All posts by Procurious HQ

Supply Chain Management – Much More Than Just The Wire Between Switch And Light…

Sometimes supply chain is viewed as an abstract part of the business – we’re the wire between switch and the light. But that wire is not always fully understood…

Career Boot Camp 2018 kicks off this week! And this year’s series, Your Supply Chain Career: Accelerated, has been designed to help you sprint outside of your comfort zone and get into the best career shape of your life!

On Day 1, we catch up with Rick Blasgen President and CEO of CSCMP who has a lot of hope for the future of the supply chain profession.

“I think our professions have come such a long way already and have such a long way to go. Procurement and supply chain management will be an embedded feature of every competive global company around the world because they see so much of what goes on.

“[At CSCMP] we see it really growing into the fabric of successful companies. There is so much opportunity before us as our global economies kick in and we use technology and productivity processes to improve our ability to serve customers in markets that are yet to be conquered.”

The value in professional certifications

The debate rages on over the true value in professional supply chain certifications. But Rick is pretty sure they’re here to stay!

“This profession changes so rapidly –  think about risk management or about deliveries by drones or autonomous vehicles. These types of systems or technologies were not even part of our lexicon ten years ago and so certifications allow us to keep fresh, allow us to continue to demonstrate that we have a mastery of the supply chain and procurement professions by being on the forefront of what’s coming down the line that we might be able to use in our professions.

“One of the things important to CSCMP is to advance the logistics, supply chain and procurement professions and the careers of those working in them. The only way we do that is by being thought leaders and thinking about using the new technologies and tools that have never before existed. Our certifications will educate you on these things and then test that you have the understanding and can utilise the complexity within them.

“So I think [professional certifications] are a normal course of continuing to educate yourself and continuing to be knowledgeable about such a dynamic and ever-changing field.”

Upskilling your supply chain team

How does Rick feel about experienced hires versus the value in up-skilling talented professionals from diverse backgrounds?

“There is no reason that someone with a lot of experience in a different field can’t be very successful working in supply chain. If you have the ability to analyse data or if you’re an engineer – those types of talents and skills play a very important role within the supply chain world.

“Sometimes supply chain is viewed as an abstract part [of the business] – we’re the wire between switch and the light. You flick the  switch and the light goes on you don’t call your power company and thank them because you expect the light to go on.

“Well that wire is sometimes not truly understood – supply chain and procurement professions struggle a little bit with awareness.

“But there’s so much opportunity and different types of jobs that folks can come into. If you have a set of skills like great interpersonal skills or great managerial and leadership skills you’re going to do just fine in a supply chain position as long as you can analyse data and think logically about this flow of inventory and information.

“We’ve seen folks come from the medical industry, consumer products, consumer electronics or even different types of functions such as English or History majors who have come and done a wonderful job.

“Is it great to get supply chain education? Sure it is!  Universities these days are doing a great job of explaining modern day supply chain theory. But you can certainly be successful as you fly into this profession with a set of skills that really make a difference.”

Rick’s parting words to any aspiring supply chain professionals?

“Young folks have a great opportunity – I have never seen a hiring market like it is now. If youre looking for a job on another continent I can’t think of another field where you can go ahead move to another part of the world If you so desire and have a very fruitful experience. If you have a global experience or a global mindset  you’ll do very well in supply chain because it is such a global field.”

Rick Blasgen is speaking on Day 1 of Career Boot Camp 2018. Sign up here (it’s free) to listen now! 

The Rise of The Contingent Workforce… And How to Manage It!

Contingent Labour represents an ever-increasing proportion of our workforce, and it’s not hard to understand why. What is challenging for procurement teams, however, is effective management of their organisation’s contingent workforce… 

kurhan/ Shutterstock

“Depending on whose data you believe, the contingent workforce now makes up from 20 per cent [1] to 40 per cent [2] of the global workforce, with some analysts estimating that it will reach 50 per cent by the year 2020,” says Doug Leeby, CEO – Beeline.

Procurious caught up with Doug ahead of his keynote presentation at Big Ideas Summit Chicago to learn more about the state of contingent labour in the workplace today and to pick his brains on how procurement teams can best manage, and leverage, their ever-evolving workforce.

The rise of the contingent workforce

“It’s easy to understand why contingent labour is growing,” explains Doug.  “Most companies are under intense pressure to improve their bottom line and usage of contingent staff, contractors, freelancers, and consultants is an excellent economic model that can be deployed to both accomplish discrete projects and assist an organisation during surge periods of work.”

“There is an enormous economic benefit in being able to ramp up key areas of the workforce during heavy times and down in lighter times.  Additionally, the enterprise can complete important project work by hiring external experts rather than having to bring highly specialised skills into the organisation.  The short-term costs may appear high but the total cost to production can, in fact, be much lower.”

“Traditionally, companies have looked to the contingent labor population for work that is less strategic, saving that for FTEs.  However, more and more, we are seeing a hybrid approach.  Successful companies in which HR and Procurement are working together have figured this out.  Most of us can’t afford a team of data scientists but we can contract a team for a specific goal.  That’s a very strategic example whereas the contingent workforce can produce extraordinary value.”

The challenges of contingent labour

Employing a large proportion of contingent labour to your organisations presents a whole new set of challenges for both procurement teams and HR. But, as Doug advises, it is specifically in-effective management of contingent talent that will lead to enormous problems and risks for your organisation.

“Companies may be operating out of compliance, exposing themselves to severe penalties.  Additionally, improperly managing this talent can lead to overpayment or under-delivery of results. Metrics and KPIs are critical to ensure that the program is properly managed. Everyone has heard about the now-infamous ‘war on talent.’  It isn’t subsiding.  Not having a smooth-running program to manage contingent labor invariably leads to losing great talent to those who do have solid programs.”

Part of the difficulty with managing contingent labour is procurement’s failure to work constructively and efficiently alongside HR departments.

“Asking the two departments to take time to think about optimising their workforce is a tough ask,” explains Doug.

“This is not a small undertaking nor is it something that can be accomplished in one meeting, or even a series of meetings. It is transformational, which means it requires a significant investment of time and resources, but I believe it will happen as the focus on talent comes into greater view at the C-suite. HR has an outstanding opportunity to look at talent holistically and work with Procurement to ensure that it is sourced and managed properly. This will deliver tremendous value to the organisation.”

Using tech to manage contingent labour

“Technology today is an enabler,” Doug explains.  “However, with the progress being made in AI and machine learning, it will soon become far more than just an enabler – it will become an advisor.

“Technology shouldn’t just be about workflow and reporting.  Rather, it should act more as a subject matter expert or concierge helping procurement and HR to analyse their workforce and make strategic decisions.

“The challenge with this transformation is that it depends on organisations getting all their data into the technology and most still have a way to go. At a minimum, they need get all of the contingent labor into the system – complex, statement-of-work (SOW) based, milestone-based services as well as contingent staff.

“VMS technology can manage not only who the contingent workers are, where they are, what they are doing, and what facilities and data they have access to, but also how well they perform their assignments.”

The future of the workforce

“The workplace and workforce model that has been in place since the Industrial Revolution, designed for stable markets and long-term business planning, is giving way to a new model based on constant change and adaptability,” Doug believes.  We asked Doug to outline what he believes will be the key features of the workforce of the future…

1. Talent first

Over time, I believe organisations will adopt a “Talent First” approach that will be led by HR.  Procurement will remain a solid partner, but HR will need to lead the initiative within the organisation. They will work, proactively, with department heads and finance to figure out the best way to achieve desired outcomes.

2. The human touch

Some outcomes will be handled via artificial intelligence and robotic process automation, but much will still depend on people.  Competitive organisations will focus on optimising their workforce.  They will then focus on how to source this talent holistically.

3. Talent pools

Talent sourcing won’t be done in silos anymore.  Organizations will establish private talent pools and work to attract talent, both FTE and non-FTE, to their pools.  Then, they will be able to hire/engage known talent which leads to a higher propensity for success.

4. Self-sourcing

Companies will make use of functionality like our Self-Sourcing.  In other words, they will go directly to the contingent talent rather than through intermediaries.  This is already being done with freelancers, but we will see more of this with contractors and consultants.

Doug Leeby will be speaking at Big Ideas Chicago on 27th September. To  hear more from him and to follow the action LIVE from wherever you are in the world, register as a digital delegate (it’s free!)

Continue reading The Rise of The Contingent Workforce… And How to Manage It!

Making Sustainable Procurement Work

Now, more than ever, it’s important for the profession to put sustainable procurement at the front and center of business.

AYA images/ Shutterstock

Daniel Perry, Global Alliances Director – Ecovadis believes that the role of procurement is evolving. Evolving from being “primarily focused on cost savings and operational efficiency, to a more strategic and central player in risk management and value creation.”

Now, more than ever, it’s important for the profession to put sustainable procurement at the front and center of business.

“Stakeholders, including end consumers, B2B customers, shareholders etc. are demanding that businesses take responsibility for practices all the way into their value chain. They’re driving transparency and, ultimately, a positive impact by working with high-integrity partners. And it’s procurement teams that are in the ideal place to meet these higher stakeholder demands.”

“The power of the spend that procurement controls (often between 50-70 per cent of turnover) puts procurement at the crossroads of not only risk management and brand protection, but also as internal partners for driving value creation. Of course they want the value chain to be resilient – to avoid interruptions or damage to their company’s reputation – but they also want to provide supplier-driven innovation and support for transformative business models and offerings. –

“Procurement teams focused on sustainability do this by selecting and working with the best suppliers in a way that goes far beyond price, quality and delivery, to include performance around environmental, social and labor and ethics practices.”

The value-add of sustainability programs

It’s all too common to hear an organisation defend their lack of commitment and lack effort in this space. “It’s too expensive”, “it’s too difficult”, “it’s too time consuming” or “we’re just not ready” are typical refrains.

The benefits and ROI of sustainability include not only operational savings, but strategic outcomes. A well-developed Sustainability and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) program that is integrated into the company values, and is driven with executive support, can drive key business performance metrics such as:

  • Sales and reputation: A burgeoning wave of consumer sentiment is cresting. More and more customers are comparing the sustainability details of products and services, and it is changing their purchase decisions. Companies making the right sustainability investments can realise a possible increase in revenue of up to 20 per cent.
  • Employee morale and productivity: Sustainability programs can do wonders to improve employee satisfaction, reducing a company’s staff turnover rate by up to 50 per cent and increasing employee productivity by up to 13 per cent. Integrating CSR practices in your company and brand also has a hugely positive impact on recruiting.  If your company has a better sustainability reputation, it often generates more interest from applicants, allowing you to be more selective and choose higher quality candidates.
  • Increased market value: Sustainability programs can increase a company’s market value by up to 6 per cent.
  • Innovation: With more power comes more responsibility…and more options. Many companies are pursuing sustainable procurement strategies in order to find innovative suppliers that will help them differentiate their product or service offering.

Dupont, for example, changed its innovation strategy to embrace a “sustainable growth” mission, saying “If we bring the solutions to the market sooner than our competitors do, we will be more successful in continuing to grow the company.”

Making sustainable procurement work

“One of the biggest challenges companies face in sustainable procurement is measuring and understanding current performance within their supply base, in the context of global standards and benchmarks. It can also be challenging to engage suppliers as collaborators in their mission. And to get there requires a mix of expertise, the right technology, change management and process integration backed by executive commitment.

“First, the organisation needs a clear mandate from the executive team, which makes the sustainable procurement program an integral part of the function’s mission and values. This is embodied by investing in change management and communication programs and taking steps towards implementation and company-wide adoption.

“Success also requires reliable, agreed-upon indicators for sustainability performance that both buyers and suppliers can understand, and that are actionable. Many companies collect lots of unvalidated data, but buyers rarely have the CSR expertise or time to validate or interpret it – and this is where a standardised, evidence-based, and analyst-generated rating – like EcoVadis provides – comes into play.

“Additionally, CSR criteria and performance indicators must be integrated across the procurement function and include the use of clear and enforceable codes of conduct, contract clauses and tender criteria. Buyers need to believe in and leverage these criteria in their supplier development and sourcing activities.,  And, procurement groups should agree on, measure and reward on the critical CSR / sustainability KPIs in the same way they track cost savings or other key metrics. These all drive adoption in the organisation and make sustainability inherent to the procurement role.

“Increasing the benefits to a single company, a mutualised platform can make it much easier for suppliers to share the same scorecard results with all their customers, enhancing transparency and collaboration to drive network effects for maximum improvement and impact.”

Daniel Perry will be speaking at Big Ideas Chicago on 27th September. To  hear more from him and to follow the action LIVE from wherever you are in the world, register as a digital delegate (it’s free!)

Read more on this subject from EcoVadis in  Beyond Compliance – The 5 Pillars of sustainable procurement value creation

Procurement 2030: Preparing For The Revolution

Only 7 per cent  of procurement functions are perceived as ‘maturing’ in terms of digital transformation and a mere 38 per cent of teams have the capability to meet the challenges of Industry 4.0. Find out how to address these challenges in our latest report: Procurement 2030: Level 2.

Without careful preparation, revolutions fail.

From Spartacus’ slave rebellion in Ancient Rome, to the Satsuma Samurai uprising in Imperial Japan, to the Boxer rebellion in colonial China, history has shown that a revolution cannot be powered by enthusiasm alone. Successfully landing a change of any significant scale requires strategy, planning, and no small amount of determination to see it through.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution (Industry 4.0) is now upon us, and its effects can be seen in the assembly lines and offices of companies around the globe. Game-changing technology such as 3D printing, the Internet of Things (IoT), and Blockchain will super-charge the supply chains of many organisations, but need to be implemented with care.

Level One of the four-part “Procurement 2030” series by Procurious and Michael Page UK examined the forecast for procurement and the threats and opportunities facing the profession. The latest report, Level Two, shifts the focus to the practicalities of procurement and supply chain management’s evolution – against the backdrop of a technological revolution.

Our survey of 590 global professionals revealed that there is a great deal of preparation to be done before the majority of procurement functions will be equipped to take full advantage of Industry 4.0, particularly in the areas of strategic planning, creating a roadmap that gives priority to the most impactful elements of the digital revolution, and (crucially) having the right talent on board.

Download Procurement 2030: Level 2.

Low Maturity

Our survey revealed that only 7 per cent regard their procurement functions as ‘maturing’ in terms of digital transformation. The factor holding back this maturity would appear to be a lack of support from the wider business, with comments such as:

  • “Management is not interested in a digital transformation journey.”
  • “Our desire to transform is not matched by the business, who do not see the value.”
  • “Digital transformation of procurement is not even on the agenda.”

Some steps that might be taken to improve this situation include:

  • Do your homework and build a rock-solid business case that supports digital transformation. Alarmingly, 43% of survey respondents indicated they do not have a formal digital transformation strategy.
  • Ensure you align each step of your digital transformation journey to an enterprise-level objective.
  • Find a sponsor (a senior person in the organisation) to support your proposal.
  • Have the courage to take a risk – have confidence behind your ideas and be prepared to stand up for them.

Procurement’s Kryptonite

What do you regard as procurement’s greatest weakness? This research reveals that a narrow focus on cost savings and a lack of influence in the wider organisation are two stand-out factors that are holding procurement back.

HSBC CPO Jan Fokke Van Den Bosch shared his opinion of procurement’s greatest weakness in this video interview.

What’s Your Priority?

Moving systems into the cloud and leveraging big data analytics are by far the two most likely technologies to be implemented within the next 24 months by surveyed organisations.

Although AI and cognitive procurement are perceived as two of the most difficult-to-implement technologies, they are also expected to have the greatest impact on organisations. Other high-impact technologies include big data, cloud computing, and robotic process automation.

When prioritising these technologies to create a digital transformation roadmap, take the following factors into account:

  • Enablers – which technologies need to be implemented first to enable others to work successfully?
  • Impact – which technology will make the greatest positive impact on your wider organisation’s goals?
  • Costs and benefits – what is the long-term ROI on this investment? What are the benefits beyond cost savings?

The Right Team For The Job

Our survey-takers believe that on average, only 38% of their colleagues heave the capability required to meet the challenges of Industry 4.0.

For procurement functions on the cusp of a major digital transformation, now is the time to examine the team’s attributes and capabilities and, if necessary, bring in fresh talent with the ability to drive change and reap the full benefit of enabling technology.

While digital skills are a must, candidates should be screened for attributes such as a willingness to embrace change, agility, and the flexibility to make use of new behaviours and technologies.

Another solution to the perceived capability gap is to embrace the gig economy. The future of work will be project-based and outcome-focused. From the employer’s perspective, it will become increasingly important to bring in the right team for the right project.

A higher percentage of contractors in procurement will enable project managers to scale up and down as necessary, with results revealing that employment of contractors is expected to nearly double by 2030.

Interested In Learning More?

This content-packed report also contains links to relevant thought-leadership from Procurious and Michael Page UK,  including videos, blog articles, podcasts and webinars.

And don’t forget … parts 3 to 4 of the Procurement 2030 report will be released in the coming months!

  • Part 3: Human vs AI Skill Sets: October 2018
  • Part 4: Procurement Makeover: November 2018

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PROCUREMENT 2030: LEVEL 2.

Procurement’s Missing Puzzle Piece

How can the missing puzzle piece make it easier for procurement teams to operate sustainably, improve supply chain transparency and eliminate corruption?

As procurement professionals we’re always talking about how leveraging innovative technology can add value to our organisations.

But less frequently addressed is how technology can make it easier for procurement teams to operate sustainably, improve supply chain transparency and eliminate corruption. 

In our latest Procure with Purpose webinar we’ll be exploring how the latest and greatest in technology innovations can not only help procurement pros deliver business value but also drive and enable purpose-led practice.

Join us on October 10th when we’ll discuss the tech that’s helping procurement  teams to collaborate with their suppliers and  improve transparency; how to communicate the importance of using tech to improve purpose-led procurement and why businesses must integrate tech-led purpose-driven practice into all of their decision making.

How do I register for the webinar?

Registering for The Missing Puzzle Piece: How Technology Can Empower You To Procure With Purpose couldn’t be easier (and, of course, it’s FREE!)

Click here to enter your details and confirm your attendance. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

I’m already a member of Procurious, do I still need to register?

Yes! If you are already a member of Procurious you must still enroll to access the webinar. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

When is it taking place?

The webinar takes place on 10th October at 10am EDT/ 3pm BST. Sign up or log in via the form above and we’ll be in touch ahead of the event to provide details on how to join the webinar live.

Help! I can’t make it to the live-stream

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Can I ask a question?

If you’d like to ask one of our speakers a question please submit it via the Discussion Board on Procurious and we’ll do our very best to ensure it gets answered for you.

What is the Procure with Purpose community?

Procure with Purpose is a community for procurement pros who want to deliver value beyond cost savings and efficiencies – shining a light on the biggest issues from Modern Slavery to Environmental Sustainability – and on you, our members, who are already driving exponential change.

Webinar Speakers

Oliver Campbell, Director Procurement & Packaging Engineering

Oliver is a Director of Procurement & Packaging Engineering at Dell Technologies.  He has become one of the most influential thought leaders in the packaging industry by combining innovation and supply chain best practices.  Under his leadership, Dell introduced industry changing materials such as bamboo, mushroom, and molded paper pulp for more environmentally healthier packaging.

Most recently, Dell launched Ocean Plastic packaging with the aim of creating an industry response to tackle the task of the ocean plastic crisis.  Through founding NextWave, a cross-industry consortium of like-minded companies, Dell is creating a commercially viable, and scalable, supply chain that is focused on keeping plastics out of the ocean and in the circular economy.

Oliver’s accomplishments have been highlighted for their business and social influence by Fortune in their 2017 Change the World Companies, and by LinkedIn in their 2017 Top Companies to Work For.  Additionally, the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show recognized his pioneering work in Ocean Plastic with a Best of Innovation Award.  Mr. Campbell holds Bachelor and Master Engineering degrees from Cornell University and an MBA from The University of Texas.  In his free time, you can find him training for his next triathlon.

Justin Sadler Smith, Head of United Kingdom & Ireland, Ariba Cloud Procurement at SAP Ariba

Justin Sadler-Smith is head of SAP Ariba UK and Ireland, procurement and supply chain thought leader, and cognitive procurement ambassador. He is one of a growing number of procurement leaders around the world who helps procurement and supply-chain teams ensure that fair labor practices are in play across their global supply chains by harnessing innovative technology and increasing competitive advantage

Padmini Ranganathan, Global Vice President – SAP Ariba

Padmini Ranganathan is Vice President, Products and Innovation for Supplier Risk, Compliance and Sustainability solutions for SAP Ariba.  In this role, she is responsible for product strategy and engineering and leads a team of experts focused on delivering solutions that enable risk-aware, sustainable and ethical supply chains.

Prior to SAP Ariba, Padmini led the Analytics for Industries solutions marketing team at SAP which brought to market the first analytical applications and content for “art of the possible”  industry and line of business application scenarios. Before joining SAP, Padmini worked at Oracle, where she was part of the procurement product management team that delivered the first web-based, self-service applications for procurement and a technical consultant in the areas of order management, inventory & distribution, procurement and manufacturing.

Padmini is a passionate advocate for bringing technology to business users that simplifies and enriches their daily work and decision making. And as the Products & Innovation lead for SAP Ariba’s Procurement with Purpose initiatives, she is dedicated to helping businesses balance their costs with conscience and make an impact on the larger world.

Padmini has a post-graduate diploma in computer science from UC Berkeley, California, and a bachelor’s degree in commerce with a major in Cost & Management Accounting from Bangalore University, India.

Sign up for The Missing Puzzle Piece: How Technology Can Empower You To Procure With Purpose ahead of 10th October. 

Your Supply Chain Career: Accelerated

What do supply chain leaders predict for the future of the profession and how do you ensure you’re prepared seize the opportunities and get the most out of your career?

What is the biggest mistake supply chain professionals make?

What are the five key skills you need to make it to the top?

How should supply chain leaders embark on a major transformation?

Will the profession evolve in the coming years in preparation for an AI-enabled world?

We’ll answer all of these questions and more when Career Boot Camp 2018 kicks off at the beginning of October.

This year’s series, Your Supply Chain Career: Accelerated, has been designed to help you sprint outside of your comfort zone and get into the best career shape of your life!

Featuring tips and tricks from some of the best in the business we’ll be discussing how to make it as a Head of Supply Chain, the true value of professional certifications, how to persevere in the face of adversity and what the future holds for the profession.

Sign up here ahead of our launch on October 1st.

FAQs

What is the Procurious Career Boot Camp ?

Procurious’ Career Boot Camp, sponsored by IBM, is a global professional development event for supply chain professionals. The series, features five, fifteen-minute podcasts that have been designed to help you get into the best career shape of your life.

How do I listen to the Career Boot Camp podcasts?

Simply sign up here and you’ll be re-directed to the Supply Chain Pros group where you can access all five podcasts. You will also join a mailing list, which will alert you each time a new podcast is released.

How will I know when each podcast is published?

The series will run for one week, starting on October 1st, with a daily podcast released on Procurious each day. We’ll drop you an email to let you know as each podcast becomes available.

Is the podcast series available to anyone?

Absolutely! Anyone & everyone can access the podcasts and it won’t cost you a penny to do so. Simply sign up here!

When does Career Boot Camp take place?

Starting on the 1st October, Career Boot Camp will run for five days. The podcasts will be accompanied by daily blogs from our Supply Chain Career Coaches plus group discussions and articles on Procurious. When the series is complete, all five podcasts will be available for registrants via the Procurious eLearning hub, FREE of charge.

Why should I do Career Boot Camp every day?

Dedicating 15 minutes a day to developing and progressing your supply chain career can make the difference between standing still, or sprinting quickly into more impactful roles. At Procurious, we firmly believe that daily procurement learning is essential for career advancement. And Career Boot Camp will help you get into the habit!

Speakers

Rick Blasgen, CEO & President – CSCMP

Rick D. Blasgen has been the president and chief executive officer of the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) in Lombard, Illinois, USA since 2005.

Rick Blasgen has responsibility for the overall business operations and strategic plan of the organisation. His efforts support CSCMP’s mission of leading the supply chain management profession through the development and dissemination of supply chain education and research

Ron Castro , Vice President – IBM Supply Chain

IBM Supply Chain Vice President leading a remarkable team through the digital and cognitive journey to an end to end AI-enabled supply chain. Driving adoption of cutting-edge technology and applications inside and outside of the manufacturing walls.

Chris Crozier, Chief Digital Officer – Orica

Chris Crozier is the Chief Digital Officer for Orica International, the world’s largest manufacturer and supplier of explosives for mining and civil construction. In this capacity, Chris’ digital teams supports the global footprint of the organisation across Business, Customer and Manufacturing systems, including governance of Orica’s digital ecosystems, architecture, data and cyber posture. Prior to this, he has held executive roles within Orica as Global Vice President Supply Chain, and BHP Billiton.

Tom Evans, UK Ultramarathon Runner

Tom Evans is a 26 year old professional Trail Runner and Red Bull athlete. In 2017 he discovered ultra running and finished 3rd in the famous Marathon des Sables, which was his first ultra marathon. Since then, he has become a full time athlete. He finished 3rd in the Trail running world championships while representing Team GB. He has recently won the CCC – one of the most prestigious 100km mountain races”

Samantha Gash, Australian Ultramarathon Runner

Samantha Gash, as a World Vision Ambassador, ran 3253 km in 76 days across India, raising over $150,000 to fund education programs. Her other achievements include a 1968km expedition run along South Africa’s Freedom Trail and four 250km desert ultramarathons as part of the Racing the Planet – Four Deserts Grand Slam.

Laura Faulkner, Director Supply Chain Management – Nationwide Building Society 

After graduating from Strathclyde University with a BSc in Technology & Business, Laura joined Polaroid as a Graduate Buyer. Laura then spent time with GSK and Ernst & Young before taking a role with RBS that led to her being appointed CPO in 2014.

Laura is now CPO and Director of Supply Chain Management (SCM) at Nationwide Building Society where she has brought together Procurement, Property Services, Third Party Risk, Vendor Management, Accounts Payable and Offshore Operations.

SCM’skey focus is to maximise the value of 3rd Party Relationships across the Society, leading the Supply Chain Strategy to drive efficient, resilient and innovative solutions for the benefit of all Nationwide Members.

Career Boot Camp, Your Supply Chain Career: Accelerated kicks off on October 1st 2018. Sign up here (it’s FREE!)

How to Keep the Supplier Love Alive

We take a look at some of the ways procurement professionals should manage, and negotiate with, their long-term suppliers when things get tricky…

Nobody said it was going to be easy. Building and, most importantly, maintaining good supplier relationships takes hard work, commitment and focus. And the longer they last, the more they require this careful nurturing to keep the love alive and the flame burning.

But what happens when one half of the partnership doesn’t hold up their end of the deal; taking advantage of a long-term contract or a presumed arrangement which has started to have a negative impact on your organisation?

What do you do when a change of circumstance means you want to re-negotiate your terms?

How do you get yourself out of an undesirable, self-destructive partnership when to change things up could be costly and difficult to implement?

We joined a recent Negotiation Roundtable organized by CABL (Conti Advanced Business Learning), a firm that specialises in Negotiation & Influencing, on the topic of long-term negotiations. We wanted to hear advice from a number of procurement and sales leaders on how to manage those long term supplier relationships.

Giuseppe Conti, the founder of CABL, introduced the subject by highlighting that in long-term relationships there is a risk that one of the two parties take advantage of the situation. He then led the group to discuss a number of different ways for procurement professionals to manage, and negotiate with, suppliers when things get tricky.

Look below the iceberg

 For procurement professionals, this is a tale as old as time – how do you manage a supplier who increases prices without warning, when you were under the impression that you had a long-term agreement. Do you cut and run?

“That depends entirely” argues Laurence Pérot, Global Supply Chain Procurement Head at Logitech, “on the nature and origin of your relationship with that supplier.

“You need to consider how you selected them in the first place. Was there a good cultural fit, what drew your organisation to them? Cost reduction is just the tip of the iceberg.”.

According to Xinjian Carlier Fu, Sourcing Leader at Honeywell, “If you can satisfy all the elements beneath the surface (i.e. risk reduction, security, protecting margins and personal requirements) you will have a much more effective negotiation.”

Believe that you have the power

 It’s easy to be intimidated by suppliers who seem to be calling all the shots in your relationship. Xinjian Carlier Fu believes it’s important to have confidence in your own procurement power. “Don’t be afraid of [your supplier] relationship. They might seem dominating and intimidating but I like to use the analogy of David and Goliath.

“Procurement professionals should think of themselves as David. Don’t underestimate your influence or give up hope for your organisation.  You do have negotiation power. Don’t give up hope.”

“Unfortunately not every supplier is willing to work with you in a partnership. Sometimes not all parties are considered equal,” explains Guillaume Leopold, Former CPO at Coty.

Look for a win-win

Ifti Ahmed, Managing Partner at Titanium Partners, described that tricky situation of inheriting an existing supplier when starting a new procurement job. “This particular supplier wasn’t my first choice but it became my job to manage the negotiations and the budget. I did look for alternatives, of which none were suitable and so I did feel like I was in a tough position from a negotiations perspective. ”

“But we prepared well for these negotiations, ensured we had a greater idea of what they valued; what was annoying for them and what they wanted from the partnership, so we were able to discuss points for improvement on both sides and the new contract ended up as a win-win”

Giuseppe Conti also highlighted the importance of using partnership tools to effectively manage the supplier. This includes a Service Level Agreement with KPIs for both parties, performance reviews, alignment of senior management teams, bonus system, audits, 360-degree feedback. 

Make your position clear

It’s very difficult to build trust in your supplier relationships when staff turnover is high. Indeed, as Alessandra Silvano, Global Category Director CAPEX & MRO at Carlsberg, pointed out “many suppliers try to take advantage of frequent rotations in the workforce. But they need to know that you are aligned. Pricing should be treated in the same standardised way, not matter who you are working with.”

Work at it like a marriage

Regina Roos, VP & Sales Segment Leader Mineral and Mining at Schneider Electric, recommends you approach your supplier relationships like a marriage. “It’s not a one off event. There are levels of commitment and you have to keep working at it. If you’re not prepared and you don’t know what you’re getting into with a supplier it’s your fault. You need to make a commitment, and stick to it.”

Paul André, Director Reduced Risk Commercial Supply at JTI, agrees, arguing that “you need to be very clear on what you’re entering into – and that you don’t have a different expectation of the relationship you are building.”

Get to the crux of the problem

What should procurement professionals do when faced with a seemingly irrational supplier who simply won’t re-negotiate terms or agreements? Xinjian Carlier Fu suggests that you “try to identify the motivations underlying these actions or attitudes. Think about the possible constraints they might be facing. Then test your theories by asking questions – ‘Are you facing pressure to cut costs?’” When you understand what’s driving the supplier’s behaviour, you’ll find it easier to come to an agreement.

Work with suppliers you like

The value of supplier likeability is not to be underestimated according to Francesco Lucchetta, Director EMEAI Supply at Pentair. “Taking company culture into account is so important when it comes to selecting suppliers, particularly if you’re forming a long-term agreement. People are very different and to work with people you like is a really good thing. When the culture is unfriendly it’s hard to build trust in the relationship.”

For more advice on managing your supplier negotiations, check out the first blog in this two-part series – 6 Ways To Prevent A Negotiation Blow Up.

Tuesdays With Tom: Trump, Trade and Turning Disruption into Opportunity

Institute for Supply Management CEO Tom Derry compares the Trump administration’s trade policies to “self-inflicted friendly fire” in the first of our 10-part Tuesdays with Tom podcast series.

“In military conflicts, one of the outcomes we most dread are instances of ‘friendly fire’, when you mistakenly fire on your own troops. I think the current [trade] policy is almost an instance of self-inflicted friendly fire, from an economic perspective. We might be helping domestic industries like steel and aluminum (although even that’s arguable), but we’re actually damaging the far bigger industries that are consumers of those products; who make household appliances, yellow goods for construction, or automobiles. All of our exports in those areas will suffer with this trade policy.”

In the first of our Tuesdays with Tom podcast series, ISM CEO Tom Derry talks with Procurious Founder Tania Seary about the current raft of trade wars and tariffs that have come about as a result of US policy shift.

Supply management professionals do NOT like trade wars

“ISM publishes economic reports every month for the manufacturing and services sector. Comments have been very consistent: we’re seeing suppliers trying to impose price increases on buyers as they’re buying metals (such as steel and aluminum)”, says Tom. “We’re seeing people anticipating the tariffs, looking to end sourcing from China and look for suppliers elsewhere, and we’re seeing people postpone investments.

“The two most important economic factors in deciding where to locate a manufacturing facility are local taxes and tariffs. If tariffs are uncertain, [companies are] going to postpone decisions about building that next facility, which is not good for the economy in the long run.”

NAFTA renegotiations having an impact

“What’s so interesting about these policy changes”, says Tom, “is that even mere discussion has a real economic impact and causes real dislocation of supply chains. Even before the steel tariffs were imposed, people reacted to the idea of tariffs, and that caused businesses to have to change their plans.”

Historically, NAFTA has resulted in incredibly tightly integrated supply chains in certain industries, particularly the automotive industry. “We do a lot of assembly of automotive in northern Mexico for final sales here in the United States or in Canada, but before you get to that final assembly in those plants, you’ve got components for parts that move across the Mexican/US border four or five times before we get to the final vehicle”, says Tom.

“Imagine what it would be like to impose tariffs in both directions four or five times, and the inspections that would have to go with it, and the country of origin verification that would have to be performed. If NAFTA [fails], it’ll be incredibly disruptive in terms of the auto industry here in North America.” 

Two tips for turning disruption into opportunity

  1. Have a Plan B: “Every good category manger has a Strategy A for expected economic conditions, and Strategy B if there’s an economic downturn or something happens in the commodity markets. You have to have those playbooks thought through and scripted … if you haven’t done that, get to work on that immediately.”
  2. Be prepared to react fast: “If you see a dramatic change, you need to be able to respond to it in the moment. The advantage goes to the company, the organisation, or the individual who can react fastest during times of great change. If you’re late in moving, any potential benefit to be realised will be captured by someone else. Make sure you’ve got that playbook well defined.”

“The advantage goes to the company, the organisation, or the individual who can react fastest during times of great change.”

Tom tells the story of a CPO working at LG Electronics during the 2008-9 recession, who was concerned about securing semiconductors. They were aware that a recession would lead to a drop in consumer demand for electronics and hence a demand for semiconductor chips, so he visited his suppliers in Asia, then managed to convince his executive committee to buy $9 billion worth of semiconductors because the price would never be as low again. LG subsequently posted record profits for 2009 due to that CPO’s business acumen, his understanding of the spot market for semiconductors, and doing his homework. This is how you respond to disruptive events.

“[Procurement needs to] see through the common perception, recognise market opportunities and the dislocation between price and demand, and seize opportunities to turn a perceived threat into a great opportunity for a huge bottom line impact.”


Tuesdays with Tom is a 10-part podcast series featuring exclusive insights from ISM CEO, Tom Derry. Register now to receive an alert whenever a new podcast is released.

Here’s What Procurement Will Look Like By 2030

92 per cent of respondents believe that by 2030, procurement will look very different to today’s profession. But what exactly will this evolution look like, and how do we get there? Download the Procurement 2030 Report!

Procurious and Michael Page UK recently surveyed 590 procurement and supply management professionals from around the globe to uncover the facts about the outlook for the profession, the threats and opportunities facing procurement, and perceptions of procurement. Here’s what we uncovered in our new report, now available for download.

Procurement is expected to evolve

All but 8 per cent of survey-takers roundly rejected the suggestion that procurement in 2030 would be similar to today. This stands to reason, given the transformation the profession has undergone in the past 10 to 15 years from back-office function to an influential and highly-visible part of the business that’s increasingly focused on driving innovation and generating value.

Here’s the result when we asked respondents what they expect procurement will resemble in 2030:

Just over half of our respondents believe procurement will evolve into “an agile group of strategic advisors”. But what does this actually mean? It could refer to Agile (with a capital A) work practices that are sweeping through many of the world’s top organisations, or perhaps it means that procurement will evolve into a high-value team of experts who will move around the business to give advice at the highest levels and solve specific challenges.

To use an analogy from the gaming world, this evolution is a bit like moving from a Space Invaders-style “mission-control” approach where you are dealing with a never-ending stream of issues from the bottom-up, to the approach taken in 21st-century games such as Fortnite or Call of Duty, where a highly cooperative group of professionals with different areas of expertise parachutes into a certain area to solve a problem before moving on to the next mission.

The word “strategic” is also key here. This report discovered that an incredible 49 per cent of procurement’s current workload is regarded as “tactical”. Filtering by role and seniority revealed that:

  • Survey-takers with “junior” roles identified 59 per cent of their workload as tactical in nature.
  • Analytics professionals have the most tactical tasks (57 per cent), followed by supply chain professionals (56 per cent).
  • The tactical workload of category managers sits at 46 per cent.
  • Concerningly, 57 respondents who identified as Chief Procurement Officers indicated that 40 per cent of their workload is tactical on average, despite having what is regarded as a highly strategic role.

It’s also worth noting that two persistent concerns about the future of procurement have also been dismissed by survey-takers. Only 3 per cent believe the profession will be completely outsourced, while 9 per cent believe procurement will be completely automated by 2030.

Positive forecast

Procurement professionals remain optimistic about the profession, despite the rapid development of ever-smarter AI and media coverage of white-collar job losses to automation. In fact, optimism about the future has climbed by four points since this question was first asked in 2017.

Similarly, job security is relatively high. Only 9 per cent of respondents report a lack of confidence that they’ll be able to keep their role of the next 24 months.

While the profession itself is confident about its future, the task at hand is to broadcast this positivity to the wider organisation, other functions, and to suppliers. Building upon the brand of procurement will enable us to:

  • change the face of the profession from the inside out
  • overcome outdated stereotypes, and
  • educate others on the full value-offering of the profession.

Threats and opportunities

When we asked survey-takers to nominate the greatest threats and opportunities for procurement and supply chain management, we were surprised to discover that the top two threats are also seen as the top two opportunities.

  • “Not keeping up with technological advances” is seen as the biggest threat, while technological advances are also seen as the number one opportunity.
  • Being unable to recruit and retain top talent is seen as the 2nd-biggest threat, while recruiting and retaining top talent is also seen as the 2nd-biggest source of competitive advantage.

Organisations must therefore retain their focus on investing in top talent, even while they are investing heavily in technology. It also follows that procurement functions with leading-edge technologies will be more attractive to top-tier candidates.

Prisoners of our own perceptions?

We know that the profession wants to evolve into an agile group of strategic advisors by 2030, but what’s holding us back? In one word: perception.

  • Less than a quarter of respondents say their organisations have a strong understanding of procurement’s value, while 21 per cent have “little understanding” of procurement’s value-offering.
  • Procurement’s own perception of its purpose needs to change if it is to expand its value offering and transform into strategic advisors and commercial leaders. At present, 38 per cent believe cost reduction is procurement’s main purpose, followed by risk management.
  • The good news is that by 2030, the main purpose is expected to shift to two high-value tasks: “driving supplier innovation (29 per cent), followed by “driving sustainability” (25 per cent). Both of these revised areas of focus will also support procurement’s core capability of cost reduction.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE REPORT.

But wait, there’s more:

This content-packed report also contains links to heaps of relevant thought-leadership from  Procurious and Michael Page UK,  including videos, blog articles, podcasts and webinars.

And don’t forget … parts 2 to 4 of the Procurement 2030 report will be released in the coming months!

  • Part 2: Preparing for Industry 4.0: September 2018
  • Part 3: Human vs AI Skill Sets: October 2018
  • Part 4: Procurement Makeover: November 2018

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE REPORT.

Why Out Of Date Procurement Models Are Worse Than Useless

Manufacturing and procurement technology has moved so fast in recent years that it’s entirely possible the trusty maturity assessment you’ve always used is now hopelessly out of date.

Image by Stokkete /Shutterstock

The other day, someone showed me a quiz from a 1960s Cosmopolitan with a title along the lines of How Good a Housewife Are You? The subject-matter, of course, had not aged well. The reader had to answer questions about what they did when their husband comes home from work – do they put dinner on the table straight away, or fetch his pipe and slippers first? For the 21-century reader, every question in the quiz came across as outdated, and you’d never dream of using it for its intended purpose (unless it was for a laugh).

Things change – whether it’s women’s equality, social mores, or technology. The point of the story above is that the way we measure performance must keep pace.

In the procurement world, maturity models are one such tool that can become obsolete.

Conventional maturity models for direct materials sourcing usually evaluate procurement in terms of outdated capabilities and enabling systems. You know the ones – they focus on concepts such as “upstream versus downstream” and rely on traditional metrics like spend under management. What they don’t do, however, is address the tremendous advances in technology that have transformed the manufacturing world in the last ten years. Nor do they address impaired agility and opportunity risks hidden by siloed data, fragmented ERP systems, and different product management systems. 

A contemporary maturity assessment

Cognitive sourcing advisor, LevaData, were motivated to build a Cognitive Sourcing Maturity Assessment after their 2017 cognitive sourcing study revealed the following trends:

  • Only 13 percent of companies continuously engage their suppliers; the average organization engages with only 52 percent of their suppliers once a year.
  • Outmoded enterprise analytics and sourcing tools lead to reactive, inward-looking decisions, rather than proactive insights that identify market risks and opportunities before they become a problem.
  • Compared to an average organisation, the most advanced procurement teams use technology to speed up their prep and negotiation time by a factor of ten.
  • Only 5 percent of organizations utilize a purpose-built platform for direct materials sourcing operations.

Proof of LevaData’s Maturity Model’s currency is the fact that it takes into account so many of the aspects of Industry 4.0. Founder and CEO Rajesh Kalidindi said the Model is “unique because it captures the impact of contextual market intelligence on sourcing professionals’ decision-making and their ability to leverage open-source analytics, machine learning, and AI-enabled insights with cross-functional teams”.

The survey takes about 10 minutes to complete, and will provide you with a summary report with recommendations for near-term improvements. Kalidindi explains: “This maturity assessment enables companies to quickly and easily close the performance gap. It offers an objective, third-party perspective of an enterprise’s strategic readiness and visibility into actionable business intelligence. C-level executives and board members who may not be familiar with these issues gain a clear picture of resources and processes needed to improve outcomes in increasingly volatile global markets.”

Click here to take LevaData’s Cognitive Sourcing Maturity Assessment.

Don’t miss out on the 2018 Cognitive Sourcing Summit

LevaData will host the 2018 Cognitive Sourcing Summit in Santa Clara, CA, on September 13, 2018.

The event is expected to attract 150 attendees, with speakers and panels exploring how to accelerate the journey towards cognitive sourcing, with a focus on the latest trends in digital transformation and the adoption of AI among procurement teams.

Attendees can expect to hear insights from executive leaders from the high tech, industrial equipment, medical device, telecommunications, and consumer products industries, along with industry analysts and thought leaders from IDC, Supply Chain Insights, Gartner, Chainlink Research, and Spend Matters. Presentations and workshops will include:

  • Cognitive Sourcing: Maturity Model, Innovation and Competitive Advantage
  • Digital Procurement: Building a Successful Roadmap
  • Driving the Transformation: Making the Case and Enabling Change

Participants will also hear from Fitbit’s Kevin Purser and others regarding their successful digital procurement journeys and recommended best practices.

Here’s the really exciting part – the closing keynote presentation will be delivered by Procurious’ very own founder Tania Seary, who will discuss:

  • How to formulate an action plan for when delegates return to the office.
  • The attributes needed to successfully orchestrate, collaborate and negotiate within a complex, technology-enabled global supply network.
  • The uniquely human skills we’ll need to untangle the gridlock of competing interest and find a resolution to the supply challenge in an AI-boosted environment.

Interested in learning more? Visit www.levadata.com.

Register now for the 2018 Cognitive Sourcing Summit.