All posts by Procurious HQ

How 9 Technologies Will Drive Global Supply Chain Disruption

Cloud corporations, supertrends, and potentially procurement without lawyers and auditors. Are you keeping up with technologies driving global disruption?

technological-disruption

Last week, Procurious attended the ProcureCon Europe conference in Berlin. You can read about our experiences, keynote highlights, and more on our Blog.

One keynote caught our attention enough that we felt it needed delved into in more detail. Professor Leslie Wilcocks, Professor of Technology Work and Globalisation at LSE, spoke about how procurement needed to prepare itself for digital disruption.

If you are a regular reader of the Procurious Blog, then you will be aware that we have a keen interest in future technologies. From drones and last mile logistics, to blockchain, we’re aiming to keep up to date with the impact on global supply chains.

So with this in mind, we revisit what was a fascinating keynote.

Prepare for Disruption!

Professor Wilcocks kicked off with the following statement: “Technology will disrupt pretty much everything between now and 2025.” This isn’t just the world of business, though that will see a massive change. But it’s also everything we do, see, touch, and encounter in our daily lives.

According to the GEP Procurement Outlook 2016, there are 5 so-called “supertrends” we need to be on the look out for. These are:

  1. Heightened impact of geo-politics
  2. Shift of economic power to the USA and emerging economies
  3. Continued decline in global commodity prices
  4. Increased impact of climate change
  5. Push to Digital

It’s safe to say that all five have been highly visible during this year. We’ll be keeping an eye out for 2017’s “supertrends” with great interest!

However, it’s the fifth trend that Professor Wilcocks focused most on. He believes that much of the interconnectedness and innovation being seen in procurement comes from the application of technology.

As we have frequently stated, procurement cannot afford to ignore technology. If it does, it cannot deliver true value to organisations, and faces redundancy, or obsolescence, in a fast-changing world.

Rise of “The Cloud Corporation”

Happily, the assembled procurement professionals were given a list of technologies to watch over the next 4-5 years. These fell into an easy to remember acronym, SMAC/BRAID.

  • Social Media
  • Mobile Technology
  • Analytics (Big Data)
  • Cloud Service
  • Blockchain
  • Robotics
  • Automation
  • Internet of Things
  • Digitisation or Digital Fabrication

These technologies all link together to help the emergence of digital businesses. Or as Professor Wilcocks put it, “The Cloud Corporation.” They also provide a number of opportunities and challenges for businesses. They need to be more agile, and manage on a ‘micromultinational‘ level, but it also opens up the potential for major process innovation.

However, Wilcocks did give one caveat on technology and innovation. No-one knows how to fully maximise the potential of technology. The only way to do this is by learning by making mistakes, something less agile organisations have proven themselves to be less good at in the past.

Transforming the Supply Chain

So how does all this fit together with disruption to the global supply chain? For the most part, the disruption has already started, and, as a result, organisations are playing catch up. However there are some tactics that can be used.

  • Organisational – realigning organisations strategy for supply chains on a functional, geographical or regional level.
  • Technological – ensuring supply chains are integrated to work best through better connectivity.
  • People – traditional pyramid structures aren’t optimised for the digital era. Human talent in the digital supply chain should be organised as a diamond, providing a more streamlined hierarchy, and better training opportunities at the lowest levels.

Switching the focus to the benefits of automation showed how the technologies could impact productivity. Traditionally, organisations have used five methods to transform their supply chains:

  1. Centralise
  2. Standardise
  3. Optimise
  4. Relocate to Low Cost Region
  5. Technology Enablement

However, there is a sixth that can, and is already, increasing productivity in supply chains – automation. It’s estimated that by automating, an extra 3-4 per cent can be added, on top of the efficiencies found in the other measures, by automating processes.

Final Word on Blockchain

There was one final word on blockchain before the end of the keynote. The disruption being caused by blockchain is, in itself, a protector for organisations from being disrupted. And organisations can leverage the technology to aid transparency, governance, and authentication.

Blockchain can also help with the evolution of “smart contracts”. These contracts can have rules set for automatically storing data, and executing commands.

Could it help to disrupt the disruptors? Probably, yes. Operating the technology at its most effective level could remove the need for banks, lawyers, credit cards, and even auditors, in the procurement process.

Whatever the challenges that exist, surely that’s something to aim for. Isn’t it?

Roll Out the Red Carpet – David Cameron to Deliver ISM2017 Keynote

The Institute for Supply Management (ISM) announces its most impressive keynote to date as registrations for ISM2017 open.

david-cameron

Former UK Prime Minister David Cameron will deliver the opening keynote at ISM2017, it has been announced today.

Cameron will speak about the geopolitical impact of policy and current events on global business. Over 2,500 assembled procurement and supply chain professionals will witness a riveting and eye-opening first-hand account of Cameron’s own experience during his tenure as UK Prime Minister.

With Brexit arguably being the defining moment of his career, Cameron will share his unique understanding of what the result means for US businesses and supply chains the world over, including its effect on globalisation.

Sharing Leadership Lessons

Cameron’s appearance continues a strong tradition of impressive keynote speakers at ISM’s annual conference. He follows in the footsteps of former President and CEO of Ford Alan Mulally, author and introversion expert Susan Cain, former Secretary of Commerce and professor of public policy, Susan Schwab, and former US Secretary of Defence, Robert Gates, as keynote speakers.

Learning and Networking in the Heart of Disney World

ISM2017 will be held at the Disney Coronado Springs Resort in Orlando, Florida, in the heart of Disney World. This surely makes the one annual conference where attendees will be sure to bring their families along! The conference will feature:

3 Learning Tracks – designed to help attendees deep-dive into three large themes over the conference:

  • Economic (Boom or Bust)
  • Business (Top Line and Bottom Line)
  • Professional (Inside and Outside)

As per previous years, all sessions are tagged with ISM Mastery Model experience levels, ranging from Fundamental through to Mastery.  

11 Signature sessions, including:

  • Unleash the magic of transformational supplier Relationships
  • Accelerating your career path with “insides” from procurement leaders
  • How to lead a successful transformation
  • Be a hero in boom times, not just in bust times
  • Shift the focus to change the results: Procurement’s opportunities to grow the top line

73 other conference sessions on overcoming shared challenges, featuring procurement and supply chain experts from around the world. 

Pre-conference training seminars and certifications, including the CPSM Exam 1 now offered onsite at ISM2017.

Presentation of three major awards

  • The R. Gene Richter Scholarship Program, providing scholarships to six students gaining an education in supply management or procurement.
  • The J. Shipman Gold Medal Award, presented to individuals whose unselfish, sincere and persistent efforts have aided the advancement of the supply management field.
  • ISM and ThomasNet’s 30 Under 30 Rising Supply Chain Stars program, recognising young procurement and supply management professionals for their passion, creativity and contributions to supply chain.

Finally, and perhaps most importantly, ISM2017 offers unparalleled face-to-face networking opportunities with thousands of peers from the profession.

Whether you attend ISM2017 to hear from thought-leaders, hone your skills, witness David Cameron’s keynote, network with peers or simply to have your kids meet Mickey Mouse at Disney World, be sure to share your experiences with the online community here on Procurious.

Registrations are now open for ISM2017. Find out more by visiting http://ism2017.org/

Disrupting or Disrupted? Why The Status Quo Won’t Do Anymore

If you’re not disrupting, then you are being disrupted. If procurement doesn’t get to grips with the right technology, then the profession’s future path is uncertain.

innovation

Watch our free webinar, ‘200,000,000 to 1: Using Technology to Find Your Perfect (Supply) Partner’, here.

The current pace of change around the world is unprecedented. Procurement and the wider organisation are quickly recognising that maintaining the status quo will not suffice in staying ahead of the pack.

However, that’s not to say that simply implementing a technology solution will solve every problem. No technology is perhaps better for the long-term health of an organisation, than a poorly chosen technology, implemented poorly.

Procurement 4.0 is a term many of us are using to encapsulate the changes Industry 4.0 is making in the supply chain. Also known as the fourth manufacturing revolution, Industry 4.0 marks the convergence of physical and digital manufacturing capabilities, where increasing automation and computerisation allow us to create so-called ‘smart’ workplaces.

Technology is at the core of the Industry 4.0 changes. Procurious hosted a webinar last week, in conjunction with Oracle, to discuss the critical role technology will play in the evolution and advancement of the procurement profession in this “brave new world”.

Ask the Experts

We invited David Hobson, Business Development Director, Cloud Solutions at Oracle, and Darryl Griffiths, Enrich Director of Delivery and Presales, to help us answer the tricky questions.

The discussion covered four key topics and challenges that face procurement, and provided some solutions as to how the profession can deal with them in the future.

Innovation

“IT is only ever an enabler for change.”

Procurement is under a lot of pressure today to find suppliers who will deliver the ground-breaking innovation that will give their company a huge competitive advantage.

However, real innovation is now coming from smaller, more agile companies, which procurement hasn’t traditionally worked well with. Traditional procurement structures and processes have been designed to work with large strategic suppliers, and are now inhibiting innovation.

We heard:

  • Why most rationalisation and standardisation efforts in the supply base have failed.
  • How the right technology or platform can ensure that performing supplier relationships are fully leveraged.
  • Why the challenge for business is to be able to adapt and apply new solutions and technology for competitive advantage
  • Why highly customised legacy systems, fragmented data, complex integrations and inefficient processes are hindering the digital innovation agenda.

Predictive Analytics

“Increasingly the evolution of the procurement function is to more proactive, rather than reactive.”

Spend management and standardising processes can come across as a pretty uninspiring (yet essential) part of what we do. Technology, innovation and digital strategies are where people want to be, but it all comes undone if we’re not managing risks in the supply chain.

On the table in this topic was:

  • The question of are procurement using the right tools in the right way?
  • The vast array of data available for tracking compliance, and how organisations can best leverage this.
  • How automating non-differentiating processes will free up time for value creating parts of the business, such as gathering insights into changing market dynamics.
  • Why many organisations are still grappling with getting data into a structured and accurate form that they can use for predictive analytics.

Streamline Processes

“Organisations that are effective in integrating data outrank their peers by 70 per cent across revenue and margin.”

If procurement can get its processes frictionless, we could then focus on the sexier, more value-adding, parts of procurement.

Standardised processes are a huge enabler for this. And, of course, technology plays a huge role in helping realise the benefits of standardised processes.

We found that:

  • In the past, often the best the system ever was on go live day, thanks to sporadic, or non-existent updates
  • Few organisations are entirely harmonised across business operations, as result of M&A, divisional evolution and conflicting business demands.
  • People tend to underestimate the complexity of stitching together the myriad vendor solutions as they aim for a more B2C-type interface
  • We will see gaming industry concepts and increasing virtual representation as part of Industry 4.0

Implementation

“The journey to Cloud is often viewed as a when, rather than an if.”

Time and time again, we hear stories about how the business case a software solution hasn’t been realised due to a failed implementation.

Among some of the most common reasons for this are a lack of understanding that this is a change management process, not just a technology roll-out, and cuts to budget for training and support.

Our experts also argued that:

  • Solutions providers need to move from being software companies, to being service companies, or risk losing their customers.
  • Grand technological visions of the past failed as the solutions we too far out of line with the business needs
  • Regardless of solution some common foundations exist for any project success which include rubbish data in means rubbish data out.
  • Change management is vital in implementation, or people will revert to old habits
  • Focus needs to be on proving the tools first to help quickly establish credibility

Watch Now!

These are just some of the highlights from the webinar. You can catch up with the full discussion by signing up here.

And the learning doesn’t stop there. If you have any questions, please let us know below, and we’ll make sure it gets passed along to the experts.

For more information, and to watch the full webinar, visit our dedicated page.

Could President Trump Make Procurement Great Again?

Not that we’re saying that procurement isn’t already pretty great. But could a new man at the top mean major changes for the profession?

trump great

If you missed the result of the US Election last week, then you must have been on Mars. Or living under a rock/hiding behind your sofa. In an unexpected turn of events, Donald Trump was elected as the 45th President of the United States of America.

And irrespective of your thoughts on both the campaigns, and the ultimate result, it’s clear that there are changes coming. We have no idea what Trump’s first 100 days in office will look like, so much of what we’re seeing is still very much educated guesswork.

But should many of the agendas and policies from the campaign come to fruition, then procurement and supply chains, both domestically in the US, and globally, will be affected.

Automotive Indecision

A great deal of campaign rhetoric from the Trump camp came in the shape of American industry, and American jobs. The President-elect frequently stated he would look to remove the US from the North Atlantic Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) should he win the election.

If this were to happen, it could potentially boost the US’ ailing car industry. In the past year, 8 new manufacturing plants have been created in Mexico, having been moved from the US for lower wages. Included in this number is Ford, who moved all small car production from Michigan to Mexico in September.

If Trump were to end US involvement in NAFTA, these car manufacturers would be just a few of the organisations with a big decision on their hands. Should they manufacture abroad and risk rising import costs? Or return operations to the US heartlands, and pay considerably higher wages?

However, though it’s easy for America to withdraw from NAFTA, it’s unclear what tariffs would be placed on imported goods. Beyond this, it’s likely to result in higher prices for American consumers (and buyers too), without any guarantee that jobs would return to the US either.

From a global supply chain point of view, it wouldn’t create much change. Mexico will remain an attractive proposition for non-US companies, such as Audi, BMW, and Toyota, none of whom are subject to NAFTA. So concerns the Mexican economy will collapse are unlikely to be realised.

Great Big Business Benefits

However, some big businesses and industries would stand to gain significantly from a Trump presidency. In the days following the election, shares in Oil and Gas companies shot up, following Trump’s pledge to make the US energy independent.

This would mean great exploration of the US mainland, and potentially relaxation of environmental policies put in place by President Obama. This would in turn impact procurement, who would have to bear in mind any changes in longer-term contracts.

Another group to benefit could be the Defence sector. There is likely to be great investment in defence in America, which may in turn move other countries to do likewise. Increased spending could free up previously-stalled projects, and kick off new projects benefitting both procurement and suppliers.

Finally, it’s fully anticipated that infrastructure procurement will be increased. With more money being promised to federal budgets, but greater efficiencies required, procurement will play a pivotal role in ensuring that funds are used wisely.

Investment Nerves

In the hours following the announcement of Trump’s victory, global markets dropped significantly. However, the drop, unlike Brexit, was a temporary one, with nearly every major market reporting an increase by close of trading.

Long-term, however, no-one is exactly sure what will happen. As one media source put it, “Investors are in wait and see mode”. This is likely to continue until the middle of 2017 at least, when formal policies will become much clearer.

strong anti-globalisation message resonated through the Trump campaign, and there are concerns that major investments will be hedged until such times that investors are clearer on what the outcomes might be.

Countries like India have traditionally relied on US investment. Any major policy changes could in turn impact significantly on the linked global supply chain. Whichever way it happens, organisations at least have a while to prepare, with President Trump due to take office on the 20th of January 2017.

What do you make of the procurement implications of the election? How major do you think the changes will be? Let us know in the comments below (procurement/business only, no political views please!).

It’s not been easy with news cycles dominated by other events, but we’ve found some great headlines this week.

GM to Cut Production Shifts in US

  • General Motors are to cut production shifts and lay off 2,000 workers at car assembly plants in Ohio and Michigan.
  • The move comes amid falling demand for passenger cars, and shifting consumer trends.
  • GM is the latest in a series of auto makers taking steps to deal with softer retail sales.
  • Earlier this year, GM announced plans to invest up to $691 million to build new plants and expand current ones in Mexico.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal

Burberry Cuts Product Lines

  • UK luxury retailer, Burberry, is to cut the range of products it offers by between 15 and 20 per cent.
  • The company reported a 40 per cent drop in first-half profits, blaming rising costs for the fall.
  • Pretax profit for the first six months of 2016 was £72 million, compared with £119.5 million in 2015.
  • The company has recently written down a number of assets, as well as incurring major costs for restructuring plans.

Read more at Market Watch

Rio Tinto Suspends Executive Over Alleged Payments

  • Rio Tinto has suspended a senior member of staff following an inquiry into a $10.5m payment made to a consultant on a mining project in West Africa.
  • The company launched an investigation in August 2016 after email correspondence from 2011 was found.
  • The emails showed “contractual payments” made to a consultant providing “advisory services” on the Simandou scheme in Guinea.
  • Rio Tinto has also announced that its selling its stake in the Simandou scheme to another project stakeholder.

Read more at Supply Management

Review Called After Contract Dispute Payout

  • Calls for an urgent review have been made after new details emerged about a £1.25m compensation payment following a contract dispute.
  • Legal proceedings were brought by Triumph Furniture after it challenged a contract awarded to a rival.
  • It has now emerged the Welsh Government was alleged by the bidder to have breached EU rules.
  • The Welsh Government said it was taking the issue “extremely seriously”.

Read more on The BBC

Ask Not What You Can Do for Your Organisation

But what your organisation can do for you. And these tips should point you in the direction of a great employer.

jfk organisation

For a decade or more, the economy has very much been a hiring manager’s market. A number of economic events culminating in the GFC made it increasingly difficult for even the most qualified candidates to find a position. But not anymore.

Thanks to a host of economic upturns, more and more jobs are appearing. Finally applicants can ask: “What can an organisation do for me?”

These days, it is important for employers to consider how they can work to better their workforce. Career management is no longer the sole responsibility of the worker; companies must consider how to lend their employees support.

As a job candidate, you should look for organisations that are eager to learn your goals and aspirations, and provide backing and encouragement to help you achieve them. More specifically, you should search for an employer willing to do the following for the sake of your career:

Understand Your Intended Path

As a human being, you have personal and professional goals. Often, those goals include a specific career path culminating in a prestigious job title with important responsibilities and generous benefits.

From the very beginning of your employment, your employer should be eager to learn your goals and pave the way for you to achieve them.

As you endure the job-hunting process, you should explain your personal and professional plan to every prospective employer. The most promising employers will respond with information on career paths through their organisations, available career-boosting tools or programs, and (most importantly) a commitment of support for your goals.

Those who seem uninterested in your goals will not do anything to help you achieve them.

Adapt Roles and Responsibilities

Though you might not expect an entry-level position to be handcrafted to match your abilities and interests, as you head into your mid-career, your employer should begin adapting your role and responsibilities to suit your preferences and skills.

In fact, ideal organisations will be able to assess your strengths and weaknesses and provide opportunities for you to develop those abilities you will need to enhance your career and achieve your professional goals.

During the interview process, you might ask about the possibility of you gaining a hand in the development of your work responsibilities as you gain experience within the organisation.

Offer Necessary Resources

Regardless of your career goals, your organisation can dramatically improve your chances of success by connecting you with valuable resources.

Perhaps most importantly, your employer should have a programme to support the continued education of its staff. This can be through workplace seminars or tuition reimbursement.

Flex time will help you pursue advanced education, like a master’s of organisational leadership degree, that could qualify you for top positions at your organisation while also improving your skill set for the company.

Additionally, you might look for an employer that boasts a mentorship programme. This way, you can build relationships with important figures at your company and gain career-boosting opportunities.

Be Respectful and Compassionate

It is entirely likely that your goals will change during your career. It’s imperative that you find an employer who won’t disrespect your choice, or react extremely and destroy your opportunities for success.

Employers should recognise the value of investing in employees, who will undoubtedly become valuable assets or allies in their future positions – regardless of whether those positions are inside or outside the organisation.

It isn’t difficult to identify companies who lack compassion for their workers. You can often find evidence of poor treatment on ratings websites like Glassdoor.

Most organisations think first of the profit margins, second of the customers, and third of their employees. In years past, companies had little reason to worry about workers leaving for better jobs, because the potential for finding alternative reliable employment was low.

However, if we expect the current trend of job growth to continue – which it should, given the strength of the economy and imminent retirement of baby boomers – employers must begin to consider the health and happiness of individual employees.

Being kind and supportive, having tools for personal and professional improvement, and remaining flexible in roles and rules are the hallmarks of organisations that treat their workers well. You should keep an eye out for job opportunities with companies like these.

Tiffany Rowe is a marketing administrator who assists in contributing resourceful content throughout the World Wide Web. Tiffany prides herself in her strong ability to provide high quality content that readers will find valuable.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #22 – Revolutionising Financial Services

Crowdsourcing and mobile technology will change the face of Financial Services and how new businesses source funding.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Winds of Change in Financial Services

Chris Hancock, CEO at Crowd2Fund, says that there is a revolution coming in the global Financial Services sector, thanks to the power of community and new mobile technology.

Chris draws on his own experience to explain how this revolution will change how money is lent to businesses. This in turn will help to increase the number of small, agile, innovative businesses getting started.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 18,500 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Getting Millennials on Board the Collaborative Procurement Bandwagon

Could the secret to e-procurement adoption success be Millennial engagement? Could more collaborative approaches be the key?

collaborative approach

This article was first published on My Purchasing Center.

No matter how good your e-procurement solution is, its success depends on user adoption. Getting employees to purchase through an e-procurement system is a hurdle that needs to be overcome in any organisation, particularly when it comes to engaging Millennials.

This generational powerhouse is having a major influence on corporate culture and how we interact with technology and communicate with each other.

This generation, which grew up with technology and social media, is accustomed to getting information at the tap of a finger, participating in digital communities, and relying on online reviews and opinions.

And they have come to expect this same level of convenience, immediacy and ease of use with the enterprise technology solutions – including the procurement systems – they use.

Raising Millennial Interaction

Understanding how millennials interact with technology is critical to increasing adoption of procurement systems. And as their significance and numbers in the workplace increase, so too does the importance of recognising their needs.

So how can you effectively engage them? Here are five strategies for increasing Millennial adoption of procurement systems:

1. Make it Relevant

To minimise rogue buying, make sure your system is relevant to the daily work lives of the users. Ensure it is as fast and easy to use and as user-friendly and intuitive as consumer sites. This means offering users efficiencies that resolve challenges unique to their specific roles.

Create a seamless process, enabling users to quickly and easily find what they are looking for and submit travel and expenses on-the-go. By creating these user-friendly systems and processes, you will encourage users to make the best decision possible because it’s the easiest thing to do in the natural course of their work.

2. Leverage Critical Intelligence

Gather knowledge from users across the enterprise to tap into the wisdom of the crowd and promote success. Create your own crowdsourcing environment on your procurement system.

Allow employees to suggest the items they need to do their jobs best so that procurement teams can negotiate the best contracts for those items. Help users save time by creating a system that recognises their needs and serves up the right information at the right time.

Create social opportunities. Consider setting up a reviews section where employees can post and read products and services reviews from their colleagues. This section could also promote corporate social responsibility by allowing them to share information on suppliers with green practices.

3. Instil a Bottom-up Approach

Instil a bottom-up approach to system design, roll-out and management. Empower users to drive and improve the process, instead of trying to control people and force them into compliance from the top down.

By making users active participants in strategic company initiatives, they will have a sense of ownership and feel more engaged. This also ensures you’re delivering a system that meets users’ needs and one that they will like using.

4. Foster Awareness of Actions

Foster awareness across the user base by incorporating gaming and making it fun. The Pokémon Go craze, which has caught on like wildfire, shows the appeal that games have with millennials.

You could create healthy peer competition by showing employees how their efforts compare to their peers, such as who are the smartest shoppers, and who are the most frugal travellers. Recognise them on the system with bronze, silver and gold achievement levels.

Share the visibility you have into spend, and track usage and measurable results across the enterprise so employees can see the value they are adding, how their actions directly contribute to company goals and what others are doing to achieve success.

For example, show the progress your company is making on overall savings goals, user adoption and total spend under management. This will create the mindset that every person who buys goods and services is not only helping to optimise processes that streamline their daily tasks, but also creating spend data that can be used to make better decisions and save money for the organisation.

5. Reward the achievers

In our research, we’ve found that the number-one reason users drop out of a process is because they don’t understand what’s being asked of them and feel their actions are not making a difference.

Create a greater level of awareness by acknowledging company “rock stars” – employees who make big strides toward company goals through consistently demonstrating desired behaviours.

You can reward these individuals through points and badges. For example, “Speedy Approver” for those in the top percentile of the approval cycle. Or “Compliance Champion” for those requesting items that are on contract 98 per cent of the time.

These strategies will help you build a collaborative procurement culture that not only engages millennials, but all of your employees. As users better understand greater company goals and are incentivised to participate, they will gradually shift their spend behaviours to strategic, deliberate approaches that help realise collective goals.

You will not only turn Millennials and other employees into stewards of company funds, but your company will also benefit from the cost savings, and optimised processes that collaborative, strategic purchasing delivers.

Tehseen Dahya is General Manager, North America for Basware, a leading provider of networked purchase-to-pay solutions, e-invoicing and financing services.

How Executives Can Avoid a Social Media Headache

Navigating the increasingly complex world of social media is the norm for executives. Here’s what you need to know.

executives headache

Social media can be a hugely important tool for executives in this day and age. When used appropriately, it can help you land your next job, help you communicate what you’re working on in your role, and help keep you on top of industry news and trends.

But setting up and occasionally maintaining your LinkedIn profile is just the tip of the social media iceberg these days.

According to a study conducted by Forbes and reported on SocialTimes, CEO engagement on social media will double by 2017.

Brands are doing this for good reason, with 82 per cent of people more likely to trust a company with CEOs on social media, according to the study.

You could get a tap on the shoulder by your HR leader any day, too. Companies often look across their organisation when considering a social media strategy for executives, with subject matter experts in different areas of the business (such as procurement) often having great insights to share.

Blurring Personal & Professional Boundaries

Of course, it takes extra time to be active in the social media. In fact, it’s blurred the lines between people’s personal and professional time and space. Used unwisely, a person’s social media presence can have repercussions in both their personal and professional lives.

This not only includes LinkedIn and Twitter, but also blogging, Instagram and Pinterest.

And at times, a lot that can go wrong. For example, the media stories of a Scottish executive who lost his $US2 million-a-year position as CEO last year when he decided to talk to his daughter during a ‘boring’ board meeting.

The executive told his daughter how he hated board meetings and that he was tired of the session that morning. He used Snapchat to share photos of the board meeting, along with tagged messages to his daughter, saying he was bored.

His daughter using a screen grabbing app to save the photos and posted them on her Instagram page, prompting a backlash that cost him his job.

This is just one of the many headlines about social media misuse that have caused headaches for successful corporate executives. There have also been plenty of accusations, misinterpretations and media headlines due to social media use.

Use Social Media as Tool for Good

However, don’t let this deter you from using social media, with executives able to use social media to their advantage rather than using it to ruin their career.

On the other hand, when used responsibly, social media has helped politicians win elections, startups take their new brand to the world and executives land new positions.

Posting blogs on LinkedIn or your company blog can also be a great way to bolster your corporate profile and help position you as an industry expert.

Outsourcing this process to a freelance journalist or copywriter can be a great way to ensure you meet your blogging goals.

Start by familiarising yourself with your company’s social media policy, which should outline their expectations. Raise any clarifications with your HR or communications department.

Avoiding the Executive Headache

When it comes to security, you can never be too careful. Here are a few ways to ensure you aren’t giving away too much information online.

Avoid checking-in: Don’t check in on Facebook at airports, on trips away for work or in specific locations during your time off. You never know who is watching for this information to be made public.

Set status updates to private: If you’re going to post business photos of delicious meals at a restaurant or tell people where you are on social media, make sure that your status settings are private, so that only your connections can view this.

Manually approve online tags: There’s an option on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter to approve photos and status updates you’ve been tagged in, which could reduce the chance of attackers actively monitoring your movements.

Key Social Media Platforms

And just in case you weren’t sure where to start, here is a brief run-down of the key platforms for you.

  • Facebook

The largest social network on the web both in terms of name recognition and total number of users. It’s a great medium for businesses to connect with customers.

  • Twitter

Share 140 or fewer character text updates to your followers, along with videos, images, links and polls. Twitter enables you to interact with other users by mentioning their usernames in your posts.

  • LinkedIn

Nowadays, if you’re a professional not on LinkedIn, you’re in a small minority. Allows you to create a professional profile and connect with people around the world, from peers, to colleagues, to competitors, to potential business partners.

  • Procurious

The world’s first online business network for procurement and supply chain professionals. With over 18,000 members, there’s a wealth of knowledge and potential collaboration with fellow global professionals.

  • Instagram

This visual social media platform is based entirely on photo and video posts, with many users posting about food, art, travel, fashion, architecture, hobbies and similar subjects. Growing numbers of retailers have had strong sales growth on the back of utilising this platform to display their collections.

  • Tumblr

This is one of the most difficult social media platforms to use as a business, but it’s also one of the most interesting. Users can post text, chat posts, quotes, audio, photo and video, while reposting other users’ content is quick and easy.

  • YouTube

This video platform allows businesses to show their products in action. It’s particularly useful for companies that mostly sell over the internet.

  • Blogs

Posting interesting articles either on your own personal blog, the company blog or post articles to LinkedIn can be a great way to bolster your corporate profile.

Procurement Translation? Now You’re Speaking My Language

Sometimes in procurement it feels like you’re speaking a different language to the rest of the business. 

speaking my language

Procurious is at ProcureCon Europe this week. Stay up to date with what’s happening on Procurious, and by following us on Twitter.

If we’re perfectly honest, procurement wasn’t the first thing on everyone’s minds this morning. With both media and social media, dominated by US Election coverage, you might have been forgiven for not having your eye on the procurement ball.

However, if you didn’t, then you were likely to miss some great nuggets of procurement knowledge on Day 2 of ProcureCon Europe.

Do You Speak the Language of the Business?

A prevailing theme at the conference has been communication and collaboration between procurement and the rest of the business.

Kristian Saksida’s gave a Finance to Procurement perspective yesterday in his keynote. Today gave us the Engineering to Procurement perspective from Gordon Tytler, Director of Purchasing at Rolls-Royce.

It’s worth noting that none of these speakers have used this as a criticism of procurement. In Tytler’s case, his Engineering and Supply Chain background gave him a broader perspective both inside and outside the profession.

According to Tytler, Procurement as a role and a function is appreciated but, crucially, not fully understood by the rest of the business. If procurement is too insular, then it can’t be sure it’s delivering what the business actually wants.

However, by communicating well (and speaking the right language), procurement can be sure it’s meeting the strategic needs of internal and external stakeholders.

Fly the Plane While Fixing It

Collaboration was also picked out as a vital part of procurement transformation and procurement excellence.

Thibault Eissautier, CPO at pladis (a newly formed organisation in the FMCG industry), was discussing the factors procurement must consider when choosing its operating model. He highlighted collaboration between functions as the only way to definitely deliver significant value.

Procurement needed to speak the language of the business to make sure that senior managers were on board. From Decentralised, to Centralised, to Centre-led, there was no way that procurement could operate in isolation.

The current POM is often defined by the maturity of the organisation. However, many organisations will be changing their POM, while still trying to deliver for the business. Eissautier likened to “flying the plane while fixing it” – not really an image you want with a flight back to the UK later on!

The Future of Air Travel?

The flight metaphor leads nicely into an afternoon session on the construction of a new airport in the Netherlands. Not your common fare for procurement, but there were some amazing insights into the potential future of low-cost air travel.

The Royal Schiphol Group has been charged with the project to build Lelystad Airport by 2018. Two of the team, Budi Darmadi and Peter Mustert, showcased the very different approach the Group is taking to the project’s procurement strategy.

Competition in the sector is fierce, and Lelystad Airport is aiming for the low-cost market, so needs to price accordingly. Given a $58 million maximum budget to work with, Mustert said that they knew a best-value approach would be needed.

For this, they needed to work with experts, but first they needed to identify them using a 4 step model:

1. Approach the Experts

Using a functional, rather than technical specification, and a maximum budget for a ‘good’ solution.

2. Assessment

Experts are asked to supply a 6 page only bid. This is to focus on proven performance and results.

3. Clarification

Following selection, the two parties discussed unclear items, risks, etc. to form a contract.

4. Execution

Let the supplier do their job, procurement is not to interfere. A weekly risk report helps to ensure that there are no blockers for the supplier in completing the project.

And that was it! There was no question of SRM, or partnerships, or even the endless meetings usually associated with contracts. The process aimed to have all parties working together in an open, functional way.

Whether this proves to be successful, we’ll have to wait until April 2018. But if it is, Lelystad Airport will showcase the future of the form of travel. Fully automated, simple, but highly innovative designs, all aimed at providing customers what they need, and want, from low-cost travel, and nothing more.

And who knows, maybe if this is a success, then best-value, non-interference contracts will become the norm. A great vision of the future (so long as you don’t manage contracts…!).

Why Some Supplier Relationships Are More Equal Than Others

All suppliers are equal, it’s just that some supplier relationships are more equal than others. It’s just one of the challenges facing procurement.

some supplier relationships more equal

Procurement in the public sector can provide its own set of unique challenges. Learning from the experts is one of the best ways that professionals can aim to overcome them.

Marea Getsios is the Coordinator of Procurement at Kogarah City Council in New South Wales, Australia. Marea has worked with both Local and State Government departments in Australia over the past 20 years.

This has given her an in-depth understanding of the procurement process from a strategic leadership perspective, as well as what it takes to drive procurement success.

Ahead of her appearance at the 3rd annual GovProcure 2016 conference, Marea highlighted some of the key challenges she faces in her current role, and the ways she has overcome them. She also shared some tips on the practical side of procurement, including best practice in supplier relationships and risk management.

What qualities and capabilities have you built that supported you in achieving better procurement outcomes?

I’ve used my sales and marketing background to communicate, and engage, with stakeholders more effectively, in order to achieve better procurement outcomes. It’s been important to educate stakeholders on the differences between a procurement and a purchasing role.

By communicating the procurement cycle, and discussing the importance of good procurement practice, it’s been much easier to achieve better governance and practice amongst my colleagues.

The other area I focus on is the importance of planning your procurement program. It is important at the beginning of every project to sit down with key stakeholders and work out the key objectives and risks of the project.

It sounds like you are really harnessing your strengths and experience to minimise setbacks at your organisation!

What would you say the biggest challenges you and your organisation are facing in procurement at the moment? Do you feel that these challenges translate to local government at large and why?

At the moment the most challenging aspect of my role is amalgamating two very different frameworks into one. You have to methodically go through each process and work out which method is going to work best for the new entity going forward.

It’s a good opportunity to look at what has worked in the past for both organisations and decide what will be the most effective in the new framework going forward. Many Councils are presently going through this process, and its not any easy one.

In addition to trying to amalgamate the differing key procedures and policies, the most challenging factor is the culture, and trying to break down the silo mentalities of individuals who are adverse to change.

Interesting you mention the change adverse cultures that exist in business. We know that procurement operations within local government can have far-reaching, visible impacts on the community.

Can you tell us a bit more about the key procurement trends that might impact procurement and supplier relationships at the local level? How you can make the most of these challenges and opportunities?

Obviously we are embracing cloud-based networks to streamline ordering processes. We also have lots of new technological platforms that can automate certain procurement functions, including spend analysis, contract management, and saving trackers.

I don’t believe local government has embraced enough of these opportunities, but they are beginning to play in this space. There is opportunity now to start implementing some of these platforms and managing the workflow more effectively.

The other area I believe could also be embraced better is social media, especially where the engagement of both the community and suppliers is involved.

Procurement technology with built-in social collaboration tools can encourage innovation through improved collaboration with suppliers and other stakeholders. At the same time it can minimise risk, and enable effective decision making.

Moving outside your business to your external suppliers. Do you have any advice or key lessons learned from your supplier relationships and risk management strategies?

I believe if you are fair and transparent, and allow all suppliers and contractors the same opportunities, you will be successful in developing good supplier relationships and managing any potential risk to your organisation.

I try where possible to give suppliers the best insight to the business and our requirements in order to allow them to work out if the organisations requirements are a good fit for their business. This way they don’t waste their time or our time.

It’s important to be clear at the beginning of any relationship, and to set expectations at a realistic and achievable level. I have found that problems arise if suppliers feel they have entitlements, or are basing their livelihood on anticipated revenues.

As long as the communication is clear, it enables the supplier to work out whether they are able to service or supply your organisation accordingly. If they feel they are building their business fairly, then they will do whatever they can to grow their business and in turn provide a good service to your organisation.

It’s important not to treat suppliers and contractors with contempt, or as if they owe you. This can create issues and open up the organisation to unnecessary risk.

It’s been wonderful hearing from you, your insights are extremely useful and there are many thought starters here!

How can attendees benefit from your panel participation at the GovProcure 2016 conference?

The GovProcure conference is a good opportunity for procurement professionals to get access and exposure to a variety of principals and processes that operate across the three levels of government.

It’s interesting to see where there are alliances in the various government sectors and it’s a good opportunity to share ideas and network with other likeminded procurement professionals.

My contribution will have a strong Local government focus, but I also try and talk about how my sales and marketing background has helped me promote procurement in my sector. Much of my procurement practice focuses on the engagement of stakeholders, which I believe is the foundation for success in the procurement sector, and all other sectors for that matter!

Too find out more or to download a brochure, visit the event website.