All posts by Gyles Scott-Hayward

5 Key Trends Driving Supplier Management and Due Diligence

Can you afford to take the risk? We assess the key drivers behind increasing supplier management and due diligence activities in supply chains.

Supplier Due Diligence

This article was first published on Greenstone.

First, we would like to take the opportunity to thank the Procurious members who took part in this survey. Your input is very much appreciated.

In the current non-financial reporting landscape there is a heightened focus on understanding your supply chain. As a result, organisations are increasingly evaluating the performance of their suppliers against a wide spectrum of non-financial criteria and monitoring the associated risks.

In order to better understand what is driving this behaviour and how companies are identifying and mitigating supply chain risk, Greenstone conducted the ‘State of Supplier Management 2016 survey.

We asked 1000 senior decision makers from mid-to-large organisations about the perception of supply chain risk and due diligence at their organisation. We also asked about the drivers for collecting supplier information and key factors in shaping their supplier engagement programmes.

We have identified five key insights into the state of supplier management from this study. These are listed below and expanded on in this report.

  • Supplier due diligence processes are a growing requirement for most businesses.
  • The majority of businesses are collecting non-financial information from their suppliers at some level.
  • Regulation and reputational risk are the strongest drivers for collecting supplier information and help to shape supplier engagement programmes.
  • Procurement teams are much more likely to be responsible for the collection of supplier data than Sustainability teams.
  • There is a growing trend of companies adopting online solutions to gather and analyse supplier management data.
Supplier Due Diligence

As you might expect, given the increasing global focus on supply chains, more than three quarters of respondents see supply chain risk, and the resultant need for supplier management and due diligence processes, as a growing requirement in their business.

Supplier Management Survey - Fig 1

In line with this perception, 72 per cent of responding companies are already trying to address supply chain risk by collecting non-financial information from their suppliers.

Supplier Management Survey - Fig 2

Data Collection

The necessity to collect non-financial information from suppliers appears to have become accepted across multiple sectors. However, the level of detail, method, and frequency of data collection differs greatly.

It was found that 43 per cent of respondents only collect supplier information as part of a tender process, or in the initial stages of supplier contracting. Therefore, these organisations are not conducting ongoing supplier due diligence. They cannot be sure that suppliers remain compliant throughout the period in which they deliver services.

However, a similar number of organisations do keep track of ongoing supplier performance. 17 per cent are sending out questionnaires by email or post, and 22 per cent are using an online supplier management tool.

Where supplier information is being gathered, there are common topic areas of compliance focus. Environment, health and safety and commercial information (e.g. insurance certification etc.) are the top three areas covered in supplier questionnaires.

However, what the study also shows is that a wide range of information is being requested.  As a result, increasingly diverse areas of both the buyer and supplier organisations are required to engage in the process and have access to the data. 

Supplier Management Survey - Fig 3

Drivers for Supplier Engagement

The research demonstrated that non-financial supplier risk and compliance have become key topics for organisations but what is driving this shift in behaviour?

When asked which factors are driving the collection of supplier information, 43 per cent of all respondents point to regulation and legislation being the strongest motivating force, followed closely by reputational concerns (32 per cent).

Supplier Management Survey - Fig 4

When asked what factors were important in shaping the structure and focus of organisations’ supplier engagement programmes, risk reduction, corporate sustainability, reputational risk and regulation were all sighted as significant motivating forces.

Specific legislative and reporting framework drivers mentioned by respondents included: Bribery Act, the UK Modern Slavery Act, UN Global Compact and ILO Core labour Standards as the top four frameworks or guidelines used to inform their supply chain practices and reporting processes.

Responsibility for Supplier Risk and Compliance

While non-financial reporting has long been the responsibility of CSR or sustainability teams, the increasing momentum of supply chain reporting is engaging new areas of organisation.

This is partly due to the outward looking nature of this issue and the need to engage with multiple supplier organisations. It is also due to the breadth of topics covered by the requests for information.

The study shows 83 per cent of respondents stated that procurement is the area that manages the entire process, from contacting suppliers, through to analysis of the data.

This is most likely due to the fact that procurement ‘own’ the relationships with the suppliers, have a clear idea of contract status and the commercial scale of the contracts and can therefore identify which suppliers meet the buyers defined risk and compliance criteria.

The level of resource allocated to supplier programmes varied significantly with 40 per cent saying that managing this process was the part-time responsibility of a full time employee and 38 per cent saying that multiple individuals in the business have full time responsibility.

What this does show is that there are clearly defined responsibilities within organisations for identifying third party risk and dealing with non-compliance.

Moving Beyond Manual Processes

The complexity and scope of collecting, analysing and reporting supplier information often calls for solutions beyond the manual processes and repository functions of lifeless spreadsheets.

For those organisations that have not yet automated the process, 61 per cent say they are considering adopting an online solution to gather and analyse supplier information.

It is evident organisations recognise the need for automation in the process, as it is not feasible to manually evaluate hundreds or thousands of supplier responses, and monitor their ongoing compliance.

In addition, the increasing legislative and reporting requirements place an additional emphasis on transparency and audit capabilities.

For more on the ‘State of Supplier Management 2016‘, visit the Greenstone website.

Greenstone’s SupplierPortal solution enables buyers to effectively manage supplier risk and compliance through a secure and private online platform. Buyers have the flexibility to distribute standard framework questionnaires, as well as proprietary questionnaires, to their suppliers and can then manage and analyse this information through a comprehensive suite of analytical tools.

Modern Slavery Act 2015: Supply Chain Transparency Requirements

In October 2015, the UK government issued statutory guidance relating to supply chain transparency and reporting obligations of the Modern Slavery Act 2015.

Modern Slavery Act

This article was first published on Greenstone.

The document confirms who is required to comply and when they need to comply by, as well as including essential details on the all-important annual statement. You can read the document here.

Here is everything you need to know and what you need to do.

Background

Consolidating UK law on slavery and human trafficking, the Modern Slavery Bill was first introduced to parliament on 10th June 2014, and subsequently passed into law on 26th March 2015.

With the aim of preventing employment exploitation and increasing disclosure of labour practices, the Modern Slavery Act introduces new grounds of compliance for commercial entities. Not only do organisations need to ensure that modern slavery is not an issue in-house, they also need to take, and report on, actions to prevent the issue from occurring within their supply chains.

Which Companies are Captured?

The threshold to determine which companies have to adhere to the Modern Slavery Act has been something of a discussion point for the vast majority of the year.

Following a government consultation period earlier in the year, it was confirmed that the Act applies to any organisation that supplies goods or services and that has a turnover exceeding £36 million, aligning the legislation with the definition of a ‘large business’ in the Companies Act 2006.

Furthermore, this threshold is valid for any organisation that has operations in the UK, regardless of where it was formed. This means that many non-UK organisations, providing goods or services within the UK’s geographical boundaries, will have to engage with their suppliers, essentially resulting in diverse, complex and global supply chains being assessed.

Annual Statements

A key part of the Modern Slavery Act is the stipulation that captured organisations need to prepare and publish an annual statement. The statement details the ongoing process they are taking to ensure that there is no modern slavery within their business and supply chains.

To be published at the end of the organisation’s financial year, and required to be approved at board level, the statement must be publicly available via a prominent link on the company’s corporate website homepage.

What does the statement need to look like?

There are 2 routes that organisations can go down when it comes to preparing the slavery and human trafficking statement. Captured organisations must prepare and publish either:

  1. A statement detailing steps the organisation has taken during the financial year to ensure that slavery and human trafficking is not taking place in any part of its own business or supply chains; or
  2. A statement that the organisation has taken no such steps.

Although Option 2 is the simpler journey, having a publicly available statement that effectively says that the organisation does not care about the issue of modern slavery risks a backlash from stakeholders. As such, the safest route to compliance is certainly the first.

In terms of what the annual statement needs to looks like, the Act does not stipulate the exact parameters, but does provide some key areas that should be covered:

  • the organisation’s structure, its business and its supply chains;
  • its policies in relation to slavery and human trafficking;
  • its due diligence processes in relation to slavery and human trafficking in its business and supply chains;
  • the parts of its business and supply chains where there is a risk of slavery and human trafficking taking place, and the steps it has taken to assess and manage that risk;
  • its effectiveness in ensuring that slavery and human trafficking is not taking place in its business or supply chains, measured against such performance indicators as it considers appropriate;
  • the training about slavery and human trafficking available to its staff.

What do captured organisations need to do?

The statutory guidance confirmed that the supply chain transparency and reporting provisions of the Modern Slavery Act commenced on 29th October 2015.

However, a transitional period applies to businesses with a financial year-end date between 29th October 2015 and 30th March 2016, meaning those who have a year-end of 31st March 2016 will be the first to publish the statement.

So what should companies be doing to prepare for these new supply-chain requirements? Regardless of when the year-end date is, it is imperative that organisations start engaging with their suppliers now and assess the level of risk. Without an extensive, and ongoing, information gathering exercise, taking steps to prevent the risk and subsequently reporting on them is simply not possible.

Where to start

As it is now a requirement for companies to collect and interrogate data from across their web of suppliers, it is essential that they make the process as efficient as possible.

We understand that this can be a complex and time-consuming process. The traditional offline data collection methods are not suited to the demands of today’s globalised supply chains. As such, it is an increasing trend for companies to move the process online.

For advice on what you need to consider when moving your supplier risk and compliance process online, please read our previous blog article on the subject.

Gyles is Head of SupplierPortal at Greenstone, a non-financial reporting solutions company providing software and supporting services to clients in over 100 countries.

Greenstone’s SupplierPortal solution enables buyers to effectively manage supplier risk and compliance through a secure and private online platform. Buyers have the flexibility to distribute standard framework questionnaires, as well as proprietary questionnaires, to their suppliers and can then manage and analyse this information through a comprehensive suite of analytical tools.

Supply Chain Transparency: Why We Need It More Than Ever

As scrutiny over supply chain practices increases, organisations need to ensure supply chain transparency, from Tier 1, all the way down.

Supply Chain Transparency

This article was first published on Greenstone.

As non-financial reporting frameworks and requirements for organisations evolve, so does the need for transparency throughout supply chains. There is an ever increasing emphasis within current, and upcoming, regulations on being able to demonstrate a deeper understanding of your suppliers and vendors.

Most recently we have seen evidence of this advancing mood through the UK Modern Slavery Act, the EU corporate disclosure directive, and, of course, the Dodd Frank Act covering conflict minerals.

Last summer UK Prime Minister David Cameron further clarified the criteria surrounding the UK government’s commitment to anti-slavery and supply chain transparency in a speech in Singapore.

The prime minister stated: “From October [2015], we will also require all businesses with a £36 million turnover or above to disclose what they are doing to ensure their business and supply chains are slavery free. This measure is one of the first of its kind in the world, and it will be a huge step forward, introducing greater accountability on business for the condition of their supply chains”.

Legal Requirements

Guidance for compliance with the Modern Slavery Act was published in October 2015. And businesses with a turnover of greater than £36 million have some work to do. This includes involving internal buyers and procurement departments so that they are aware of any potential implications of the Modern Slavery Act, and can prepare to embed it in their processes. As well, as including the requirements into any current audit practices.

Supply chain transparency is also being driven by EU Directive 2014/95/EU, relating to disclosure of non-financial and diversity information. This requires by 2017, that all companies concerned (all companies based in the EU with over 500 employees) disclose in their management report, information on policies, risks and outcomes with regards to the following:

  • Environmental matters;
  • Social and employee aspects;
  • Respect for human rights;
  • Anti-corruption and bribery issues; and
  • Diversity in their board of directors.

Even though there are already mandates around CSR reporting in some EU countries, and many large enterprises already report on their environmental and social impact, the new directive will demand further commitment, as it also requires disclosure on the supply chain.

Placing Responsibility on Companies

The Dodd Frank Act, also known as the conflict minerals law, has been in operation for over two years. Under the law, over 1000 U.S. listed companies report their conflict minerals status to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

The law is designed to reduce the risk that the purchase of minerals from Central Africa contributes to conflict or human rights abuses. It places a responsibility on companies to be able to trace the designated minerals throughout their supply chain. This is something that can only be achieved through increased transparency of information at all levels.

Companies have struggled to accurately disclose information through their conflict minerals reports. They may also struggle with the Modern Slavery Act and the latest EU Directive. Like organisational level, non-financial reporting before it, supplier information disclosure and supply chain transparency is a new way of working for many businesses.

Those that address this area now will be creating robust processes that ensure a competitive advantage, as well as being well positioned for future legislation.

Role of Software

At Greenstone, we are increasingly seeing organisations turning to software solutions. This is not only to drive supply chain transparency, but to enable organisations to handle the burgeoning reporting requirements, and stakeholder expectations, efficiently.

Previously, supplier compliance has been a box ticking exercise for organisations. The processes of data gathering were ill conceived and incomplete, and information gathered was rarely interrogated, and almost certainly not used for reporting purposes. This lead to disillusionment amongst suppliers, and even lower levels of engagement.

However, we are now seeing that users of SupplierPortal are utilising the analytical tools available to manage suppliers and their data. The increasing emphasis on transparency and reporting means that organisations are no longer ticking boxes, but adopting new processes and procedures in order to identify and manage non-compliance.

What is more, is that this doesn’t have to consume a great deal of additional resource, but rather for organisations to acknowledge a new way of working, and realign current practices.

Gyles is Head of SupplierPortal at Greenstone, a non-financial reporting solutions company providing software and supporting services to clients in over 100 countries.

Greenstone’s SupplierPortal solution enables buyers to effectively manage supplier risk and compliance through a secure and private online platform. Buyers have the flexibility to distribute standard framework questionnaires, as well as proprietary questionnaires, to their suppliers and can then manage and analyse this information through a comprehensive suite of analytical tools.