4 Reasons Why L’Oréal is Winning the War for Talent on Social Media

Because you’re worth it…


We talk a lot on Procurious about using social media to ‘win’ the war for talent. More frequently, organisations are using social media in this respect, but some are using it more effectively than others.

The Role of Social Media

So how can procurement organisations ensure that they are attracting the best talent and having a better perception than their competitors in the recruitment market? Social media may provide an answer.

Having a positive presence on social media can help organisations to promote themselves, their opportunities and the benefits for potential employees if they join the company. Visibility is the key, but it needs to be done right in order to have the best impact.

One organisation doing it right is The L’Oréal Group.

What L’Oréal Is Doing Right

The L’Oréal Group is the world’s largest cosmetics company, headquartered in France. With an annual turnover of €20.3 billion, a presence in 130 countries, 27 global brands and 68,900 employees, the Group has good reason for wanting to attract the best talent.

But in an increasingly crowded market, L’Oréal has managed to make itself stand out from the competition on social media by tailoring its approach in the following ways.

And, although these campaigns have not been directed at procurement specifically, there are some good takeaways for procurement teams to consider.


The L’Oréal Group has a major presence on social media in its own right, but has also chosen, as many other large organisations have, to dedicate pages and accounts to careers and job advertising in multiple countries.

What’s more, these pages are run as the main accounts are and pack just as much of a punch in terms of followers.

That’s a huge community, accessing regular posts, Tweets and videos and hearing the L’Oréal message.

Uniform Branding and Naming

The beauty of the L’Oréal pages is that they are uniform in branding and design on all pages, accounts and profiles. The branding helps to give each of the sites a professional feel and make them immediately recognisable for potential employees.

The accounts and pages are also easily searched for, with the naming conventions for them following a simple pattern, where the platform and location are called out clearly; e.g. facebook.lorealusa.jobs


One of the key tips Procurious gives for having a great personal brand on social media is to keep your accounts active. There’s no use having all those followers if you aren’t saying anything to them.

The L’Oréal accounts and pages are regularly updated with new job opportunities, information, videos and blog content (like this) to keep people interested. Part of this includes unique insights into what you might get up to at work and why L’Oréal is a great place to work, which brings us on to our next point.

Employee Advocacy

There’s very little that can say more about the strength of a company as an employer than testimonials from its own employees. And L’Oréal has made sure that their social media accounts show plenty of these.

Like this one from LinkedIn:

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Or this one from Twitter:

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Getting your employees to talk positively (and genuinely!) about your organisation sends a strong message to potential employees and may tip the balance for them.

And the result?

Two campaigns that bore fruit for L’Oréal came one each from Facebook and LinkedIn. Using a combination of approaches on social media, including an app to allow employees to share listings across their own networks, L’Oréal benefited from:

  • “Optimised” performance and return on investment and higher than average click through rate
  • Higher than average conversion rates from adverts
  • A higher percentage of qualified resumes than when traditional methods were used
  • Substantial savings on recruitment fees for hiring

And as the organisation’s networks continue to grow, there’s no reason to think that this level of success won’t continue. It’s just up to other organisations to try to follow in L’Oréal’s footsteps.

Is your organisation up to the challenge?