All posts by Procurious HQ

What’s Coming To Procurious in 2018

What’s around the corner in 2018…? There’s a whole host of exclusive procurement content and events for you to get your teeth stuck into!

The Procurious community, at 26,000+ members,  is growing faster and providing better networking opportunites than ever before.

To keep pace with our growing membership, we’ve planned out the most exciting year yet on Procurious. From our now-famous global Big Ideas Summit series; to procurement webinars; Career Boot Camp 2018 and this year’s Gen NEXT survey, we can guarantee there’s something for everyone.

So make yourself a cuppa, open up your online calendar and let’s get some dates in the diary!

#FeeltheLove Webinar

On the 14th February 2018 – 3pm GMT/ 10am EST – we present #FeeltheLove.

NEWSFLASH: Being world-class today doesn’t mean being the best in the world. It means helping the world run better.

In 2018, you should be working beyond cost savings and process efficiencies. You should be committed to making a positive impact on the communities in which you operate by eradicating slave labour, creating ethical and sustainable supply chains and levelling the playing field for all.

Thanks to the awesome power of social media and our interconnected world it’s easier than ever before to make that happen. But the challenge procurement pros still face is kick-starting, and measuring the impact of, their purpose-led work.

This Valentine’s Day, SAP Ariba and Procurious will present #FeeltheLove – the first Procure with Purpose webinar.

Sign up for #FeeltheLove here. 

Conducting a Cognitive Symphony – Podcast Series

From 26th February, Procurious present a new five-part podcast series – Conducting a Cogntivie Symphony – sponsored by IBM.

There are many factors that require careful consideration to bring about effective, scalable and sustainable analytics and cognitive solutions. Intelligence is the conversion and enrichment of data into meaningful business insights. It is a little like an orchestra: you can get good sound from one instrument, but correctly managed, you get a symphony from the entire orchestra.

Marco Romano Procurement Chief Analytics Officer, Global Procurement, Transformation Technology, IBM; Anna Madarasz Analytics & Cognitive Lead IBM Global Procurement and Peter Hrabovski Analytics and Automation Lead, IBM Global Procurement will guide you through the steps required to conduct a dazzling cognitive symphony!

Stay tuned for sign up details later this month.

Big Ideas Summits 2018

The Big Ideas Summit is the world’s first digitally-led procurement event. With a global reputation as the most innovative leadership event for the profession, Big Ideas 2018 once again promises to light up social media, spark vigorous discussions and crowd-source ideas for the future of the profession.

The Summit is an interactive, online event where up to 50 senior executives, industry thought-leaders and CPOs come together to connect with digital delegates from across the globe via our social media platform to discuss and test strategies and solutions for real world change.

2018 will once again see the Big Ideas Summit go global, with events in London, Sydney, Chicago and Munich.

Attendees and digital delegates will be joining a community of 26,000+ procurement professionals from 140+ countries to connect, learn, discuss and innovate together.

Big Ideas Summit London 2018 26th April 2018

This year, we’ve assembled some of the most energising and fascinating speakers: from IBM’s CPO to a Chicago-based Futurist and a former Las Vegas Poker Extraordinaire – it’s certainly one procurement event you won’t want to miss!

This year, our Big Thinkers will tackle:

  • Engineering Serendipity: Workplace of the Future
  • Understanding Risk, Reward and ROI
  • AI: How your human touch will win the day
  • Why Design Eats Discipline for Breakfast
  • Procure with Purpose: The power in your hands

We are also hosting:

  • Big Ideas Summit Chicago 2018 27th September
  • Big Ideas Summit Sydney 2018 30th October
  • Big Ideas Summit Munich 2018 29th November 

Find out more here  or email Olga Luscombe via [email protected] to request an invitation to London. 

London CPO Roundtables

Following our very successful Big Ideas Summits in London and Chicago, Procurious are hosting a series of London CPO roundtables. These provide a more intimate setting for our attendees to get to know their peers through working sessions and the chance to hear from some inspiring speakers.

Wednesday 7th February – Sponsored by Basware

At next week’s event we’ll be joined by Charlie Wigglesworth –Deputy CEO, Social Enterprise UK; Elizabeth Linder – Founder & CEO, The Conversational Century; Paul Clayton – Head of New Service Development, Basware and Jonathan Harvey – Global Head of Talent & Culture, Barclays PLC.

We will, of course, be reporting on the day’s dicussions for the Procurious blog but if you’re a CPO and would like to attend in person please contact Olga Luscombe via [email protected] to request an invitation

Interested in joining but can’t make it on the 7th? We’re also holding CPO roundtables on 30th May, 19 th September and 14th November –  email Olga Luscombe via [email protected] to request an invite.

Career Boot Camp 2018

Career Boot Camp  is a global professional development event for procurement and supply chain professionals. Each year the series, features five, fifteen-minute podcasts,  designed to help the most ambitious professionals put their career fitness first and upgrade their skill-sets.

It’s an opportunity to hear from the brightest and the best in the industry in a format that is FREE and easily accessible; on the go or in the workplace, providing answers to the most common procurement questions you’re desperate to have answered!

The 2018 series will kick off in September.

Stay tuned for more information and check out the full series  from 2017 here. 

Gen Next Survey 2018

When Procurious put out a call in 2017  for procurement survey participants, we were delighted that 500+ professionals across more than 50 countries shared their insights and wisdom.

The results revealed some fascinating information about the current climate in procurement and the attitudes of professionals working within the function.

We discovered that:

  • 55 per cent of procurement professionals either don’t hold memberships in professional associations or do not regard membership as benefiicial to their career development
  • Over half of those surveyed don’t trust their boss to be proactive about their career progression
  • 77 per cent of global procurement professionals have never crowd-sourced a solution to a business challenge on social media
  • 48 per cent of professionals intend to move on from their current role within two years

We’ll be launching the survey and Gen NEXT report again in 2018 and we want YOU to be involved. Stay tuned for more information and.

In the meantime email us to request your copy of the 2017 report – packed with data, insights, recommendations, and links to over 20+ Procurious articles that further explore many of the findings that are raised in the report.

Can You #FeeltheLove This Valentine’s Day…?

As a procurement professional, cutting costs is the very least you can do! Procure with purpose and start driving change world-wide…

Our webinar,  Feel The Love takes place at 3pm GMT /10am EST  on 14th February 2018. Register your attendance for FREE here. 

NEWSFLASH: Being world-class today doesn’t mean being the best in the world. It means helping the world run better.

In 2018, you should be working beyond cost savings and process efficiencies. You should be committed to making a positive impact on the communities in which you operate by eradicating slave labor, creating ethical and sustainable supply chains and levelling the playing field for all.

Thanks to the awesome power of social media and our interconnected world it’s easier than ever before to make that happen. But the challenge procurement pros still face is kick-starting, and measuring the impact of, their purpose-led work.

This Valentine’s Day, SAP Ariba and Procurious present #FeeltheLove – the first Procure with Purpose webinar.

What can I expect from the Feel the Love webinar?

We’ll be discussing…

  • What is Procuring with Purpose?
  • Why should professionals care about purpose-led procurement?
  • What are the small things that you can do immediately to drive big outcomes?
  • How do you measure and report social impact to the CFO?
  • The procurement teams who are already getting it right!
  • How can businesses ensure that economic growth is always accompanied by a respect for human rights?
  • Our vision for using the power of social media to drive purpose-led procurement around the world

Who are the guest speakers?

Tania Seary – Founder, Procurious

A true procurement entrepreneur, Tania is the Founding Chairman of Procurious, The Faculty and The Source. Throughout her career, Tania has been wholly committed to raising the profile of the procurement profession and connecting its leaders.

After finishing her MBA at Pennsylvania State University, Tania became one of Alcoa’s first global commodity managers.

In 2016, Tania was recognised by IBM as a #NewWaytoEngage Futurist and named “Influencer of the Year” by Supply Chain Dive. She hosts regular procurement webinars, and presents at high-profile events around the world.

Pat McCarthy – SVP and GM, SAP Ariba North America

As head of SAP Ariba’s North American business, Pat McCarthy is responsible for driving sales performance, the go-to-market strategy and overall operations of the field organization across the U.S. and Canada.Since joining SAP in 2005, he has held a number of executive roles successfully leading Net New, Mobility, and Database &Technology teams throughout the U.S.

Immediately prior to his current post, Pat served as chief operating officer for the Midwest region of the U.S., overseeing the consistent execution of sales strategies, operations and the region’s go-to-market initiatives.

Pat graduated from Elmhurst College, sits on the board of Chicago Tech Academy, a charter non-profit for Chicago high school students, and supports global charitable endeavours through Kiva.

Nicole Verkindt – Founder and CEO, The OMX

Nicole Verkindt is the Founder & CEO of Canadian technology company, OMX (theomx.com).

She is passionate about the role that data and networks can play in connecting diverse supply chains and analysing and improving the exact impacts from procurements.

The platform is the only one in the world that manages obligations companies have to invest in local businesses. OMX is an online marketplace to help companies diversify their procurement by providing opportunities through the platform that smartly matches to suppliers.

Nicole is a commentator on CBC and columnist for Vanguard magazine focusing on technology and business news and was a “Dragon” on Next Gen Dragon’s Den, which is dedicated to early stage technology businesses. She was named Canada’s national woman entrepreneur of the year in 2017.

Peter Holbrook – CEO, Social Enterprise UK 

Peter Holbrook became CEO of Social Enterprise UK in January 2010.

Social Enterprise UK is the national trade body for social enterprise and represents a wide range of social enterprises, regional and national support networks and other related organisations. SEUK works to promote social enterprise as a model for changing both business and society.

Peter has established, developed and supported hundreds of diverse social enterprises over his career. He has advised government taskforces in the UK and overseas and chaired the Social Enterprise World Forum, the global network of social businesses until 2015.

Peter has previously worked for Oxfam, Greenpeace and various disability charities. He has experience of working in overseas development, community development and public health. Peter started his career with Marks and Spencer PLC and also spent several years with Body Shop International

He was appointed a CBE in 2015.

How do I register for the webinar?

Joining the Procure With Purpose movement and registering for our webinar couldn’t be easier (and, of course, it’s FREE!)

Click here to enter your details and confirm your attendance. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

I’m already a member of Procurious, do I still need to register?

Yes! If you are already a member of Procurious you must still enroll to access the webinar. We’ll send you a email with a link to the webinar platform in the run up to the event.

When is it taking place?

The webinar will take place at 3pm GMT /10am EST on14th February 2018.

Help! I can’t make it to the live-stream

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Can I ask a question?

If you’d like to ask one of our speakers a question please submit it  via the Discussion Board on Procurious and we’ll do our very best to ensure it gets answered for you.

Commit to Procure with Purpose

Procure with Purpose is a movement. A coalition of committed, energised procurement professionals who want to deliver value beyond cost savings and efficiencies.

Through the Procure with Purpose campaign, we’ll shine a light on the biggest issues –from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability–and on you –our members -who are already driving exponential change.

How do I get involved ?

To stake your place, simply sign up here. It’s FREE to join –you just need to be passionate and ready to lead with purpose! When you sign up for the #FeeltheLove webinar, you’ll be automatically registered for the Procure with Purpose group on Procurious and all of our related, online events.

Our webinar,  Feel The Love takes place at 3pm GMT / 10am EST on 14th February 2018. Register your attendance for FREE here. 

Flashback Friday – Can You Make Procurement Decisions Under Fire?

Are you struggling to lead or motivate your team through difficult times and under extreme pressure? We’ve got some top advice from someone who knows a thing or two about making decisions in extreme conditions…

Andy Stumpf spoke at the Chicago Big Ideas Summit 2017. Read more about our upcoming event  – The London Big Ideas Summit – on 26th April 2018 and find out how you can get involved. 

“There are only two types of leadership.” begins Andy Stumpf “good (effective) and bad (ineffective).”

In today’s world, senior managers often struggle to effectively  respond and adapt to change. But the world is full of change and it’s crucial that our procurement leaders are flexible enoughto respond to the unexpected, to “read the tea leaves and meet the challenges of the real world.”

Andy  began his U.S. military career at the age of 17, transitioning from the position of an enlisted soldier, to an officer, and then,  in 2002,  he joined the most elite counter terrorism unit in the military; SEAL Team Six.

The unit, which is tasked with conducting the nation’s most critical missions, has become the inspiration for a number of Hollywood movies and books.

If you ever needed a man who knows how to plan for and adapt to change, Andy Stumpf is your guy! He’s strategised and executed hundreds of combat operations throughout the world in support of the Global War on Terror.

At Procurious’ Chicago Big Ideas Summit, Andy will draw on his wealth of leadership experience to talk about the intersections between business and combat, decision-making and empowering procurement teams.

Building the greatest leaders

“Business and combat are defined by their similarities, not differences and the theories of successful military leadership and successful business leadership are identical” Andy believes. It’s possible to apply the same principles and philosophy to your procurement teams because it’s really only the arena that differs.

“60 per cent of the time, organisations want me to talk about leadership. In fact, the definition is always the same. What can change is the way in which you approach leadership.”

So, how do the military build strong and competent leaders?

“Leadership is about empowering your people. From day one in the military we are taught, and it is enforced, that in the absence of leadership you must stand up and take control.

“Instead of creating individuals that think reactively in nature, we instead create individuals that think proactively.  You don’t have to be in a leadership position now to think two or three steps ahead.  In doing so, when a decision presents itself you’ll already have an answer for it.”

Does Andy believe these skills can be taught or are natural leaders exactly that?

“neither successful teams or leaders occur by accident, these are skills that must be learned, practiced, and refined. Navy SEALs are successful because of how we select, train, and lead our teams.

“Nothing in that process happens accidentally, everything is calculated. We demand leadership and accountability from each individual starting from the first day of training. We prioritise the individuals to our left and right, and the goal of our team over personal success. This philosophy is diametrically opposed to what is often found in society, and requires a structured approach and prioritisation from leaders to be successful.”

And Andy has some strong words of advice for any over-confident leaders out there. “The 1st leadership principle within the SEAL Team is ego; if you have a massive ego you’re more concerned that your ideas and strategy is being used as opposed to striving for success of the team. You can’t meet the challenges of the real world this way!”

Plan, plan and plan some more!

“We plan for everthing in the navy. We often say that if you want to shut down the military, you simply need to shut down powerpoint!

“Every stage of a plan gets one slide and there might be between five and seven slides on the ‘what-ifs’, the contingencies. Where will we land this helicopter? Where is the nearest location for medical treatment and what alternate options do we have?” When, as Andy points out, precisely 0 per cent of planning goes as expected, contingencies are everything!

“You make primary, secondary and tertiary plans because you don’t want to have make snap decisions in a crisis. You need to be able to fall back on stable procedures”

And of course, it can’t hurt that contingency planning makes you look like something of a genius! “It’s really hard to make difficult decisions in a crisis because you’re in a time compressed environment and you may have people’s lives depending on you.  We plan for 24 -72 hours and there are 5 phases per plan. Each phase has 5-7 ‘what if‘ contingency plans because, at the end of the day, you don’t want to make decisions in a crisis, you want to be able to draw on a branch diagram.

“It’s the contingency planning especially in the SEAL teams that makes the difference between success and failure in moments of crisis.”

What can our procurement teams learn from this? Spend a lot more time planning, for starters! But Andy also reinforces the value in having baseline standards to fall back upon. “Businesses should always fall back on standard procedures so people can come together, with a clear knowledge of the protocol. This is especially crucial when you’re working under restrictive time constraints.”

Andy’s final words of advice? “Don’t get attached to your plan -get attached to success!”

Andy Stumpf spoke at the Chicago Big Ideas Summit 2017. Read more about our upcoming event  – The London Big Ideas Summit – on 26th April 2018 and find out how you can get involved. 

Do We Still Care About Professional Associations?

Do procurement professionals across the globe still see the value in professionals associations? And, if not, what can these associations do to regain their appeal?

When Procurious put out a call for procurement survey participants, we were delighted when 500+ professionals across more than 50 countries shared their insights and wisdom.

We’ve investigated the finding that 54 per cent of procurement professionals don’t trust their boss and interviewed a number of global CPOs to find out why this figure is so alarmingly high.

We also asked them why it is that procurement staff are moving on from their current roles so quickly and how leaders can cope with this erratic workplace dynamic.

And thirdly, we looked at the scepticism the profession still feels towards social media – 77 per cent of global procurement professionals have never crowd-sourced a solution to a business challenge on social media.

Our final deep-dive into the survey’s results looks at the stat that 55 per cent of procurement professionals either don’t hold memberships in professional associations or do not regard membership as benefiicial to their career development.

This result would suggest that professional bodies need to re-group and reform in order to stay relevant in today’s world…

The Results Explained By Global CPOs

At The Big Ideas Summits in Chicago and Melbourne earlier this year we revealed the results of the survey to our CPO delegates.

In this video we ask what professional associations can do to maintain relevance and membership growth. Is there still a place for these organisations?

Have today’s procurement leaders benefitted from professional association memberships?

Many of the people  we interviewed admitted to placing a lot of value in professional associations, citing them as one of the key secrets to their success.

Tony C. Astorga, Supply Chain Management Consultant described his career path and explained  “I set my goals upon  what do I need to learn to be more successful and provide greater contributions to my company. I think through certifications, memberships allow us to have those tools to be able to grow.

Josh Teperman, Senior Consultant, The Source Recruitment “A membership organisation is going to have value. It gives you access to a community of people who are all thinking about what does the future of procurement look like. If you want to stay relevant you want to be part of a reall good  membership organisation where people are talking about the future leaders in procurement, what the technologies are going to look like,  what the macro economic and politial trends are that are goint to affect procurement. So there’s certainly a lot of benefit to be had in being part of those organisations.”

So what should professional associations do to up their game…?

1. Communicate their value

“I think the challenge here for organisations is helping people understand how to maximise the benefits” argues Alan Paul, SourceIt CEO. Of course, if  prospective members, don’t see the potential benefits of a membership – they simply won’t join.

Michelle Varble, Procurement Director, United Airlines concedes stating “I do think they need to reinvent their service offerings. But having said that I think these organisations need to focus on how they market themselves. We need to move past the idea that we have an affiliation with them and move to an area where we see them as resources.”

2. Stay relevant

“I am a member of an organisation in Australia. I would have to say it has not been very relevant to me,” says Jane Falconer. ” The generations coming through universities now will have to find different ways of commuting and embrace social media in its most modern form. If we use existing means it’s not going to work.”

Anne Berens, Principal AMB ProCures LLC agrees stating  “Organisations need to remain relevant. There are so many things that organisations offer whether its education or networking or develoment or futurisitc thinking that it’s important to not try to be everything to everyone. I think then it gets spread a little bit thin- be very focussed on what your mission is and allow the customers be discerning and select what’s appropriate.”

3. Be “on topic”

John Foody General Manager Procurement, U.S Steel believes that “Organisations have to be topical. Sometimes at the local level the meetings, the challenges, the issues aren’t topical to our people so the ability to address issues that are relevant in the moment and tie it up with that membership is the challenge that any organisation faces”

Keith Bird, Managing Director, The Faculty  shares this view arguing that “As long as you invite a membsership that adds value to the CPO, the CPO’s direct reports and the team overall that can bring the global insights to you then I think it’s worthwhile.”

Request your copy of the Gen NEXT Report

The Gen NEXT report, exclusively available to Procurious members, is packed with data, insights, recommendations, and links to over 20+ Procurious articles that further explore many of the findings that are raised in the report. Email us to request your copy. 

Dude, Where’s My 3D-Printed Car?

3D printers have been around for 30 years, yet the prediction of “one in every household” has not yet come to pass. When will this technology really hit the mainstream, and how will it impact our careers in procurement?  

For those of us keeping an eye on the coming megatrends that will impact the procurement profession, the list of technological disruptions is a familiar one. Big data, cognitive technology, cybersecurity and blockchain are frequently included in “what’s next” articles, but here’s the thing – rather than being futuristic ideas that are 5 to 10 years away, all of these technologies are already here. What’s lacking is our ability to unlock the full (and vast) potential of these disruptive forces.

This concept holds true for another frequent inclusion in this list – 3D printing.

3D printing is still regarded as a futuristic technology despite the first additive manufacturing equipment being developed in the 1980s. The 30-year technology is seen as revolutionary even today because it is constantly evolving, and has not yet realised anywhere near its full potential. Every year we hear of innovative companies utilising 3D printing to produce cars, trucks, aircraft, clothing, firearms, and even body parts, yet these advances still tend to be reported as the “experimentation” rather than a new way of doing things.

When will we know that 3D printing has truly arrived? Perhaps it will be the day that you can walk into the showroom of an average car dealer and be told that 90% of the cars for sale are 3D printed. Or maybe when it becomes normal practice to go online to build a custom pair of sneakers that are 3D printed and delivered to your door. Or when organised crime catches on to the potential of 3D tech to print unheard-of amounts of firearms, counterfeit products, and drugs.

Meanwhile, keep an eye on the innovators who are helping push 3D printing ever-closer to the mainstream while regulators scramble to keep up. In just the past two weeks, we’ve seen:

What does the rise of 3D printing mean for our procurement careers?

3D printing means that every organisation will become a manufacturer. Instead of scouring the global supply chain to find the widget that’s required, the role of supply management risks devolving into two basic steps:

  1. acquiring the 3D model
  2. ensuring your organisation’s printer has the raw material it needs.

Doesn’t sounds like a very fulfilling career, does it? To take things one step further, consider the fact that it doesn’t take a human procurement professional to perform either of those tasks. End-users could source 3D models themselves, while 3D printers are intelligent enough to manage their own stocks of materials, just as an IoT-enabled laser printer re-orders its own ink when supplies are running low.

Here’s the good news, though – the result of being freed up from the tactical work of sourcing means that the profession can concentrate on the strategic projects that we really want to be doing, rather than just responding to a buy signal.

Image from Pinshape.com.

Sustainable Procurement: Reversing The Race To The Bottom

Don’t dismiss the importance of supply chain sustainability! Learn from the mistakes of others and count yourself out of the race to the bottom! 

A short-sighted focus on cutting costs and speeding products to market is resulting in a race to the bottom that will cost companies more in the long-run. Top performers in sustainable sourcing will emerge with stronger supply chains, higher margins, more trusted brands and happier customers.

Consumers are increasingly putting their money behind sustainability, with Nielsen reporting 66 percent of global consumers are willing to pay more for products from companies they perceive as sustainable. This is forcing every industry to innovate in a way that makes transparency and sustainability permeate throughout the entire supply chain. Companies are often stuck in a race to the bottom, focusing on offering the lowest possible prices to compete with retail giants like Amazon and Walmart. Manufacturers who sell through these giants are also competing with each other, facing immense pressure from their customers to have the lowest price each week. Although price may seem like the best factor to emphasize, quality and sustainability considerations are often sacrificed in favor of cutting costs and speeding time to market. Even companies that have made sustainability promises often retreat after the initial pressure wears off due to perceived higher costs, but the long-term impact of irresponsible sourcing will impact their bottom line even more in the end. In fact, a recent BCG study found that gross margins were 4.8 percent higher for companies that were top performers in sustainable sourcing compared to those who were median performers.

In the long-run, participating in the race to the bottom is bad for business as it results in cheaply made, low-quality products and services that undermine the viability of the companies they are sourced from. This will all eventually be discovered by consumers and other stakeholders, and will open companies up to varying kinds of risk, including economic and financial, reputational and quality control consequences. Because these risks can impact a company’s bottom line, it is crucial to consider how sustainability can mitigate risk before it happens.

Unfortunately, hesitation and fear around competition (antitrust) laws are deterring businesses from working together to promote sustainability. A new report from the Fairtrade Foundation found that businesses are wary of working with rivals to improve the quality and security of their supply chain, but with fluctuating trade fees and climate change they have no choice but to collaborate. Instead of competing with peers to be fastest and cheapest to market, companies should be working together to promote sustainable procurement. When companies within an industry work together, it sends a much clearer signal to suppliers about the importance of responsible practices. With the right indicators and tools, those buying organizations can help suppliers advance in maturity and improve their practices – not only in sustainably issues but across all business operations. Companies should be working with other industry players – instead of against them – to ensure efficient and effective sustainable practices.

Learn from the mistakes of others

Nike, Asics and Puma saw the consequences a lack of sustainable and ethical practices could bring when more than 500 workers in four factories were hospitalised after fainting on the job. Outsourcing factory jobs to Cambodia may have saved the company some money on labor and wages, but unethical work conditions including long days and soaring temperatures canceled out any small benefit the retailers may have seen. The reputational and operational consequences turn out much worse than the small cost reduction initially intended. Improving ventilation and adding air conditioning, although good intentions, only put a band aid on the problem – these retailers and other companies should be working together to implement ethical and sustainable procurement practices as part of a long-term solution.

Geopolitical considerations

The turbulent political and trade climate in recent months is also challenging. Companies in almost every industry in the U.K. are facing a difficult choice between joining the race to the bottom to secure post-Brexit deals in terms of purchasing cheaper products from other countries and promoting high-quality, ethical and sustainable practices. Unfortunately, lower standards mean lower quality products and services, which will not just limit the emphasis placed on tackling issues like climate change and modern slavery, but also impact business revenues in the long run. NAFTA is having a similar effect on North American companies, making the consequences of the race to the bottom a universal concern. Instead of panicking about the effects of eminent trade deals, companies should be focused on working together to pursue sustainable procurement and mitigate risk before it happens.

Fortunately, many local and global governments are encouraging businesses to get on board and combat modern slavery, environmental sustainability and other risks in the supply chain. California recently signed the “Buy Clean California” act, which will clamp down on imported carbon emissions by creating rules for the procurement of infrastructure materials purchased with state funds. The U.K. just pledged $53 million to combat modern slavery with a focus on improving the apparel supply chain, joining the U.K. Modern Slavery Act in attempting to ensure business compliance. Australia may follow suit and introduce its own laws designed to root out forced labor and compensate potential victims.

At this point, we shouldn’t be thinking of it as “sustainability for sustainability’s sake,” but sustainability for risk mitigation and improved business operations. Technology is evolving to help companies better trace suppliers and other parties and improve transparency throughout the supply chain. Regulations around the world are banning or limiting unethical practices. The movement towards sustainability has changed in the last decade, placing the burden directly on companies to ensure responsible practices – both within their own operations and those of their partners. It may seem daunting to invest in sustainability while competitors are continuing to race to the bottom in pursuit of producing the cheapest products fastest, but companies that go above the standard will find it truly improves their bottom line and creates more value throughout their supply chain.

Pierre-Francois Thaler is co-founder and co-CEO of EcoVadis, a supplier rating company that helps organisations institute corporate social responsibility (CSR) and various sustainability programs. Pierre brings 15 years of experience in procurement and developing innovative sourcing solutions. Prior to starting EcoVadis, Pierre was CEO of B2Build SA, the first B2B marketplace for the European construction industry, and also served as a director of Ariba’s Procurement BPO business.

Taking The Heat Out Of The Resolution Room

If you can’t take the heat get out of the resolution room! Or invite Watson! 

We’ve all been there. Something’s gone terribly wrong with a major customer delivery. Emails are flying around and there are rumours from HQ that “heads are going to roll”.  Everyone concerned has been summoned to “THE meeting” in order to resolve the supply chain issue.

We know what happens next; fists slamming, red faces, an embarrassing lack of data and a lot of verbal ping, pong. Eventually, a resolution is found.

But what happens when Watson is in the resolution room? Could this take the heat out of your supply chain disputes?

 What is a Resolution Room?

A Resolution Room provides the organisation the ability to collaborate quickly to resolve supply disruptions. Users can discuss and resolve issues with other colleagues, business partners, or their suppliers. What distinguishes Resolution Rooms from all other collaboration platforms is Watson.

What does it mean to have Watson in the resolution room?

The big benefit of Watson being in the resolution room is that it recommends experts, provides insight from all data and actionable advice based on learned best practices.  Over time, it leverages Watson’s capability to develop a body of knowledge by learning how issues were best addressed in the past.  This enables greater speed and accuracy in responding to future events.

“Watson provides the opportunity to deliver business value and insights from all of these data insights – structured and unstructured, data from weather patterns, news, D&B and supplier IQ,” explains Joanne Wright, Chief Supply Chain Officer, IBM.

“It does this with speed and accuracy. No more are we saying ‘OK…let’s get the data and meet again tomorrow’ because Watson takes my team’s input and incorporates that into the next iteration as we go.”

Watson In The Resolution Room: A Case Study

IBM Watson is always a room participant, so you can draw on Watson’s expertise using natural language to ask a question, for example: @Watson what is the status of order ABC123?

Imagine the following scenario; A Late Shipment alert in the Ops Center reveals that orders of your most popular drone are in jeopardy because the shortage of the entire supply of a critical part, a lithium battery, has been delayed. You create a Resolution Room to manage the incident collectively.

Watson is in the room.

Whilst your team discusses how best to manage the problem you have the ease of asking Watson questions such as:

  • Which customer has the most sales dollars that will be late?
  • What are the financial impacts of any late orders?
  • Have we experienced this problem before? Who are the experts who have worked on these similar issues in the past?
  • Are there any alternate suppliers for part number 46001?
  • Why is there a shortage of lithium batteries?

Watson can provide answers to questions such as these based on the data available in the data model and in other Resolution Rooms. Learning over time, it becomes smarter and able to provide better insights about your supply chain.

Click here to try a Resolution Room demo. 

Got a big idea you want to push through a big company or simply want to learn more about Watson and the Resolution Room?

Sign up for next week’s procurement webinar, How IBM Built the Cognitive Supply Chain of the Future. hosted by Tania Seary and featuring IBM’s Chief Supply Chain Officer Joanne Wright. 

Welcome to the Most Miserable Day of the Year

Feeling down? You’re not alone! Today is Blue Monday, a date widely claimed to be the most depressing day of the year.

The concept of the most miserable day of the year was first publicised back in 2005, dreamt up by a public relations agency on behalf of holiday company Sky Travel.

Put simply, the “equation” used to calculate when Blue Monday falls is nonsensical pseudoscience (i.e. absolute baloney), but that doesn’t mean it isn’t fun. 

W=weather, D=debt, d=monthly salary, T=time since Christmas, Q=time since failing our new year’s resolutions, M= motivational levels, and Na=the feeling of a need to take action.

In other words, the horrible weather (in the northern hemisphere), the realisation that you’ve overspent in December and that your salary isn’t going to cover it, and failing your new year’s resolutions outweighs your flagging motivational levels and the feeling of a need to take action to start the year with a bang.

 

Two factors missing from the equation

  1. Keeping up with the online Joneses!

For those of us who spend a lot of time on social media, there’s another theory emerging about why this time of the year can be so painful: social media envy. How many posts have you seen on LinkedIn along the lines of… “I’m SO EXCITED ABOUT 2018! I’ve already secured 15 new clients, I’ve met my future spouse, and I’m running a half-marathon every morning before a super-healthy breakfast! Go ME!”

If you’re exposed to enough of this, it really can make you feel inadequate. “Why aren’t I feeling this motivated?” “Why do I just want to crawl back into bed?” “Where’s MY future spouse?”

  1. Are people really brimming with joy about being back at their desk?

Yes, there is a chance that some of your co-workers are genuinely chuffed to be back at the grindstone, and best of luck to them. But for the rest of us, the end of long, pleasant holiday is really no reason to celebrate. It’s hard to get back into the swing of things and regain your work-week mojo – and until then, it’s easy to fall into a bit of a slump. After all, have you ever seen your kids’ reaction when a “back to school” ad comes on the telly?

Take heart, though, from the likelihood that many of your (apparently) highly-motivated, back-to-work-loving colleagues on social media are in fact putting on a front. Whether it’s for the benefit of their bosses, their co-workers or their clients, the super-positive post may not reflect the mood of the person glumly typing it out.

So – wishing you a miserable Blue Monday. Try not to eat too much chocolate.


In Procurement and Supply Chain News This Week:

Fiat Chrysler Reshoring Production

  • Fiat Chrysler Automobiles is investing $1 billion to move production of Ram Heavy Duty pickup trucks from Mexico to Michigan.
  • The move will lower the automaker’s exposure to potential changes to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).
  • Approximately 2500 jobs will be moved to the company’s factory in Warren, Michigan.

Read more: http://fortune.com/2018/01/12/fiat-chrysler-michigan-mexico-nafta/

 Iranian and Chinese Tankers Collide

  • Thirty-two sailors are presumed dead after Iranian tanker “Sanchi” collided with Chinese freighter “CF Crystal” 257 km off the coast of Shanghai. The casualties are from the Iranian vessel, while the 21-member crew of CF Crystal have all been reported safe.
  • The Sanchi was carrying nearly 1 million barrels of ultra-light oil, bound for South Korea. After listing for nearly a week, a large explosion sank the vessel on Sunday.
  • The cause of the collision is unknown. Thirteen ships were employed in the rescue effort, which has been hampered by poor weather.

Read more: http://time.com/5102663/iranian-tanker-collision/

 Maccas Is Finally Ditching Foam Cups

  • McDonald’s has announced a plan to use recycled and certified sources for its fibre-based packaging by 2020, while foam packaging will be eliminated by the end of 2018.
  • Polystyrene drink containers are known to be eco-unfriendly and very difficult to recycle. The restaurant chain eliminated polystyrene packaging for hamburgers nearly 27 years ago.

Read more: http://metro.co.uk/2018/01/13/mcdonalds-will-get-rid-foam-packaging-2019-7226373/

You Will Be Assimilated: The Collective Intelligence Of Procurement

For those who remember “The Borg” from Star Trek, you’ll remember the notion of a dispassionate alien mind-being that would suck up your individual mind to subsume into the collective intelligence.  Resistance is futile. You will be assimilated.

Crazy stuff, right?  Or maybe not.

Flash forward to today.  For most people, your every move is being tracked by your smartphone, social media apps, web browsing, and credit card transactions.  Ever wonder why Google and Amazon are basically giving away their helpful devices and AI assistants?  You are being watched.  You are the product (not the customer).  You are the raw materials of a collective intelligence being built upon your individual experiences and desires.  In other words, the proverbial machine is watching and learning from you (in order to sell to you, er, rather, to “better meet your needs”).

But, this is all consumer stuff, right?  B2B is different, right?

Sort of – but it’s not THAT different.  And with all the regulatory pressures coming on consumer data privacy, as compared to much of the privacy that you sign away your rights to when you enter an employment contract, the tables may actually turn here. If you’re using a popular cloud-based Procurement system, you are also being watched (many providers analyse your system behaviour to figure out how you navigate the system and how to help you… yes, the chatbots are coming). If you use a procurement “business network” or eMarketplace (e.g., Amazon Business), your suppliers are signing away some of their intellectual property – whether they know it or not.  And smart companies are trying to gain a market intelligence advantage through digital business strategies in the supply chain. There’s a reason why GE created Predix; why Flex funded Elementum; why DHL sells supply chain risk technology; and so on.  Adoption creates insight and intelligence… and advantage.

All this isn’t necessarily bad for you though.  It serves up price benchmarking, risk intelligence and improved system usability.  It also signals how the world is moving away from “empty apps” that push documents around in workflows and move towards systems that are building intelligence to make your apps “smarter”.  This intelligence is typically built using machine learning fed by large data sets that help improve repetitive tasks like spend classification. Of course, AI is a bigger topic, and there are 23 distinct areas in AI for procurement and supply chain that we’re following that I can’t cover in a single blog post!  For example, contract management is a great example where AI is already having an impact and this will be very disruptive in the Legal services (e.g., Legal BPO) area.

Still, building your collective intelligence for your firm doesn’t necessarily require AI.  You can avail yourself to some good old-fashioned knowledge management built up from the various collectives that are all around you:

  • The internal corporate collective. Learn from consulting companies and build presentation storyboards of your procurement projects that created change and value – and use them to win over skeptical stakeholders.
  • Your supplier collective. Your current supply suppliers, previous suppliers, “almost suppliers” (who bid on your business), and potential suppliers via crowdsourcing are a wealth of knowledge – if you know how to tap them through supplier innovation programs and proper supplier management processes.
  • Your customer collective. This includes not just internal stakeholders, but external customers as well.  For example, Lenovo uses its social customer mining tools to identify key customer/demand information that can be passed upstream to suppliers.  On the flip side, many similar intelligence tools are being deployed on the supply side with varying results (that’s a whole topic for another day).
  • The installed base collective. Your procurement app providers, consulting providers, and managed service providers are likely working hard to extract and productize your individual intelligence into a re-saleable collective intelligence. Choose a provider that is working on building collective intelligence into its overall platform strategy.
  • Your peer/community collective. There are lots of communities out there right now where you can learn from your peers – and many of them are free. You’re learning right now by reading this on Procurious, so you’re already well on your way!

We even practice what we preach at Spend Matters when we tap into this collective intelligence of procurement technology users by capturing end user satisfaction (think Net Promoter Score on steroids) and using it as an entire axis of our “SolutionMap” vendor scoring model/methodology.  And, yes, there’s a freemium version (it has eight procurement technology areas mapped out based on five different buyer personas from which you can select)!

The bottom line is that although we all start with a certain amount of individual intelligence, it’s the collective supply market of intelligence that is all around us if we can learn how to tap it, build it, and wisely bring the right intelligence back to our individual selves (and we’ll even be able to augment that individual intelligence into our own personal bots and ‘digital twins’).  And since procurement should be enabling stakeholders to also tap that collective intelligence of supply, it couldn’t be a more important competency to build right now.

So, go bravely into that supply market and assimilate yourself into the collective intelligence of procurement and be smarter and better from that experience.  It’s really what life is all about, isn’t it?

This article was contributed by guest author Pierre Mitchell, Chief Research Officer and Managing Director at Azul Partners.

7 Procurement Trends To Watch Out For In 2018

Which hot topics and trends will everyone in procurement be talking about in 2018…?What’s the buzz in 2018? We’ve done a spot of investigating to identify all the hot topics the procurement world is excited (and concerned!) about in the coming year…

1. Technology Hype Won’t Let Up

Steve Banker, writing for Forbes, concurs stating that “emerging technologies such as blockchain, 3D printing, autonomous mobile robots, IoT, machine learning, and related technologies continue to get a tremendous of amount of publicity.

According to Supply Chain Digital, “The pace of innovation is picking up steam at an exponential rate.

“Robots, self-driving vehicles, electric trucks, blockchain, the Internet of Things (IoT), and new mobile-enabled categories are all poised to explode onto the scene in one form or another.

“It’s hard to predict what’s real and what will fade away, but expect 2018 to become a year of heavy innovation for supply chain leaders, even if it’s experimental.”

Vivek Soneja, writing for EBN online  asserts that “Blockchain capabilities have transformed collaboration across trading partner networks”. He believes Blockchain will “enable much tighter collaboration across supply chain planning and execution decisions. ”

Read our latest articles on Blockchain by Basware’s Paul Clayton and  InstaSupply’s Simona Pop.

2. Brexit Will Continue To Cause Disruption 

“While 2017 was the year of Brexit uncertainty, 2018 will be the year where things start to change,” asserts Francis Churchill on Supply Management.

Last year CIPS revealed that 63 per cent of EU companies planned to move some of their supply chain out of the UK as a result of the decision to leave the single market and customs union.

“The slower-than-expected progression of Brexit negotiations has put off business investments in current or new UK operations,” explains Gary Barraco on Global Trade Mag. Recent readings on economic growth showed investment by companies to be flat in the second quarter.

“Supply chain executives are voicing concerns about tariff and quota changes, hoping to keep trade open and flowing as it does today. For manufacturing to remain strong, the raw material imports from Asia need to remain duty and tariff free, as they are currently in the customs union. Costs could go up without the trade advantages, leading to higher export costs from the UK.”

We discuss the implications of Brexit for procurement in this Procurious blog. 

3. Cognitive will reign supreme

Global Trade Magazine predicts that “by the end of 2020, one-third of all manufacturing supply chains will be using analytics-driven cognitive capabilities, thus increasing cost efficiency by 10 per cent and service performance by 5 per cent.”

And IBM predict that, by this point, all of our important procurement decisions will be made with the assistance of artificial intelligence. We know that our teams must “transform or die” if we don’t want the function reduced to the back office,  facing extinction.

But if you’re still feeling a little overwhelmed by the magnitude and potential of cognitive technology or simply wondering how to get started, this Procurious article has some great advice.

4. Transparency

Paul Martyn , writing for Forbes, spoke to Sue Welch, CEO, Bamboo Rose, on her supply chain predictions for 2018, discussing why “transparency and sustainability will be practiced with more vigor in 2018.”  She said ” ‘There’s been an explosion of demand from consumers to know where their products are originating and the required information is extremely granular. For example, with a package of carrots, consumers want to know not only the farm where they were harvested, but also the row and lot number where the carrots were planted.’

“Welch, whose company, Bamboo Rose, works with a number of top retailers and apparel companies, expects traceability demands to not only shape how consumers buy, but how companies will source and market their services.

“Smart retailers will begin to market their products from an information/sustainability-first standpoint and to be credible about it, they’ll need to invest in integrating technology that makes this level of transparency possible at every level of the supply chain.’ ”

5. Cybersecurity

Global Trade Magazine predict that by the end of 2019, cybersecurity will have surpassed physical security as a top concern for one-half of all manufacturers, and in the transition to digitally enabled, cognitive supply chains, cybersecurity will have become a top investment priority.

“High-profile hacking cases that compromise sensitive information for millions of people will continue in the coming year.” states Soneja, “With the proliferation of data and connected endpoints, companies will need to step up their security and privacy protection protocols in 2018.”

Earlier this year, we spoke to Craig Hancock, cybersecurity expert and Executive Director of Telstra Service Operations on the dangers of cyber crime. Read the full article here. 

6. Back to basics

“While a number of new trends are giving procurement leaders directions to explore in 2018, many supply chain professionals are still aiming for easy-to-understand goals” explains The Strategic Sourceror.

“According to Deloitte’s latest research on chief procurement officers, cost advantages and cash flow improvements are still the bread and butter of the supply chain. Traditional efforts to improve contracts and advanced, tech-driven strategies can deliver favorable costs to companies.”

7. Big data is a big deal

“In the context of the supply chain for most businesses, big data and predictive analytics are still an untapped resource that can potentially provide insights which help anticipate or respond to events or disruptions,” explains Raanan Cohen on Supply Chain Management review. 

“Unpredictable consumer behaviour, traffic or weather patterns, and labour unrest are all external events that can disrupt a supply chain and lead to increased costs and customer service challenges. Big data can help organisations become better trading partners to their customers and suppliers. But before insights and analytics can be leveraged for a better supply chain, there’s a huge task at hand for the many organisations that need to first collate data points from all sources and align them to their business operations.”