique factors must leaders in manufacturing, retail, logistics and other industries consider? What technological innovations in areas such as AI are empowering them today and what is coming to accelerate their transformations? What basics must be addressed to ensure your company can benefit from the latest innovations? The event will look at the Future of Procurement, focusing on what can and should be done today. Other keynote speakers will include Peter Smith, Managing Director – Spend Matters UK/Europe, Francesco Cortini, Group Director of Strategic Sourcing at Smiths Group and Hemant Gupta, CFO at Blackberrys Menswear. We hope to see you there.

I Don’t Have Time To Do Market Price Research

We’ve all experienced it – a niggling feeling that we could have gotten a lower price for a product or service … if only we’d done our research. But who has that sort of time?

IBM’s CPO, Bob Murphy, is concerned that his peers around the globe aren’t getting a proper night’s rest.

“Chief Procurement Officers lose sleep at night worrying that their procurement teams are buying over market prices or that falling prices in a particular category of spending are not being rapidly achieved.”

Access to data on historical prices paid and current market conditions isn’t the problem. The data is out there, and readily available, but it takes time and resources to do the research, and it’s a never-ending task.

Monitoring the market is too big a job for a single person, which leaves our sleepless CPO with two options:

A) Carve out an entire team to do the research, or

B) Bring in Artificial Intelligence through a robot to augment the team capabilities.

And that’s what IBM has done. The procurement team collaborated with data scientists and developers to design a solution harnessing external data and analytics that provides users with market intelligence, historic IBM purchasing data, and market sentiment surrounding subcontractor services. IBM Watson Analytics partners with “PeopleTicker” to ingest real-time, external market intelligence providing a comprehensive view of global markets. By comparing historical data with current market information, buyers get an immediate view on the price difference that may be available, enabling new levels of cost competitiveness to be achieved.

The result is “Pricing IQ”, a product where millions of data points can be efficiently organised with interactive graphics and visually clear dashboards where useful trends and insights can be identified. This solution opens opportunities for live price negotiation via the use of advanced analytics – with significantly reduced manual workload for the buyer.

Alongside Watson Analytics, Watson’s Explorer and Alchemy software capture key words and provides sentiment analysis to indicate rising or falling markets. Additionally, PeopleTicker’s data is integrated within the “Pricing IQ” product enabling a seamless solution for our customers. “We have been using PeopleTicker internally now for over 2 years. As a client, they have provided us with over 10,000 global rates. What started as a client relationship has grown into a Watson Analytics partnership.”

Real time insights

If you’re hurtling down a freeway in a high-performance car, having a speedometer that only shows yesterday’s speed isn’t going to help you. That’s why access to genuinely real- time data is emerging as one of the key competitive advantages across procurement functions. The team that developed Pricing IQ recognised this, and have built in real-time alerts for action.

Take A Bow, Pricing IQ

You’ll be hearing a lot more about Pricing IQ, especially since the solution won the Most Innovative Use of Technology Award at the 2017 CIPS Supply Management Awards.

Like all good innovators, the IBM team identified a significant pain-point held in common by procurement teams across the globe, and came up with an idea that eases the burden.

So, the next time you’re manually wading through reams of pricing data and wondering to yourself if there’s a better way – be assured, there is.

UK Accuses Russia Of Massive Cyberattack on Global Supply Chains

Maersk, TNT and other global companies that suffered nearly a billion dollars in collective damages were not the intended targets of a Russia-launched cyberattack. How, then, were they infected?   

“The UK government judges that the Russian government, specifically the Russian military, was responsible for the destructive NotPetya cyberattack. Its reckless release disrupted organisations across Europe costing hundreds of millions of pounds. “We call upon Russia to be the responsible member of the international community it claims to be, rather then secretly trying to undermine it.”

This statement was part of the UK Government’s unusual step last week of publicly accusing the Russian military of being behind a cyberattack. The White House also called out Russia, issuing the following statement: “In June 2017, the Russian military launched the most destructive and costly cyberattack in history. This was also a reckless and indiscriminate cyberattack that will be met with international consequences.”

Experts believe that Russian hackers launched 2,000 “NotPetya” attacks in the early hours of June 27 last year. NotPetya was designed to masquerade as ransomware, but was soon revealed to be wiper malware with the purpose of destroying computer systems, erasing data and disrupting business operations.

Global firms were collateral damage

One of the consequences of living in a connected world is increased vulnerability to indiscriminate cyberattacks, even for organisations that are not the hackers’ intended victims.

NotPetya’s primary target was a shipping company in Ukraine, which has been locked in conflict with Russian-backed separatists since 2014. However, the virus-like nature of the cyberattack meant that businesses with strong trade links with Ukraine, including parts of FedEx, Danish shipping giant Maersk, UK manufacturer Reckit Benckister, and Dutch delivery firm TNT were also affected. Pharmaceutical firm Merck & Co and FedEx reported permanent damage to the systems, while a West Virginia health system had to replace its entire network after being attacked.

Russian officials have responded that the claims are “groundless” and that Russian businesses were among those whose systems were affected.

Read more: Wall Street Journal

 

In other news this week:

Unilever Publishes Palm Oil Supplier Data

  • In a move to boost transparency, consumer goods giant Unilever has published the location of over 1,400 mills and over 300 direct suppliers of palm oil.
  • The palm oil industry is under increasing pressure from consumers after revelations of deforestation and human rights abuses in Indonesia and other countries.
  • A spokesperson from Unilever said the company hoped that sharing the information would be the start of a new industry-wide movement towards supply chain transparency.

Read more: The Straits Times

 

Tennessee Truck Dealership Selling Dirty Engines

  • A loophole in emissions control laws has enabled a truck dealership to sell Peterbilt and Freightliner trucks with rebuilt diesel engines that spew 40 to 55 times the air pollution of other trucks.
  • The New York Times reports that the loophole is being “championed” by Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt after the Obama administration failed to close it.
  • The trucks are known as “gliders” because they are manufactured without engines and are later retrofitted with the rebuilt, 1990s-era engines recovered from salvage yards.

Read more: New York Times

 

CIPS Announces New Group CEO

  • The Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply (CIPS) last week announced the appointment of Malcolm Harrison (FCIPS) as Group CEO.
  • Currently Chief Executive Officer of the Crown Commercial Service at The Cabinet Office, Harrison will take over the post from the current interim CEO, Gerry Walsh, in July 2018.
  • The announcement comes nearly one full year after the sudden passing of former CEO David Noble in February 2017.

Read more: https://www.cips.org/en-cn/news/news/cips-announces-group-ceo-appointment/

4 Ways Diversity Makes A Rock-Solid IMPACT

Cultural diversity – whether it’s racial, ethnic, gender, or sexual – is an increasingly hot topic that shows no signs of slowing down. Let’s examine why diversity in the workplace has gone from a “nice-to-have” to a critical business imperative.

  1. Diversity leads to a higher market share

While communities are becoming increasingly culturally diverse, businesses need to mimic the communities they serve by bringing together individuals from different backgrounds and experiences. Put simply, people want to engage with companies that employ people similar to them. This enables companies to capture a greater share of the market by marketing more genuinely to diverse communities, communicating effectively with their diverse customers, and understanding their needs.

Looking for proof of the above? Research from McKinsey revealed that companies in the top quartile for racial and ethnic diversity are 35% more likely to have above-average financial returns, while companies in the bottom quartile were less likely to achieve above-average results.

  1. Diversity supercharges problem-solving

Institute for Supply Management CEO Tom Derry told Procurious that cultural inclusiveness is no longer an idea, but an expectation. “Your team needs to be diverse – in fact, you’ll look impoverished if you don’t have that. The benefits include being able to tap into a diversity of experience and opinion to solve challenges. This creates a truly attractive environment for top talent.”

If you lived in a dystopic Brave New World scenario where every member of your workforce had identical cultural backgrounds, education and work experience, it’s highly likely that each individual would come up with an identical set of solutions when presented with a problem. That’s why it’s imperative that any group includes people with culturally diverse backgrounds and highly varied work experience who can bring entirely different schools of thought to the table, and hence a wide variety of innovative solutions.

  1. Diversity in the workplace helps you become a more effective global professional

Supply management professionals are increasingly working within the global supply chain, which is why being about to communicate effectively in different parts of the world is a must-have skillset. Having high cultural intelligence (CQ) means knowing how to create relationships, understand cultural nuances and adapt your approach to suit cultural differences in foreign countries.

Shelley Stewart, CPO and VP, DuPont, told Procurious that “A diverse workplace provides a wealth of varied experiences that are crucial for supply management organisations to operate even more effectively in the global economy.”

How? Because an inclusive and diverse business will increase the empathy (and CQ) of all employees as cultural tunnel-vision is reduced. In short, everyone benefits from a higher appreciation of different outlooks and an increased understanding of others. Armed with these skills, a supply management professional is much less likely to suffer culture shock or put a foot wrong when interacting internationally.

  1. Diversity will help you attract and retain the best talent

If your company has built a solid reputation as an organisation with a truly diverse and vibrant workforce, it will attract the very best and brightest in the market. Companies that fail to recognise this are missing out on top talent, as potential candidates may have the perception that your company simply doesn’t tend to hire people from their cultural background. To state the obvious, companies should be making every effort to widen, rather than shrink, the talent pool.

There’s evidence that businesses which fail to foster inclusive, diverse workforces suffer from higher turnover rates, as a hostile work environment forces employees to leave. High turnover leads to avoidable costs, which is another reason why cultural diversity positively impacts your organisation’s bottom line.

More resources on Diversity from ISM:

Love learning about Diversity? ISM IMPACT2018, The ISM Diversity Conference, will take place on February 21-23, 2018 in Washington, D.C. and will feature industry leaders including Craig Reed (CPO, DowDuPont), Walter Charles (CPO, Biogen), Apollon Fanzeres (CPO, Laureate), and Sid Johnson (CPO, Aptiv). Click here to learn more.

Buying Social, Expressing Yourself Online and Other Procurement Challenges…

Does it pay to buy social? Can I build greater trust online? And how do I prepare my team for AI developments? We answer some of the questions and challenges on the minds of procurement leaders…

The Procurious London CPO Roundtable was sponsored by Basware

How do you evolve your organisation from the mindset of  “we’re not doing anything bad” to actually “doing something good” ?

What happens when people who don’t know what they’re talking about start talking online, what does that mean for society’s leaders?

With the development of RPA and AI, are we all out of a job, and when?!

How should organisations go about developing existing talent to prepare them for leadership roles?

These are just some the questions we answered at last week’s  Procurious CPO London Roundtable, sponsored by BaswareWant to know the answers? Look no further…

The Buy Social Corporate Challenge

Charlie Wigglesworth, Deputy CEO – Social Enterprise UK (SEUK) gave a fascinating insight to the great work social enterprises are doing across the UK.

SEUK was established in 2002 as the national body for social enterprise. Now, with over 1200 members they strive to support social enterprises and develop the evidence base to showcase their benefits, as well as influencing policy and political agendas within UK government.

Social enterprises sit comfortably in between a charity and a private sector company. They have a clear social mission and  look to make profits to further that social mission – they are “businesses which trade for a social purpose.” 

“Businesses and governments can support social enterprise in lots of ways but the best way to do good is to buy from them,” explains Charlie.

They are much more likely to be better represented or minority led or based in the most deprived areas. They are more likely to employ people that wouldn’t have work otherwise had work or give money where people wouldn’t otherwise have had it.

Supporting these companies is good for your business because they are likely to be cheaper, more innovative and doing so gives corporations the opportunity to overlap and integrate CSR with normal business, rather than have it exist as a separate entity.

Buying social doesn’t cost more money or change the procurement process  but it has significant strategic and ongoing value for communities and your business.

Of course, as Charlie admits, it can seem hard to make changes and switch your mentality from “not doing anything bad” to “doing something good”. Charlie’s advice is to “find opportunities locally- they may seem tiny but there can be significant opportunities. Look at where you can do things directly.”

SEUK is working with a number of businesses for The Buy Social Corporate Challenge with the challenge to achieve $1 billion of procurement spend with social enterprises by 2020. Follow their progress here.   

The Conversation Century

Elizabeth Linder, Founder and CEO of The Conversational Century joined Youtube in 2007 and often thinks back to that year, a significant time for Youtube, in order to understand the social media space.

It was an exciting and life-changing time for skilled amateurs. A time that had millions of people singing in their bedrooms or racking  up millions of video views for a commentary on something they would never otherwise have been considered an expert in. Youtube ultimately offered them the opportunity to be heard.

Elizabeth is a strong believer that the internet is the best place to build trust. “The people” ( i.e. you and me) have already got this all figured out. But the reason so many people still believe the internet is destroying trust is that our leaders are still so far from getting it right! We simply don’t have leaders at a political level that have invested in a voice on social media.

Some key things to remember when trying to start conversations online:

  • Most leaders fear that they have to move at an increased pace because of today’s internet culture. You don’t. Go at your own pace but keep people informed as you do it. It’s ok to communicate to people that “the discussions are still in progress” or “we don’t have information on this yet” so long as you’re communicating something!
  • Believe in the power of primary sources because the public certainly do. Hearing directly from the source rather than a paper adds a lot of value to your communication. If you’ve ever been quoted in an article, blog or feature you’ll know the producer of that piece never quite gets to the meat of what you were trying to say because you don’t own the conversation or drive the discussion – they do!
  • Embracing in the hacker culture, i.e. making it up as you go along, is key. EU politicians, for example, only see social media as a tool for outbound communications and not for their inbound policy making. Hacker culture dictates that they need to consider the latter.

Elizabeth’s take away advice on owning the social media space? “Be yourself online and talk to people in a way that lets them in but not in a way so casual that you’re treating them like family.”

RPA and AI – Are We All Out of A Job?

Where are we at in terms of Robotic Process Automation (RPA) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) ?  Paul Clayton, Head of New Service Development, Basware outlined the current threats and challenges.

RPA essentially replicates things that aren’t easily automated; the things a human would do. Its skills lie in coding systems and inserting data. The downside to RPA is that there is no intelligence or decision making process, which means it can go very wrong!

There are four levels to AI:

  • Level 1:  This is the simplest form of AI and is quite prevalent today.  It’s reactive and rule-based with no memory or recollection and decides what to do based on a set of rules.
  • Level 2:  Limited, but not long-term, memory with decisions based on recent experience. It will react to data from the things it sees.
  • Level 3:  These are computers that learn and have memory. They  can re-formulate their view on the world so they can make decisions and remember actions. Whilst there are Level 3 computers out there, other than C3P0 (!),  it hasn’t been applied in procurement except in the areas of fraud and risk management.
  • Level 4:  This, fortunately, does not exist…yet! These are machines that are self aware and can form their own view on anything, redevelop their own software and change their behaviour entirely.

Levels 1 and 2 cover most of the repetitive tasks in procurement and finance. Not before long, 90 per cent of the people in this sphere wont be required.

So yes, as Paul admits, the jobs we have today won’t be here tomorrow and people won’t have careers in the way that we currently define “a career”. But the workforce coming in today is used to their environment changing every 30 seconds,  they already expect instantaneous change and they’re able to adapt quickly to something different.

Barclays’ leadership development process

Jonathan Harvey – Global Head of Talent & Culture, Barclays PLC, gave us a high level overview of Barclays leadership development framework and how it compares or contrasts with other leading companies.

When Jonathan joined Barclays two years ago he was tasked with assessing whether Barclays were doing enough to embed a common set of values and to measure their progress in embedding them.

He evaluated how they were developing existing talent in preparation for leadership roles and eventually established a set of criteria for potential leaders at Barclays. This criteria demands they live by Barclays’ values and inspire others to live by them and that they have leadership critical experience such as experience managing more than 1000 people, across different geographies and through different business cycles.

The most successful leaders of organisations will be those who can think the most adaptively and creatively, and that comes down to experience!

Procurious are hosting CPO roundtables on 30th May, 19th September and 14th November. If you’re a CPO and would like to attend one of our roundtables in person please contact Olga Luscombe via [email protected] to request an invitation.

6 Reasons It Pays To Care In Procurement

“Do good, feel good” or “Do good, and save lots of money”? Whichever  you find the more enticing, we can certainly conclude that it pays to care in procurement!

Pat McCarthy, SVP and GM, SAP Ariba North America, is one of the driving forces behind SAP Ariba’s Business with Purpose initiative. Over time, he’s noticed how business attitudes have shifted as corporations become more socially aware. “For companies in the past it was pretty simple, the charter was pretty simple – increase profits for their shareholders or their owners. But today we find that many companies are taking on a higher mission to make the world a better place to live and work and to run their businesses with a higher purpose.

Of course, you don’t need Pat to tell you that sourcing from minority owned businesses, eradicating slave labour or watching your carbon foot print is a good thing. No one would try to contest that. But aside from the “do good, feel good” ideology, is Business with Purpose actually good for your business, or is it going to cause your procurement team a whole lot more – in money and stress!?

“We know that purpose driven companies out perform the market by almost 5 per cent” says Pat. “In other words they can do good and do well. Procurement has a unique opportunity to lead the way.”

And so it would seem that there’s a strong business case far beyond the moral imperative to embrace a higher cause in your procurement team.

Peter Holbrook, CEO Social Enterprise UK, gives six reasons why this is the case.

1. It’s cost effective

“We’ve undertaken research with PwC to look at what social value means for people within procurement departments” begins Peter. “We see that in the majority of cases when you take a social value or an environmental lens to procurement your new suppliers coming in to support your business are in most cases creating value add but are actually cheaper. [You will find] suppliers are much more cost efficient as a result of being more socially and environmentally imaginative.”

2. It brings in top talent

Attitudes of the millennial workforce is a significant factor for organisations to consider in today’s world if they want to recruit and retain the best talent. Employees, for the most part, want to feel as though they are working for companies who care for more than simply profit, who are making the right decisions for the world around them as well as the right decisions for the business.  As Peter explains “the good work your business does can give you the cutting edge or differentiation to bring in the very best talent.  When [organisations] take these approaches and staff believe they are authentic they are more likely to stay in the business in the long term.”

3. It makes suppliers more responsive

The research Social Enterprise UK carried out with PwC revealed that in two thirds of cases  suppliers were more responsive in purpose led companies. This, Peter explains, is due to the relationships created that meant suppliers “were more responsive in terms of responding to the changing needs of companies buying from them.”

4. It makes your organisation more innovative

Purpose driven companies, according to Social Enterprise UK’s research carried out with PwC,  “brought on new products and services to market, which is the traditional way we assess innovation.”

5. It keeps you ahead of the game

“We all recognise that businesses have to change and adapt to help meet the challenges that we all face. Using supply chains as a way to do this is a way of really being cutting edge, staying ahead of the pack and building brand differentiation that all companies increasingly need to be able to define themselves.”

6. It gets your customers on board

“We have researched customer loyalty” says Peter, “And whether it’s members of the public or in B2B relationships – [people] are more likely to remain with companies that are also creating a social benefit.

Peter has some reassuring advice for anyone feeling overwhelmed by the challenge of becoming a purpose-led procurement team. “The risk is that we overcomplicate it. There’s something to be said for proportionality. Start small and start easy- culturally within a company you’ll get much greater buy in if it feels as if its accessible and something that can be achieved relatively simply rather than an additional burden you’re putting on everybody.

“It’s about starting a journey and taking small steps to evolve your methodology and your approach and being fairly honest about where you are succeeding and where some of the challenges exist. No one is assuming and no one should assume that when a company starts embarking on this route that they will come to the ultimate solution within weeks months or even a couple of years!”

Sign up for #FeeltheLove, the first Procurious and SAP Ariba Procure with Purpose webinar, which takes place later today  at 10am EST/ 3PM GMT.

How To Conduct A Cognitive Symphony

If cognitive technology is not normally your forte, let us be of assistance. In one week we’ll have you conducting a cognitive symphony! 

There are many factors that require careful consideration to bring about effective, scalable and sustainable analytics and cognitive solutions.

Intelligence is the conversion and enrichment of data into meaningful business insights.

It’s akin to conducting a group of musicians – it might be easy to get a pleasant sound from a solo instrument but, if expertly managed, you can avoid falling flat and accomplish a symphony from the entire orchestra!

Conducting a Cognitive Symphony

From the 26th February let Procurious and IBM guide you through the five steps required to conduct a dazzling cognitive symphony as we present a new five-part podcast series. 

Day One: Building Your Orchestra

Procurement process and acquisition of data need to evolve to meet data needs. How should procurement teams embark on their knowledge journey to Cognitive and analytics transformation?

Day Two: Orchestrating Your Melody

It is not sufficient to know that you are buying software or how you are buying software; you need to know what software you are buying. So how do you implement an effective taxonomy strategy?

Day Three: The Rehearsal Room

Automation is a buzzword of the moment and fast becoming a business necessity. How can procurement professionals achieve a happy balance and effectively implement transaction automation.

Day Four: Getting the brass on Board

How procurement leaders works with their teams to remove barriers will ultimately have a huge influence on the rate and pace of adoption of cognitive and analytics solutions.

Day Five: The Conductor

In a fast-paced and ever-changing environment, some instability and churn is inevitable, which is why all these data instruments need a decent conductor and a single data strategy.

Podcast Speakers

Marco Romano Procurement Chief Analytics Officer, Global Procurement, Transformation Technology, IBM

Marco applies more than 15 years of experience as a procurement practitioner and project manager to understand complex environments that separate the noise from real issues and determine near-term and strategic solutions in realising business value. He leads a team that has saved IBM Procurement a significant amount in third-party costs and efficiencies through analytics data solutions and innovative sourcing strategies over the past three years. His team is also developing commercial analytics and cognitive procurement offerings leveraging data and technology for IBM clients’ competitive advantage.

Anna Madarasz Analytics & Cognitive Lead IBM

Anna has 14 years of procurement experience, out of which 12 is in project leadership. She is a master at change management, and loves working in a complex, cross-functional environment. She is an expert at procurement taxonomy in support of increasing companies’ negotiation power. Anna is a certified Lean Six Sigma Black Belt.

Peter Hrabovski Analytics and Automation Lead, IBM Global Procurement

Peter is the leader of the Analytics and Automation organisation at IBM Global Procurement. He has a masters degree in economics, in the field of business and administration. He has more than 5 years of experience in managing the data analytics and robotics process automation teams in IBM procurement globally. Being a technology and data enthusiast his focus is on applying the latest technologies in solutions being developed. This enables procurement in delivering exceptional value to IBM and its clients.

How does the podcast series work?

This series will run for five days with a daily podcast released from 26th February.  Each morning, we will deliver the new podcast straight to your email inbox.

If you’re a little late signing up to the series, don’t panic! We’ll still be sure to send you all five podcasts so you can listen at your leisure.

How do I access the podcast series?

Simply register for the series via this link and you’re good to go!

From the 26th February we’ll deliver a podcast straight to your doorstep.*

*straight to your email inbox!

Are the podcasts available to everyone?

Anyone and everyone is welcome to sign up and it’s totally, 100 per cent free to do so- simply sign up here and we’ll handle the rest.

From 26th February, Procurious present a new five-part podcast series – Conducting a Cognitive Symphony – sponsored by IBM. Sign up here (it’s free!) to access the series. 

Warfare Just Got A Whole Lot Cheaper

The US Navy’s recent purchase of two drone-incinerating laser cannons signals a turning-point in the ever-rising costs of sourcing – and firing – high-tech weaponry.

Remember the USS Zumwalt? Launched with much fanfare in 2013, the guided missile destroyer was equipped with 155-millimeter advanced gun systems, designed to fire the Long Range Land Attack Projective, a GPS-guided shell with a range of 60 miles. At an eye-watering $800,000 a round, however, the guns were simply too expensive to fire, and were soon replaced with a more affordable system.

Zumwalt provides an extreme example of the prohibitive cost of firing a weapon at sea. At its cheapest, a typical shipboard gun and missile arsenal costs $5,000 per shot.

That’s why the US Navy’s procurement of two high-powered lasers – developed by Lockheed Martin at $75 million each – will change the game for the expense of firing weaponry. One of the lasers is designed for testing on land, while the second will be installed aboard an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer by 2020.

The lasers are so cheap to run because firstly, solid state lasers run on electricity rather than chemicals, and secondly, they do not fire a projectile at all. A pulse of directed energy costs under one US dollar each – that’s $799,999 cheaper than the Zumwalt rounds. At present, the lasers are primarily defensive, with the magazine limited only by the amount of energy pumped into it. Using 150 kw of power per shot, they are able to destroy small boats and shoot down unmanned aerial vehicles (drones). Upgrading their power to 300 kw could allow them to destroy fast-moving anti-ship missiles, while 1000 kw (one megawatt) worth of power could burn through 20 feet of steel in one second, easily enough to neutralise a fighter jet.

The Navy is clearly anticipating ordering more lasers. The contract with Lockheed Martin includes options worth an additional $800 million (nearly $950 million in total) to buy another 10 weapons and equip over 10% of the fleet’s destroyers with high powered lasers.

The lasers were purchased against the background of China’s reported testing of a ship-mounted rail gun, a weapon that uses powerful electromagnets to accelerate projectiles to over 3km/s. Again, these weapons are expected to be cheaper to fire than conventional guns as they will not require explosives or propellant to launch ammunition.

Several US contractors have attempted to build a rail gun including BAW Systems, which created a prototype, but the project was scrapped due to budget issues.

Chinese rail guns aside, observers have speculated that the 300 kw laser’s ability to destroy small boats is a direct response to Iran’s use of “swarm boat tactics” in the Strait of Hormuz. Iranian fast boats, typically armed with anti-ship cruise missiles and torpedoes, set off in an asymmetrical, dispersed fashion from hidden harbours in the Persian Gulf and then converge to surprise-attack an enemy ship. Laser weaponry has been mooted as the most promising solution to ward off this form of attack.

Meanwhile, Lockheed Martin has developed a ground vehicle-mounted laser system that can burn through tanks, and is working on an anti-missile laser that can be mounted on fighter jets. Defence contractor Raytheon built a laser that could be fired from a moving helicopter, along with a drone-destroying, laser-mounted dune buggy. Similarly, Boeing has developed an anti-drone laser cannon.


In other news this week:

Japan launches its own Belt and Road Initiative

  • Tokyo is deepening economic ties and security cooperation with multiple countries in an apparent bid to counter China’s Belt and Road Initiative.
  • Japan’s Foreign Minister Taro Kono has recently completed a tour where Japan made investment announcements in areas including Southeast Asia, Sri Lanka, Pakistan and the Baltics.
  • Tokyo has launched a US$200 billion infrastructure plan as they actively propose an alternative to the Chinese Belt and Road. Previously, the single biggest competitor to the Belt and Road Initiative was the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact, which collapsed after Washington withdrew.

Read more: http://www.scmp.com/news/asia/article/2132811/japan-takes-lead-countering-chinas-belt-and-road-initiative

Hummus crisis!

  • Drought in India, the world’s largest producer of chickpeas, has resulted in several years of poor harvests and rising costs of products such as hummus globally.
  • India has had to buy chickpeas from growers in other countries, putting pressure on supply and driving up prices. British supermarkets have reported a 12% rise in a single year.
  • The unexpectedly severe drought has affected hundreds of million of people who rely on the harvest in India itself.

Read more: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/08/business/hummus-chickpeas-prices.html

FAA Drone Licensing Unpopular

  • According to a report from Gozmodo, the US Federal Aviation Administration has only acted once to enforce its licensing requirements for the operation of commercial drones.
  • The FAA began requiring licenses in 2016 for people operation drones for commercial use, including photographers, crop-sprayers, and pilots delivering goods via drones. Hobbyists are exempt from the license requirement, although all drones need to be registered. The licensing system is unpopular, with drone pilots having to pay $150 and pass a 60-question test with a 70%+ score.
  • Goods delivery via drones is an area of key interest for supply managers worldwide, along with associated regulatory and cost burdens.

Read more: https://www.gizmodo.com.au/2018/02/basically-no-one-is-getting-fined-for-flying-drones-without-a-license/

3 Essential Ways to Motivate Staff and Improve Morale

Want to lead a happy and productive workforce? When it comes to improving staff morale, you need to focus on three key factors. 

As a leader, you have several concerns and major responsibilities that all need your attention. This means you must be able to focus on the big picture: if you constantly have to look over the shoulders of your employees, it is going to be difficult for you to manage the larger matters that can affect the success of your organisation.

You may worry that employees will have trouble staying on task and meeting goals if you are not there to supervise. While keeping your team motivated is important, you don’t have the resources to hand out huge bonuses and you don’t want to try to rule your business through fear.

The answer to this problem is to build a culture of accountability: express the value of accountability and integrity in the workplace, have time to communicate with your employees, and make sure that you are giving regular performance reviews to let your employees know that you value their contributions.

Trust is Better Than Fear

Fear can seem like an effective tool for getting more out of your employees. It is common for some leaders to believe that they need employees to fear the potential outcome of a mistake. The problem is that fear does not build authentic motivation. The person is not performing because they want to, but rather in order to avoid an unfavorable reaction.

If you want to inspire true motivation, you need to build trust with your employees. Much of this trust building comes from open communication. In a survey of 1,000 US workers, 91 per cent said that communication issues can negatively impact the effectiveness of a leader. This includes things like not giving clear directions and not having time to meet with employees.

As a leader, you need to make sure there is time to communicate with your employees. Make sure they understand their responsibilities, ask them questions about their work, and encourage them to talk about their successes.

Set an Example

You want your employees to be responsible and to act with integrity, but these values have to come from the top. If leadership does not demonstrate these values in their work, it is going to be difficult to get employees to accept them as their own.

Furthermore, as a leader, you have to be willing to admit when you made a mistake. If something fails on your end, you can’t pass the blame onto those who work for you. If employees see their leaders are unwilling to hold themselves accountable, they are not going to accept responsibility either.

Promote the Positives

Since fear is not a good motivator, you should look to the positive side of work as a source of inspiration for your employees. According to a study from the Boston Consulting Group, appreciation for the work done is the top factor that affects employee happiness.

Let your employees know that you appreciate the work they do. You should even give compliments for minor accomplishments–employees perform better when they know they are appreciated. The simple act of showing recognition can increase happiness, motivation, and productivity in the workplace.

You don’t need to give out extravagant perks to motivate your employees. By promoting the right values and communicating with employees in the right way, you can motivate people without having to resort to punitive measures or handing out bonuses that you can’t afford.

Read more on 15Five

This article was written by Rae Steinbach. Rae is a graduate of Tufts University with a combined International Relations and Chinese degree. After spending time living and working abroad in China, she returned to NYC to pursue her career and continue curating quality content. 

Procurement with Purpose: Beyond the Bottom Line

How can you embrace the notion of procurement with purpose authentically and in ways that are consistent with your core beliefs and ideals?

Sustainability improves the bottom line, and companies can do good while doing well.

In fact, research shows that purpose-driven companies with strong performance in environmental, social, and governance outperform the market by 4.8 per cent. But this is not “new” news.

So what is different now that makes purpose more vitally important? It comes down to transparency and trust.

In many segments of life, trust is at an all-time low. The swarm of misinformation, slanted stories and editorials, and paid reviews have continued to foster these low levels of trust. This presents a unique challenge to companies.

How do companies and we as leaders embrace the notion of purpose authentically?

How do we do so in ways that are consistent with our core beliefs and ideals?

How do we “walk the walk” and not just talk the talk?

In the past, business leaders might have defined their goals as “increasing profits for shareholders and owners.” Now leading companies are beginning to recognise that this is only part of the equation. They see the bigger picture and are taking on a higher mission to make the world a better place to live and work. They are finding new ways to solve the world’s most pressing challenges. Gaining (or regaining) trust will happen through transparent action that demonstrates a commitment to creating a more purpose driven business environment.

Purchasing with Purpose

Those of us in procurement have a unique opportunity to lead the way. With increasing frequency, companies are redefining their supply chains and buying from suppliers who support, for example, people with disabilities or are female led. Companies want to know that no forced labor is being used by their suppliers, and their supplier’s suppliers, and all the way back up the value stream. Procurement is in the unique position to address these issues and have an incredible impact.

Collectively, the Global 2000 spend $12 trillion on goods and services annually. By tying their purchases to purposes, these companies can take a stand and drive ethical behavior across the supply chain. And technology exists to make this possible. The key is to get started. Business networks, for instance, provide transparency and insights into supply chains that enable companies to ensure they are acting in responsible ways.

Take SAP Ariba, the world’s largest business network. Leveraging historical and real-time purchasing data, supplier intelligence, and network insights, along with data and services from third parties like Made in a Free World, procurement can shine a light on materials, regions, and suppliers to ensure they are meeting the organisation’s standards.

Through a link between SAP Ariba Discovery, a global business matching service, and the ConnXus Database, buyers can tap a wider pool of minority, woman, LGBT and veteran-owned businesses and enable global supply chains that are more responsible, sustainable and inclusive. Extending our network even more, we’ve partnered with Nicole Verkindt, founder of OMX, to help our customers analyse the economic impact of their spend in industries such as international defense, aerospace, oil & gas, mining, automotive and construction industries.

But it doesn’t stop there. SAP Ariba is a sponsor of the UN Global Compact’s Decent Work in Global Supply Chain Action Platform. The UN developed the Action Platforms to accelerate the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. Action Platforms offer a systematic solution to sustainable development challenges through new fostering innovation, developing new financial models, and identifying sustainable solutions across a range of issues. As a Platform Sponsor for the Decent Work and Global Supply Chain Action Platform, SAP Ariba has deepened our commitment to driving purpose across the global supply chain.

Procurement professionals will always be responsible for doing more with less and for delivering value to our organizations. And we can do even more than that.

There’s real power in purpose. It inspires us. It moves us. It enables us to reimagine and to reinvent what is possible and to achieve great things. It is also one of the greatest challenges issued to business leaders today. Join us in taking it up. Together, we can make a difference.

Sign up for #FeeltheLove on 14th February – the first Procurious and SAP Ariba Procure with Purpose webinar .