Why Contracts Are Key to Executing Your Sourcing Category Strategy

The implementation of a category strategy is seen as best practice in procurement. But contracts themselves hold the key to success.

For procurement organisations, “category management” is considered a best practice for sourcing. Simply put, category management is the process by which companies segment all the goods and services they need to procure into discrete categories that reflect the specific common characteristics of the products they’re buying.

For example, the procurement department at an automobile manufacturer will likely be responsible for sourcing everything from steering wheels to cleaning services. While in both cases the company needs to make prudent decisions about its spend, what goes into to choosing vendors for those goods and services are obviously very different.

Some goods are highly commoditised and therefore cost will be the determining factor. Other goods may have stringent performance requirements attached to them. These will be evaluated based on the quality of the vendors bidding for business. Some goods are business critical. Others, less so.

A category management strategy for steering wheels may look something like this:

  • The company’s steering wheel vendors should be equally dispersed between the North American, APAC and EMEA regions;
  • No one vendor should supply more than 40 per cent of all steering wheels;
  • The total spend on steering wheels can’t exceed a pre-determined amount.

This strategy means that the supply of steering wheels is more resilient to disruptions like natural disasters (since they are coming from various geographies) and not exposed to undue damage if a single vendor fails (since no one vendor dominates the supply). And, of course, it provides predictability in how much will be spent procuring the product.

Making Sure the Category Strategy Is Followed

But designing the category strategy is just the first step of the process. The greater challenge is carrying it out. The history of large enterprises trying to execute category strategy-driven procurement shows that while they are sometimes able to apply the category rules at the time of sourcing, it becomes a struggle to monitor adherence during the operations phase of a contract.

For example, contracts may have been awarded assuming a certain mix of supply sources (with differing costs and quality parameters) to deliver on certain quarterly cost goals, but issuance of purchase orders in a different proportion at the execution stage will invalidate those assumptions and cause the category strategy to fail.

To improve compliance with a category strategy, leading enterprises are taking a new approach. Putting contracts at the centre of the process.

Using contracts to drive category management compliance is enabled by the emergence of digital contracts and contract management software. By managing contracts on an enterprise contract management platform, companies can leverage contract data to execute effective contract strategies—and design superior strategies to begin with.

How It Works

Let’s go back to the steering wheel example and see how enterprise contract management can optimise the process.

First, the procurement organisation develops the category strategy for steering wheels. The development of a category strategy is a consultative process and depends on data to draw insights and validate assumptions. Much of this data exists in past contracts: supplier performance on existing contracts, spend on different sub-categories and geographies, and other data points. That information, when available on a contract management platform, gives rise to a superior strategy.

Next, the company put out requests for bids from vendors. Contract requests and bid lists aligned with the adopted strategy are launched from within the contract management system. This ensures that the vendor shortlisting and price discovery process conforms to the category strategy.

Once purchase orders begin to be issued, business rules in the contract management platform ensure the strategy is carried out. If a buyer tries to execute a contract that goes against strategy – for example, with a vendor whose geography has already reached its limit in the strategy – the contract will be blocked or routed for special approval.

Finally, the contract management software monitors in real time vendor performance against the contract. This is done both through data tracked within the platform itself and through integrations with other enterprise systems. This way category managers can not only make sure contracts comply with the strategy, but that performance complies with the contract.

Contracts Are the Foundation

Since contracts are the foundation of buyer-supplier relationships, an enterprise contract management platform can support all phases of a category strategy:

  • Insights to develop the strategy;
  • Tools to execute the strategy;
  • Rules to enforce the strategy; and
  • Integrations to monitor the strategy.

Icertis is focused on how digital contracts and cloud-based enterprise contract management software can improve business performance, including in procurement. To learn why Gartner has named Icertis a “Cool Vendor in Sourcing and Procurement” and why “the clear leader” in buy-side contract management, contact us today.

Want to get access to more great insight on contract management, A.I. in procurement and all things procurement software? Icertis are one of the main sponsors for the Big Ideas Summit Chicago 2019, and will be delivering one of the keynotes on the day. There’s still time to register as a digital delegate – find out more and sign up today here!

Procurement Can…Save the World

Procurement can do much more than it’s already doing when it comes to sustainability. And together we really can save the world…

Photo by Jessica Podraza on Unsplash

Historically, Procurement’s mandate has involved cutting costs and little else. The reputation for barking orders and slashing spend has led to more than a little resentment within certain organisations. Business units are often hesitant to engage with the function. When they do, they’re typically gritting their teeth and counting down the seconds until they can go back to focusing on their own key objectives.

Reducing costs is a noble cause – and Procurement’s top priority. But it’s just the beginning of what Procurement can offer the business and its customers. With its cross-functional position and unique insights into the supply chain, Procurement has the capacity to fundamentally change the way an organisation operates.

In Part 1 of this blog series, I examined some of the life-saving initiatives that Procurement teams across the globe are supporting. Cracking down on modern slavery and optimising disaster response plans, they’re evolving in their role and making it possible for corporate leaders to serve a higher purpose.

This time around, I want to look into Procurement’s efforts to address even broader issues. In addition to saving individual lives, great Procurement teams can potentially save entire species by working to identify and address worldwide environmental concerns.

Procurement Can . . . Save the Planet

Addressing Climate Change

The most pressing environmental crisis of our time, climate change, has dominated conversations among politicians, business leaders, and consumers for more than a decade. While forecasts vary from source to source, it’s clear that rising temperatures and sea levels present nothing short of an existential threat. From a business perspective, the myriad effects of a changing climate could mean a 10 per cent reduction in profits for American businesses. The planet and its people could suffer even more dire consequences.

The global economy simply cannot continue along the path that’s gotten it to this troubling position. For Procurement, the looming threat of climate change should provide the quintessential burning platform. It’s an opportunity for the function to distinguish itself as the value-added entity and to take the lead in designing a totally new worldwide supply chain.

When most of us think of climate change, we think of greenhouse gas emissions. While it’s somewhat reductive to describe such a broad issue through these narrow terms, addressing emissions is certainly a high-impact way to begin promoting responsibility. It’s not nearly enough to clean things up internally. Even organisations that don’t personally burn coal and oil often rely on supplier networks that make an outsize contribution to climate change.

The Carbon Disclosure

The Carbon Disclosure has found that suppliers often account for four times as many carbon emissions as an organisation’s direct operations. This eye-opening fact has inspired a number of businesses to broaden their approach to sustainable business. As organisations gain additional visibility into their supply chains, they have more and more power to enforce a higher standard of responsibility.

Target, for example, has made supplier-generated emissions an important part of its climate goals. In addition to establishing objectives of its own (including a 30 per cent reduction in emissions by 2030), the retailer is asking nearly every one of its suppliers to begin working toward similar goals by 2023.

One of Target’s direct competitors, Walmart is taking a similar approach. The world’s largest retailer is not merely holding its suppliers accountable for cutting down emissions, but offering additional incentives for those who successfully do so. They’ve partnered with HSBC Bank to introduce a new program that will provide better loan terms to organisations who make demonstrable progress.

Data, visibility, and consistent communication will only become more important as Procurement teams work toward cutting down emission and addressing their contributions to climate change. Still CDP reports that just 35 per cent of organisations are tracking emissions throughout their supplier networks. With the wealth of information at Procurement’s disposal growing in scope and the conversations around our climate growing in intensity, there’s no longer any excuse for inaction.

Fighting Ocean Pollution

Paper straws aren’t especially popular, but they’ve already served a valuable purpose. In addition to getting plastic out of the restaurant supply chain, they’ve forced consumers to confront their own reliance on plastic-based products and materials. Simply put, businesses and their customers buy a lot of plastic and Mother Nature is typically the one stuck footing the bill.

Eight million tons of plastic wind up in world’s oceans every year. With consumption expected to surge, experts predict we could see more plastic than fish by 2050. In certain regions, plastic particles are already outnumbering plankton 26 to 1.

With its central role in material purchasing, Procurement enjoys an obvious opportunity to take the lead in identifying and introducing sustainable alternatives to plastics. In 2017, Dell Technologies announced that it would take an especially creative approach to amending its supply chain. The organisation elected to create an entirely new supply chain dedicated to collecting and re-purposing ocean-bound plastics. This initiative provides a perfect example of the wide-reaching effects an environmental initiative can have.

Post-Plastic World

Providing access to near-endless supply of affordable materials, Dell’s new reclamation supply chain helps the organisation cut down on its material spending, create a slew of new jobs for collectors and recyclers, and (most crucially) provide an example for other business leaders to follow.

They’re already partnering with likeminded organisations through their Next Wave program to build a collaborative supply chain for collecting and reusing ocean waste. They expect to reclaim more than three million pounds of it within the next five years.

Dell’s not the only organisation cleaning up its act to clean up our oceans. Businesses throughout the retail and restaurant sector have also taken swift action to address the question of waste. Walmart, Aldi, and Trader Joe’s are just three of the retailers looking forward to a post-plastic world.

Starbucks and Dunkin’ Donuts, for their part, have made headlines by pledging to provide sustainable alternatives to their single-use cups. Each of these projects, regardless of scope or industry, will rely on strong Supply Management minds to steer the ship.

Procurement Can . . . Do More

It’s an unfortunate reality, but time is running out for businesses to take action and pursue environmental initiatives. In the past, organizations might have hemmed and hawed on the subject of sustainability. Fearing higher costs or the hard work of transitioning to new suppliers, they might have looked for excuses to forget about the environment and focus on something more directly relevant. There’s no forgetting about the environment anymore. Reports from organisations like the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change suggest that while businesses and consumers have done a great deal of damage, they still possess a valuable opportunity.

Back in 2015, Nielsen confirmed that more than half of consumers will pay more to do business with environmentally responsible organizations. They want to purchase natural, sustainable products from companies that have made green practices a central component of their missions. The conversations around pollution, deforestation, climate change, and other environmental concerns have only grown more intense in the intervening years. Companies that continue to avoid pursuing the “triple bottom line” (people, profit, planet) will soon find themselves growing more irrelevant, unsuccessful, and even controversial throughout the next few.

I look forward to addressing Procurement’s environmental imperative at the Big Ideas Summit. Last year saw thought leaders describe their efforts to identify alternate materials, repurpose recycling, and make Procurement a more purposeful function. This year, I’ll join the conversation by sharing some of the green initiatives my team has spearheaded throughout the last several years. Want to listen in? Make sure to register as a Digital Delegate today.

Do you want a steer from Diego on what your organisation can do with your triple bottom line? You can access this and much more by registering as a Digital Delegate for the Big Ideas Summit Chicago 2019 next week. Even if you can’t be there in person, you can still be in the room. Find out more and sign up today here!

The Secret of Successful Supplier Selection

Still using cost as a primary criteria for supplier selection? Our latest webinar shares all the secrets you need for success.

Have you been tasked with running a selection process for a new supplier but don’t know where to start?  Perhaps you’ve been using the same routine for years but feel it’s time to freshen it up?  Are the old ways just not delivering the outcomes you need?

In our recent Procurious-Ivalua Webinar, Critical Success Factors for Supplier Selection, our panel of experts revealed the secrets to how they get the outcomes they want from their sourcing processes. 

Here are five great take-aways from that discussion.

Supplier Selection – Get the Balance Right

Our panel reported that many organisations are not yet on a path that leads away a cost-driven focus.  Tech tools that are available to help with future cost modelling mean procurement can go to the market with uncertainty about this type of risk reduced.  When cost risk is managed this leaves the way clear for the road to value. 

A great example quoted in the discussion was a utility contract. The focus was on value rather than cost. It led to costs being reduced and also meant a more sustainable outcome was delivered. This lowered usage and introduced measures to promote sustainability. 

Can you introduce a selection process that balances cost, value and your organisation’s wider sustainability goals to select a supplier who is right for you?

Remember, One Size Doesn’t Fit All

Making sure a supplier is a good cultural fit for the organisation is a key requirement that all our panel members stressed.  Think about the impact of a cultural misalignment on your organisation’s reputation or brand.  

Cultures vary across the world and getting a cultural fit when you’ve got a global supply chain is hard. However, there are many things on which the buyer and supplier can agree. How about meeting with your supplier’s leadership team as part of the sourcing process? This would allow you to assess their management ethos to make sure that the cultural fit is there right from the start?

The unknown unknowns

Managing external factors and risks, particularly those that are not yet known, are something that supplier selection process is often expected to address.  All panel members reported the challenge of grappling with the unknown unknowns in the current period of global upheaval and change. 

The advent of technology-driven real time data is something panel members welcomed to manage supplier and supply chain risk.  It’s also a great way to check and monitor supplier financial health. 

Make use of the new tools that are available to ensure your organisation is prepared and have a backstop position to allow a response when situational or supplier risks change.

Be a customer of choice

When it came to the supplier-buyer relationship our panel had very clear advice.  Whether we’re a supplier or a buyer, we’re all looking of a return on the investment in the relationship we’re about to have.  Focus clearly on the outcomes both sides are trying to achieve. 

Make sure you put yourself in the seat of your supplier’s sales director – how can a contract with your organisation provide a supplier with the opportunity for fair value earnings or a sustainable revenue stream?

Start the conversation

Changing the way your organisation selects suppliers will not happen overnight.  When you’re engaging with stakeholders our panel advises you to talk in their terms not the language of procurement. 

Will the change you’re proposing add value?  Why will it improve customer experience?  Why could it safeguard or improve reputation?

So, go ahead and pick one of the secrets that the webinar panel shared as being critical factors for success and start that conversation with the business today.

A recording of the Procurious-Ivalua Webinar – Critical Success Factors for Selecting Your Suppliers with panel members Gordon Tytler, Rolls Royce, Stephen Carter, Ivalua, Fred Nijffels, Accenture and host Tania Seary, Procurious is available here.

How Procurement Professionals Can Look Like Rockstars

Will procurement ever achieve ‘rockstar’ status within an organisation? It’s an idea that hasn’t gained much traction in the past. But help may be at hand from a new source.

Muhammad suryanto/ Shutterstock

Despite the profession’s best efforts, the terms ‘procurement’ and ‘rockstar’ are uneasy bedfellows in a sentence. When you picture a rockstar – Keith Richards, Dave Grohl, Joan Jett, Pete Townshend – they are a free spirit; perhaps anarchic, but certainly someone who lives life by their own rules. Does this sound like procurement to you? No, me neither.

Even now, after all the efforts to make procurement a strategic partner, moving from transactional purchasing to strategic buying or strategic sourcing, the image of procurement remains the same. A profession that’s very traditional, process driven, compliant (not that this is a bad thing) and just maybe a little … boring.

Although some progress has been made, rockstar status is still a ways away. While there are huge, global names that have come from the profession, the name recognition is still an issue. You know Sheryl Sandberg, Bill Gates and Tim Cook, but do you know who their CPOs are?

Have you heard of Bo Andersson, formerly GM’s ‘Mr Purchasing’? How about Jennifer Moceri, CPO of global drinks giant, Diageo? Without wider recognition of what these rockstars have achieved, very few people outside the profession will be able to understand much about what procurement can deliver.

Collective rather than Individual?

The profession has spent so long trying to create ‘rockstar’ CPOs and leaders with global profiles that it may have lost sight of the true aim – to elevate procurement as a whole. When it comes to being a ‘rockstar’, the one thing that nearly all the greats have in common is a group by their side or backing them up. And it’s in this power of the collective that procurement’s ultimate success may lie.

For the collective profession it’s about understanding what the business needs, aligning a procurement strategy with the overall business strategy, and then delivering on this. Procurement will be treated as a strategic partner when it has earned the organization’s trust as a value-adding operation.

It might be an unpopular move, but the first thing that’s going to be on the agenda is savings. The drive in procurement has been to promote an agenda that covers more than just savings – efficiency, compliance, risk management and supplier development are just a few.

However, without even realizing it, the majority of these elements underpin savings and cost reduction. The trick is to not get too focused on savings to the detriment of the wider strategic agenda. Supplier consolidation and centralized procurement are a couple of approaches which tick both the savings box and that of the wider strategic aim of adding value.

Procurement Solutions – Your Backing Vocals

Rather stretching the metaphor of the rockstar and the band, it’s important to understand the tools available to help create your own procurement version of the Traveling Wilburys. Rockstar status won’t happen in isolation and that’s where procurement solutions and procurement consulting can take to the stage.

The best procurement solutions can help turn your data into a major strength through the power of spend analytics. Software can help organizations understand who they are spending their money with, how much they are spending and, most importantly, if they are getting what they have paid for. It makes spend visible, facilitating a greater understanding of how cost optimization and spend management will work within the wider procurement strategy.

As with any band, it’s important to pick a software solution that acts in harmony with existing systems, processes and how it will work once it’s been implemented. Given that employees are the ones who will be using it on a day-to-day basis, it’s critical that the solution is user-friendly, and that employees are trained fully.

Even the great rock bands (Queen, Black Sabbath, the Beatles) sometimes need to bring in external experts to push them on to greater things. For procurement it’s no different and the choice may be to engage procurement consulting organizations to assist.

These consultants can assist with software choices, implementation and running. But Group Purchasing Organizations (GPOs) go one step further, offering contract monitoring, spend management and collective buying power through their membership network.

This can help drive savings targets, aid supplier consolidation and all the other positives that organizations want from their procurement teams. Put simply, they help transform procurement from an undiscovered and unappreciated talent to a global rockstar!

Visit UNA to learn more about the benefits of Group Purchasing Organizations.

Creating a Procurement Video to Make Your Mum Proud!

Photo by Donald Tong from Pexels

This article was written for Procurious by Sievo. Find out more about them here.

Have you ever had a hard time explaining what you do to friends or family? Do you love your job but get the sense other people find it boring?

We all know sales drives growth, marketing builds brands and the buck stops with finance. Why is it so difficult to explain the excitement and value procurement brings to the table?

According to Wikipedia, procurement is “the process of finding and agreeing to terms, and acquiring goods, services, or works from an external source, often via a tendering or competitive bidding process. Procurement generally involves making buying decisions under conditions of scarcity.”

Yeah, I know! It sounds boring. Compare it to what we came up with to describe procurement analytics. And we promise you, this is NOT just another boring video about procurement.

Time for a Re-Brand

So why did we break the procurement as we know it and create that simple-fun video? We all know that procurement is often introduced in a boring way – it’s no Sales or Marketing.

But if Sales and Marketing can brand themselves well, why can’t procurement? Why is it that when think-ing about sales, people think of smiling businessmen in suits making deals on lunch dates that increase the company’s revenue, and when thinking of procurement it’s something….well…different.

At Sievo we do procurement analytics. It’s arguably the nerdiest, geekiest, most jargon-filled area of procurement. Analytics is tough to explain on its own. But analytics combined with procurement? I’m not going to even put the definition of that here.

But don’t worry – the fact that procurement is boring is not your fault!

You can choose who and what to blame – the fact that procurement professionals are focusing on savings instead of branding or the lack of knowledge about the subject – but one thing is true: procurement has a branding problem.

Our Procurement Video – Sharing the Excitement

A while back we were looking at YouTube videos about procurement to have some inspiration for future projects. Turned out, we weren’t very inspired at all after watching all of the long and technical videos. In fact, we got a bit worried when wondering what our moms would say if they decided to look into what we do for a living.

We decided we had to do something. Anything. We found that there was a clear demand for an interesting and fun video about procurement. Like the one the sales function has where Leonardo DiCaprio shows how to sell a pen. If for no-one else than to finally explain to our partners and mothers what it really is that we do in a way that they wouldn’t fall asleep halfway.

The thing is, procurement and procurement analytics are actually quite exciting. You should know. Sure, it’s not smiling people out on launch dates all the time, but dang it, procurement is an important function. It’s a function that should be portrayed in the exciting way it deserves.

This subject of changing the way we talk about procurement seemed to be close to the hearts of many since there has been an abundance of comments in response to the video.

Check some of those out:

“Definitely going to show this to my family to let them know what I do at work all day!”

Naavie

“Very cool – this video shows importance of procurement analytics to CPOs, cate-gory managers, compliance officers who look for sustainability in procurement process and even legal department!”

Alexandra Shtromberg

“Shared to my network, great vid… procurement analytics, simply explained and fun to watch… ”

Laura Garcia-Hornell

“Interesting and fun video, really liked it. I am all in for procurement analytics because on the best case it helps to support better decisions which lead to better negotiations… ”

Phil Kowalski

Want more? Read here 14 of some of the most creative definitions of procurement analytics by the ex-perts. Who knew procurement analytics could be explained with Tequila, an Indian wedding, and digging up gold?

Comment what you think about our approach and let us know how YOU would rebrand procurement!

We are Living in Exponential Times

We are living in exponential times. While that fact makes it exceedingly exciting to be alive right now, it also comes with a lot of procurement related issues. Let’s examine a few facts, and see if you can realise where I am going with this:

  1. In 1984, there were 1,000 internet capable devices.
  2. By 1992, there were 1,000,000.
  3. In 2008, there were 1,000,000,000.
  4. Today it is estimated at 30,000,000,000.
  5. Last year, 4 exabytes (4.0 x 10^18) of unique information was generated, which is more than the previous 5,000 years in total!
  6. It is estimated that there will be 70 billion connected devices by 2025.
  7. NTT Japan has successfully tested a fiber optic cable that pushes 14 trillion bits per second down a single strand of fiber
  8. Technical obsolescence is accelerated with technologies becoming obsolesced in as little as 3 years!

The Exponential Risk in Your Tail Spend

Let’s talk about third-party risk management. In procurement we need to focus on getting the correct supplier/provider/adviser at the best total cost, delivering the right level of quality and service levels.

To most people, this means that we are living in exponential times. But to a procurement person it means “oh no, I need to look at all of my supplier relationships because of the possible threat of risk.” The issue with this logic is we don’t know what we don’t know. And that means we have probably done little to no research/cyber security/risk assessment on our tail spend, let alone on every supplier in our critical spend.

Most companies have entered into multi-year agreements with their critical spend suppliers. This is in an effort to secure the best total cost of ownership and allow ample time for their suppliers to retool, ramp up and to get to know them in order to meet their service and quality requirements.

Therefore, despite quarterly business reviews (QBRs), it can possibly be as long as one to 10 years since that contract and relationship has been assessed (if ever) for real third-party risks.

Getting to Grips with your Supply Chain

I speak with CPOs on a daily basis and every one of them admits that they do not have a perfect grasp of their third parties, let alone their fourth-, fifth- or sixth-level parties. When was the last time you asked a supplier (especially in the tail) if they ever subcontract? Or whether their third parties, or fourth, have been reviewed for cyber risk? Or any risk at all for that matter?

Do you know whether your fourth parties are using human slavery? If every device is updated for the latest virus check? Whether employees are charging their phones through their devices, or if they are permitted to insert USBs into their computers from an unknown source?

How do we know if our fourth-level parties have a proof of mining to avoid conflict minerals? When was the last time we even checked our own staff for complying with strong cybersecurity norms?

The Cyber Risks Within Your Organisation

Just recently at a convention for hackers, cables that looked like Lightning cables were modified with extra hardware that gave hackers remote access to devices. Here’s how they work:

“O.MG cables are indistinguishable from the real thing, and they even come with the iconic adhesive binding rings you’ll find wrapped around new Apple cables. The [modified] cables act normally, too, letting you charge your devices via USB or transfer files from your iOS devices.

Neither your PC nor your connected devices will ever notice that anything is amiss. Short of dissecting the cable to look for the extra hardware, the only way to detect that you’re using an O.MG cable is when you realize, after the fact, that your device was exploited.

And even if you happen to catch an attacker running a terminal window on your PC remotely, O.MG cables include a kill switch that disables the implanted hardware, thus destroying any possibility to track down the attack’s origins.”

‘These Dummy iOS Lightning Cables Let Hackers Remotely Access Your Devices’, Lifehacker, August 2019

Secure Apps?

Apple would have you believe that your iPhone is very secure, until you add your first app. For example, when traveling recently I downloaded an app to play Dominoes (the game, not the pizza). This is seemingly innocent, but since I was on a long flight, I actually read the privacy information.

Check out some of the following extracts from the Terms & Conditions and Privacy Information:

  • FM GAMES App is a gaming application that may utilise your personal data. You also consent to FM GAMES’s cookie policies, as described herein.
  • Types Of Data We Collect: We collect personal data and non-personal data about you.
  • Location and Distance Information: When you use the FM GAMES App, we will collect your location to determine your distance from other users (“Distance Information”) through the GPS, Wi-Fi, and/or cellular technology in your Device. Your last known location may be stored for the purpose of calculating Distance Information between you and other users.
  • Messages: When you send a message we may retain the message for archival purposes or as otherwise allowed by law.
  • Purchases: We collect information necessary to complete purchases. This may include, among other things, your name, credit card information, billing information, address, telephone number, and email address.
  • Third Party Tracking Companies: We may share your hashed Device ID, Profile Information, Distance Information, and demographic information with our advertising and analytics partners. These third parties may also collect information directly from you as described in this Privacy Policy.
  • Third Party Service Providers: We may share your Personal Data with third party service providers

When I tried to turn off location services, this was not allowed, so I discarded the app. If this is the case with a gaming app for my phone, can you imagine the angst my home screen caused our IT folks?

Would you know if you had been hacked?

If I charge my phone through my computer, imagine what I am opening up for hackers to get to? How many of you reading this are using public Wi-Fi? What about Starbucks, or at the airport? Many of us will pass through at least one on the way to the Procurious Big Ideas event.

Did you connect to the seemingly innocent Wi-Fi? Would you know if you were hacked? If you haven’t heard about the reporter whose email was hacked on an airplane while using the airline app while working on a story about the FBI and Apple, take the time to do so.

The hacker read nearly everyone’s email on the plane. They then pulled the reporter aside when they landed to discuss the security, or lack thereof, of his phone while using public Wi-Fi, even if was at 35,000 feet.

The Fallability of Passwords

If this isn’t enough, consider what anyone can do with your passwords. Take for example my login for Amazon. If you were able to see my screen while I was logging in, this is what you could do.

Then, if in Chrome, right click and click on Inspect.

By merely highlighting the password and writing the word “text,” you will see my password. It is that easy if someone is “looking at your email” as you are logged in.

So, there you go. This is my Amazon password and I have now changed it since I wrote this post (but don’t tell my kids). This is the most basic level of cyber protection you can get, but even at a personal level with my own “research,” we are so out of our league, especially when dealing with technology obsolescence.

In the era of BYOD (bring your own device) who knows what your staff is exposing your company to. If we take this one level further to our third parties, who out there is doing the exact same thing and exposing their company to the same risks I just showed you?

So, while we are going to discuss third-party risk management in my session at The Big Ideas Summit, this is just the icing on the cake. If I am just one of the hundreds of contractors, imagine what damage I could be doing to your risk profile.

The Art of Third-Party Risk Management

So, the long and short of it, we are living in exponential times and it is time we paid clear attention to all of our third-party relationships (and their third parties, etc.) along our supply chains or we are destined to be in for a large risk event. It isn’t a matter of if, but when it will happen. If technology obsolescence is happening faster all the time, then we need to stay educated and alert, not paranoid.

To overcome these obstacles, we need to have an effective third-party relationship management and framework. Successful third-party management programs should focus on the four cornerstones approach: contract and performance management, risk management, financial management and communication management. The risk aspect of the relationship framework needs to be addressed for both critical and non-vendor relationships, along with non-critical vendors.

I recently took SIG University’s Third Party Risk Management Certification Program and was amazed to learn how much risk we are exposed to within our contracts and the need for a strong third-party relationship framework with a focus on risk. For a framework to be successful, it must have strong governance and approved by senior management.

As a result of the 2008 financial crisis, there has been a renewed focus on the role of board of directors, the composition of the board, capabilities, accountabilities, and responsibilities for prudent acceptance and management of risk. This renewed focus has made it much easier to focus on third-party risk and to get strong governance in place to mitigate risks.

The most important lesson to leave you with is that third-party risk management is an art, not a perfect science. Having a framework in place to address and mitigate risk, escalate issues and seek resolution is the key to making strategic procurement decisions.

Learn more about procurement’s role in managing third-party risk by attending Dawn’s session at the Procurious Big Ideas Summit Chicago 2019 on Wednesday, September 18. If you can’t be in the room, there’s still time to register as a Digital Delegate. Find out more and sign up today!

About the Author

Dawn Tiura is the CEO and President of SIG, SIG University and Future of Sourcing and has over 26 years’ leadership experience, with the past 22 years focused on the sourcing and outsourcing industry.

In 2007, Dawn joined SIG as CEO, but has been active in SIG as a speaker and trusted advisor since 1999, bringing the latest developments in sourcing and outsourcing to SIG members. Prior to joining SIG, Dawn held leadership positions as CEO of Denali Group and before that as a partner in a CPA firm. Dawn is actively involved on a number of boards promoting civic, health and children’s issues in the Jacksonville, Florida area. 

She is a licensed CPA and has a BA from the University of Michigan and an MS in taxation from Golden Gate University. Dawn brings to SIG a culture of brainstorming and internal innovation.

One Small Step for People, 5 BIG Ideas for Procurement

Change all starts with one small step. But Big Ideas are great in helping us get our feet moving!

Photo by Joshua Earle on Unsplash

What happens when Australia’s biggest CPOs and procurement leaders gather in one room?

You get a flood of ground-breaking ideas that are bound to push our profession into an exciting new era.

The Big Ideas Summit Melbourne 2019 has wrapped after a day of thought-provoking speeches, lively discussions and the unforgettable sight of 120 procurement professionals hopping on one foot before their morning coffee. You probably had to be there to believe it, but it’s true.

A recurring theme throughout the day – both from our presenters and from the attendees themselves – was fun. Whether they were creating unusual networking opportunities, encouraging us to gamify our processes to make the mundane tasks more enjoyable, or reminding us that positivity was the secret to longevity, fun permeated this procurement event.

Our line-up of inspiring speakers spent the day continually challenging existing ideas and shifting the goalposts as we took a glimpse into the future. Here are five of the biggest ideas to come out of the Melbourne Big Ideas Summit this year:

1. Co-design is the essential skill needed to succeed in Industry X.0

Ben Tulloch, Managing Director at Accenture, lead us on a journey through the history of procurement. We’re standing on the cusp of Industry X.0. Soon we’ll be utilising the full force of advanced technology and challenging the ways we do business to become faster, smarter and better.

But what do procurement professionals need to focus on now to best utilise emerging technologies in the future? Co-design is the ability to actively involve all stakeholders in the problem-solving process, focusing on the user and pulling apart the problem to find the best answer.

2. Think with your head, but lead with your heart

We all know the three C’s of procurement: cost, control and compliance. But Henrik Smedberg from SAP Ariba believes we need to be aware of three new C’s: convenience, connectivity and conscience.

It’s time to move beyond just checking the boxes of legal compliance, and start using our hearts to think about the humans affected by problems like modern slavery.

But if administrative processes to monitor our supply chains are too difficult, they simply won’t happen. We need to utilise tech solutions to manage and automate our supplier risk administration. Only then can we have a more holistic view of our suppliers and be proactive about driving change.

3. Psychological safety is the number one factor in high performing teams

We’re at record high levels of anxiety in the workplace. When we’re under extreme stress our brains can only focus on getting the task in front of us done, making us lose our ability to think creatively, innovate and problem solve.

To counteract this and create high performing teams within our businesses, John Dare of Emotous believes we need to create a positive environment and foster a level of trust that will lead to psychological safety.

This is the common thread of high performance – the confidence to innovate, share ideas and take risks with the support of your team.

4. We need to give new starters support to agitate change

During their panel discussion, Billie Gorman of Accenture, CPO of the Year, Lisa Williams, and Future Leader in Procurement, Sapphire Loebler, tackled the issue of encouraging the next generation to drive change.

Ultimately, we need to give them room to operate, an opportunity to speak and the space to try new things. Whether they make mistakes or have success, there will be important learnings that will benefit the business going forward.

5. Agile procurement is a competitive advantage

Agility and flexibility are big news at the moment. It’s a trend that has crept in from software development into all facets of the business world and is increasingly becoming important in procurement.

Andrew Shaw, Enterprise Sales Manager at Felix, shared how agile frameworks can help to increase efficiency, simplify processes and shorten delivery times. Moving away from rigid plans make you more able to adapt to change – an increasingly important skill as the entire profession evolves exponentially.

The Big Ideas Fun isn’t Over Yet…

As an added bonus, our high-energy MC, Dean Gale from Phuel, reminded us of an important lesson for all procurement professionals: learning and growth comes from incremental changes and regular challenges. If we’re going to drive change within our company – and the wider world – it all starts with one small step.

Thank you to everyone who joined us in Melbourne and online – we can’t wait to see what ideas await us in Chicago on September 18th.

Did you miss out on Melbourne? Or can you just not get enough of the Big Ideas vibe? If you want to get more, more, more, there’s still time to register as a Digital Delegate for the Big Ideas Summit Chicago 2019. Even if you can’t be there in person, you can still be in the room. Find out more and sign up today here!

Raising Procurement’s Role in the Fight Against People Trafficking

Photo by lalesh aldarwish from Pexels

“On this World Day against Trafficking in Persons, let us reaffirm our commitment to stop criminals from ruthlessly exploiting people for profit and to help victims rebuild their lives.”

UN Secretary-General António Guterres

In 2013, UN member states officially adopted the 30th of July as the ‘World Day against Trafficking in Persons’. The aim of the day was to raise the profile of this critical issue, and “raise awareness of the situation of victims of human trafficking and for the promotion and protection of their rights.”

In September 2015, the same member states created new goals aligned with this agenda. The goals aimed to put in place measures to combat people trafficking, specifically to end trafficking of and violence against women and children.

A number of individual countries have laws in place against people trafficking. In the USA, this is the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA) 2000, most recently reauthorised in 2013. The UK’s Modern Slavery Act of 2015 was created to provide stronger protection for those being trafficked for the purposes of sexual slavery or forced labour.

In spite of these laws, and the fact that 173 UN Member States have implemented the UN Protocols, modern slavery and people trafficking still exists in huge numbers. According to the Global Slavery Index, an estimated 40.3 million people were in some form of slavery on any given day in 2016.

People Trafficking – Failure to Comply

In the simplest terms, it’s up to the individual organisations to take responsibility. Responsibility for their own operations. Responsibility for their suppliers. Even responsibility for the wider supply chains.

Modern Slavery and People Trafficking doesn’t stop with a tick-box exercise. Procurement needs to stand up and make a difference through its actions, rather than words. Under the Modern Slavery Act, any organisation with an annual turnover greater than £36 million must publish a statement on what they are doing to combat slavery in their supply chain.

Let’s look at public procurement in the first instance. (But don’t let that make you think private companies are off the hook. We’ll come back to this!)

Public procurement faces huge scrutiny and rightly so. According to reported figures, an estimated £220 billion worth of contracts were awarded in 2017 by the UK Government to private companies. (See, we did say this was coming.) However, in 2018 it was reported that 40 per cent of the Government’s top 100 suppliers by lifetime spend had failed to comply with Modern Slavery legislation on reporting.

Far from leading from the front, the UK Government was being criticised for continuing to award contracts to these organisations. Figures for the private sector are harder to come by, but we can assume that the same reporting issues exist there too.

Procurement’s Role in Reversing Fortunes

Compliance with legislation and reporting issues would be a good place to start. Beyond this it’s about creating a culture of responsibility throughout the supply chain. Openness, honesty and transparency are the hallmarks of a strong supply chain. This is what procurement must aim for as a minimum.

We have spoken before about the need for procurement to create a legacy for future generations. This not only covers sustainability, but also driving social responsibility through multiple supply chain levels.

Tools such as blockchain and other technological advancements can provide key assistance. From here, procurement can move to open up data and shine lights on the dark corners of supply chains. By doing this, it helps to expose poor practices, undermine slavery operations and start making a real difference to those in need.

The final thing to remember is not to do this in isolation. True, each organisation has individual responsibility. But as with many procurement progressions, collaboration and communication are key. The whole is greater than the sum of the parts. Organisations face common challenges, so they should be able to come up with common solutions.

Shared expertise is the way forward and the path to procuring with purpose. Let’s finally put an end to modern slavery and people trafficking. You can take the first steps now.

Procure with Purpose

Procurious have partnered with SAP Ariba to create a global online group – Procure with Purpose.

Through Procure with Purpose, we’re shining a light on the biggest issues – from Modern Slavery and People Trafficking to Minority Owned Business, and from Social Enterprises to Environmental Sustainability.

Click here to enroll and gain access to  all future Procure with Purpose events including exclusive content, online events and regular webinars.  

Don’t Move! Improve: How the Property Market Should Inspire your Career Choices

Photo by rawpixel.com from Pexels

When you’re considering your career choices, take inspiration from the property market. There are more similarities than you think.

As a nation we are pretty obsessed with house prices – what our property would fetch if we put it up for sale, what the neighbour’s/our boss’s/our ex’s home is worth, how much our ‘bricks and mortar’ has gone up/down in value. Even if we have no plans to sell up, “property porn” is highly addictive.

Well, you might not realise it, but the jobs market is very similar the housing market.

Who hasn’t got bored at work, and scrolled through job boards to see if there is a better paid role elsewhere? Who hasn’t looked at their pay and perks and wondered if they earn more or less than their colleagues and friends?

This is not the only similarity between the jobs and property markets.

Take supply and demand: When there is uncertainty, the supply of candidates drops. This is keeping “values” up with average pay up 3.9 per cent over the last year.

It’s a similar picture in the housing market. Fewer properties for sale is preventing a property price crash as there is less supply. So prices still managed a 0.9 per cent rise in the year to June (although in London they dipped 2.7 per cent).

Both are a Buyer’s Market

Just as homebuyers can negotiate hard – so can candidates. In 2018, employees who stuck with the same firm saw their average pay rise by just 0.6 per cent after inflation. Those changing employers saw their pay rise by seven times as much, up by 4.5 per cent.

However, this can be a risky strategy.

Yes, you tend to earn more by switching jobs but it’s not the only way to increase your earnings.

If you stay put and “improve” your job prospects, you won’t have all that uncertainty – not knowing if a new job is really for you, worrying that you won’t pass the probationary period and (even worse) waiting until your first day to discover that the job description could be something written by an estate agent (i.e. it bears very little resemblance to reality).

How to Improve Your Job

There has been a fivefold increase since 2013 in the number of homeowners choosing to improve rather than move. So, why not take a leaf out of their book and do the same with your career choices.

· Start with a Valuation

Just as with a house move, many of us wonder if we would be better off with a job move. But how do you know for sure? Well, check out salary benchmarking websites.

Check out Michael Page’s Salary Comparison tool, which compares pay for a number of procurement roles by sector to see if you are underpaid or not. Also check Glassdoor and scour a few job websites to check advertised salaries.

· The Best Improvements to Make

Look at the LinkedIn profiles of people who are one-step-up the career ladder to see what attributes they have that add to their value.

Just as bi-fold doors and open-plan living are desirable in the property market, there are some skills that really stand out among successful people (whether that it is soft-skills such as leadership or hard-skills like proficiency in the latest tech).

Check out job adverts too – are there any skills that seem to be in high demand, that you don’t have?

· Can you get away with a bit of DIY?

If your tech skills are lacking or you need a bit of CPD to bring you up-to-date with latest developments in your sector, online learning is an easy solution. You can learn in your own time, invest in the courses that work best for you and then have something to prove your worth to your employer.

When negotiating a pay rise, showing that you have invested your own time, money and effort in your own success – which could also help boost productivity – is a great bargaining chip.

· Or do you need Professional Help?

Sometimes a bit of DIY is not going to add value. In some cases it can even be a waste of time and money. So, this is where you may need to get professional help, perhaps studying a postgraduate or professional qualification with a recognised provider.

For this you are going to need finance. You can get postgraduate student loans (a bit like a home improvement loans, only for your career). These are similar to student finance for a first degree and you can borrow up to £10,906. Go here for more information.

Or you could simply ask your employer. Many professionals are reluctant to put in a training request (partly because they worry that they will appear as though they need training).

However, this is about career development – doing a better or bigger job – so sell the benefits. It is less of a big ask right now.

According to recruiters Robert Half the biggest talent management concern for senior executives is “employee retention and training” which will be a priority for 31 per cent over the next 12 months. Attracting talent comes in second at 29 per cent – showing that firms see greater benefit in up-skilling their staff than hiring new ones.

· Get Someone Else to Market You

Despite those online property platforms offering to sell your property for less, most homeowners still favour traditional high-street estate agents. Paying someone else to sell your property is not only easier, they are professionals so should (in theory) be able to get you a higher price.

Do the same for your career. If you can find someone else to champion your career, you might not have to ask for that promotion or pay rise – you could be identified as a “potential highflyer” and approached instead.

Seek out mentors, who can help guide your career but who also have currency within your organisation. Perhaps a manager in a different department or even the person who first hired you (and has an interest in you doing well).

Also, reach out via LinkedIn – post thought-provoking and intelligent ideas, link to senior professionals and build your brand through endorsements and connections.

· Get a New Valuation

Finally, prepare your career for the market – declutter your social media, spruce up your online presence and update your particulars (your CV). Now ask for a chat with your line manager (tell him or her what it is about) and go in with a clear asking price (use your research to determine your value). Then see what offers are made.

If your improvements do not yield results, it’s not the end for your career choices. At least you are ready to put yourself on the market!

Want to get your wheels turning towards a supply chain career one could only dream of? Then don’t miss our upcoming Career Boot Camp with IBM – a free 5-part podcast series with some of the very best of the best. Check it out here: https://www.procurious.com/career-boot-camp-2019

Progress or Perish: How to Push our Profession to the Next Level

Traditional procurement roles will perish if significant progress isn’t made. But how can the profession progress enough to deliver true value?

By @lindsayhenwood on Unsplash

By Ben Tulloch, Managing Director at Accenture

Ask any business executive in Australia how procurement has made their life easier, and they’re more likely to tell you that it’s been a roadblock.

Despite the profession’s brilliant minds, appetite for improvement, and advanced solutions from AI to blockchain and beyond, only 20 per cent of procurement tech projects down under prove successful. The issue, it seems, is something more deep-seated. The modern Australian enterprise is not geared for rapid evolution.

By the time Aussie companies have dedicated years of effort and distraction to available solutions, the market has advanced beyond recognition. What we really need is the ability to rapidly prototype and test ideas, implement them at scale and do it all again next month.

A lack of agile skills has left Australia lagging behind the EU and US. In fact, we’re probably at a 3/10 in terms of our capabilities and maturity, still using procurement tech and processes that harken to the 1970s. As we’re so late in implementing the basics, how can we even begin to place ourselves ahead of the curve?

Progress: The role of the traditional procurement manager will perish if it doesn’t change

There’s a fearmongered risk that jobs will be lost to advanced technologies. At some level, that’s correct: if a theatre nurse implemented AI to predict, trigger and record stock orders in the blockchain, they wipe out the P2P function of procurement. But this doesn’t spell disaster, it opens up new opportunities for growth.

If we can remove the administrative element of the job, procurement professionals can progress from a traditional role and take a more strategic view, rather than just buying stuff. They can leave a legacy and make a tangible difference – socially, environmentally and economically. For example, readily available blockchain solutions have the ability to eradicate modern slavery by providing ultimate transparency across supply chains.

But the skills needed to run a digital control tower or AI stock predictor are different. We’re going to need system integrators, program managers, design thinkers, full-stack engineers, mathematicians and AI experts. How do you rapidly shift engrained national mindsets – quickly and cheaply? A culture of co-design, ecosystem partners and using the success of tangible use cases to build trust are key.

‘Design Thinking’ is the Next Step

One of Accenture’s government clients had small armies of people trying (and failing) to keep up with updating pricing lists. Place an order, and it was most likely attached to the wrong stock number. As a result, buyers lost trust in suppliers and vice versa.

Now imagine if those master pricing lists were housed on the blockchain – transparent, secure and updated in real time? That technology exists, it’s cheap and takes only weeks to implement. But this isn’t a tech problem, it’s a change problem.

In the startup ecosystem, design thinking is in their DNA. Even three months is considered a long time, and products evolve continuously to keep up with market changes. These newer generations of Australian innovators would laugh our outdated tech and processes out the room, instead turning to a slick new app or platform that can be pushed to market within weeks.

But if procurement brought a startup solution to the CMO of a large Australian enterprise, it would likely be met with, “they’re not on our preferred supplier list.”

The Business Case for Innovation

The return on investment for agile solutions is not only profound, it’s immediate. We’ve been working with a major airline in Australia on using AI to predict, prioritise and elevate invoices for large suppliers, and manage changes in very complex supply chain relationships. In doing so, they’ve removed all paper processes, increased transparency, and seen a significant ROI in only three months.

Another major telco client has been tackling customer service with an omnichannel conversational platform that can replicate complex human conversation, comprehend voice, text and multiple trains of thoughts – not just spit out an answer to a direct question. Within months, the bot has compressed contract changes from 3.5 days to 8 minutes. This relatively inexpensive solution has potential solutions for the entire procurement profession.

The best part is that the platform was in live testing by week three. That’s on a live contract with live scaling and live data, three weeks after the idea was suggested. That’s design thinking in action.

The Art of the Impossible

Showcasing the impossible is powerful. If I utter the word ‘blockchain’ to an old-school Australian organisation, they’re likely to palm it off as a futuristic dream. But show them a functional, cheap and efficient blockchain contract in action and they’ll get it. Demystify advanced technology for your workforce, and take the objection off the table.

Collaborate with industry partners to forge a path forward that benefits everyone – not just your company. Start with the problem, and isolate solutions. Sure, there are technical and personal risks involved in evolution. But there are risks with everything in business. Not every idea has to be rolled out permanently across your entire enterprise. But not taking steps towards the future is the biggest risk of all.

At this month’s Big Ideas Summit, procurement professionals will be coming together to understand, challenge and solve the profession’s biggest problems. I’ll be speaking to the power of design thinking in facing the future of procurement, and how an “Industry X.0” mindset can pave the way forward.

The bottom line is that if you do nothing, people will find their way around you. The best way forward is to recognise that you’re not alone – Australia lags behind with you – and then get on the front foot and be ready to progress.