Why Buying From Social Enterprises Is As Easy As A, B, C

If you’re looking to boost the sustainability of your category plan, try seeking out social-enterprise suppliers. While we all know change can be challenging, and some buyers are reluctant to shift from tried and tested suppliers, this simple A, B, C approach empowers you to make things happen – and support social enterprise with buying power.

Do you want a quick and easy way to get more sustainability into your category plan?

How about an approach that’s focused on suppliers rather than the scope of what you buy? The answer is to ‘buy social’ – purchase from a supplier that is also a social enterprise.

B2B social enterprises are increasing in number both here in the UK and globally. They’re a great way to promote sustainability because:

  • Social enterprises have a positive social or environmental impact at the heart of their business model.
  • Their scale is significant – they make a contribution of £60 billion to the United Kingdom’s GDP.
  • Social enterprises are more diverse in their leadership and workforce, and we all know that diversity is proven to help businesses succeed and grow.
  • Building social value into your supply chain can help your business attract and retain talent, enhance your brand and access new sources of innovation.

And the good news is that buying social is as easy as A, B, C!

A: Analyse Your Spend

Given that there are more than 100,000 social enterprise suppliers in the UK alone, there’s every chance you’ve already got them in your spend. Make sure you analyse spend before you start to source new suppliers – and get your Buy Social KPIs off to a flying start.

Once you have identified that existing spend, why not amplify the impact by highlighting these suppliers to your buyers and getting even more spend with them if you can?

Sometimes you will find them in unusual areas. One of my teams identified that we already used a local social enterprise for kettles and other household goods. We decided to direct more of our buyers to that cause, which meant increased revenues for that supplier – and all it took was an email from our procurement team.

B: Baby-Steps Approach Gets Quick Wins On The Board

Sometimes changing suppliers is a difficult thing to do. People can be reluctant to shift their spend away from suppliers they’ve used for years. So a baby-steps approach could help by giving your team an early success story to build momentum. Try starting with a low-risk category of spending.

Janette Evans-Turner, Head of Sourcing & Procurement at Zurich Insurance, quite literally took a ‘baby-steps approach’ when engaging with the social enterprise From Babies With Love. Members of her team identified a social enterprise they could use in a low-risk category of spend to ensure that there was a minimum of fuss – and they were able to redirect their spend from a mainstream retailer to a social enterprise.

‘It was easy to approach the buying department as the change didn’t seem that big,’ Janette reports. ‘When we explained to our colleagues in human resources the double whammy of benefits that the change to buying social with From Babies with Love could bring, they were chomping at the bit to get started!’

C: Commit To A Challenge

The final step in the process is a commitment to a target that you want to achieve. Companies such as Amey have put in place ambitious targets to increase their spend with social enterprise and the results have been impressive.

They signed up to the Buy Social Corporate Challenge, developed and delivered by Social Enterprise UK, to support this:

  • The Buy Social Corporate Challenge programme, launched in April 2016, is designed to make it as easy as possible to buy from social enterprise suppliers.
  • There are 24 high-profile businesses signed up to the Buy Social Corporate Challenge representing a broad range of industries – including built environment, financial services, technology and communications.
  • More than £65 million was spent with social enterprise suppliers by Buy Social Corporate Challenge partners in the first three years of the programme.
  • 100% of Buy Social Corporate Challenge partners in the UK rated the quality of their social enterprise suppliers as comparable or better than existing suppliers.

So why not follow this A, B, C process and see if you can start buying from a social enterprise or increase your spend with one today? Find out more about the Buy Social Corporate Challenge here.

How To Get Moving On Your Career Path To The Top

Ambitious and driven? Plot your way to the top with the help of the Procurious webinar featuring advice from three senior leaders 

Are you looking for the next steps to get moving on your career path? Or are you thinking of quitting the day job in search of a new path to the summit?

Do you have questions?

Good news! Procurious has produced a webinar, ‘Don’t Quit the Day Job – Your Path to the Top’ with all the answers you need.

We have assembled a panel of experienced senior leaders from different industries and different parts of the world – Lara Naqushbandi (Google), Christina Morrow (Ricoh USA) and Imelda Walsh (The Source) – to offer career advice. 

And they have plenty of great insights to share with you.

Plan to succeed

Top of their list of recommendations is to have a plan.

Some people like a fully worked-out, detailed action plan. Others prefer a few tasks on a to-do list. 

Either way, you’ll benefit from having made a plan. It’s a good place to start to identify the things you need to do. 

And – as Imelda points out – you’re much more likely to succeed when that plan is written down.

But once you’ve made the plan don’t feel tied to it. Don’t feel you always need to stick to the programme.

Because sometimes doing that can stop you considering potential new roles that could be a great fit for you. 

Take Christina’s advice and ask yourself how you would define professional success. Use that as your guide to consider whether to stick to or deviate from your plan when a new opportunity arises.

Ask what’s important now

Although the financial side of work is an important consideration, the panel members stress the drawbacks of being blindsided by the money associated with a role. 

‘Look at the whole package, not just the pay cheque,’ Lara advises. 

In her experience getting the balance right between work and home life is something that everyone should consider before taking on a new role.

Having a passion for what you do is something all our panel members cited as important. Imelda reports that she’s been most successful when she has a role that focuses on her passion. 

Christina has always taken time out regularly to reflect on what she enjoys doing so that she’s clear on what she might want from any prospective new position.

Take risks

Be open to taking risks.

This may involve deviating from your plan or exploring options to try something new. 

Lara is a great believer in having an openness to risk. Going off the beaten path can often bring great benefits when thinking about the next step in a career. That’s an approach that has definitely worked for her.

But taking a step up can present new challenges and in Christina’s experience, there is always something from a previous role that you can use to build on for the next. 

So don’t stay too long in one job and get bored is her advice. Take a risk and try something out of your comfort zone. 

The soft skills we use every day in procurement and supply chain – like leadership, negotiation and collaboration – are just what are needed for the challenges of a new role.

Hone your network

Having a network is a great resource you can use for securing a new role.

Imelda sees many candidates who have used a mentor to help them develop and grow, achieving great success.

And mentors can help you think about how to adjust to a culture and brief that a new job can bring. 

Moving between different companies can mean adjusting to completely new working environments and procedures – and even sometimes changing continents. 

Lara has found she’s had to adapt her style to accommodate each company’s culture and management style.

Listen in

Why not listen in to our webinar to find out more from our panel about how you can create your path to the top by:
Planning your route
Asking what’s important 
Taking risks
Making the most of your network.

Register for our upcoming (free) webinar here and start 2020 out with a bang!

Don’t Overlook This One Critical Factor When Choosing Your Next Role

Many mention salary as a reason to look elsewhere. So, what possibly could go wrong when you chase the money?

When Tom* was headhunted for a procurement specialist role at a major energy supplier, his eyes lit up. It was literally his dream job – and at a salary $30,000 higher than he was being paid. 

What could possibly go wrong? 

Tom resigned immediately and started planning the lavish holiday on which he’d now be able to take his family. 

Yet less than 6 months later Tom found himself in my office, miserable. 

Tyrannical boss

It turned out that what had seemed like a lucrative move was anything but.

The long hours and high stress of his new role – combined with a tyrannical and workaholic boss – had made the situation untenable. 

‘I’ve learnt the hard way,’ Tom told me, ‘that it’s not all about money.’ 

As general manager of The Source, I meet hundreds of talented procurement professionals every year.

Like Tom, many mention salary as one of the reasons they want to look elsewhere. 

But I often tell candidates that money shouldn’t be the only reason for choosing a job. And in many cases it shouldn’t be an influencing factor at all. 

Here’s why. 

Flexibility and well-being are key

Workplace satisfaction research conducted over the last decade tells us that, contrary to popular belief, salary isn’t one of the driving factors when it comes to happiness at work. 

In fact, salary comes close to last on the list. 

What makes us truly happy at work is, in fact, a combination of permanent workplace flexibility, a commitment to health and well-being and the feeling that we’re doing meaningful and interesting work. 

We also need to feel respected at work. 

We need and want our leaders to notice and listen to us.

And, to an extent, we want them to praise us for our efforts.

In Tom’s situation, he had ended up with none of these. 

He wasn’t getting any respect. In fact, his new manager often berated him in front of other colleagues. 

He also had little flexibility. 

Despite the fact that the organisation had a strong policy on workplace flexibility, Tom’s workaholic manager made him feel like he could never take advantage of it. 

Finally, the lack of flexibility, high expectations and poor management had a knock-on effect on Tom’s health and well-being.

He was stressed and tired all the time – and struggled to stay motivated. 

Again, the organisation had a policy on employee well-being. But that hardly mattered to Tom, whose entire experience was being dictated by a manager he hated. 

People leave their bosses, not their jobs

After talking to me about his situation, Tom quickly came to another realisation about his poor career move.

And this time it wasn’t about salary. 

When you look at the drivers of workplace satisfaction, almost all can be achieved – or derailed – by your leader. 

This is something that’s enshrined in fact: 75% of all people leave their bosses, not their jobs. 

So if you think about it like that, risking leaving a good boss for the unknown can make the salary gain pale in comparison. 

Sure, that extra money might get you a great holiday, help you pay off your debt or buy you the car you’ve always wanted, but what are you giving up in return? 

Your job is a 40-hour-a-week, 48-week-per-year reality, and your career – which a manager can also make or break – is a lifelong endeavour. 

After a few months of searching, we eventually placed Tom in a new role, with a leader I know will give him the career experience he wants and deserves. 

But for all of you thinking of your next move this year, let this be a cautionary tale. 

How much does salary really mean? And how much emphasis should you place on that against working for someone who holds the key to your workplace happiness? 

I’d love to hear your experiences – please share them in the comments section below. 

Interested in some more career advice? Whether you want to move up in your career, change industries, or even need some extra motivation for the new year (and new decade!), start 2020 off with a bang in our upcoming webinar – Don’t Quit Your Day Job. Register here.

Tony Megally is the General Manager of The Source, Australia’s leading procurement recruitment and executive search firm. If you’re looking to hire in the procurement space, or alternatively, you’d like to have a confidential chat about your next role, please contact Tony on +613 9650 6665 or via email on [email protected]

*Name changed to protect privacy

Redefining Corporate Purpose – Is It Time For Boards To Adopt ‘Total StakeHolder Value’?

Major challenges such as spiralling inequality and climate breakdown are putting corporations under pressure to rethink their very purpose. The Maturity Institute has developed a ‘responsible business model’ that puts people at the heart of business and produces best value for stakeholders as well as shareholders.

Is your company facing an existential crisis?

To provoke discussion at a recent Procurious CPO roundtable, I suggested that each participant was working for a company that was already in the midst of one.

Why did I say this? From the London Financial Times calling for a re-setting of capitalism to US CEOs shattering the prevailing paradigm of profit maximization, to investment firms in the City of London calling for a renewal of stakeholder-focused value creation, the purpose of corporations is under intense scrutiny – and facing pressure to change.

The questioning of corporate purpose is putting firms into a state of flux.

If shareholders (or owners) are no longer to be accorded primacy in setting strategies designed to deliver the best financial returns, then what else should be driving them? 

How, and for whom, a firm creates value has become a boardroom conundrum like no other.

Text Box: “This topic blew my mind…my question is now – which organizations are going to take the big leap forward on this?” 
Procurious CPO Roundtable participant, November 2019

A Host Of Challenges

Environmental and human problems arising from business and economic activity have continued to surface at an alarming rate. Poverty, human rights, slavery and growing inequality have become more acute.

Climate breakdown is now impacting all around us. Polluting plastic swirls around in our oceans, contaminating marine life, while toxic pesticides find their way into our bodies via food systems, and poisonous air may be undermining our health every day.

Customers, investors and workers are not just asking questions about their involvement with firms that do not seek to address and resolve these problems, they are increasingly avoiding them altogether.

Governments and regulators are also under growing pressure to restrict or revoke licenses where firms do not work to address such issues or fail to provide real benefit to local communities. 

So what should your own company do to meet these challenges?

It is evident that firms that understand how to simultaneously serve society and perform financially will be the ones that can survive and thrive.

Shareholders And Stakeholders: A Common Purpose

Since 2012, the Maturity Institute (MI) has been building a responsible business model that shows how companies can produce the very best stakeholder and shareholder value by putting people at their heart.

By aligning management systems to leverage and realize the potential value of all their human stakeholders, companies can competitively differentiate themselves from their peers.

For procurement heads, this specifically includes suppliers. This is an area in which value-based relationships (as opposed to those driven more by cost parameters), together with appropriate system design, should lead to superior outcomes.

Moving from a ‘shareholder’ to a ‘stakeholder’ business system requires an understanding of what this entails across an organization’s whole system – including workers, customers, investors, suppliers and wider society.

It also requires engaging everyone in the pursuit of a common purpose.

Total Stakeholder Value

Our work is designed to act as a practical guide, to set out a way forward for boards, C-suites and managers to pursue a goal focused on creating healthy organizations through what we call Total Stakeholder Value (TSV).

This is not based on a theoretical perspective but on existing, exemplary ‘mature’ organizations.

At MI, we teach the invisible factors that have enabled organizations like Toyota, Handelsbanken and Mercadona to lead the world in a direction that is in everyone’s interests. These are companies that have a central purpose rooted in serving society.

Alongside financial outperformance, they have consistently delivered the best-quality products and customer service ahead of peers.

In achieving this, they have deliberately designed high-value management systems, including supplier relationships, and have also led others on managing out harm, in either environmental or human terms.

Organisational maturity

To help companies identify how these factors play out within their own organization, we deploy Organizational Maturity Ratings (OMR) to uncover the intrinsic value and risk arising from the company’s whole human ‘ecosystem’.

Our open-source OM30 diagnostic looks at 32 inter-related questions and is able to identify and predict the likelihood of material human value and risk arising from critical causal drivers, such as:

  • Formulating and articulating a corporate purpose of Total Stakeholder Value (TSV) maximization
  • Identifying whether an organization’s business strategy and operating model are predicated on reconciling its (market) value with changing societal values
  • Checking the extent of trust placed in the leadership and management team by customers, employees and other key stakeholders
  • Determining whether the organization is planning to maximize the value it generates from all of its human capital value (both internal and external, e.g. supply chain)
  • Considering the evidence of any never-ending, continuous improvement philosophy being operationalized.

By examining these factors across their whole system, companies can, at last, gauge a baseline of true corporate responsibility and how it affects total value generation.

Strategies For Transition

This also enables executives and managers to identify key strategies that will help the transition to a corporate purpose of TSV – one that drives financial, human and environmental performance that can also be measured and monitored.

For CPOs, the OM30 also has a specific additional application – in helping to assess the suitability of suppliers. Here it acts as a measure of alignment with parent-company culture and human systems, and can be used to determine levels of supplier responsibility and fit, above and beyond any compliance requirements.  

MI is using its methodology and building its evidence base by working with corporations, investment managers and academic institutions to help them understand the relationship between the OM30 and a range of value and risk outcomes.

Recent academic testing of our data has shown:

“…the benefits to shareholders and stakeholders are not mutually exclusive; in other words, the value to business, shareholders, stakeholders and society are aligned. A company can maximize profits and create wealth for shareholders mainly by establishing a mature institution that enhances well-being for all legitimate stakeholders as well as create positive externalities to the environment and the wider society. 

Cambridge Judge Business School, March, 2019 

We can all participate in encouraging, demanding, designing, building and facilitating the process of change that is now necessary; to help create many more mature, exemplary firms that can lead others.

MI is actively helping stakeholders to play their part.

Stuart Woollard is Council Member at the Maturity Institute. The Mature Corporation – A Model of Responsible Capitalism, co-authored with Paul Kearns, is available with a 20% discount using code Corporation20 from Cambridge Scholars Publishing https://www.cambridgescholars.com/the-mature-corporation.

How To Stop The Computer Saying ‘No’! Clever Hacks For Getting Hired

AI is increasingly involved in recruitment. But how do you get on the right side of a computer that is reading your CV, running an aptitude test or assessing you in an online interview?

It’s impossible to argue with a computer, which is why the famous Little Britain TV comedy skit – ‘The computer says “No”!’ – is so memorable. However, there are ways to get around recruitment algorithms and perform better in an AI video interview.

You have just a few seconds (between 5 and 7) to impress someone with your CV. Hiring managers will quickly scan your résumé to decide whether or not to reject your application.

It’s easy to spot ones that will be instantly dismissed: too short or too long (2 pages max), too unusual (the rejection rate for those with photos is around 88%), badly presented and littered with spelling mistakes . . . with barely a glance, these will all be filed away (or binned).

It doesn’t give you much time to make a good impression.

However, if you think that someone in HR is hard to please, try impressing a computer algorithm.

A human being might, at least, see your potential if you write a convincing personal statement and a powerful cover letter showing that you have the ability and determination to succeed in a role for which you don’t quite have the right qualifications or experience.

When the process is automated, whether or not you get past the first few stages of the hiring process is all down to data. If you fail to score highly, you’ll never get hired – however brilliant you are. So what are the clever hacks?

Algorithm Aces

Always include everything asked for in the job spec in your CV . . . and use exactly the same words.

So if the candidate requirements say ‘Must be proficient in Excel’, say ‘proficient in Excel’ rather than ‘Have experience of using spreadsheets’.

Yes, you might not quite have the required level of expertise, but you can then explain that. The main thing is to pass the first hurdle. You could, for example, say ‘Proficient in Excel: with a relevant qualification’ – then go online to sites such as reed.co.uk or udemy.com and sign up for an online course. For £10 or so and 4–16 hours of online study you could have a qualification.

The other advantage is that you can then add this to your LinkedIn profile and other job applications.

At the very least make sure you include all the ‘musts’ and as many of the ‘desirables’ as possible.

Tips:
  • Tailor your CV to each job. You won’t know in advance which applications are screened by algorithms and which by a human being . . . so play safe.
  • Don’t lie – but be creative. If the job spec requires ‘At least 5 years in a leadership role’ you could add in leading a team (even if that was only 2 of you) or leading a project, to stretch your years of experience to 5.
  • Remember your aim is to get to the interview stage – most firms are struggling to find candidates that tick all the boxes, so don’t be afraid of applying for jobs where you don’t quite have all the qualifications and experience that is required. As long as you pass the initial screening, you can then elaborate on your answers in person . . . and hopefully impress the interviewer so much that you land the job.

Aptitude Hacks

Increasingly often employers are posting online assessment tests to pre-screen applicants.

If possible, set up a dummy account, so that you can go through the process and familiarize yourself with it before doing it for real. Also see if there are any similar aptitude tests online.

Tips:
  • If the test is timed or a stretch, you might want to do a test run several times. However, if you find the test a real struggle perhaps this isn’t the job for you.
  • If the employer leaves the assessment until the day of the interview, prepare – you might be asked to prove your proficiency in a particular program, so go online and do a quick refresher course to get up to speed.

Assessment Musts

Some employers also undertake personality profiling to make sure you have the right characteristics for the role.

The key with this is to be totally honest. Relax and complete the assessment truthfully – using the first thing that comes to mind as your answer, rather than overthinking each question.

If you lie in a personality test, it can be easily spotted. Often assessments take this into account – as they know that people tend to answer with what they think they should say, rather than what they honestly feel in the first 10 or 20 answers. After that they tend to relax and tell the truth.

Tips:
  • Being honest is important – if you are the wrong fit for the job, it will not work out and you could find yourself out of work and with little or no severance (remember, you have virtually no rights in the first 2 years of employment).
  • If the assessment is in a group situation or you are asked to perform a mock sales pitch/presentation etc. at the interview, be the best version of yourself rather than trying to be someone else.

Video Tricks

Unconscious bias is a problem in recruitment and is the reason for a lack of diversity within organizations.

Interviewers tend to have preconceptions about individuals and often look for similarities – leading to them hiring a ‘mini me’. This can leave organizations open to discrimination claims.

This – along with the need to reduce costs – has led to the introduction of AI as an interviewing tool.

However, it is very disconcerting to find yourself talking to a computer screen rather than a real human being.

Tips:
  • Practise, practise, practise. You will often be given a set time limit to answer each question. Umming and ahhing or lengthy pauses will impact on your score.
  • Video yourself answering questions – some AI programs look at your body language, which can give away tell-tale signs of lying (such as looking away or to one side).
  • Treat a video interview as a real interview – get a good night’s sleep, dress to impress, don’t drink too much coffee and try to relax.
  • Stick a photo of someone you like and want to impress (even a celebrity) next to your screen camera. Visualize yourself talking to this real person and your conversation will be more natural – your eyes will also be looking towards the camera, rather than down, and this can make you appear more professional and confident.

So be prepared for AI when you’re applying for your next position. Remember these few tips and behavioural tweaks to handle selection and assessment algorithms and give yourself the best chance of having a happy ending to your job-search story.

Think you could use a little career motivation for the new year and new decade? Join our upcoming webinar – Don’t Quit Your Day Job!

How to Get Stakeholder Buy-In

It doesn’t matter how good your ideas are, without stakeholder buy-in they won’t get any traction. Can you improve this?

buy-in
Photo by S O C I A L . C U T on Unsplash

True innovation comes from true influence. However, the painful reality is that it often doesn’t matter how good your ideas are. If you can’t get buy-in from other people, from the stakeholders in your organisation, then it will end up at the bottom of the pile.

Whether you are trying to implement a new program, in a difficult meeting at work, or attempting to convince your spouse or children of a different point of view, getting buy-in, or being able to influence others, is often the difference between success and failure.

Yet getting buy-in has nothing to do with how loud you are, how great your idea is, or even how confident you are of being right. So what does it involve?

Getting Crystal Clear

Like all important things the key to ‘influence’ is simple – but not easy. It means getting crystal clear on what you actually want your audience to ‘think’, ‘believe’ or ‘do’ differently.

However, in order to do this effectively, you need to craft a message based on what your audience are thinking, believing or doing right now.  

How you go about this depends on who your audience is, but it is possible to get a good read on the think, believe, do in any situation.

For example, as procurement professionals, you have a multitude of stakeholders. So you might want to start by investing in some market research. You might start by inviting some of those key people to lunch, then asking them what their biggest challenges, pain points or questions are in relation to your world.

Crafting the Message

Once you’ve been through that important exercise, break it down: Right now, what do they believe about your value? What are they thinking? What are they doing?

When you know this information, it is much easier to craft a message that speaks their language. However more importantly than that – a message with a clear and engaging path to action.

Once you become experienced in this process you can apply it to any topic. For example: What does marketing need to know right now in terms of procurement trends? Start there – ask the right person (or people) about what they are currently thinking, believing and doing in relation to the topic. Then use that language to bridge the gap between their current reality – and the reality you want to create.

Illuminate a Path

One of my favourite interviews for my Inside Influence podcast was Nancy Duarte. Nancy is a global communication expert, CEO and bestselling author. While discussing her core advice for those looking to become compelling communicators or storytellers – she explained something I wanted to shout from the rooftops.

She said that if you want to create real engagement – rather than a short burst of attention – then turn that engagement into actual action – your primary role is to ‘illuminate a path’. What does she mean by that? She’s saying that it’s not enough to tell people what to do – you also need to give them a compelling enough ‘why’ – followed by a clear pathway to action.

A clear pathway to action doesn’t have to be huge. In fact, going for a ‘simple yes’ is far more likely to result in action that a complex plan of execution. It could be something as simple as: ‘If you want to talk more about some of the possible results we could get from this idea – let me know when you’re free for a brief phone call’. Or ‘In order to take full advantage of this procurement trend we would need to do three simple things…’

An Idea to So Much More

It’s a simple path to action (what you want them to think, believe or do differently) that takes our communication from being ‘just an idea’ to so much more.

So what’s next if you want to increase your buy-in – or influence – in any situation? First become a student of the world of your target audience. Ask the right questions, of the right people – and then use that language to illuminate a path to the promised land.

Julie Masters is a globally recognised expert in influence, authority and thought leadership. She is the CEO and Founder of Influence Nation and Founder of ODE Management – responsible for launching and managing the careers of some of the worlds most respected thought leaders. Julie is also the host of the soon to be launched weekly podcast Inside Influence. An exploration into what it takes to find and own your voice – and then use it to drive a conversation, an idea, an industry or a Nation. To subscribe check out iTunes or Julie’s website.

Calling All Future Procurement Leaders… Start Building Your Personal Brand, Now.

Creating a personal brand as a procurement leader not only helps you do your job better but also boosts your professional standing. So, how do you begin?

‘Personal brand’ seemed such a strange expression to me the first time I heard it.

It sounded like something one of those Gen Z Influencer types would talk about on a beach while flogging an internet get-rich-quick scheme.

Little did I know that building a personal brand would – in time – become a leadership imperative.

Or, crazier still, that one day I would be helping executives develop personal brands while uploading selfie videos of my large, round head onto the internet as a career coach at Executive Career Jump.

The benefits of a personal brand

Whatever your main challenge as a future procurement leader – be it attracting talent, supplier engagement or driving innovation – all these pressures can be reduced by building a strong personal brand.

More and more, jobseekers are told to ‘pick a leader, not a job’. So a strong personal brand will help you no end with recruitment.

It’s not only great for doing your job but also excellent for your career prospects.

When you build a strong personal brand, you’re rarely short of career development, mentoring or employment opportunities.

It is estimated that in today’s digital era 65% of decisions by key stakeholders are made in advance, before you have ever met them. Their decision is almost exclusively based on what they can find out about you online – on social media and on your website.

So what you’re putting out there for people to see is super-important.

It should be strategically positioned and well thought-out.

Three steps to (brand) heaven

Eddie Cochran famously sang that there are ‘three steps to heaven’. Below is a simple three-step process to help establish a strong personal brand as a procurement leader – and then continue to enhance it.

Push yourself out of that comfort zone and give it a go … you’ll be surprised at the results.

STEP 1 – GET YOUR HOUSE IN ORDER

Anything on the internet is findable.

And you will be judged on the basis of what you put out there.

So decide what you want to stand for (make it authentic) and then undertake an online clean-up. There are even apps that can help with this audit process.

Do you have posts out there that you wouldn’t want customers or employers to see? Take them down.

A drunken rant or risqué material? That should definitely go.

Even the pictures in which you appear are important.

I knew one guy who was overlooked for a job offer despite interviewing well as in one of his pictures on social media was next to someone who was smoking cannabis. 

He may have never even touched the stuff, but – fairly or unfairly – hiring him was seen as a risk.

STEP 2 – START PRODUCING ONLINE CONTENT

Once you have your house in order, you need to start producing online content and getting your message out there.

The ROI on this isn’t instant but if you’re consistent it will be significant. Besides, it’s free to use platforms like LinkedIn!

First, you need to decide what you want your personal brand to be. Make sure it is real and authentic.

Next work out which stakeholder groups you want to impress or attract most right now. 

It’s like building up a buyer persona in a marketing exercise.

For example, you may decide that you want your personal brand to be synonymous with promoting the procurement profession as a career of choice and that your biggest priority right now is recruiting entry-level procurement analysts.

That’s your audience.

You could give a name to the person you want to attract . . . ‘Graduate Grace’, for example.

Now start writing articles, producing videos and sharing posts that help promote the profession and will appeal to ‘Graduate Grace’.

Simple as that.

STEP 3 – CONVERT ONLINE BRANDING TO OFFLINE OPPORTUNITY

When you start gaining momentum and building an online brand and community you’ll create an ecosystem that generates offline opportunities, too.

So grab them with both hands. Appear on panels, start mentoring, go to events and deliver talks. Network with peers.

Delivering on your online brand in person is a powerful thing and will only continue to bring you satisfaction and tangible benefits.
Good luck with the journey. Keep striving and experiment often. Use these 3 simple steps to build and maintain your brand – and reap the benefits.

This article was written by CPO Roundtable attendee & Founder at Executive Career Jump, Andrew MacAskill.
In 2020, we will be holding CPO Roundtable events in London and Edinburgh. If you are interested in attending one of these events, please contact Laura Hine by clicking here.

Our Advice? Don’t Quit Your Day Job!

It’s one of the most popular times of year to think about changing your day job. But before you take the plunge it’s best to take some good advice on board.

Don't Quit Your Day Job

It’s the start of a New Year, so you might be looking to make some changes in your life. You might want to get in shape or join thousands of people giving up a habit, something like smoking or sugar or coffee (gasp!).

Or maybe you’re one of the many, many people who decide that a new year means a new career. According to recruiters and advisors galore, January is one of the most popular times of year to look for a new day job. And it’s also one of the best times to be looking for a new job too.

Why is this the case? Well there are a number of theories. One is that this is the time that many organisations and departments receive their budgets, so know how much, if any, recruitment they might want or need to do. Another is that employers come back in the New Year looking for a new start, so are more active in looking for new employees.

Get Some Career Advice

It’s also the start of a new decade, which may give rise to more thoughts on changing your day job. Have you been in your current role too long? Have you developed the role, or been developed in the role, as much as possible? Or is it simply time for a new challenge?

Before you take the plunge and quit your job in a flurry of paperwork, or worse, a fit of pique, it’s a good idea to get some advice from people who have already had hugely successful careers. After all, what better way is there to focus your decision making than learning from the guidance, achievements and even mistakes of those who have ‘been there, done that’.

Join our Webinar

Procurious has just the solution, and plenty of answers, for you as we kick-start the new decade with a new webinar, ‘Don’t Quit Your Day Job – Your Path to the Top’.

We’ve put together an all-female panel to tell us what it takes to have a successful career. Joining Helen Mackenzie, Principal Advisor at Procurious, we have:

  • Lara Naqushbandi, Finance Director, UK and Ireland, Google UK
  • Christina Morrow, Director, Global Procurement, Ricoh USA
  • Imelda Walsh, who is the manager, at Procurious’ sister company, The Source

Sign up now for our webinar on Thursday the 23rd of January at 14:30pm and you’ll hear from this expert panel on a range of topics including:

  • What the one thing is that they have got wrong in their career that webinar attendees can learn from;
  • Why it’s important to have a plan set out before embarking on something new in their working life;
  • How women in leadership roles can pave the way for aspiring future leaders; and
  • How to use your past and current roles to provide a platform to step up to a more senior or C-suite role.

FAQs

Is the webinar available to anyone?

Absolutely! All Procurious members can register for the webinar and it won’t cost you a penny to do so. Simply sign up here.

How do I listen to the ‘Don’t Quit Your Day Job’ webinar?

Simply sign up here and you’ll be able to listen to the on-demand. 

Help – I can’t make it to the live-stream of the webinar!

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream, and you have registered, you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be sure to send you a link that will still work after the webinar is finished. That way you can listen at your leisure!

Don’t Miss Out!

This webinar promises to provide real insight into success, how you need to prepare for the next stage in your career and what it’s going to take to push your career all the way to the top.

Make sure you don’t miss out – sign up today!

Save the Date! Procurious is your Perfect Partner for 2020

Time to get out your diary and save some important dates. Whatever events you’re looking for in 2020, Procurious is your perfect partner in procurement.

2020 Save the Date
Photo by Isaac Smith on Unsplash

Yes, we know it’s only a few days into the New Year. But we’re so excited about the great events we’re got coming up this year that we just can’t wait any longer! Since Procurious first came into being in 2014, we’ve had the aim of putting on a show when it comes to great procurement and supply chain-related events.

And 2020 is no different.

But, as we know you are all busy people, and that diaries tend to fill up fast, we thought we would share some important dates for you to pencil in. That way we can help you plan, and you won’t miss out on anything we’ve got in store for you during the year.

We pride ourselves on making sure we’re offering great content for every member of our community. Not only will we be bringing you webinar discussions on some of the hottest topics facing procurement and supply chain right now, but we’ve also signed up of the some of best leaders, thinkers and speakers around, all set to help you get involved.

So, whether it’s webinars or Roundtables, Summits or podcast series, there’s something here for you in 2020.

Empowering Webinars

We know how much you like a webinar, so we’ve got a great line-up already sorted. We hit the lift-off button in only a couple of weeks from now on the 23rd of January with the highly relevant, ‘Don’t Quit Your Day Job’.

Procurious’ own Helen Mackenzie will be joined by special guests Lara Naqushbandi from Google, Christina Morrow of Ricoh and Imelda Walsh from The Source to discuss all things careers. With topics covering everything from making sure you have a solid plan before you start the quest for a new role to the one change you can make right now to get you on the path to the top, it’s sure to be a cracking start to the new year.

Following this, we’re keeping up a regular plan of webinars throughout the year. You’ll be able to find dates in the Procurious Events Calendar, and we’ll keep you up to date via the Blog and handy email invitations.

High-Powered Roundtables

We’ve extended our CPO Roundtable programme for 2020, with events in London and Edinburgh. We’ll be gathering some of the profession’s top CPOs in the region, or dare we say in the world to serve up new ideas and spark the wisdom of the crowd as they discuss some of the biggest challenges facing procurement and supply chain now.

Although these events aren’t open to everyone, we still like to share some of the great ideas in the Procurious community, as well as a selection of Blog articles in the lead up to the event, and wrapping up the best of the talking points and key takeaways after.

If you’re a senior leader can want to attend a London or Edinburgh Roundtable event, please contact Laura Hine by clicking here.

Perfect Podcasts

If podcasts are your particular flavour of professional development, then 2020 will deliver for you too. We have a week of supply chain themed podcasts, partnering with IBM, from the 11th of May. Then returning in October is our annual Career Boot Camp, with all new speakers and all the best career advice you need.

One of the best things about our podcast series, besides the great coaches and content, is that, at 15 minutes, they are a short, sharp way to get your learning in for the day. If you want to get a flavour of what to expect, you can find all our 2019 podcasts in the Learning Area here on the Procurious website.

Biggest of Big Ideas (2020)

Big Ideas Summit isn’t just the world’s first digitally-led procurement event, it has a global reputation as the most innovative leadership event for the profession. And 2020 is going to be bigger than ever … and that’s not just because our theme is ‘Dream Big’.

Not only do we have Rugby World Cup Winning Head Coach and former Olympic Team GB Director of Sport, Sir Clive Woodward OBE presenting, but a range of the world’s most influential thinkers, eminent business leaders, and commercially creative minds converging in London on March 11 for Big Ideas Summit London.

As always, we’re offering you the opportunity to join us, either online, or in the room with other global thought-leaders. Registration is already open for this unmissable event. After London, Procurious will be visiting global members in Chicago (September) and Sydney (November), and we’ll be releasing more details on these events closer to the time.

Sign Up, Prepare to Soar

We’re sure this has all whetted your appetite for 2020 and the great events Procurious has to offer. If you have any questions at all on the events, you can get in touch with the team via the website, or on one of our social media platforms.

We hope to see as many of you as possible at these events during the year, so sign up now and get ready for your career to soar high this year.

Shifting the Balance of Power when Negotiating

Sometimes it’s hard to shift the balance of power in long-term relationships. But 10 negotiation experts have some tips on how to do this.

balance of power
Photo by Loic Leray on Unsplash

This article was based on research conducted by Conti Advanced Business Learning (www.cabl.ch), a Swiss training company that specialises in Negotiation & Influencing training.

The relentless assessment and recognition of “who’s got the power in this discussion” plays a vital role in the success of your negotiations. In a roundtable discussion featuring 10 senior Sales and Procurement experts, we explored a number of strategies that aid in tilting the scales in your favour. The six key dimensions we singled out are investigated below:

1. Having the mindset to create leverage

As Laurence Perot, Head of Global Supply Chain Procurement at Logitech, highlights, “we need to create leverage if there is none.” She explains that an effective way to do this is by working at different levels throughout the organisation.

“In my past experience in Logitech, we needed to negotiate a contract with a much larger company however they did not want to have a contract in place. To counter this, we worked internally with our R&D team that had a close collaboration with the supplier. Then we got the approval from the CPO and the Executive Team to our strategy: “No contract, no new designs”.

The supplier was reluctant at first, however, after consulting the R&D and executive teams at Logitech, finally took us seriously and we could agree a contract within two months.”

2. Building Alternatives

It was consensus among the procurement and sales professionals during the roundtable that the balance of power in negotiations shifts when there are alternatives.

Giuseppe Conti, Founder of Conti Advanced Business Learning, added that ‘moving to performance specs or removing a technological barrier may help us to enlarge our portfolio of alternatives.”.

Joerg Steinhaeuser, Vice President Global Sourcing at General Mills, added that “sometimes negotiators use bluffing, but going down the road of bluffing can significantly and negatively damage the trust between the two parties.

Building real alternatives is always much better although you may not need to completely implement your BATNA if you are aligned well internally.” Fundamentally speaking, lasting relationships with liars and bluffers is not possible and long-term business relationships fail when there is no trust.

3. Effective Preparation

Regina Roos, Sales Transformation Manager at Marketing & Innovation Group, emphasises how preparation and bringing a “can do” attitude when negotiating can make all the difference.

Salespeople usually take much more time for preparation than Procurement people and tend to have a better knowledge of the market. Francesco Lucchetta, Procurement Director EMEAI at Pentair, adds that preparation includes choosing the right supplier.

For instance, “do we have some power with this supplier over the total business? Can we choose not to give them future business that is attractive to them?” It is easy to focus on keeping the business momentum moving forward but if you overlook the future implications of your decision, the gains today may be overcome by the loses tomorrow.

4. Exploiting the Power of Emotions

Daniele Giorgi, Director of Procurement at Ferring, recalls a past negotiation with a supplier much bigger than his company while working in Pharma in a single source supply situation. He then talked about the impact this project would have on the patient and on families, colleagues, friends or other members of society like themselves.

“Using the emotional side and talking about “how we can help couples have babies” is a more powerful argument than dry facts.” Our counterparts have the same set of human needs that we do, and connecting with them on a human level will strengthen your ongoing working relationship.

5. Using a Fear of Loss

As Ifti Ahmed, Managing Partner, Titanium-Partners explains, “the fear of loss is significantly more motivational to get someone to move from their position. If the other party feels that they will lose something valuable, they are more likely to move in the direction you want.”

This echoes Kahneman & Tversky research outlined in their 1979 book Prospect Theory: An analysis of decision under risk. They go into detail about how people are more likely to take a risk to avoid a loss than they are to take a risk for an equivalent gain.

Conversely, in a long-term partnership or relations, we should also take into account the impact that this has on the relationship and the trust between the two parties.

6. Penetrating the Other Party’s Organisation

As Marco Martelli, Vice President Procurement at Tetra Pak, underlines “Negotiation is a power game. If you sell, you try to understand how to penetrate the other organisation. You try to understand the structure, the decision makers, and more specifically, you play on the lack of internal alignment. The ideal goal is to sell to Engineering and get the bill to be paid by Procurement.”

Giuseppe Conti adds that the effective Seller is able to differentiate himself via innovation/technology/business model/branding so that the buyer’s organisation wants to buy only from them.

These answers were collected by Giuseppe Conti, Founder and Managing Partner of Conti Advanced Business Learning (www.cabl.ch), a consulting firm that specialises in negotiation & influencing. This article is part of a series aimed at collecting real-life negotiation experiences from Procurement executives. Explore other negotiation topics on the Conti Advanced Business Learning YouTube Channel or visit the website, www.cabl.ch.