All posts by Procurious HQ

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #26 – Changing Talent Management

Procurement needs to change its approach to talent management or risk losing out with the Millennial Generation.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Talent Management Approach

The growth of the Millennial Generation in the workforce shouldn’t be viewed by procurement as a threat, but an opportunity. That’s the view of Melani Flores, Practice Leader, Procurement Advisory EMEA at The Hackett Group.

However, Melani also believes that procurement doesn’t have the talent management processes in place to work with this generation. In order to train them, and enable them to work to the best of their ability, procurement needs to change its approach.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 18,500 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Be Like Two Turtle Doves – Spread the Love

On Day 2, the true love gifted two turtle doves. This festive season, be like the doves, and spread the love with suppliers and customers.

two turtle doves

The traditional 12 days of Christmas might not start until the 26th of December. But this festive season, we’ll be bringing you the 12 days of procurement Christmas in the run up to the big day. Catch up with Day 1 here.

“On the second day of Christmas, my true love gave to me…two turtle doves.”

Turtle doves traditionally represent love and faithfulness because they mate for life, and work together to build nests and raise their young.

What’s that got to do with procurement, we hear you cry? Well, if you’re looking to build world-class procurement performance, you need to value your relationships. Be it your suppliers, customers, or internal and external stakeholders, they should be the focus of your attention.

Take the Lead from the Turtle Doves

If you’re not feeling the love in your supplier relationship, you’ll need to put some hard work in. As Tania Seary says here, there will come a time when the romance fades. But you can bring it back to make sure that you and your supplier are working in tandem.

It takes time and commitment to build this relationship, there are no short cuts. And once you have built trust, you’ll need to work even harder to maintain it. This is where good Supplier Relationship Management comes in. Here’s a brief refresh:

Building the relationship (much like our turtle doves) helps build that feeling of faithfulness, and both parties are less likely to drop the relationship at the first sign of trouble.

So what are some of the tactics you can use to keep you relationship fresh and mutually beneficial:

  • Spend time with your supplier, and make time to visit their offices/factories/premises. They’ll appreciate it.
  • Give due reward for good work. Often a simple thanks will work best, but how about letting them in on the ground floor of future contracts?
  • Be open, honest, and truthful. Nothing destroys a relationship quicker than a lack of trust.
  • Got a problem? Invite them into see if they can help with a solution. You never know, you might just get a great gift of innovation from them.

Can You Feel the Love Tonight?

And it’s not just your suppliers that you need to build strong relationships with. Your customers, internal and external, are just as important for procurement. The customer is always right after all (even when it seems like they aren’t!).

Customer (or stakeholder) engagement comes down to three critical skills for procurement professionals:

  1. Good communication
  2. Effective questioning
  3. Stakeholder mapping

Want to know more? Funny you should ask that – you can catch up on another top Procurious video here.

Much of this can be linked back to the well-known, and oft-trodden, procurement process. Stakeholder engagement should underpin the entire process – we used this example yesterday when we talked about creating a specification.

People naturally want to be kept in the loop, and don’t like unexpected surprises. But, at the same time, most people will be more understanding of issues if they are made aware of them. So, much like your supplier relationships, open and honest communication will take you a long way.

Although we’re on Day 2, consider this as step 1 in the process. Get everyone onside at the start, and you’ll save yourself a lot of pain in the future. And, with any luck, you’ll manage to build a lasting relationship.

Do you still feel like you’re speaking a different language to the rest of the business? Still struggling to communicate procurement’s value. We’re talking Three French Hens on Monday.

Can You Write a Specification For a Partridge in a Pear Tree?

“On the first day of Christmas, my true love gave to me…a partridge in a pear tree!”

partridge in a pear tree

The traditional 12 days of Christmas might not start until the 26th of December. But this festive season, we’ll be bringing you the 12 days of procurement Christmas in the run up to the big day.

No-one is entirely sure why the “true love” in question decided to gift this particular item. As you can tell by the song, he/she was clearly out to impress, and figured this was a good place to start!

Building up from there, the gifts get grander and grander, culminating in a large number of drummers. More on that in a few days…

Irrespective of motive, what can be said about this gift giver, is that they got their specification and logistics right throughout. Not one gift arrived on the wrong day, and they were all as expected. With a procurement hat on, this is no mean feat (especially at this time of year).

Can you Specify a Partridge?

So how do you go about drawing up a specification for a partridge? There are 14 species of partridge in the world, and you wouldn’t want one that didn’t happily perch in a tree. It needed to be that specific partridge, and no other.

Or the whole plan would have fallen apart on Day 1.

And for the tree, it had to be a pear tree too. (Though some people believe that pear tree is actually a mistranslation from French.) What’s not considered in the song is the height of the tree, the number of branches, the colour, and other attributes.

We’re stretching a metaphor here, but you should see where we’re coming from.

Writing a Good Specification

A good specification, or Scope of Work (SOW), is a key foundation for an efficient procurement process. It can mean the difference between the right product for the job, and purchasing something not fit for purpose.

In its simplest terms, a specification or SOW outlines exactly what procurement requires from its supplier. It should be written in conjunction with end users and internal customers, to ensure all requirements are taken into account.

However they can be written in such a way that allows for flexibility from suppliers. This can also open up opportunities for innovation. You can find out more by watching our great eLearning video on this topic. Here’s a quick sample to whet your appetite:

In the case of the partridge in a pear tree, a descriptive, rather than functional, specification would be required. This outlines exactly what is required, complete with all relevant details and attributes, and will help to stop scope creep.

So now you’ve specified your partridge in a pear tree, you need to think about delivering it. But you’re going to have to wait for that one!

Turtle Doves have traditionally symbolised love – but how can you show this love to your suppliers and customers? Join us tomorrow for the next part in our festive series to find out.

Escaping Groundhog Day with Corporate Knowledge Capture

Can cognitive technology revolutionise the way we capture corporate knowledge?

groundhog day knowledge capture

Introducing Watson Supply Chain from IBM. Get to know Watson here.

Do you ever feel like you’re stuck in the nightmare of a supply chain groundhog day? One minute you’re gaining some solid ground in your organisation and the next… You’re back at square one, looking likely to make the same mistakes over and over again, trying in vain to get things right.

Capturing the Knowledge

Groundhog day is the reality for procurement and supply chain professionals who don’t adequately and methodically capture corporate knowledge.

  • When an individual leaves your organisation that doesn’t mean that all their knowledge should leave with them.
  • The tribal knowledge residing in your supply chain shouldn’t be reliant on key individuals keeping it there.
  • All of your supply chain decisions should be mapped out.
  • If your team makes a mistake you should be learning from it, not repeating it.
  • Knowledge capture should be an ongoing, continuous process and not something that is attempted, under pressure, at the point of employee exit.

There’s no question that retaining corporate knowledge is good for business. It helps facilitate the creation of new knowledge, it saves time and effort, positively affects your relationship with suppliers and customers and encourages new innovations.

Corporate Knowledge Capture is also great for new employees who can learn quickly and resolve problems more efficiently. That’s not to mention the benefits of leveraging the accumulated experiences of employees both past and present.

Social Capture and Collaboration

Organisations have employed various techniques to retaining corporate knowledge.

One approach is to use social intranet software that acts as a social collaboration platform. These provide a space where you can capture information, share data and communicate better with colleagues, suppliers and customers. Services such as Yammer and Jive have helped to increase efficiency and enhance information flow.

Other organisations have their own internal intranet, which serves the same purpose.

The problem with either of these options is that they are both laborious and time consuming. They depend on your knowledge base being regularly updated with the newest information as it becomes available in order to offer maximum value.

Employees will also be relied upon to review information and update the content. It might sound like reasonable expectations in theory but, in practice, it’s hard to maintain. New approaches are needed which are proactive as opposed to reactive.

Along Came Cognitive Technology

Fortunately, the ways that we capture knowledge are changing and evolving with technology developments, making it easier than ever before to do so. Cognitive Technology is today’s game changer in many ways and one of them is the impact it could have on corporate knowledge capture.

It can think, learn, and generally mimic human intellect. IDC estimates that, by 2020, 50 per cent of all business software will incorporate some cognitive computing functionality.

With regards to knowledge retention, cognitive tech can modify and document specific and analytic knowledge in a manner that others can re-use and adapt it for their specific use.

It can make intelligent decisions about where inventory should go, but also how it gets there.

It will also add information to the puzzle on warehouse space capacity, trailer loads that are going LTL, and ultimately, the best route not only based on cost or labor, but all of the extraneous details that aren’t apparent at the onset of an order.

Decisions will no longer be made that leave out key stakeholders by accident. Cognitive tech will recognise recommended participants for conversations and bring them together for troubleshooting in one place.

Balancing supply chains is a never-ending puzzle. As the complexity grows, communication and knowledge retention becomes of the utmost importance. How can Watson supply chain help to enable more intelligent decisions and guide leaders to make strategic moves? Find out here.

Why Procurement Should Be All About the Cloud

The Cloud is the future for procurement. If that’s the case, why do we still have so many questions about it? 

the cloud

Procurious are at ProcureCon IT in Amsterdam this week. Stay up to date with the latest highlights on the Blog, and follow live on Twitter.

We sat in a very interesting, interactive panel discussion yesterday on anything and everything Cloud related. This is one of the most talked about topics in procurement, so it’s no surprise that it generated a lot of discussion at this week’s conference.

As Tania Seary noted, the cloud has a touch of the ‘Emperor’s New Clothes’ about it. Everyone’s talking about it, everyone is convinced that they need it, but not everyone knows exactly what it is or how to use it. It’s clear that procurement is being hindered by this lack of clear understanding.

We were particularly interested in hearing the views of the panel compared to the others we’ve heard this year. What we heard was a consistent message, aligned with other Cloud experts Procurious have spoken to.

In our Oracle webinar last month, our discussion touched on the array of options in technology available to procurement. Also discussed was the idea of how traditional offerings differed from those from smaller, more agile companies.

All About the Cloud?

The panel, chaired by Procurious founder, Tania Seary, included Christiaan Murphy, Global Software Category Manager at CGI, and Michael Delle, Regional Head for SI & IT Sourcing at Ericsson.

Both men are active in the procurement space, as well as active members of Procurious! Christiaan Murphy is responsible for CGI’s global software spend of around 500 million per year.

Michael Delle is part of Ericsson’s global organisation for category management for SI & IT. He has a unique perspective on the Cloud, familiar with it for internal use, but also as part of the reselling systems integration programme at Ericsson.

CGI is divided around procurement categories (telecoms, software, hardware), but this isn’t common to all organisations. Traditional structures could present some difficulties in management of the Cloud, particularly from the point of view of data centre.

Michael raised the point about a lack of shared Cloud best practice for processes such as contract management. When it comes to negotiating cloud contracts, are you paying a subscription or a monthly cost? Either way, you need to be sure of what service level you expect for your costs. It needs to suit you, your organisation and your customer expectations.

Hidden Costs of the Cloud

Another fascinating area of debate raised was that of the hidden costs of the Cloud. Many people have chosen to focus on the benefits it offers, but few have stopped to consider the unseen costs.

Michael, in particular, was keen to point out how surprised people were when they found this out.

The first was the difficulty of getting back out of the Cloud environment once you were in it or even simply switching to an alternate vendor. There is always difficulty in migrating away from what you are buying, but the Cloud adds an extra level of complexity to this, especially when it could take months to get your data out!

It’s important to have a recovery scenario for your data and a contingency plan in place in case the cloud fails.

The second cost relates to legacy solutions. Some organisations involved in the Cloud environment would still keep their legacy solutions on site.

This was a conscious decision in many cases, with concerns about Cloud migration driving this. However, it did lead to duplication of technology and, more importantly, cost.

Cloud Brokering

One final topic of interest surrounding this topic is Cloud brokering. For those of you who don’t know (and we were one of them), this is more simple than it sounds. As you might be able to guess, a Cloud broker is an intermediary between a Cloud seller and buyer.

The concept of brokering has grown in Cloud software, as companies are asked to provide a service for people who don’t know what they are doing. Often, these are mid-sized companies who could benefit from the Cloud, but can’t dedicate the resources to understanding it better.

The companies that are suffering in this area were larger organisations with solutions for managing data centres. Cloud software is trending towards very specific solutions, which can be open source, and not dependent on the larger providers.

These ‘point’ solutions are proving to be better than the larger, all-in ones. The Cloud is enabling the trend towards virtualisation, but are hurting the providers offering off-site management, as people don’t see it as a requirement any more. It’s possibly better to go with the ‘point’ solutions, and avoid the software lock-in.

What do you make of the discussion points in this panel? Do you agree? Why not create your own discussion, or contact Michael and Christiaan on Procurious to find out more?

Look After Your Data – Keep It Secret, Keep It Safe

Concerned about data protection? How can IT procurement ensure data security and reduce cyber risk for your organisation?

data secret safe

Procurious is at ProcureCon IT in Amsterdam this week. Stay up to date with what’s happening on Procurious, and by following us on Twitter.

Day Two of ProcureCon IT is well underway and we’ve been privy to another morning of thought provoking discussion.

Procurious founder Tania Seary picked the brains of Kaushik Yathindra, Manager, Procurement Analytics, HSBC and Florian Schroeder, Head of IS Commodity & Contract Management, Bombardier Transportation to learn more about how to implement data security, the end of Safe Harbour, and the effects of Internet of Things (IoT). 

Where to Start?

Why is data security so important? As Florian Schroeder pointed out, you wouldn’t leave your most valuable possessions at the front door, you’d hide them away somewhere secretive. We should consider our data in the same way and not leave it exposed to hackers.

Data security is one of the fastest growing areas of IT spend. An estimated $1 trillion is going to be spent globally between 2017 and 2021. But how do you make sure your money is well spent, and your information secure?

Whilst data protection is a huge concern for organisations, it can be difficult to know where to start, particularly given the multiple types of data security on offer. Here are a few points to consider: 

  • To ensure the security of both yours and your suppliers’ data, it’s first important to understand the roles of everyone concerned. How will your procurement, legal, compliance and IT teams collaborate to ensure that contracts fulfil the level of service required in your organisation?
  • Consider data security in all of your organisation’s decision making whether it be Sales, Accounting or IT.
  • Take what you need and nothing more. There’s no point in collecting useless or excess information. The more you have, the more that can get stolen. Likewise, only store information as long as your organisation has a need for it. And when you do dispose of it, do it securely!
  • Ensure your service providers have adequate security measures in place. And don’t just take their word for it – get it in writing!
  • Use complex passwords. Make sure they’re stored securely, and keep the most sensitive information secure throughout its lifecycle by encrypting data when it is transferred.

As both panelists reminded us, you can never ensure 100 per cent security while there are hackers looking for it!

The End of Safe Harbour

Changing privacy regulations can make choosing where to store your data a complex process, particularly for global organisations.

In the EU, for example, privacy laws forbid any citizen’s data to be moved outside of the EU unless transferred somewhere with adequate privacy protections.

Safe Harbour was an agreement between the EU and the US in which the US government promised to protect the information of EU citizens if transferred to the US by American businesses.

This has been an extremely convenient agreement for companies such as Facebook. These companies were, up until now, able to store all of their EU data in US centres.

Last month, however, the European court of justice ruled the agreement invalid. This will mean a lot of paperwork and red tape for US businesses trying to move information out of the EU.

Perhaps the future is in establishing EU-based centres to handle data for EU citizens? Google, Facebook and Apple are already leading the way on this.

And it’s not just the end of Safe Harbour that will shake up Data Protection policies. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) framework was formally adopted by European parliament in April this year to be implemented by May 2018.

If the UK has completed Brexit negotiations by this stage, they will face pressure to adhere to the GDPR framework in order to continue trade within the single market.

Digitisation and the Rise of the Internet of Things

Kaushik explained how banks are moving towards complete digitisation in order to accommodate the next generation of customer who expect to be able to do everything online. Whilst this is great in terms of customer convenience, it presents additional data security challenges.

The worldwide Internet of Things market is predicted to grow to $1.7 trillion by 2020. More than half of major new business processes and systems will incorporate some IoT elements. It won’t be long until every aspect of our daily lives is connected. We’ll have smart bridges, smart cars, smart houses, smart vending machines…we could go on!

Of course, with great tech developments comes greater data protection challenges. The Internet of things adds a significant threat layer in which physical devices can now be hacked, have their information stolen, and even be remotely controlled.

There are a number of ways that organisations can manage data security relating to the Internet of Things. These include:

  • Encrypting sensitive data as close to where it’s generated as possible, rendering it useless to attackers in the event of a breach.
  • Only sharing information on a need-to-know basis.
  • Applying end-to-end encryption to ensure that sensitive information captured by IoT devices is protected throughout its lifecycle.
  • Procurement teams can help move the market towards a world where security becomes a part of IoT products.

In the words of Gandalf, when it comes to protecting data, keep it secret keep it safe.

We Need You – To Vote Procurious in UK Blog Awards 2017

Here’s your chance to get the result you want in at least one vote this year. Vote Procurious in the UK Blog Awards 2017!

we need you to vote

Vote for Procurious here!

It’s been a year of surprise results in global elections. For many, the votes just haven’t gone the way they had expected, planned, or, for many, hoped. But here’s your chance to make sure the final vote of the year has a happy ending!

Procurious has entered the UK Blog Awards 2017, and now we need your support to get to the judges shortlist. If you enjoy the content we publish on the site, then this is your chance to put your mark against our name.

You can vote for Procurious from today, for the next 2 weeks. It would mean a lot to us – so thanks in advance!

UK Blog Awards

The UK Blog Awards were first launched in 2014, aimed at recognising “recognise true viral style and creative excellence across a variety of 16 UK industries. The awards celebrate the very best of British Blogs, from both companies and individuals, across a range of topics.

As well as creating great networking opportunities in the Blogging community, the Awards offer individuals and companies the chance to promote their business and content. The Awards cover a number of topics, including:

  • Digital & Technology
  • Education
  • Green & Eco
  • Vlogger and Podcast
  • PR, Marketing, Media and Communications; and
  • Travel.

You can find out everything you need to know about the Awards, the categories, and previous winners here.

Your Vote Counts

Procurious have entered the Blog Awards for the past 2 years, and have been ‘highly commended’ in the PR, Marketing, Media and Communications category both years. This is great for us, given the age of the company, and the niche area we write about.

However, we are really keen to go one better and actually win this year! And this is where you come in. We need your votes – as many votes as possible – in order to be considered for the final category shortlists. The more votes we get, the better our chance of consideration.

Voting is now open and runs until the 19th of December at 9pm.

It’s really easy to vote too. Go to the Procurious profile on the UK Blog Awards website, and click ‘Vote Now’ at the top of the page. We appreciate any and all votes we get!

And, if you’re really keen, you can share this with your colleagues, peers and friends across social media and get them to cast their votes too!

Why Vote for Us?

Procurious aims to deliver procurement and supply chain news, views, interviews, and hot topics to the global profession. In the past year, we’ve covered everything from the Brexit, to how to improve your personal effectiveness at work, and myriad topics in between.

We don’t just talk about procurement (though it’s one of our favourite topics), we deliver fresh, original content daily to our audience to keep them up to date with everything they need to know.

The recognition gained from the UK Blog Awards in the past 2 years is a big deal for us. As we build more awareness of our site, we attract more people to the community, which benefits all our members. Networking opportunities grow, we get richer discussions, and more engagement in raising the profile of procurement.

Plus is means we can continue to provide high-quality, relevant content for all our members, and all our followers on social media.

Details

If you need to refresh your memory of some of our, and our contributors’, best and most popular articles from the past 12 months, head over to the blog to check them out. Alternatively, here’s a small selection of our most read articles this year:

Every vote you cast really does count. To vote, go to the UK Blog Awards website and visit the Procurious profile. Thanks!

Carving Out a Niche in the Supply Market

Large organisations are no longer a closed shop for small, niche suppliers. In fact, they are now being actively sought out for their skills.

carving a niche

Procurious is at ProcureCon IT in Amsterdam this week. Stay up to date with what’s happening on Procurious, and by following us on Twitter.

The procurement profession has started to come to the conclusion that bigger isn’t always necessarily better. This is particularly the case when it comes to suppliers. Larger suppliers may be able to offer lower costs, and greater security but when it comes to agility and innovation,  niche suppliers are the ones for the job.

Traditionally, these smaller suppliers have been bunched into the ‘tail spend’ classification. However, procurement has realised that by allowing the tail to wag the dog, as it were, opportunities are being missed. Niche vendors have creative and unique methods of communicating and innovating that procurement should be tapping into.

Identifying and managing niche vendors was the topic of a very informative panel discussion at ProcureCon IT this afternoon. Chaired by Procurious founder, Tania Seary, the panel also included:

  • Soren Mølby Henriksen – Head of Procurement Innovation, Danske Bank
  • Claire Tapping, Head of Sourcing & Commercial – IT and Business Process Outsourcing, Rolls Royce
  • Samantha McCarthy, Global Procurement Manager IT, Reckitt Benckiser

Niche Suppliers a “Source of Innovation”

The question for procurement often isn’t finding smaller suppliers, but how to engage them. Traditional procurement processes are set up for larger suppliers, and it’s a much too onerous process for suppliers without similar resources.

But, as the panellists pointed out, large organisations are now turning an increasing amount of attention towards niche suppliers and adapting their contracts accordingly to be less risk averse.

Soren Mølby-Henriksen  noted that, within five years, banks won’t exist. The future of banking is digital, and it might take niche vendors to help this evolution.

Danske Bank recently stepped into the start-up market to source innovative suppliers. Mølby-Henriksen discussed why start-ups were such a big focus for Danske Bank’s procurement team. The set up in the procurement team is to address specific “pain points”. The bank has brought together a variety of suppliers, including start-ups, to conduct a dialogue on solving these issues.

Once solutions are found, they are documented, and then matured to see how they can be implemented. Although the process is relatively new, it’s found some solid support amongst Danske Bank’s suppliers.

Another positive for the procurement team is that it’s also helped to reduce negotiation time, as many discussions are happening up front.

Engagement a Mindset Shift

While Danske Bank appears to have found a way to engage niche suppliers, it’s still an issue for many organisations.

Claire Tapping discussed how there can be some initial pushback when it comes to engaging smaller companies over concerns that it might be too risky to do so.

But she believes it is often proven easier to negotiate with niche vendors who aren’t restricted by a hierarchy of governance and teams of lawyers trying to mitigate risks. Another benefit of niche vendors is that they have a smaller focus. As such, they tend to do what they do to a higher standard than a larger organisation.

Leveraging competencies, while keeping suppliers engaged can also be a challenging proposition.

The panellists agreed that the impact of disruptors, such as blockchain and bitcoin, on the Financial sector was driving a need for change. But, this change involved a serious mindset shift for many of the financial organisations.

Procurement needed to shift it’s business angle to fully understand what they were doing before they entered the market. The vendor space in IT and technology is a completely different beast, where suppliers might not work with you if your business isn’t trendy enough.

Agility & Responsiveness Key

The final tips for engaging niche suppliers was the key role that agility and responsiveness played for procurement. Claire Tapping highlighted the issues procurement faces in keeping pace with business changes.

Relationships and engagement with the suppliers would rely on procurement becoming a “customer of choice” for the smaller suppliers. Without staying more agile, procurement could face a situation where the supplier is brought in by the business. If this happened, procurement is left playing catch up, and its value is diminished.

For procurement in financial services, niche suppliers open up a whole host of possibilities. As Tapping reminded us today, many organisations bring in the smaller vendors because they don’t know what they want!  Once the suppliers are on board, there’s more new thinking in order to ensure great engagement.

How this plays out will be interesting to see, as procurement in other industries will need to do likewise, probably in the very near future.

Peak Oil – From Global Catastrophe to Global Opportunity

Modern economics is a matter of supply and demand. And when it comes to ‘peak oil’, it’s the difference between catastrophe and opportunity.

peak oil

Since the early 20th Century, scientists, experts, and economists have been predicting the manifestation of ‘peak oil’. For years, many people viewed ‘peak oil’ as a herald of global catastrophe, and the end of major economies.

However, in recent years, the supply and demand situation for oil has turned in favour of supply. It now appears that peak oil demand is what organisations and countries need to be aware of.

What’s more, some experts are predicting that this demand will happen sooner than expected. And global oil and gas organisations need to consider their next move in order to stay competitive.

What Do We Mean By ‘Peak Oil’?

Peak Oil‘ describes a situation where global oil production hits its peak, then is in perpetual decline. The first prediction of this was in 1919, and an expectation that peak would be reached by the mid-1920s.

Throughout the last century, a number of geoscientists have continued to make predictions. And these predictions have all been proved to be wrong. However, some experts believe this peak may already have happened without anyone really noticing.

Studies have shown that in North America, the volume of oil discovered has dropped consistently since the 1930s. In addition, production of oil in the region has dropped year on year since the 1970s. That’s not to say that overall fossil fuel production has dropped – we’ll come to that shortly.

What people have agreed upon is that the concerns over ‘peak oil’ have abated, or disappeared entirely. The expected global economic collapse is unlikely to take place (or at least be a result of running out of oil).

Supply Outstripping Demand

So what has changed? Well, there are three reasons that keep appearing in a lot of the articles written about ‘peak oil’. They are:

  1. A huge increase in the volume of shale oil being produced. The oil is produced differently, but can be a direct substitute for crude oil.
  2. The US-Iran deal signed in 2015 has lifted sanctions on the oil-rich Middle-Eastern country.
  3. OPEC, which accounts for 43 per cent of global oil production, has, until recently, refused to cut supply. This surplus of supply was the reason the price of a barrel of oil dropped dramatically earlier this year.

This has shifted the thinking on a surplus of demand for crude oil, to a surplus of global supply. Or from ‘peak oil’ to peak oil demand.

Simon Henry, the Chief Financial Officer at Royal Dutch Shell, has predicted that this could happen in as little as five years. Henry stated that, “peak may be somewhere between 5 and 15 years hence…driven by efficiency and substitution.”

This view is at odds with many of the other major global oil producers, however. Exxon Mobil is anticipating a 20 per cent rise to 2040, while Saudi Arabia, the world’s largest crude oil producer, has argued that demand will rise on the back of increased consumption in emerging markets.

But, as some experts point out, even these predictions are built of shifting sands. The global trade slowdown, combined with the events of 2016, could adversely impact demand in developing countries.

Consumers & Organisations Shifting Focus

Whether it’s five years, or fifty years, what is clear is that oil is still a finite resource. Production will eventually diminish, and consumer requirements will change alongside this. This is where the global opportunities come in, but only for organisations willing to keep pace with change.

Public interest in renewable energy is increasing rapidly, and consumer buying habits are changing too. Even industries traditionally driving oil consumption, like the automotive industry, are seeing massive change.

In the UK alone, sales of electric cars have increased by 48 per cent in the past year. Sales of hybrid cars during the same period have increased a whopping 133 per cent. There are large solar panel fields being built around the world, and Ikea is even selling them to consumers in the UK.

Shell and BP are just two of the organisations expanding their portfolios into renewable energy sources, such as biofuels and natural gas. Greater investment in the renewables industry by major organisations has also helped to reduce costs associated with it. And as costs fall, demand from organisations and individuals will inevitably rise.

It would be foolish to make predications given how difficult it is to predict correctly about oil and energy. It’s a topic that is unlikely to go away any time soon, and one that organisations and wider supply chains need to be keeping up to date with.

Do you have a view on ‘peak oil demand’? Do you think it’s time to focus more on renewable energies? Let us know what you think in the comments below.

Like a treat behind each door of your advent calendar, we’ve found the tastiest procurement headlines this week.

Robotic Exoskeleton Gives Workers Super-Strength

  • SuitX, a Californian robotics company, has unveiled a new Modular Agile Exoskeleton for manual workers.
  • The suit is expected to greatly improve worker productivity and limit exposure to long-term health risks such as back injuries.
  • The exoskeleton is comprised of three modules – backX, shoulderX, and legX – which can be worn separately or as a single system.
  • The exoskeleton supports the body, reducing the amount of effort required to perform tasks such as lifting heavy weights.

Watch the video on THOMASNET

U.S. CEOs Face Consumer Backlash over Trump Victory Response

  • US Corporate CEOs have not hesitated to make their political views known in light of Donald Trump’s election victory.
  • Responses have ranged from congratulatory, to calls for unity, and commitments to company diversity policies.
  • Statements in support or against President-elect Trump have put brands at risk of consumer backlash.
  • Some CEOs who have spoken out have seen calls for boycotts of their brands on social media. Other CEOs have experienced backlash from their own employees on the other side of the political spectrum.

Read more at the Washington Post

Bank of England Seeking £5 Note Solutions

  • The supplier for the new £5 is looking for solutions to the make-up of the note’s base polymer following a backlash this week.
  • It was revealed that the note’s polymer contains animal fat in the form of beef tallow.
  • A petition on behalf of groups including vegetarians, vegans, and religious groups garnered more than 100,000 signatures in two days.
  • The Bank of England has said that their supplier, Innovia, is working with its supply chain to come up with a resolution.

Read more on Supply Management

Maersk Line Acquires Hamburg Sud

  • A.P. Moller-Maersk has agreed a deal to acquire German shipping line Hamburg Sud from the Oetker Group.
  • It’s estimated that the deal is worth over $4 billion, after Maersk won out in the bidding process.
  • The deal brings Maersk’s share of the global container market to 18 per cent, and it hopes to use the deal to return to profitability.
  • It’s the latest in a long line of mergers and acquisitions in the shipping industry, thanks to a huge downturn in 2016.

Read more on Supply Chain Dive

Could Direct Bookings Help Drive Value for Procurement?

Travel procurement tends to get people hot under the collar. But should procurement be more open to direct bookings to drive greater value?

Hotels direct booking

This article is based on a study conducted by Software Advice, available to read here.

In the hotel room booking wars, online travel agencies (OTAs) seem to be giving up a little ground. This represents a great opportunity for small, boutique and independent hotels.

Hotels that sell rooms through OTAs must pay a commission, so direct bookings mean higher profit margins. For many years, hotels gave up that extra profit in order to reach a wider audience.

However, new data shows that many rates are now cheaper when booking directly through the hotel website.

What Is Causing Cheaper Direct Bookings?

The true cause of this shift is hard to nail down, though some experts think a combination of a couple key factors may be leading to cheaper direct bookings:

  • Effective regulation against rate parity clauses. Regulations against rate parity clauses – contract language that forces hotels to maintain the same rates on all distribution channels – may be having an effect. This means some hotels could offer lower rates on their own website.
  • OTAs are willingly easing up on commissions. OTAs often charge hotels an average of 15 to 25 per cent per booking, so it’s easy to see why hotels would want travellers to book direct. It’s possible the OTAs believe reducing commission rates won’t matter, since their volume of business is so high.

This shift is an opportunity for small and independent hotels to educate potential guests, and market these cheaper direct booking rates to them.

Taylor Short, Hotel Market Researcher for the hotel information systems reviews companySoftware Advice, believes that incentives could be the key to attracting customers.

“Hotels and resorts want to attract organisations and groups for the revenue and sales potential when the group is on property. Because of this, hotels will often use software to manage incentives offered to guests, such as free wifi or rate discounts, for those who book in groups,” says Short.

“To compel group over individual bookings, hotels will try to tailor packages to the groups they see most often. For a business networking group, for example, they may offer free transportation from the airport, discount on drinks, or a round of golf. There are things to offer that can help deliver a better, more personalised experience.”

Driving Direct Bookings

Shifting consumer habits to looking at a wider range of options presents an opportunity for small hotels to educate travellers that booking directly can be cheaper and more valuable.

There are a number of tactics smaller hotels can use to help drive customers to websites, and boost brand loyalty. These include:

  1. Compel website visitors to book direct with pop-ups or calls-to-action (CTAs).
  2. Offer incentives on the website.
  3. Arrange OTA widgets so that rates capture visitor attention.
  4. Focus on what they can offer vs. bigger brands.
  5. Prepare for the long game.

Changing Habits and Procurement

So if consumer habits are changing, it’s probably fair to say business travellers are looking for similar options. But where does this leave procurement?

Travel procurement is one of the ‘hot buttons’ for organisations. Procurement need to find the right balance between value for money, and ensuring that their staff are getting a good experience.

Every year, millions of pounds are spent outside of travel management systems. This maverick spend, which can be up to 20 per cent more expensive than through authorised sources, further hinders procurement’s position. Maverick spend comes in all shapes and sizes, and organisations need to be aware of why it is happening so they can combat it.

However, as travel options, in particular accommodation, open up with businesses such as Airbnb, procurement needs to stay in step with changes. This doesn’t mean allowing staff to book directly themselves, but not staying with preferred suppliers because they happen to be on a list.

The difficulty for procurement lies in how organisational travel is booked. Large organisations tend to use a travel management system, or agency, to collate bookings.  Smaller organisations might be more flexible. However, if processes are in place, then it’s likely to be more difficult to justify a change.

However, it doesn’t stop procurement looking at smaller hotels who may offer added extras that employees will enjoy. If direct bookings could offer greater value, then it’s worth considering working with these suppliers in the future.