All posts by Procurious HQ

Will They Still Want You, When You’re 64?

How can you make sure you’re not overlooked for jobs and other opportunities if you want to keep working in your 60s and 70s?


When Paul McCartney wrote “When I’m Sixty-Four” as a teenager, he probably thought he would be retired in his mid-to-late 60s.

Instead he has continued to work well into his 70s and will be 78 when he takes to the stage at Glastonbury 2020.

McCartney is not alone: things have changed since 1967 when the Beatles released the hit on the album Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart Clubs Band.

Today more than 1 in 10 of those aged 65 is still working and the number is set to soar.

The scrapping of the default retirement age (which makes it harder to put us out to pasture) and an increase in the state pension age (which is set to rise to 67, and then 68), means growing numbers will be working until they are nearly 70.

There is only one problem: who will employ us?

Employment drops off from the age of 50, making the lyric ‘Will you still need me?’ take on a whole new meaning.

We all need to mind the age gap

While a lucky few might have quit the ‘rat race’ because they can afford to retire comfortably, many of the 3 in 10 in the 50-64 age group who are not in employment are not out of work through choice – the majority might not be able to work due to ill health, disability or caring commitments while others may struggle to find work because of their age.

Even among those still in employment, many are working part-time or in jobs that do not reflect their expertise and experience.

So how can you remain relevant in a world of work that still does not always value the wisdom of age?

De-age – from an early age

Age discrimination is illegal. But it happens – even if it is not deliberate but a case of unconscious bias.

So it is important to appear younger than you are if you do not want to be written off.

As it is easy to search for information about you online (yes – nearly every employer now checks out candidates before inviting them for interview), start thinking about what information is being posted about you or that you are posting yourself well before you hit 50.

  • Never, ever put your age or date of birth on any job applications, CVs or social media profiles. Employers cannot ask your age, so don’t let them find out.
  • Get rid of anything on your CV and online professional profiles that screams ‘ancient’. Change your qualifications from O Levels to GCSEs. Change your polytechnic to its new university name. Delete jobs from the 1980s and early 1990s.
  • Clean up your social media profile and change your settings to private. A series of postings of you at your 55th or 60th birthday might inadvertently lead to a recruiter thinking you are ‘past it’.
  • Also change your mindset. If you ‘think’ you are no longer able to go for that new job or that promotion, other people will think the same, too. One in 4 professionals over the age of 55 believe it’s too late to change things according to research from Think Forward Consulting – they are wrong. You just need to overcome the fear of rejection that often comes with age.

Get your words right

Job adverts often specify that candidates need to be ‘hungry’, ‘ambitious’, ‘energetic’, ‘driven’, ‘innovative’, ‘dynamic’ or other words automatically associated with youth. Include a few of these in your job applications and your personal statement to reflect the fact that you still have the passion to succeed.

At the same time avoid descriptions that sound ‘ageing’. Stating that you have ‘decades’ of experience is unnecessary. It is far better to detail what you have achieved not how long it took you!

Emphasise your adaptability

In a world of constant change, adaptability is a key skill yet one that is not always associated with more mature members of the workforce.

So, make a point of highlighting ways in which you have adapted to – or perhaps anticipated – change. Managing a transformation project, changing career path to reflect a change in the market or demonstrating how you have been innovative, will all prove to potential employers that you can ‘move with the times’ and remain relevant.

Show you can learn new skills

Forget the saying that ‘you can’t teach an old dog new tricks’ and prove that you can learn new skills. Make a habit of doing courses in the latest technology, remain inquisitive about new developments in your sector and demonstrate that you have a curiosity about the future – it will show the enthusiasm that employers are looking for (and associate with younger members of staff).

Have a Plan B (for business) . . .

One of the most popular ways to remain in employment later in your career is to employ yourself.

In fact, the number of self-employed people aged 65 years and older more than doubled between 2009 and 2017.

You can start with a sideline (provided it does not conflict with your day job), grow your venture and then do it full-time if it’s a success – or enjoy it as a part-time role if you plan to flexi-retire.

. . . Or be a master of your own destiny

While employers are often reluctant to hire more mature staff as full-time permanent employees, the same does not apply to consultants, contractors, freelance project managers, interim managers and non-executive directors: they are hired for their expertise, so the longer they have been being doing the job the better. In fact, 2 in 3 interims are aged 50–70+.

While you will have to give up the day job to start in one of these roles, the pay can often more than compensate for the lack of job security. Interims, for example, earn £500 to £1,500 a day. See the Institute of Interim Managers for more information: https://www.iim.org.uk/knowledge/.

So if you’re planning to carry on working well past when you’re 64 and into your 70s, like Paul, follow these tips to get your plans in order and make your profile attractive.

‘Often The Right Way Isn’t The Easy Way,’ – Sustainable Sourcing From A World Leader

Whether or not your business is prioritising sustainability right now, there’s no doubt that it will be the focus for many of us in 2020 and beyond.


As we all well know, executing on sustainability can be challenging. Is it even possible to have full supply chain transparency? How do we manage the requirement to be sustainable against risk and cost savings? Almost all sustainability initiatives, while well-intentioned, can be fraught with complexity. 

While this may be the case for many of us, one person who believes that sustainability isn’t as complex as it seems is Chris Fielden, Group Supply Chain Director for Innocent Drinks. Innocent Drinks is a revolutionary health drinks company that gives an incredible 10% of their profits to charity. Beyond this, Innocent focuses on sustainability throughout every part of their supply chain, from creating a plastic bottle that’s made from 100% renewable material to developing a carbon neutral factory. 

Prior to his keynote at Procurious’ Big Ideas Summit, we sat down with Chris to see how he helps drive such incredible sustainability achievements at Innocent: 

Live your values – and incorporate them into your business model

Have you ever looked at a corporate values chart and thought to yourself, ‘those don’t really seem to matter here?’ Many of us feel the tension between aspirational values and lived values, but one of the reasons Chris thinks that Innocent is so successful in sustainability is because they don’t do this. 

Chris believes that sustainability can’t simply be a ‘tick box’ but it needs to be front and centre of a business’s genuine value set if they want to achieve it. On this, Chris says:   

‘Innocent drinks is a values-led business, absolutely. We believe in [and live by] sustainable capitalism. We hire people against those values.’ 

‘Often the right way [to do things] might not be the easy way, but we do things the right way anyway because we truly live our values.’ 

Even beyond this, Chris says that sustainability needs to be incorporated throughout an organisation’s entire business model: 

‘Here at Innocent, we’ve incorporated sustainability into our entire business model through becoming a B-Corp.’  

Give your people freedom 

Sustainability is often about pushing boundaries and doing things that haven’t been done before. So, in order to achieve that, Chris thinks you need to give your people creative freedom – and this is exactly what’s happened at Innocent. 

‘[The carbon-neutral factory idea] came about primarily because we told our people not to accept no. We told them “don’t accept it when someone says it can’t be done.” In all aspects, we try not to constrain our people.’ 

Not limiting people also applies to the suppliers you work with, says Chris. In fact, when you don’t give suppliers limitations, you can sometimes achieve things you never would have imagined. When planning Innocent’s carbon-neutral factory, Chris gave his suppliers an unusual challenge – which yielded an unusual (yet highly beneficial) result: 

‘With the carbon-neutral factory, we said to the contractors we employed – just geek out and tell us what you would do if you had unlimited funds and no restrictions.’ 

‘Doing so meant that it actually turned out cheaper than we budgeted and the solution is ever better!’ 

Giving their people and suppliers freedom has meant that Innocent’s new carbon-neutral factory,  to open in Rotterdam in 2021, is truly one of a kind. Costing over $250 million, it will incorporate initiatives such renewable energy, sustainable water use, and resource-based waste management. Its Rotterdam location will also mean considerable C02 is saved, as the drinks are produced close to where ingredients arrive, saving trucks over 13,000 trips a year. 

Not being afraid to fail 

Despite Innocent Drinks being a relatively large company (it recently surpassed £10 million in donations alone), everyone works hard to cultivate an entrepreneurial spirit, says Chris. And a big part of this is not being afraid to fail. 

‘Failure is a big part of what we do. We only have to be 70% sure of what we’re doing. And failure has led us to where we are – we’ve doubled in size because we’re not afraid to fail.’ 

This can sometimes be hard to stomach as a procurement professional, Chris thinks, as we’re trained to mitigate risks. But Chris insists that Innocent still do this: 

‘We do have risk registers so it’s not as if we’re being cavalier!’ 

Where to from here? 

With Innocent being at the forefront of all things sustainability, it’s hard to imagine what Chris might still want to achieve. But there’s always more, says Chris, and ultimately, he’d like to see more businesses taking an active role in helping the environment: 

‘I would love to see more businesses doing more – but we can’t wait for politicians to mandate this. The impetus needs to come from us.’ 

Ultimately, Chris has an important message for all procurement professionals out there: 

‘If you put sustainability at the heart of your agenda, then know this: you can make a difference very quickly.’ 

What are you doing to drive the sustainability agenda at your business? Let us know below. 

Want to learn more about exactly how Chris is driving the sustainability agenda at Innocent, and how you can do the same? Chris is speaking at the 2020 Procurious Big Ideas Summit on March 11, and you can hear all of his insights through becoming a Digital Delegate. Grab your free pass here.

What Do Women – And Men – Really Think Of Valentine’s Day?

We offer a woman’s and a man’s-eye view of the Feast of Saint Valentine …

You want how much for those flowers?! Love it or hate it, Valentine’s Day has become part of the global calendar and good luck ignoring it. 

Shopfronts are dining out on the day, while emails advertising spray tans with headlines like ‘Fake it for Valentine’s Day’ are sliding into your inbox. 

But we want to pop a different spin on it. A woman’s perspective on the day up against a man’s perspective. And while Emily and Dave don’t speak for everyone, you may see yourself in some of their thoughts.

Woman’s-eye view: A day of celebration and (very) high hopes

I secretly love this day and if I ever pretend I don’t or that I’m ignoring it, it’s only out of self-preservation. 

You see, unlike Dave below, I am not married. I am single. Valentine’s Day can serve as a reminder that you’re not with anyone and the only flowers you’re buying are ones ‘to you from you’.

I am a die-hard romantic. The Notebook to me is still the best movie of all time (forget the fact she cheats on her fiancé). And Titanic will never sink in my heart.

So it only follows that I have high hopes for this one day of the year.

Last year I was given the loveliest bunch of flowers by a guy I was seeing with a note in French (yes, he was French). I doubt that will be bettered this year.

But I live in perpetual – unrealistic! – hope that the guy I went on a few dates with recently . . . whom I’m not overly into . . . will suddenly have a moment and think, yes I want to spend $90 on roses for Emily and get in touch with her colleagues (whom he does not know at all) to find out where she works and at what desk. So the flowers can be delivered to her right there.  

Okay, in reality the chances of that are slim.

So I thought why not take matters into my own hands and be the ‘giver’. I mean, who said that was just a man’s job?

Women as the givers

I got ahead of myself recently and went out with a guy a couple of times, decided we were certainly going to end up together and proceeded to order his Valentine’s Day gift from Amazon a whopping four weeks ago. 

Yes, I did that. 

He was a doctor working with heart surgeons. So I found a lunch bag with ‘Live organ for transplant’ on it. The idea was to have it delivered to him with a six-pack of beers in it with ice on top. 

I would have him come to reception at his work to collect it and when he opens it and sees ice on top (like a real organ would have) he would freak out . . . and then suddenly find the beers and think it was literally the best (and most memorable) Valentine’s Day gift ever.

But after date four recently I decided it wasn’t meant to be – and now my colleagues have to open the work fridge to see a ‘Live organ for transplant’ lunch in there every day.

As I said, I’m a die-hard romantic. Here’s hoping for the flowers and even if that doesn’t come about I still have my ‘live organ lunch bag’.

Love, Emily x

The man’s-eye view: The day of the year on which more people break up than any other 

I don’t wish to throw a wet blanket on what has become a global celebration of love and romance, but Valentine’s Day – otherwise known as the Feast of Saint Valentine – does nothing to whet my appetite, or make my heart flutter.

My friend Kev has a restaurant in New York, and he maintains that Valentine’s is every restauranteur’s nightmare. A sea of two-top tables waiting for couples who barely speak to each other at the best of times but feel obliged to have that special night out together. 

Kev says that the sight of couples holding hands across the table and gazing longingly into each other’s eyes is as rare as hen’s teeth in his gaff. Comparatively very little food or booze is ordered and invariably one person is left to pick up the bill or storm out without paying.

Apparently, more people split up on Valentine’s Day than any other day of the year.

The best thing about Valentine’s Day for me was the birth of my youngest daughter, Saskia. I love her to bits. 

The downside of her joining us on 14 February is that she insists on being taken out for dinner on that night. 

I have tried to persuade her to have two birthdays (a bit like the Queen) just to avoid the misery meal. Not a chance.

Romantic meals – no thanks

So we’ll be in TGI Fridays (certainly not my choice) in Guildford, Surrey, UK – witnessing young people with soon to be arthritic thumbs communicating with friends who are not in the room rather than enjoying the company of the person they are about to split up with. What fun!

I do enter into the spirit of Valentine’s Day, however, and remember to buy a card and some flowers for my wife – who has a heart of stone and always forgets. 

No, please, I am not craving sympathy. The end of 14 February for me will be spent in the company of talkSPORT Radio and a bottle of 12-year-old Macallan!

So, in the words of the song from The King and I, ‘good luck young lovers wherever you are’ – or something like that!

Love, Dave x  

So where do you fit in? Do you agree with Emily or Dave? And what are your plans?

Whatever you do today, enjoy it. And remember that love in any form is something to be celebrated.

How The Coronavirus Will Impact Your Supply Chain And What To Do About It

What key steps can you take limit the potential effects of the coronavirus on your organisation?


In China on 9 February the world received news it didn’t want to hear.

The number of confirmed deaths from the coronavirus has now overtaken that of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), with more than 1000 casualties. 

In addition to that, the virus is spreading at an alarming rate. There are now more than 40,000 confirmed cases. And this number is increasing as much as 20% every day.

While the virus is terrifying from a public health perspective, it’s also alarming in terms of your supply chain. Wuhan, China, the epicentre of the virus and now a city in total lockdown and complete disarray, is one of the world’s largest industrial hubs. 

Here’s how the coronavirus is affecting global supply chains – and what you can do about it. 

Production delays and factory closures

If you’re currently manufacturing anything in China, especially in the Wuhan area, you can expect significant production delays.

Fashion fit innovation company Alvanon, who manufacture dress forms in China, has issued a statement saying: 

‘We expect at least a four-week delay on physical goods that have already been paid for. Our factory is currently closed, and while we are doing all we can to minimize delays, we currently do not know when it will reopen.’ 

Currently, all public gatherings in Wuhan are forbidden. All factories and public places are closed. The flow of goods in and out of the area has come to a halt. 

Reduction in freighting capacity 

The coronavirus is now confirmed in more than 23 countries. And the world’s airlines are responding by cancelling flights to and from China. 

Airlines all over the world have ceased some or all of their China freight routes. 

Sea freighting is also likely to be affected. If you have goods in transport from China, there may be significant delays in them leaving major ports. And when they do leave, there’s a risk that crew will become ill on the journey. 

People movement

Freight is not the only thing that needs to come and go out of China. People also do, for business or leisure. 

The restrictions on flights will start to impact business agendas.

Many international companies are shutting down their offices in China and restricting all travel. 

Commodities market and the broader economy

From a supply chain perspective, what’s most concerning about the effect of the coronavirus is the already devastating impact it is having on the commodities market and the broader economy. 

As one of the world’s largest consumers of commodities, decreased demand in the Chinese market has now caused many commodity prices to slump. Copper has fallen 12% and crude oil 10%. The Bloomberg Commodity Index has taken a 6% hit. Analysts expect these decreases to continue.

Economists warn that the impact on the economy more broadly could also be dire. They believe that the fallout from the virus will be significantly worse than the SARS epidemic. 

The Chinese economy is much larger than it was then. But it’s also weaker, due to the continued US trade wars. 

China’s GDP growth is on track to slow (at least) in the first quarter, and analysts aren’t sure it will recover. This will, in turn, affect exchange rates and emerging markets. 

Developed economies are also expected to suffer. The downturn in Chinese tourism is expected to impact Australia’s economy to the tune of $1 billion.

What should you do? 

How can you manage the risk coronavirus represents for your organisation? 

Justin Crump, Procurious consultant CEO of Sibylline, a world-renowned risk management consultancy, recommends that procurement takes the following actions immediately.  

1. Understand cascading supply chain consequences

‘You need to understand more than just your suppliers,’ says Justin, ‘as it will be second-order problems that bite when you think you’re okay.’ 

To do this, Justin recommends you dig further to understand supplier dependencies.

A great way to do so might be to survey your suppliers. Test their exposure to the virus, and then try and mitigate any issues early. 

2. Stockpile if you can 

It might be too late for some, but Justin recommends that everyone who is able ‘tries to stockpile while you still can’. 

This is difficult for those practising just-in-time manufacturing.

But Justin thinks that if you can still action this advice you’ll benefit – as oil prices are substantially lower due to a steep fall in demand. 

3. Invest in resilience

Procurement should never be reactionary when it comes to risks, Justin reminds us. ‘But now, more than ever, you need to invest in resilience.’ 

Justin believes this ‘resilience’ needs to come in multiple forms.

For example:
• look into alternate suppliers – and move now to get ahead of your competitors
• consider impacts on staff, families and customer relationships 
• think long-term about how travel and freighting might be affected

4. Consider the bigger economic picture 

It’s tempting to focus on the now, Justin says. But it’s important to consider the bigger economic picture and how you might need to mitigate that risk (if that will even be possible). 

5. Appraise the effect on international relations

All large businesses depend on international relations to a degree Justin says, ‘so the effect on international relations shouldn’t be underestimated’. 

Justin thinks it’s important that we don’t rest on our laurels and just assume business will continue as usual.

‘What I see happening is that China is quietly blaming the US in some circles for the outbreak, calling it a deliberate attack,’ he says. ‘Likewise, the US is using this to encourage businesses to pull out of China. 

‘China blaming the US feels like more of an insurance policy to deflect criticism from the regime, but still . . . it’s a reminder that the global network is under threat.’ 

So bear in mind Justin’s analysis and consider taking these 5 steps to limit potential supply-chain difficulties resulting from the coronavirus. 

What effects are you seeing on your supply chain from the coronavirus? How are you managing risk? Tell us in the comments below. 

Interested in more hot tips on how to improve your supply chain approach and get more productive? Join the Procurious community of 37,000 members where you’ll find daily inspiration.

How Did We Go? Procurement’s Performance During An Unprecedented Crisis

The bushfire crisis has devastated Australia. But how has it affected our jobs and our organisations? We spoke to members of The Faculty’s Roundtable program to see what the impact had been and how they’d managed.


Whenever the need arises, procurement steps up. And during the recent unprecedented Australian bushfires, the situation was no different: procurement professionals from across the country, in roles from analyst to CPO, took the crisis under their wing and worked hard to manage huge and urgent projects, doing everything from sourcing safety masks to visiting impacted sites and absorbing, first-hand, the horror of the situation. 

The fact that the bushfire crisis is a procurement-related issue is of little doubt, so much so that it’s made international headlines. In a case that is yet unresolved, Australian charity The Red Cross has been criticised for not distributing funds quickly enough to those in need. Yet The Red Cross has fiercely defended their work, saying, in a statement we can all relate to: ‘We must manage the money so we aren’t scammed…we need to protect funds.’  In times of crisis, supplier vetting and proper process is just as, if not more important, according to The Red Cross and other charities, especially given the public pressure to ‘spend with them,’ an initiative that encourages all Australian people and companies to spend as much as possible with bushfire-affected communities.

The Red Cross might have made the headlines, but how are we, as procurement professionals for some of the world’s leading companies, doing behind the scenes? We surveyed procurement leaders from members of The Faculty’s Roundtable Program to see what impact they’d made, how they coped and what they were proud of in this time of crisis. Here’s what they told us. 

The impact of the bushfires 

There’s no doubt that the bushfires have had an impact on procurement, and this impact has been felt most for our members in the insurance, banking and service/utilities industry. 

For one member in insurance, the procurement team has been pivotal in increasing resourcing to areas that are making claims. Yet with this, they’ve treaded carefully with suppliers: 

‘[In times of crisis, like these, my team have ensured] suppliers in fire regions are being treated sensitively.’ 

For another member in utilities, the crisis has forced them to consider a few of their policies and plans: 

‘The bushfires have really made us stress test our Disaster Recovery plan and rethink our emergency sourcing process.’ 

‘They have highlighted the critical importance of having a solid, reliable and trusted supplier partner to meet all of our urgent demands.’ 

Supplier selection 

On the issue of suppliers, many procurement teams have had to adjust their approach. One, in the services industry, has made a concerted effort to follow the ‘spend with them’ mantra: 

‘[For this crisis in particular], there is a strong imperative to use local suppliers and providers, including trades, cleaners etc. This is to ensure that any investment in rebuilding these communities comes from the communities themselves.’ 

For others, like this member in the banking industry, it’s been more about alignment, agility and innovation: 

‘Right now, we’re focusing on who can mobilise fast and solve issues.’ 

‘In a crisis, it’s not so much about being perfect as it is about getting in and trying something to see if it will work. Organisations that can provide solutions by quickly connecting people and resources are more valuable than providers who take time to line everything up and have the ideal outcome in a bureaucratic fashion.’ 

For other members, it was simply an issue of availability. Two members, both in the utilities industry, simply said that ‘resource availability’ was their focus when selecting suppliers. 

Positive impact 

While the bushfire crisis – and, indeed, any crisis – is a busy time for procurement, a number of our members have achieved great things. For a member in the services industry, they were able to make a substantial frontline impact: 

‘[Our team has helped] deliver a number of significant outcomes, including bussing people from fire-hit areas to evacuation centres and providing them with catering and other services when they arrived.’ 

Another member, from the insurance industry, has gone the extra mile to look after their suppliers: 

‘We reduced supplier payment terms to those located in fire regions from 30 days to immediate.’ 

Each member has contributed, but a member from the banking industry has gone above and beyond, ensuring that they assist from a charity and staff perspective: 

‘We are currently working with WorkVentures, a social enterprise that refurbishes laptops. We’ve funded them to refurbish 5,000 laptops to provide to the Salvation Army, who will distribute them in affected areas. This has such far-reaching implications; it will help environmentally, as well as with community disaster relief and disability employment.’ 

‘In addition to this, we’ve established a $1.5 million funding packing, which includes customer/employee grants, recovery support, relief packages and unlimited paid leave for volunteers.’ 

A strategy focus? 

Given the increasing expectation on procurement to be a strategic business partner within organisations, many procurement teams took the crisis as an opportunity to use their strategic prowess. 

Yet some didn’t consider strategy at this particular time. A member in the services industry told us: 

‘At this point, the operational requirements far outweigh the strategic requirements.’ 

Other members disagreed though, with many making strategic contributions. One member in the insurance industry has used the crisis to start focusing on a long term-issue: 

‘We’re now strategically elevating climate elements within our procurement operating model.’ 

Another member, in the transport industry, is using the crisis to make critical future preparations: 

‘After this crisis, we’re now in the planning phase for emergency preparedness and response. We are reviewing our supply market, preparing for activity.’ 

Do you relate? How has your procurement team been affected by the Australian bushfire crisis, or other crises you’ve experienced? Tell us in the comments below. 

The Faculty’s Roundtable Program gives leading procurement professionals at member organisations the opportunity to learn, connect and access industry-leading research, networks and knowledge. Collaborative in spirit, the recent bushfire crisis was yet another example of where our Roundtable community was able to band together to support each other, share best practice, and drive positive outcomes for their organisations and our profession. 

Not a member? Join us. Enquire here.

Join Us For Big Ideas 2020 As A Digital Delegate

A new year means the start of many new ideas and we have something just for you that’ll get the brain cells firing!

Our flagship event – Big Ideas Summit – is happening on Wednesday 11 March in London and we’d love your brain to be part of it as a digital delegate.

Hear from Sir Clive Woodward, former coach of the England rugby team and keynote speaker at the summit explain why talent isn’t enough and what he learnt about finding joy at work from a dentist.

Check out this great interview with him on what makes a great leader and the traits of English rugby captains.

Or perhaps it’s Professor Omera Khan you’re interested in hearing from as she dives into the death of the Triple Bottom Line framework and the new kid on the block that’s taken its place.

Check out her thought-provoking piece published on Procurious last week – Can we use the disruptive model pioneered by Amazon, Uber and Airbnb in the struggle against climate change?

And if that isn’t enough to entice you to watch along, we’ll leave the final words to those from some past events.

Big Ideas Sydney 2018 – Live from the sidelines

Question: What does it take to be an influencer in an organisation?

Big Ideas Chicago 2019

Question: What’s the most exciting social or environmental change you’ve been able to drive in your career?


Have we enticed you enough already?

If you’re ready to hear Woodward’s electrifying keynote speech plus much more then register here now.

The let us do the leg work while you gather intel and new ways of thinking to drive your business forward this year.

Make 2020 the year of the new idea. We are.

Big Ideas Is brought to you by Procurious – Do you work in procurement or supply chain? Join 37,000 + procurement and supply chain professionals at Procurious today, and receive free access to the latest industry news, information, training, events and much more. 

Tenders are the Worst Form of Procurement

Tenders may be the traditional form of procurement, but it’s time they were consigned to the dustbin of the past.

This article was originally published on LinkedIn by Austin Harrison.

“Procurement by tender is the worst form of procurement, except for all the others”

Winston Churchill, British politician, army officer, and writer, 1874-1965

Actually, Winston Churchill never said that, but if he’d been a Bid Manager I reckon he totally would have.

Procurement by tender is, by and large, a solution to a whole lot of problems that ought not to exist. Nepotism, backhanding, bribery and intimidation – those old-school gangster favourites – are obnoxious and illegal and commercially inadvisable, and picking with a pin is a terrible way to get an optimal result. I fully accept that tendering is as about as fair and sensible a method of procurement as I’ve come across.

Then again, if aliens landed and were introduced to the concept of tendering, they might wonder why we’ve created an entire sub-industry devoted to a single method of acquisition that doesn’t always get the right result for the purchaser and doesn’t always guarantee a sale for the best vendor.

Tenders – A Hugely Expensive Lack of Control

As someone who supports sales for a living, the issue I have, if one accepts I’m not a gangster, is that tendering is hugely expensive, and doesn’t quite work like it says on the tin. Purchasing, even of large, complex and multi-component tangibles, as well as intangible stuff like ideas and values, works a bit better for both parties if it’s treated more like old-fashioned shopping.

The buyer needs to try it on, to prod and poke and feel the width, and the vendor needs to suggest politely that while tangerine sequins are a bit last season, this one here is timeless and elegant and 20 per cent off.

A glaring anomaly, for me at least, is that as soon as an invitation to tender is issued, both sides lose a significant element of control. From the sales side, there might have been months or years of locating, learning about, and leading a prospect towards a solution that meets and exceeds needs that have been properly and professionally identified.

An RFx is issued, and suddenly any such headway can be diminished or completely negated. For the purchaser, they give up the tactile, lived experience of shopping and replace it with acquisition by form-filling at arms-length.

And if we’re being brutally honest, both the form and the response can be poorly designed and quite a long way from what is wanted or what is actually delivered.

Re-channelling some of the blood, toil, tears and sweat

While the tendering thing fills up my time quite satisfactorily, I’d prefer to expend a little more effort on winning business, and a little less on just joining in. Tenders are unlikely ever to disappear (and nor should they), but that doesn’t stop me from exploring any alternative approaches.

I’m lucky that the field I work in is flexible to some extent in respect of the sales process. It’s been possible for my team, in collaboration with others, to provision my sales colleagues with written collateral that is designed to preempt, or at least influence (in a non-gangster way) procurement by tender. I believe we’ve had some success with the following:

A Buyers’ Guide to Tenders

More of an infomercial than an advert, this encourages a prospect to ask questions of prospective suppliers. They are, of course, the kind of questions that my company would enjoy answering, and our logo and testimonials are prominent, but for those prospects who are in the early stages of procurement, I believe it’s actually a really useful item

The Case for a New [insert your offering here]

A more substantial justification for change, and how to go about it (define why you’re shopping, don’t let the wrong people make the decision, focus on advantages rather than risk, examine the risk of not changing, etc.). Includes plenty of stories of successful procurement (of my company’s products, but then those are the only stories to which we have access…)

How to write a Request for Proposal

If we have to go down the RFP path, it’s great to receive something that we can respond to properly. You may be surprised, but this isn’t a shameless spruiking for my company’s products. Rather it highlights sensible things to ask, and how best to encourage an honest and comprehensive response (e.g.; a spreadsheet with 500 or 1,000 closed questions might actually deliver less information than 50 broad questions that can be completed as the respondent sees fit, kind of thing) 

A Host of One-Pagers

A host of documents, from one-pagers upwards, that serve to address questions from prospects that repeatedly crop up during the sales process. For my line of work, these include collections of case studies focused on a particular market sector (who else like me has your products?), outlines of change management and ongoing support services, descriptions and examples of opportunities for return on investment, explanations of solution architecture and overarching compliance, etc., etc.

While it seems that these documents have had some impact, it’s difficult to measure precisely how much. Certainly, we’ve received RFPs based on our suggestions, but often we’re not sure if a particular document reassured or persuaded a particular prospect sufficiently for a them to sign the contract.

That said, I take the view that my job is to support the salesfolk, and if they consider this sort of thing helpful, that, for me, is a decent result.

Do you do anything to anticipate or guide procurement by tenders, and move forward into broad, sunlit uplands? What are your experiences here? Always keen to learn more….

How To Increase Your Procurement Salary This Year

Negotiating your salary can be scary… but not doing so can be an even bigger risk and really add up over time.

Money. We all might agree that it doesn’t buy happiness at work and it’s far from the most important benefit in our jobs, but still, it’s a big indicator of the value we bring. And while as procurement professionals, we’re more than happy to put on our poker face, sit at the negotiating table and secure the best deal for our business, many of us are less inclined to employ these tactics when it comes to our own pay rises. 

But why? 

Negotiating for ourselves is challenging, and research shows an incredible two-thirds of us never do it. In a perfect world, we wouldn’t have to – our hard work and effort would be automatically rewarded. But our jobs, just like our supplier negotiations, are about business, so it follows that we’d need to regularly present our business case to secure the best deal. 

Doing so can be scary, but not doing so can be even scarier and over time, really add up. An example: a study conducted by Linda Babcock showed that only 7% of women attempt to negotiate their salary, as opposed to 57% of men. Over a career, this can make a huge difference – the same research showed that people who asked were able to increase their salary by over 7%. 

But even if we know we should be negotiating for ourselves, doing so can be a completely different beast. So if you want to increase your procurement salary this year, here’s how we recommend you do it: 

Step 1: Beforehand – Thoroughly prepare

A salary negotiation is like any other big-ticket negotiation in your procurement career and as such, you need to be prepared. Although salary can feel very personal, when you’re preparing you need to keep it professional and build a business case for what you’re going to ask for. Here’s how you do that: 

Understand your market value 

Before you enter any negotiations, you need to know your numbers, and salaries are no different. But where do you get this information from? 

Websites such as Payscale can be a great starting point when it comes to salary ranges. It can also be extremely helpful to talk to specialist procurement recruiters, such as those from Procurious’ recruitment partner, The Source, to understand what your market rate should be. 

After you’ve researched your range, land on exact value, ideally at the top end of the range. Why? Research shows that if you do this, you’re scientifically more likely to get closer to this amount, and when you select a number at the top of the range, you give yourself more room to negotiate. 

Once you’ve discovered your market rate, think about what you’d like to ask for as an entire package, in case the business simply isn’t able to afford the raise you’re asking for (or equally, if you value other benefits just as much). Perhaps you’d like to negotiate for more annual leave? Different flexible work conditions? Travel or different projects? Ensure you know what you’re after and have prioritised it according to your preferences. 

The last part of knowing what you’re after is considering the ‘bare minimum’ you’d accept. If you can’t get a raise, will you be ok to accept the changed benefits you’re asking for? Is nothing an acceptable outcome, as long as you know you can try again next year? Deciding on your ‘bare minimum’ can help you know when to  acquiesce your negotiations. 

Prepare your business case 

Now you’re clear on your value, it’s time to show it through preparing your business case. Many people make the mistake of defaulting to their personal circumstances or effort expounded in their business cases, but you should always focus on purely business outcomes and results. 

Your business case needn’t be long, in fact, it could be simply one page, but on it you should include: 

  • Your accomplishments, focusing on the value you added vis-a-vis the strategic priorities of your department (and even the business as a whole)
  • Any awards or other recognition you’ve received
  • Customer, stakeholder or co-worker testimonials (if you don’t have any of these, ensure you proactively ask for some).
  • A plan to achieve future objectives of the business and department.  

Once you’ve put together your business case, practice your pitch. Know inside-out how you’re adding value, and be prepared to answer any questions your manager might have (without getting defensive). Confidence will be a big part of your success, so practice definitely makes perfect. 

Get your timing right (if you can) 

Some companies mandate that salary negotiations and performance reviews go hand-in-hand. But from an HR perspective, there is always room for ‘out-of-cycle’ pay rises where they’re deemed necessary, so if possible, try to pick your timing when you’re negotiating. According to the Harvard Business Review, the best time to negotiate for a rise may be three to four months prior to your performance review, before your boss has decided what rises might be given out (NB. Team salaries often come from the same budget ‘bucket’ so getting in ahead of time might ensure there’s more available for you). 

The first rule of picking your timing is choosing a time, obviously, when your boss isn’t stressed or where you don’t have thousands of impending deadlines. Beyond this, research shows that you should choose a Thursday or Friday to negotiate, as in this part of the week people are usually more amenable to negotiation and compromise. 

Step 2: The meeting – put your best negotiation skills on

Remember the nerves you felt in your first supplier negotiation? Undoubtedly, you’ll feel those one-hundred fold when negotiating for yourself. As such, consciously employ these tactics to ensure you present your best pitch: 

Get your confidence on

Some people think of confidence as something you do – or don’t – have, but in reality there’s lots of things you can do to make sure you look and feel more confident. 

One such thing is to employ what Harvard researcher Amy Cuddy calls a ‘power pose.’ A ‘power pose is where you stand tall with your hands on your hips and your chin and chest raised. Executing one of these, even if it’s in your office prior to your negotiation, helps raise testosterone, which in turn increases confidence and reduces stress. 

You can also make sure you look and feel the part, says self-improvement researcher James Clear.  To do so, choose an outfit that makes you feel your best, and make sure you enter the negotiation room with your head held high, eye contact and a confident smile. ‘The way you enter a room can dictate how the rest of an interaction will be,’ James asserts. 

Finally, if you’re rethinking your morning coffee on your meeting day – don’t. Research shows it makes people more resistant to persuasion, so if you indulge, you might just have an easier time holding your ground! 

Listen before you ask

As you’d know from your supplier negotiations, you’re always in the best position when you’re armed with as much information as possible. Likewise, as counterintuitive as might seem, the first thing you need to do in your salary negotiation is to listen. 

What have our key successes been, you might ask. Or alternatively, what’s the road map for the future and how will be measure our success? The answers to these questions may well cause you to adjust your pitch, depending on what your manager highlights as their most crucial priorities. 

Your pitch

Now you’ve listened, it’s time for your pitch. When you’re discussing your achievements, keep everything professional and fact-based, referencing your business case as needed. 

Use your pitch to present your ‘first preference,’ whether this simply be a pay rise or a combination of pay and other conditions. Don’t mention other options as yet – these are for later down the track if negotiations don’t go as planned. Also take care not to mention anything non-business related, as relevant as it may seem (for example, I need a raise as my rent has  increased, or I need a raise because I learnt my colleague who doesn’t work half as hard earns more). Mentioning personal reasons for a pay rise will distract from the value you add to the business, which is what your salary is fundamentally about. 

Step 3: The big ask – will you get the pay rise? 

Once you’ve prepared to ask for your pay rise and presented your case, your work is almost done. But there’s still the hardest part – actually asking for the raise. How do you do that? Here’s some tips: 

Be direct 

Skirting around the topic, waiting to be asked for a number, or putting too many words into your request can all, unfortunately, be a sign you lack confidence in what you’re asking. The best way to ask for a raise is simply to ask, referencing everything you’ve presented. Try something along the lines of: 

‘Based on the evidence I’ve presented here today, including the research I did on market range, I’d like to request a pay rise to XX.’ 

Be positive, not pushy 

If the first response you get isn’t a straight yes (it almost never will be), you need to resist the urge to sound pushy, beg, or get offended or defensive. If the initial response to your request isn’t positive, ensure that stay positive and continue to lead with the value you’ve added. If you manager wants to dispute or further investigate anything you’ve presented, simply say that you’re happy to provide further evidence. 

This is especially important if you feel yourself getting emotional. Even if you have further evidence at hand, it may be better to present it at a later point when you’re feeling more composed. 

Send evidence via email 

From an HR perspective, it’s unlikely that even if your boss agrees with your request in principle, he or she will be able to approve it straight away. Also, he or she may need to provide evidence to senior management or HR as to why the decision is being made. 

To get on the front foot with this, send your manager an email after your meeting, detailing your request and your business case. Ensure you give your manager a deadline for responding, so you’ll know either way how to move the negotiations forward, if need be. 

Step 4: Dealing with a no 

When we enter a negotiation, the last thing we want is to receive is a ‘no.’ Yet at the same time, we do need to prepare for this as a possible outcome. Here’s how you do that while maintaining your professionalism and your job (if that’s your intention): 

See no as a path to yes 

When it comes to salary negotiations, it can be tempting to see a ‘no’ as a personal indictment on your performance, but according to Forbes, it’s anything but this: 

‘We’re often reluctant to negotiate past no, but we shouldn’t be. After all, it’s not really a negotiation if we’re asking for something our bargaining partner wants.’ 

‘Negotiation is a conversation whose goal is to reach an agreement with someone whose interests are not perfectly aligned with yours.’ 

If we wanted something from our supplier, would we take no as an answer? Probably not. Employ that same ethos in your salary negotiations. 

Make a counter offer 

The beauty of having pre-considered options for your negotiation means that if you get a no to your first request, you can proceed down the list. If you need to do this, continue to lead with value and sell the reasons why the benefits you’re asking for are beneficial to the business, for example, ‘Working a compressed working week has been shown to boost productivity, and I’m confident, given my track record, I can deliver that.’ 

Keep the conversation open

Did you know that some of the world’s most famous negotiations took years, and even decades to pull off? While you’re unlikely to want to wait that long for a pay rise, know that it might take some time to achieve what you’re asking for. Stay positive, make SMART goals (for example, I’d like to discuss this again in 6 months, when I’ve done XYZ) and continue building your business case. 

Have you tried to negotiate your salary? Any other tips for success? We’d love to hear them – please let us know in the comments below. 

Do you work in procurement or supply chain? Join 37,000 + procurement and supply chain professionals at Procurious today, and receive free access to the latest industry news, information, training, events and much more. 

How Uber, Airbnb and Amazon Can Help Combat Climate Change

Can we use the disruptive model pioneered by Amazon, Uber and Airbnb in the struggle against climate change?

Uber is the world’s biggest taxi company, but doesn’t own a single taxi cab. Airbnb and Booking.com are the world’s largest hoteliers, but don’t possess any hotels. 

And after being in business for a quarter of a century, Amazon – the world’s biggest bookseller – is only now experimenting with physical bookshops.

There are many lessons to be learnt from such examples. Chief among them, perhaps, is that being disruptive does work. 

These days, businesses and consumers are far more receptive to ‘early-stage’ disruptive ideas. They have seen for themselves how easy it is to be overtaken and left behind by clever ideas whose time has come.

I’ve been thinking a lot about disruptive ideas in recent weeks. And in particular, I’ve been thinking about disruptive ideas in the context of sustainability.

And the conclusion I’ve come to? 

We may need some fresh disruptive ideas and business models if the sustainability agenda is to make much more progress.

Report card

That may sound mad. Since – say – the 1970s and 1980s, the world’s environmental protection initiatives have made huge progress.

Sustainability is high on both corporate and government agendas. Cars are far more fuel-efficient. Houses, offices and factories are far more energy-efficient.

Skies are clearer, water cleaner – especially in the developed world, although progress is being made elsewhere, too.

And yet, and yet. Waters are clearer, yes. But visible pollution has been replaced with microplastic fibres.

Smoke from coal-burning has gone from our skies. Yet CO2 emissions are at record levels. The Amazon’s rainforests are vanishing. Sea levels are rising. And average temperatures are increasing.

Is it any wonder that groups such as Extinction Rebellion are protesting so vociferously? Or that the activism of teenage protesters is so widely applauded?

Lip service

For me, personally, one of the most persuasive signs that current approaches to sustainability aren’t delivering fast enough has come from the Harvard Business Review

Late last year, influential management thinker John Elkington took to its pages to officially ‘recall’ – that is, take back – a concept he first launched 25 years ago: the Triple Bottom Line.

Simply put, he argued, the Triple Bottom Line was no longer enough. Something else was needed. Something bolder.

The idea behind the Triple Bottom Line was simple. Instead of focusing on just profit, the Triple Bottom Line sought to get businesses to view their performance in a broader context.

They should examine their social, environmental and economic impact.

The idea has had a powerful effect. Twenty-five years on, it’s made a big difference. 

But it isn’t enough, acknowledged Elkington. Too many businesses see it as a trade-off mechanism, rather than as an absolute test.

Something else is required if we are to really ‘shift the needle’.

As he eloquently put it: ‘We have a hard‑wired cultural problem in business, finance and markets. Whereas CEOs, CFOs and other corporate leaders move heaven and earth to ensure that they hit their profit targets, the same is very rarely true of their people and planet targets.’

The ugly side of fashion

Which is why I’ve been thinking about disruptive ideas, and alternative business models.

Could they do enough to ‘shift the needle’?

I’m excited about their potential, to be sure.

Take the fashion industry. It’s been described as the second-most polluting industry in the world.

In water-scarce countries, water goes to produce cotton, not food. Microplastics from synthetic textiles fill our rivers and oceans.

According to the United Nations, the fashion industry consumes more energy than the aviation and shipping industries combined. It is responsible for up to 20% of global wastewater, and 10% of global carbon emissions. 

Container ships full of cheap clothes ply the world’s shipping lanes. They belch out vast amounts of the sulphur-laden black smoke that comes from burning bunker oil, the world’s dirtiest fuel.

And yet, at the end of it all, a lot of ‘fast fashion’ simply gets thrown away. The UK sent around 300,000 tons of clothing to landfill in 2016, for instance.

What can be done? 

Instinctively, most people think about some form of clothes recycling. But they are forced to conclude that the technology to cost-effectively turn unwanted clothing into useable yarn doesn’t yet exist.

But there’s another form of clothes recycling that doesn’t need technology. Or rather, the technology that it needs is already developed and with us.

The sharing economy

I’m talking about clothing rental, which is catching on fast.

Names such as Girl Meets Dress, My Wardrobe HQ, By Rotation, Rent the Runway.

These and others are offering affordable clothing rental services, either on their own account (they own the clothes), or as intermediaries (other people own the clothes).

At the moment, a lot of the activity is at the high end, in designerwear. Fast fashion it isn’t – yet.

That said, there are experiments underway. H&M, for instance, is trialling a rental scheme at its flagship store in Stockholm. In the United States, Banana Republic has recently launched a rental service.

Even so, it’s clear that what’s going on has the potential to evolve and grow.

As a business model, it’s different and disruptive. And it addresses many of the sustainability issues of the traditional ownership model. 

Instead of being hung up in a wardrobe, clothes are worn again and again – just by different people.

So could such a model ‘shift the needle’ in terms of fashion’s impact on the environment?

No one, including me, yet knows: it’s far too soon. Right now, fashion rental is far from becoming mainstream.

But don’t forget: so too, once, were Uber, Amazon and Airbnb.

Disrupting accepted business models in fashion – and other areas – could really help in the struggle to combat climate change.

This article was written by London Roundtable attendee, Omera Khan. If you are also interested in attending our next Roundtable in London, you can contact [email protected]

New Year, New Fear – The Dreaded Annual Pay Review

If you’re facing an annual pay review this month, follow these key Dos and Don’ts to boost your prospects

For many of us, our annual ‘appraisal’ when we discuss pay and performance is one of the few opportunities to talk really frankly and one-to-one with our line manager.

However, there is a tendency for pent-up frustrations to spill out.

All those extra hours you’ve put in for no extra pay. The fact that you suspect your colleagues are paid more than you.

The lack of training and development. Being overlooked for promotions. Doing the job of three people with no support.

This is your time to get everything off your chest, isn’t it?

Well, no. It is important to treat this like any other business negotiation.

So, keep it professional. Don’t get emotional. Prepare your pitch. Present your case. And have a back-up plan if you don’t get what you want.

First, some Don’ts. Avoid these common mistakes.

Don’t beg for more

Adopting the Oliver Twist approach (‘Please sir! Can I have some more?’) is just going to make your employer feel uncomfortable. 

Saying you need a rise to cover the increase cost of fares or childcare or rent may gain you some sympathy. But it won’t get you a rise.

This is a negotiation about your value to the organisation – not the cost of living.

Don’t threaten to quit

Threaten to take a job elsewhere and you run the risk of your employer calling your bluff – so you better have a job lined up.

You will also come across as disloyal. And when there’s a promotion or new opportunity, your employer might overlook you for fear you are going to leave anyway.  

However, you can point out that other employers are paying more as part of your pitch (see below). But stress you are really happy in your job and have no plans to move. 

Don’t go compare – even if it’s not fair

Some firms actively discourage staff from discussing their pay with their colleagues. So if you ask around to check if your salary is on a par with everyone else’s or to find out what pay rise they received, you could be in for a disciplinary chat, rather than a talk about your prospects.

There are many reasons why people doing the same/similar jobs are paid differently – from performance to length of service.

Most people are not happy divulging what they earn, let alone revealing the details of why they are paid what they are paid. 

Don’t lose your temper – it will make things worse

If you don’t get the answer you want, try to be understanding rather than angry. Your line manager may hate having to tell every member of the team that they won’t be getting much of a pay rise and it won’t help your case to make the process even more difficult.

Also, there may be a reason – poor performance, persistent lateness, or rudeness, perhaps – for a bad appraisal. 

You need to address these issues, not antagonise your employer.

Now some Dos. Follow these tips to make things go well.

Do prepare a business case

Many employers fear that if they give one person an inflation-busting rise ‘everyone else will want one’. So give some compelling reasons why you, as an individual, deserve more by offering something in return.

Don’t just focus your past performance (what you’ve already contributed). You should also demonstrate how you can save/make your organisation money in the year ahead and bring more to the table. 

For example, offer to take on a new project – saving your firm the cost of employing someone new or a reducing the need for hiring a contractor. 

Do your research

As part of your pitch, you can (and should) use data to support your case. In turn, this can help your line manager to justify a pay rise with higher levels of management or HR.

However, instead of saying X earns more than me or Y had a bigger bonus, use the information that’s available publicly (if you can). 

Medium and large employers must carry out an equal pay audit on a regular basis to ensure that they are complying with the law. If your salary seems out of line with what’s been published, you can use this information to present a case for better pay. 

If your organisation does not have to publish pay data, then go online to salary comparison sites such as glassdoor.co.uk or indeed.co.uk to benchmark your pay.

Also, check job adverts for similar roles in similar organisations and print out the data to support your case. Once again, be professional. Say something like: ‘The going rate for my role is £X. I feel that bringing my pay in line will not only help me but also help attract other talented people to our organisation.’ 

Do make your firm an offer they can’t refuse

Most employees have a good idea about where there are skills gaps within their organisation. Offer to solve these.

You could say something along the lines of: ‘If I undertake this development programme/do this course I could take on the responsibility for X.’ You can then justify more pay through a promotion.

Do be prepared to listen

Your line manager will probably justify why you are only getting X% as a rise. Listen carefully. 

It might be because the firm is going through a difficult time (perhaps it’s time to jump ship). Or perhaps your performance is not good enough – in which, case find out what you need to do to improve. 

Do have a plan B for tomorrow

The bad news is that your line manager has probably already decided the size of your pay rise – or been given the figure by HR. 

So whatever you say will not make a difference to your salary in the short term. However, you can use the review to ensure better pay and prospects in the future.

Think of all the things your employer can offer you that will boost your ‘value’ in the workplace and your long-term earning potential. These could include investment in your skills, the opportunity to work in a different office (or even a different country) and the chance to join a new team. 

If none of the above are on the table, look at alternative ways to be rewarded such as more flexibility – for example, working from home one day a week.

Try to leave the meeting with something – even if it is an agreement to meet again in three months’ time to discuss your progress. If you feel more positive, so will your line manager who will probably be as relieved as you are that the chat went well. This will make your next meeting much easier (and hopefully more productive).

So if you have a pay review on the horizon bear these keys Dos and Don’ts in minds as you prepare for the meeting. You’ll give yourself the best chance of getting what you want.

And in case you need a little more advice on getting to the top in your career, don’t forget to tune in tomorrow to our free webinar – Don’t Quit Your Day Job. Register here.