Best of the Procurious Blog – 3 Ways To Increase Your Procurement Salary

Another day in your procurement job, another day moaning about your unsatisfactory salary… If you want things to change here’s how you take control!

I’ve always said that I’m extremely happy working in Procurement, and there’s no question that it’s great to be doing a job that I’m passionate about.

But no matter how much enjoyment we get from our work – money is always important and a key contributor to our chosen career path.

Of course, you and I would both be happy to double our monthly income; so I thought I’d outline three pieces of advice to help you get there!

  1. Get paid for your value, not your time

Do you have a clear understanding of how your current salary was calculated? Is your employer buying your time or buying your skills?

Many procurement professionals make the mistake of thinking they are paid per working hour. But the main consideration for your employer shouldn’t be  “how hard is this person working?” but rather  “how much value is the person generating for the company?”

So my first piece of advice to you is this: Start thinking about what value you are creating for the company – start measuring it! If you measure your results and your ambitions you have a much stronger argument when it comes to salary negotiations.

Take a look at these two scenarios. If you were to approach your manager to discuss a pay increase, which one sounds more authoritative?

A) I have worked overtime and several weekends during the past six months. I don’t give enough attention to my partner and family. So I think I deserve a salary increase of +20 per cent.

B) I have finalised three major RFQ’s within our category during the past 6 months and  I have reduced prices by 12 per cent per year for our company! I think this performance justifies a salary increase of 20 per cent.

Try to use the employer’s language as in scenario B. Find the arguments and KPI’s which you know they will value the most and think about how you can add influence in these areas. Then all you have to do is impress them with your results!

2. Take more responsibility

Do you enjoy responsibility  or do you avoid it at all costs – letting others make key business decisions for you?

Both behaviors are quite natural. After all, people are different. But ask yourself, what is the main difference between you and your manager at work? Why do they earn a significantly higher salary than you? Many managers have less knowledge and skills than their co-workers and employees, but they are still respected more by the top-executives. How does that always happen?!

The simple answer is that your manager has the responsibility for a much bigger area of the work.

The rule:  greater responsibility = greater salary.

So don’t allow yourself to hesitate when it comes to taking on responsibility. Don’t just wait to be asked, be proactive.

“I heard that our Procurement department plans to run the value stream mapping for Category XYZ. Can I lead this project as I know the processes and steps for VSM?”

“Can I take the responsibility for mapping new suppliers in South Asia, as I already have many business connections there?”

This approach to your work will stand you in good stead to get a significant salary increase when the time comes to negotiate.

Generate profit  for the company

In my experience most organisations consider their procurement department to be the cost centre of the business. Others regard it as a support or service function and,  in the worst cases, they dismiss procurement pros simply as buyers.

But you and I both know that procurement  has an enormous impact on an organisation’s profit.

Whatever your savings are – they contribute to the gross profits of the company. As we say at Future Procurement organisations: “one dollar saved is one dollar earned!”

So how can this knowledge help your salary?

Senior management in your organisation may not understand the value procurement brings to the business and they certainly won’t be familiar with your individual responsibilities and deliverables. They even may not understand the role of Procurement organisation…

But top management of any company cares about profit, this is the language they understand.  So modify your messaging and communicate the extra business profits that are connected to your procurement role.

To sum up; if you want your salary to increase you need to add value to the company, take more responsibility and concentrate on proving the profit you contribute to the company.

Remember; your employer will never care about you more than you care about yourself – it’s sad but it’s true!  Throughout my corporate career, the  biggest salary increases were never initiated by my boss.

Your salary is your own responsibility and if you don’t like it – it’s your problem to fix.

So get out there and fix it!

Best Of The Procurious Blog – Is It Time To Make A Career Move? Mind the gap

When things get bad at work do you find a way to fix it or consider a career move?

The bad days are becoming more frequent, the work is no longer challenging and your procurement career seems to be floundering.   The question arises: what must you do to kick your work life into action?   If you have a general feeling of being undervalued or not being fairly recognised for your achievements, now is the time to take stock. Work takes up at least 40 hours of your week.  Life’s too short to be miserable, this is decision time.

It is unlikely that your current situation will improve much unless there is a radical change in management or strategy.  The options are:

  • Move into a new role at your current employer or
  • Move on to a different employer in a similar or different role 

Assuming that procurement is still the place you want to be, there are some steps you need to take whether you plan to stay with your current employer in another role or move on to new adventures.

Do a personal gap analysis

Take a deep, introspective look into yourself. The aim is to identify the knowledge gaps between the skills you need for your chosen direction and those that you currently have.  What changes should you begin making to prepare yourself for the kind of job you want? As Abraham Lincoln said, “The best way to predict the future is to create it.”   Be realistic about your current capabilities.  Then go and fill the gaps.

Consider further education   

There’s no doubt that further education and continued professional development play a part in opening up opportunities. The reality is that most the attractive roles require some tertiary education or certification, especially in a tight job market. If you are lagging in this area it may be an opportune time to upgrade.   If your current employer can subsidise your work-related studies, take advantage.    No funds?  There are lots of free training available, there’s no excuse.  What about a Massive Open Online Course (MOOC)?

 Learn the new skills

There are roles that didn’t exist ten years ago and those are where experience is in short supply.  The application of I.T. technologies to procurement problems is growing fast:  consider data analysis and warehousing, supplier relationship management (SRM), and procure-to-pay (P2P).   Also, both the public and private sectors struggle with issues of fraud, corruption and conflict of interest. Companies need people who can exercise constant vigilance over supplier risk, governance and contract compliance.

Sustainability issues are placing new demands on procurement leaders and their teams.  “Green” procurement is a growth niche where there is a limited number of experienced applicants and pressure is building on companies to limit their negative impact on the environment.  Focusing on fields that concern you (and the consumer) and those that play to your strengths will deliver the most work satisfaction.

Get a grip on the numbers

Whatever direction you choose, advanced analytical abilities are becoming mandatory.  An in-depth understanding of financial ratios and the triple bottom line can give you the edge over others competing for similar roles.  If you don’t know what macros or what a cash flow crisis is, now is the time to find out. If your current company offers in-house courses that can enhance your computer skills, sign up.

Influence and persuasion

A survey conducted recently by Accenture amongst global CPOs noted that traditional areas of knowledge and experience are less important to success than the ability to develop and sustain high quality internal and external relationships.  Stakeholders can influence your project’s success or failure.  Good stakeholder management just means being able to win support from any and all interested and affected parties such as end-users, subject matter experts and key suppliers.

Attitude is important, that much is clear.  It seems behaviour and demeanour can impact on career progression as much as technical know-how.  Always do what you promise to do.  To paraphrase  J.F.Kennedy,  don’t think about what your stakeholders can do for you, think what you could do for them.

Communicate your successes

Keep an on-going record of what you have done well, e.g. reported cost savings, accolades you have been given, and positive feedback received from internal customers.  This information can be used to enhance your CV.  Don’t be shy to share your successes; it’s a good confidence booster.

Moving employers   

Moving on to another employer or launching yourself as a consultant or contractor may be a choice, or it may be thrust upon you.  Protecting yourself fully from downsizing and “restructuring of the workforce” is pretty much impossible.  Don’t despair. Review your achievements to date, fire up your CV and take yourself to the market.    Sometimes you have to take a step backwards to move forwards.

The best a person can do to rise above the mainstream is to have a good attitude, stay relevant, keep up with trends, communicate well and keep the networks alive.  Sometimes the current environment is not going to deliver the options you need. Then it is time to move on.

Best Of The Procurious Blog: The Key Procurement And Technology Trends for 2019

The times, they are a-changing, and so are the markets and environments that procurement operates in. What then are the key trends in procurement and technology you need to watch for in 2019?

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Iit’s time to start looking forward to what’s coming in the next 12 months.

2019 is set to be a seismic year around the world. Major changes, such as further geo-political upheaval, the looming spectre of global trade wars and tariffs aplenty, have the potential to disrupt supply chains and set metaphorical trip wires for procurement professionals everywhere. And, as we’ve already heard, it’s rarely been more important to get a solid grips on the key factors in the market and external environment.

So gather round as we gaze into the opaque mists of the future and make some educated insights into the key procurement and technology trends waiting around the corner.

  1. Supplier Management

Let’s start with an oldie, but a goodie. Wait, I hear you cry, supplier management isn’t a new trend! We’ve been talking about this for years. Well, if we’ve talking about it for years, why aren’t we any better at it? And why is it that it’s one of the key areas a large number of procurement teams fall down on?

Like it or not, your suppliers hold the key to all your wildest procurement dreams. Innovation, top and bottom line cost reduction, avoidance and savings, stress-free supply of services and goods and free cake for all! (Ok, maybe not that last one!)

In their Vision 2020 publications, pwc state that the top 25 per cent of procurement functions will have gone beyond incremental improvements and be implementing fundamental change to process and policy alike. This includes how they interact with suppliers and shifting focus from cost and value to Return on Investment (ROI).

These outcomes all hang on better supplier relationship management in order to tease out further innovation from suppliers (who are seen as partners, rather than sponges to wring cash out of) and closer collaboration to source solutions to problems we don’t even know we have yet.

At the heart of this is great communication. Select the right suppliers and talk to them more. You never know, you might just learn something!

  1. Blockchain and Digital Adoption

Unless you’ve been living in a cave on a remote hillside (or perhaps a Faraday cage in your basement), you should have heard by now about blockchain.

From blog articles to webinars, it’s one of the hottest topics in procurement right now, and is likely to still be throughout 2019. Blockchain is and will continue to be a key tool in shaping the transparency of a supply chain. Information is shared and transmitted easily and safely, while the technology allows an “immutable signed and time stamped record of identity, ownership of assets, transactions or contractual commitments”.

This transparency will have the added benefits, and some drawbacks, of making procurement and CPOs more visible in the public environment, say EY. Procurement will wield greater power and have greater opportunity to interact with external stakeholders. But, at the same time, organisational processes and procurement will play out in a public setting like never before.

In line with blockchain’s increasing influence, there is a predicted rise in digital adoption and use of the Cloud. An estimated $1 trillion of IT spend will be moved to the Cloud by 2020, according to Gartner, as organisations look to make their IT services more agile.

  1. Social Value

There is a prevailing opinion amongst the procurement professionals I speak to that 2019 will be the year for social value and sustainability to really take hold. Organisations have begun to realise that cost and quality are only a part of the overall package and not only do they need to be seen to be doing more in the community, but they need to follow through on it.

That goes for the wider supply chain too. Using work practices and value-adding benefits for communities into tenders will become the norm and procurement will no longer be able to award contracts on cost without taking the wider impact into consideration.

  1. Next-Gen Workforce and Automation

Disregard what you’ve heard very recently regarding automation, machine learning and AI as scaremongering. Yes AI will take on tasks and people may have to move to new roles, but it’s not a future that we should be burying our head in the sand about. It’s a natural human reaction to fear change, but procurement needs to muscle up and be brave in order to evolve and survive.

Infosys estimates that AI and procurement automation will eliminate human intervention in 15 per cent of digital spending by 2019. If that’s the case, then procurement needs to embrace the change and develop, train and retain its Next-Generation workforce to meet the demands of new roles where human interaction and input is still key.

  1. Risk

From Brexit to trade wars, risk is going to be possibly the biggest trends for businesses as a whole in 2019. The organisations who will thrive in this unstable environment will be the ones who are best prepared to deal with the unexpected.

Deloitte believe that procurement will become the forecasters of risk in an organisation, raising the profile of the function as it factors total cost of risk and risk mitigation in supply chains into contracts and tenders.

Risk runs throughout the other trends that have been suggested above. Brexit, protectionism and trade wars make supplier and supply chain management all the more important. The increasing need for cyber security as technology advances is something that cannot be ignored.

Procurement is ideally placed to deal with all of these risks, but it needs to put its hand up and be at the front of the queue, or face being left behind and marginalised at a time when the function has a crucial role to play.