All posts by Procurious HQ

16 Blockchain Disruptions Explained In 1 Killer Infographic

Struggling to get your head around how Blockchain will disrupt your organisation? Check out this infographic from BitFortune explaining disruptions in 16 areas – including supply chain management.

Blockchain technology is probably one of the most impactful discoveries in the recent history. After all, it has a massive potential to change how we handle online transactions. Despite some skeptics, the majority of experts agree that blockchain has the potential to disrupt the banking and financial industry, and many other ones!

But what is this technology exactly? We at BitFortune.net will try to explain that in Layman’s terms, as well as provide you with insights into how different industries can benefit from blockchain.

To put it simply, blockchain enables decentralized transactions across a P2P network. There is no need for a middleman, resulting in almost instantaneous operations and most importantly, low fees. Plus, transactions carried out through a blockchain are much more secure, transparent, and private.

As mentioned earlier, different industries will have different benefits from implementing blockchain technology, and that is what this infographic is all about. For example, the banking sector will get faster transactions, lower costs, improved security, and better record keeping. Also, the blockchain technology can improve electronic voting systems. With this technology integrated into a voting system, governments won’t be able to tamper with votes because blockchain creates publicly viewable and singed transaction that can’t be changed or rewritten.

This infographic will help you understand how the blockchain technology can and will improve 16 different industries, from music to government. So, read on and find out what their future will look like.

blockchain disruptions infographic

8 Organisations On The Nice List This Year

It’s possible to do good and do well – just check out the Procurious 2018 nice list…

Christmas is coming and, at Procurious HQ, we’re feeling pretty festive.

To get into the spirit of things and to give Santa a helping hand this year, we’ve put together a “Nice List” to recognise the organisations who are doing good whilst doing well!

1. Dell

In December 2017 Dell announced that it would be launching the world’s first commercial-scale, ocean-bound plastics supply chain, which takes ocean-bound plastics and repurposes it for their packaging.

“When Dell uses plastics from the beach, shorelines, waterways and coastal areas, we bring them back into the economy and stop them from breaking down and becoming part of a bigger problem.

It gives us an affordable resource, creates jobs for the recyclers, provides a template for others to follow and helps put a dent in the vast problem of plastics entering the ocean.”

In partnership with The Lonely Whale Foundation, Dell have helped convene Next Wave, an open-source initiative that brings leading technology and consumer-focused companies together to develop a commercial-scale ocean-bound plastics and nylon supply chain.

The group anticipates that they will divert more than 3 million pounds of plastic and nylon-based fishing gear from entering the ocean within 5 years – the equivalent of keeping 66 million water bottles from washing out to sea.

2. Colgate-Palmolive

Colgate-Palmolive has a 24/7 EthicsLine, which allows all employees to get in contact to ask questions about the company’s code of conduct, obtain guidance or report any violations of the company’s ethics.

They also reach 60 million people annually with hand washing education, provide health education to communities around the world, partner with local and global organisations to bring clean water to underserved areas of the world and are working toward a goal of Zero Waste.

3. Sky

Sky launched Sky Ocean Rescue in 2017 to shine a spotlight on the issues affecting ocean health, find innovative solutions to the problem of ocean plastics, and inspire people to make small everyday changes that collectively make a huge difference.

Partnering with WWF, Sky have committed £25 million to help find innovative solutions to reduce plastics and pledged to eliminate all single-use plastics from their operations, products and supply chain by 2020.

They’re also running a successful online campaign to encourage consumers to #PassonPlastic

4. GAP

GAP’s P.A.C.E. program is committed to helping one million women around the globe take charge, dream bigger, and unlock opportunities to better their lives and communities.

They also source sustainable cotton and are turning recycled plastic bottles, and even wood, into yarns.

They are also partnering with governments and other international organisations to improve factory work environments and safety in seven countries including Cambodia and Indonesia.

5. Salesforce

Salesforce’s Philanthropy Cloud is the first global platform to connect employees, customers, and partners with the causes they care about. It connects employees to the charitable causes that they care about, gives recommendations for causes and volunteer activities based on location, preference, and charitable history and  connects companies and their employees to nonprofits at scale.

6. TOMS

TOMS has given more than 86M pairs of shoes to children need as part of their one for one scheme. 

They focus heavily on the environmental and social impact of their products and operations, responsible giving and employee life. They offer shoes with sustainable and vegan materials and all shoe boxes are made from 80 per cent recycled post-consumer waste and printed with soy ink. All employees are held accountable for complying with company policies, including the prevention of slavery and human trafficking within our supply chain.

7. Levi Strauss & Co.

Levi Strauss & Co. operate by the motto “Give More Take Less”.

It has adopted production techniques that use far less water than traditional methods, grows quality crops that benefit the environment and farmers and recycles old denim.

Wearing vintage jeans saves an estimated 65 per cent of the water typically used during the lifecycle of a pair of jeans, since no new water is necessary to grow cotton. Levi’s  Authorised Vintage denim is renewed in different facilities in the US before being sold again, which significantly reduces the collection’s footprint.

8. Ikea

Ikea is aiming to inspire and enable more than 1 billion people to live a better everyday life within the limits of the planet.

It is also transforming into a circular business in order to become climate positive and regenerate the earth’s resources.


Procure with Purpose

Procurious have partnered with SAP Ariba to create a global online group – Procure with Purpose.

Through Procure with Purpose, we’re shining a light on the biggest issues – from Modern Slavery; to Minority Owned Business; and from Social Enterprises; to Environmental Sustainability.

Click here to enroll and gain access to  all future Procure with Purpose events including exclusive content, online events and regular webinars.  

Could Blockchain And AI Help Procurement Change The World?

At last month’s London CPO Roundtable we explored how to enable smarter procurement, using blockchain for social good and anticipating disruptive forces…

What are the obstacles to more informed, strategic decision-making in procurement?

How can procurement pros use blockchain for social good to change the world?

What disruptive forces are heading your way in 2019 that could impact your supply chain?

These are just some of the questions we discussed when we gathered a dozen procurement leaders in London last month for a CPO roundtable sponsored by Ivalua.

Enabling smarter procurement

A new study by Forrester, commissioned by Ivalua, surveyed 433 procurement, supply chain and finance leaders across Europe and North America. The results, which Alex Saric, CMO Ivalua took us through at the roundtable, provide a practical look at how to enable smarter procurement.

The obstacles to more informed, strategic decision-making are quite consistent. The study, entitled “Enabling Smarter Procurement” found three common issues

  1. Firstly, despite efforts at automating processes, too much capacity is still consumed by operational or manual activities. Teams must free capacity to work on new projects, conduct analysis and plan, but are struggling to do so.
  2.  Secondly, leaders struggle to access relevant insights when and where they are needed. The volume of information now available is of little help if not digestible, simply leading to information overload.
  3. Compounding this, respondents also cited poor data quality as a key challenge. Duplicate supplier records, inaccurate data and poor integration between systems all were cited as sources of data quality issues.

A common viewpoint today is that Artificial Intelligence (AI) is the answer, the magical light at the end of a dark tunnel that will improve automation and give us the magical answers we need, when we need them. But what isn’t discussed is ensuring you have a solid data layer that feeds the intelligence layer, where the algorithms lie and all the talk lies.

Organisations must implement AI in conjunction with cleaning up their data, rather than using poor data quality as an excuse for inaction.

Empowering procurement to make more informed, strategic decisions is no longer an option. There is simply no other way to effectively meet the broad set of objectives now expected.

Using blockchain for social good

Olinga Ta’eed, Director, Centre for Citizenship, Enterprise and Governance became the world’s first Professor in Blockchain and Social Enterprise at Birmingham University in 2018. He led a discussion surrounding his research into using blockchain for social good, which focuses on studies into methods to alleviate problems and provide significant intervention into society.

“No one grows up saying mummy I’d like to be a CPO,” he begins. “And that’s because we value non-financial value. We grow up wanting to do things that have value in society – things to do with life and sentiment, we want to change the world.”

“In institutional life we often succeed in stripping that out – any kind of intangible value. But this attitude doesn’t occur in real life, only within institutions.”

In our own lives we use our personal values to procure things “I’d like to have products that are aligned to my values, I’ll use this coffee shop not that one, I’ll eat this ice cream not one from that place, price is this important to me but slavery is this important. We talk about our feelings”

Blockchain could enable procurement to change the world by bringing our values back into the workplace.

“My honest belief is that procurement will be the single largest instrument in the world to change the world – children will say they want to be a procurement officer because they will want to change the values of the world – what we buy, what we eat, what we sell, the values by which we transact. Blockchain and AI will change our processes dramatically.”

Preparing for the disruptive forces heading your way

Given the rate at which technology is evolving and how global events are impacting the world, it is increasingly difficult for companies to keep up without considering risk in real-time.

Intelligence about the world we live in drives business operations and the better informed we are the easier it is to drive progress. Mark Joyce, Head of Analysis, Sibylline revealed the most disruptive forces headed our way in 2019.

The four baseline trends include:

  1. Geopolitical reconfiguration – Chinese growth and assertiveness and a US retreat from global leadership
  2. Deadly conflict on the rise – Total conflict deaths fell enormously from mid-nineties up until the last decade. Since 2012 they’ve sparked to the highest since 1990s. Conflict deaths are concentrated in North Africa, Middle East, Syria Libya and Yemen. Middle Eastern countries have accounted for 70 per cent of battle deaths over the last five years.
  3. Disruptive populism
  4. Weakening of frameworks – including nuclear weapon control

These trends impact procurement in four ways:

  1. Strategic uncertainty – Impacting high-level decision making; blurred lines between politics and business -and criminality
  2. Tactical challenges – Geographical, technological, legal and reputational
  3. Cross-functional working – Procurement, legal, communications, HR and IT are increasingly stakeholders in political and security risk information
  4. Decision advantage – The importance of precise, actionable information and analysis to avoid paralysis and enable business in an uncertain external environment

Adventuring against adversity 

Kris King, Ultra-runner and adventurer extraordinaire specialises in the safe delivery of life-changing challenges and expeditions in the world’s most remote and demanding areas.

He inspired our roundtable attendees with his personal story describing how his best friend’s dad was diagnosed with Huntington’s disease and his commitment to raising as much money as he could for medical research.

Kris become the youngest gym owner in the country, started running marathons, which turned into running ultra-marathons, which turned into extreme adventuring across the world, and started to see what a difference he could make.

In his own words “adventuring doesn’t pay well” so he found a way to monetise it – designing extreme adventures for clients, as well as for himself. Whether it’s expeditions in the Arctic Circle and Namibia, driving over a frozen lake with Daniel Craig, catapulting David Hasselhoff or bungee jumping a car of a cliff – nothing seems to be out of reach.

As Kris pointed out “it’s not about skill it’s about how stubborn you are.”

The London CPO roundtable was sponsored by Ivalua. If you’re a CPO and would like to attend one of our roundtables in person please contact Olga Luscombe via [email protected] to request an invitation. 

Risky Business in Procurement and Supply Management

What sort of fallout can you expect to see from a supply chain scandal? What should you do when a risky event takes place? Tune in to today’s podcast on risk in procurement and supply chain, featuring ISM CEO Tom Derry and Procurious Founder Tania Seary.

Today we’re faced with complex supply chain challenges. In fact, it’s hard to think of an area of the business that modern procurement doesn’t touch, ranging from employment law, to climate change, to human rights.

As the complexity of supply chains continues to increase, so too does the number of issues we need to deal with, which is why supply chain disruption is often quoted as the number one concern of CEOs. They know that supply chain failures can have a dramatic impact on their public reputation – and their company share price.

ISM CEO Tom Derry joined Procurious to discuss how a supply chain disruption can damage an organisation, and what can be done to mitigate the risk.

What kind of fallout is a company likely to see as a result of a supply chain scandal?

Tom: From a Board and CEO point of view, there was an academic study written by a professor out of Georgia Tech a few years back that revealed that if there’s a publicly announced supply chain disruption, that company will experience a lower stock price for at least five years after the event. We’re talking about a catastrophic destruction of market cap and value for companies that experience disruption.

The other fallout is a permanent loss of sales. My 21-year-old daughter makes decisions about the products she buys based on what she knows about the company’s social and sustainability practices. If she hears something about a company that she doesn’t agree with, that company has lost her business for the rest of her life – that could be as much as 80 years of lost sales!

On the other hand, companies that have built up good social equity because of their CSR and sustainability practices don’t tend to suffer the same kind of heavy damage.

What are the common-sense steps to take to ensure your risk management is in order?

Tom: The first thing to understand is this doesn’t require an expensive consultant to run 10,000 Monte-Carlo simulations, give you a probability assessment or sell you a 2×2 matrix.

For procurement and supply management professionals, it’s important to look beyond the first tier of suppliers to where your organisation is really vulnerable – three or four levels down.

You should know every single-source supplier in your supply base, and you should have plans in place for immediately dealing with an issue with one of those sources.

You need to beware of geopolitical risk. If something changes – if an industry gets nationalised or if someone unexpectedly wins an election or referendum – what will your answer be if a scenario like that develops?

Look at the other side of the company. What are the products and services you’re selling, and what in your supply base could put that at risk? We should understand how the activities we are performing help support the business in making its money, and look there for risks that could really disrupt the business. 

How do you minimise fallout from a risk event taking place?

Tom: Wait. In the heat of the moment, it’s a natural human feeling to get defensive when you’re being criticised. An immediate instinct might be to get out there and say that the fault lies with someone else, but that would be a mistake. Don’t give into that instinct to blame, deny and defend. Instead, take a measured view of what’s going on, then accept ownership and responsibility. People will give you a lot of credit for being open, straightforward and transparent about a mistake. If you try to dodge it, it’s going to get worse before it gets better.

Part Five of Tuesdays with Tom is available now. Click here to sign up and hear ISM CEO Tom Derry discuss what sort of fallout you can expect to see from a supply chain scandal and what should you do when a risky event takes place? 

How Can We Achieve Our Smart City Goals?

Lately, the public sector has collaborated with the market to launch smart city solutions. How do we achieve our smart city goals?

This article was written by Hanne Lystad.

Norway’s smart cities include everything from drones to surveillance train-lines, learning apps for kids and the world’s first autonomous cars.

But the next step in facing the huge smart city challenges such as meeting climate change targets is for the public sector to cooperate with procurement.

Lately, the public sector has collaborated with the market to launch smart city solutions, which is great. But how do we achieve our smart city goals?

A key way for the public sector to achieve its goals is by using the market forces via public procurement. In this piece I will point to some front-running Norwegian examples.

I work as lead digital for the National Suppliers Development programme in Norway. The programme has collaborated with public institutions in procuring smart city solutions since 2010.

The programme is a joint collaboration by five partners with unique strengths, networks and focus areas – representing both the public and private sector and the research field.

Programme structure

In Norway, public authorities spend approximately 58 billion euros on procurement each year, which amounts to 14  per cent of the Norwegian GDP and 37 per cent of our government national budget. Public procurement accounts for a significant portion of the overall demand for goods and services and is increasingly seen as an attractive instrument for developing society and nation.

Therefore, a simple public procurement policy – such as opening up for innovation – can make a profound impact on a nation or industry.

How does the process work ?

Innovative procurement process

The “normal” procurement process goes as follow: you think you need something , you put out a tender, you get an offer and you write a contract.  But guess what? When you do it the way you’ve always done it, you are likely to get the same product or service you have had before – not innovations.

You might not get what you actually need, and perhaps the suppliers have developed new and better solutions since the last time you asked for the same product.

Because of this, we discourage requesting pre-defined solutions from the market and rather suggest putting more energy into mapping out and defining needs and creating a dialogue.

Creating an enabling environment where procurement and their suppliers can discuss different options and solutions results in relevant innovations and actual uptake.

The programme I work with has been involved in about 200 solutions targeted for smarter cities. Being open about the public needs has resulted in some amazing solutions such as :

… and many more examples within welfare, tech, digitalisation and sustainability.  Take a look at this film if you’d like more examples.

From pilots to scale

It goes without saying that these new smart city solutions are a great thing, but we have to stop obtaining them one by one, pilot by pilot. At start of our programme, we supported processes where a single public agency was involved. We gained valuable insights and know-how, but saw that the majority of products and services developed ended up as prototypes and pilots.

Today, however, we are focusing on gathering public agencies with a common agenda from the beginning, so that they together will meet relevant suppliers and developers with a shared need.

One example of this is emmission-free construction sites, which initially had one frontrunning public agency supporting the cause. We realised it would make more impact if we gathered a significant number of public builders from all levels: state, regional and local municipalities. In addition we got environmental NGOs on board, research clusters, and public agencies with an interest in meeting a common goal – in this case meeting climate change targets.

After agreeing on a common goal, or “challenge” to the market, relevant suppliers and developers from the entire supply chain were invited. The purpose of this market dialogue was to

1) Talk about the forthcoming requirement to market actors.

2) Get feedback from them on the barriers to such a development and the factors that would make such a development process attractive for them to join.

The key to creating an enabling environment is ensuring the demand and supply side can actually figure out obstacles and possibilities.

This approach has  several advantages for all parties:

  • Firstly, major challenges – such as meeting climate change targets – can be tackled by gathering a significant portion of the demand side and agreeing on a single approach.
  • Secondly, when the market sees a more clear opportunity for serial production, this triggers their contributions and efforts – both through sheer market volume, but also through a predictability in terms of knowing what they need to prepare for.
  • Thirdly, we also see that it is easier to get funding for these broader initiatives than when we support public agencies one-by-one.

The public agencies have also committed through a joint declaration that they will be requiring emission-free technology in their construction sites.

So after reading this, I hope you are left with the following:

If you are from the public sector, tackling smart city challenges in collaboration with similar public agencies is the way to go!

If you’re from the private sector, collaboration is a huge market opportunity.

This article was written by Hanne Lystad. Hanne works as Lead Digital Innovation in the Norwegian national suppliers development programme, which means counselling public and private sectors in how to achieve innovation through  procurement within the digital field.

3 Steps To Building A Future-Proof Organisation

Automation, artificial intelligence and emerging technologies are changing our world and redefining the future of work. Organisations need to gear up to manage this transition wisely and understand the new rules of the game.

This article was written by Kumeshnee West

The fourth industrial revolution has the potential to disrupt every industry in every country through large-scale automation, adoption of emergent technologies, big data and artificial intelligence. There are many predictions and estimates on how this will affect labour markets, but one thing is certain – the jobs we do, and the skills we need to perform them, will change, and rapidly.

A McKinsey report estimated that by 2030 at least one-third of the activities of 60 per cent of occupations could be automated. This means that globally up to 375 million people may need to change jobs or learn new skills. A World Economic Forum report predicted that current trends in a disruptive labour market could lead to a loss of 7.1 million jobs, two thirds of which are in administrative roles. And a study by Oxford Universityestimated that 47 per cent of total employment in the United States is at risk due to computerisation, given that automation and computerisation are no longer confined to routine manufacturing tasks. Big data and artificial intelligence are allowing a wide range of non-routine cognitive tasks to be performed by machines.

While this may sound catastrophic, the good news is that while large-scale automation may redefine the workplace it does not necessarily mean we will all be out of a job. Changes in technology also create new jobs and spawn new industries. The challenge is going to be ensuring that workers have the skills they need to transition to different jobs. The fourth industrial revolution poses a risk to job security only in the sense that not managing this transition can lead to greater unemployment and social inequality.

In approaching what lies ahead, managers and leaders should consider the following three truths.

1. Talent will be more important than capital

Klaus Schwab, Chairman of the World Economic Forum believes that “in the future, talent, more than capital, will represent the critical factor of production”. To make sure they are ready for a future that is still emerging, organisations and people need to be adaptable, innovative and responsive. If up to 65 per cent of the jobs of tomorrow don’t exist yet – it is impossible to “train” people in the conventional sense. Rather we need to invest in their essential capabilities.

To ensure we build talent that is capable of mastering change we need to invest in resilient leadership. Leadership skills are not tied to particular jobs or industries and solid leadership development provides the kind of transferable skills likely to be needed in the future. The WEFidentified the top ten skills that will be most needed in 2020 as: complex problem solving; critical thinking; creativity; people management; coordinating with others; emotional intelligence; judgement and decision making; service orientation; negotiation and cognitive flexibility. These essential skills have long been part of most good leadership development, MBA and executive education programmes – and they will need to be scaled up.

2. Education needs to be flexible too

The WEF report recommends that organisations embrace talent diversity, leverage flexible working arrangements and incentivise lifelong learning to best manage the changes ahead. Lifelong learning and executive education certainly have an important role to play in a rapidly changing job market, and these programmes also need to be flexible and adaptable to student’s and organisation’s needs.

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) already offer flexible access to lifelong learning and the number of courses available is rapidly increasing to meet demand. Many perceive the downside of online learning to be the loss of face-to-face interaction, which is still regarded as critical to the quality of education – specifically when it comes to learning and practising the essential skills identified by the WEF. Educational institutions are looking to fix this by offering a mix of traditional and online learning to reskill and prepare for workplace transition. There are opportunities for combinations and blends of one-on-one and group interactions at all levels of learning.

3. The link between education and business is a two-way street

The format of what is being taught needs to be flexible but so does the content.

As the WEF report suggests, education systems need to be re-designed if we are going to tackle the transitions ahead. This entails businesses, governments and educational institutions working together to provide curricula that meet current and future needs. The McKinsey report suggests that governments have a role to play in maintaining economic growth, scaling job retraining and workforce skills development, and providing income and transition support to workers whilst retraining. But they cannot do this on their own.

Educators supply industry with critical skills, and industry has a hand in shaping the talent pool and informing educational institutions of the changes they foresee and the skills they wish to develop. Businesses that invest in long-term partnerships with educational institutions to develop skills and respond to changes in the environment will stand a better chance of building a workforce that is future proof: suitably skilled, adaptable and ready for the challenges that we collectively face. As the African proverb goes: If we want to go far, we need to go together.


Kumeshnee West is Director of Executive Education at the UCT Graduate School of Business. This article was originally published here.

Procurement 2030: Time Enough At Last?

With 41 per cent of procurement professionals expecting there to be fewer procurement and supply jobs available in the year 2030, career longevity will be held only by those with the right skills.

Fans of The Twilight Zone will remember the Time Enough At Last episode, where it takes a nuclear apocalypse before a frustrated bank clerk finally has the time to indulge his passion.

For procurementand supply professionals standing on the brink of the robotic era, the coming wave of automation presents an unprecedented opportunity to spend time on strategic and value-adding activities that are often pushed aside in favour of the tactical workload.

Procurious and Michael Page UK’s survey of nearly 600 global procurement professionals revealed the top three activities that people would spend time on if tactical elements of their role were automated:

1. Increasing procurement’s influence in the organisation

2. Developing team and talent

3. Seeking opportunities to contribute to top-linegrowth.

This result begs the question: Why wait? If these are the three key activities that procurement professionals would like to spend more time on, they should be prioritised today.

Time for a brand makeover

As the profession continues to transform and evolve, the procurement ‘brand’ is a recurring topic of debate at conferences around the globe. Is it still relevant today, and does it encompass the many value-adding activitiesundertaken besides sourcing? Results from thissurvey reveal that nearly 72 per cent of professionals believe ‘procurement’ will still be an appropriate term in 2030, despite the expectation that the rate of change will increase over the next decade.

Re-skill to survive

With 41 per cent of surveyed professionals expecting there to be fewer procurement and supply jobs available in the future, career longevity will be held only by those with the right skills.

Critical thinking, problem-solving and relationship-building have been nominated as the key skills for the year 2030.

What would you do with 42 per cent more time?

Level 1 of this four-part series revealed that procurement professionals spend, on average, 49 per cent of their time on tactical tasks. Survey respondents expect 42 per cent of their overall workload to be automated, which raises the question: what will people do with their new-found time by the year 2030?

The top three responses indicate that procurement professionals would spend more time on tasks that generate value for their organisation

.• Increase procurement’s influence through stronger alignment with the business and better communication to enable engagement in strategic decisions.

• Do not rush the development and recruitment of top talent, even if there is a pressing business need to do so. Spending more time (not necessarily more budget) on talent will allow the development of highly-skilled teams that can drive value for the organisation.

• Seek opportunities to contribute to top-line growth. This often requires creative thinking and a thorough review of end-to-end processes, particularly in mature functions where further savings opportunities are becoming difficult to find.

The automation of tactical procurement tasks in your organisation will not take place all at once, but piecemeal automation is already happening. Be ready to seize the opportunity to drive true value as tactical tasks are incrementally automated.

Automate to humanise

Overwhelmingly, procurement professionals believe automation will enable a greater focus on building strategic relationships. While tactical transactions with the bulk of suppliers in the spend tail may well be 100 per cent automated, productive engagement with strategic suppliers will increase with technology.

  • Apps or web-apps will drive collaborative processes through event triggers and notifications.
  • Less time will be spent arguing about data, with trusted data allowing more time to spend on collaboratively finding ways to build value.
  • Expect to see more personal interaction but shorter meetings, as the tactical discussion and low-level relationship management will already have been taken care of.

Interested In Learning More?

This content-packed report also contains links to relevant thought-leadership from Procurious and Michael Page UK, including videos, blog articles, podcasts and webinars.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD PROCUREMENT 2030: LEVELS 1 to 4

3 Attributes Of The Future CPO

Why are organisations appointing CPOs from outside of the profession, what’s the no. one category that will produce future CPOs and should there be a new label for the role of CPO. 

The modern day CPO is vastly different to the CPO of a decade ago – both in terms of management style and the expectations put upon them by the organisation.

And so we can only assume that CPOs in 10-15 years will be similarly unrecognisable.

Who will get the top job in the future , what sort of professional background will they have ?

Tom Derry, CEO – ISM discusses why companies are appointing CPOs from outside of the profession, the no. one category that will produce future CPOs and a new label for the role of CPO

It doesn’t take a procurement professional to be CPO

There’s been a real trend in recent years of CPOs being appointed from outside traditional backgrounds. A savvy marketing professional or a cost-conscious operations manager could make a very attractive candidate for the role.  Similarly, IT professionals – the innovation scouts who know how to drive change and understand key threats to the business like cyber security – could be chasing the CPO role.

“Requirements of the job and the definition of the job have to evolve over time and in the not too distance future,” explains Tom.

Tom outlines some of the key qualities of the CPO of the future.

Customer-facing expertise

“Customer-facing expertise, the ability to interact with, understand and even anticipate customer needs, is a critical skill”

One of the key themes in a recent CAPS research survey emphasised the importance of a demand-driven supply chain.          “[This] means an orientation toward, and a sensitivity to, the needs and requirements of the customer, flexing to meet the customers requirements and configuring your supply chain and your procurement activities to meeting those requirements.”

Market expertise

It’s so important for future procurement leaders to have clear vision and strategy – a strategy that your team can implement based on what you’ve identified.

“Another way of saying that is market expertise” explains Tom.  “Understanding where your company is, what markets you’re going after and the characteristics of those markets in terms of customer and suppliers [is really important]. [Someone with an understanding] of where markets are today and where they’re headed would be ideally suited to lead the supply chains and procurement activities of the future.”

Leadership

Tom stresses CPOs of the future do not need to be process experts. “We don’t need someone who has grown up in the ranks of procurement and has become very good at RF processes, scouting new suppliers, or understanding supply markets.  These are key skills but they are not the leadership skills that are required to lead the entire companies  effort-  they’re just necessary functional skills.”

So where does Tom think CPOs will come from in the future? “Some will become category managers and then move laterally into different positions, and then move into the top job. But it won’t be a straight-line path. You won’t be climbing a ladder within the function to get to the CPO job. You’ll have to leave the function and come back, or come from outside the function because you’ve got the vision and strategic skills to lead.”

Part Three of Tuesdays with Tom is available now. Click here to sign up and hear ISM CEO Tom Derry discuss CPOs of the future and how we might label the profession going forward. 

Big Ideas Zurich: 3…2…1… ACTION!

Big Ideas Zurich is now available to watch on demand. Sign up as a digital delegate to watch the event in full! 

We’re so excited to finally share Big Ideas Zurich with you. This truly digital event addresses what skills you need to perfect in order to drive peak performance in your career; what’s the latest intel on blockchain and how to close the gender pay gap in procurement.

The entire event is now available to stream on-demand via the digital delegates group on Procurious.

Check out the agenda below to see what tickles your pickle and watch some highlight videos from the event:

Tania Seary on Driving Peak Performance

Joelle Payom on Diversity and Inclusion

What is your favourite job interview question?

Big Ideas Zurich is now available to watch on demand. Sign up as a digital delegate to watch the event in full! 

Three Truths For Building Future-Proof Organisations

Automation, artificial intelligence and emerging technologies are changing our world and redefining the future of work. Organisations need to gear up to manage this transition wisely and understand the new rules of the game.

The fourth industrial revolution has the potential to disrupt every industry in every country through large-scale automation, adoption of emergent technologies, big data and artificial intelligence. There are many predictions and estimates on how this will affect labour markets, but one thing is certain – the jobs we do, and the skills we need to perform them, will change, and rapidly.

A McKinsey report estimated that by 2030 at least one-third of the activities of 60% of occupations could be automated. This means that globally up to 375 million people may need to change jobs or learn new skills. A World Economic Forum report predicted that current trends in a disruptive labour market could lead to a loss of 7.1 million jobs, two thirds of which are in administrative roles. And a study by Oxford University estimated that 47% of total employment in the United States is at risk due to computerisation, given that automation and computerisation are no longer confined to routine manufacturing tasks. Big data and artificial intelligence are allowing a wide range of non-routine cognitive tasks to be performed by machines.

While this may sound catastrophic, the good news is that while large-scale automation may redefine the workplace it does not necessarily mean we will all be out of a job. Changes in technology also create new jobs and spawn new industries. The challenge is going to be ensuring that workers have the skills they need to transition to different jobs. The fourth industrial revolution poses a risk to job security only in the sense that not managing this transition can lead to greater unemployment and social inequality.

In approaching what lies ahead, managers and leaders should consider the following three truths.

1. Talent will be more important than capital

Klaus Schwab, Chairman of the World Economic Forum believes that “in the future, talent, more than capital, will represent the critical factor of production”. To make sure they are ready for a future that is still emerging, organisations and people need to be adaptable, innovative and responsive. If up to 65% of the jobs of tomorrow don’t exist yet – it is impossible to “train” people in the conventional sense. Rather we need to invest in their essential capabilities.

To ensure we build talent that is capable of mastering change we need to invest in resilient leadership. Leadership skills are not tied to particular jobs or industries and solid leadership development provides the kind of transferable skills likely to be needed in the future. The WEF identified the top ten skills that will be most needed in 2020 as: complex problem solving; critical thinking; creativity; people management; coordinating with others; emotional intelligence; judgement and decision making; service orientation; negotiation and cognitive flexibility. These essential skills have long been part of most good leadership development, MBA and executive education programmes – and they will need to be scaled up.

2. Education needs to be flexible too

The WEF report recommends that organisations embrace talent diversity, leverage flexible working arrangements and incentivise lifelong learning to best manage the changes ahead. Lifelong learning and executive education certainly have an important role to play in a rapidly changing job market, and these programmes also need to be flexible and adaptable to student’s and organisation’s needs.

Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) already offer flexible access to lifelong learning and the number of courses available is rapidly increasing to meet demand. Many perceive the downside of online learning to be the loss of face-to-face interaction, which is still regarded as critical to the quality of education – specifically when it comes to learning and practising the essential skills identified by the WEF. Educational institutions are looking to fix this by offering a mix of traditional and online learning to reskill and prepare for workplace transition. There are opportunities for combinations and blends of one-on-one and group interactions at all levels of learning.

3. The link between education and business is a two-way street

The format of what is being taught needs to be flexible but so does the content.

As the WEF report suggests, education systems need to be re-designed if we are going to tackle the transitions ahead. This entails businesses, governments and educational institutions working together to provide curricula that meet current and future needs. The McKinsey report suggests that governments have a role to play in maintaining economic growth, scaling job retraining and workforce skills development, and providing income and transition support to workers whilst retraining. But they cannot do this on their own.

Educators supply industry with critical skills, and industry has a hand in shaping the talent pool and informing educational institutions of the changes they foresee and the skills they wish to develop. Businesses that invest in long-term partnerships with educational institutions to develop skills and respond to changes in the environment will stand a better chance of building a workforce that is future proof: suitably skilled, adaptable and ready for the challenges that we collectively face. As the African proverb goes: If we want to go far, we need to go together.


Kumeshnee West is Director of Executive Education at the UCT Graduate School of Business. This article  was originally published on the University of Cape Town Graduate School of Business blog.