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How Big Data Insights are Revolutionising Global Procurement Strategy

More companies than ever are using Big Data insights to drive their decision making. But what key benefits are they realising by doing so?

big-data-insights

This article was originally published on My Purchasing Center.

Advances in technology are making it possible to generate more data than ever before. We can quantify, measure and track every interaction, transaction and engagement in excruciating detail.

And when we collect these “big data,” we can gain tremendous insights into business processes, including global procurement strategy.

Because global procurement is focused entirely around obtaining greater efficiencies and streamlining purchasing operations, global procurement is primed to be revolutionised by the insights that stem from big data.

Businesses that collect big data insights are finding that they can refine global procurement strategies and processes with greater precision than ever before. They also can intervene more effectively to resolve problems and challenges, and they can use concrete data instead of intuition and instinct to accomplish this work.

One study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management, finds that among companies in the top third within their industry, the use of data-driven decision-making made a company 5 per cent more productive and 6 per cent more profitable than a company that didn’t use data-driven decision-making.

Let’s explore the specific ways that big data insights are revolutionising the global procurement industry:

Shorten order-to-delivery times

Traditionally, the procurement timeline has been based largely on individuals using their best judgment and insider knowledge to get the right products and resources to the right place at the right time.

No matter how talented people are, however, they’re often no match for a computer algorithm that is specifically designed to optimise timelines and manage all aspects of the ordering and delivery process.

Computer-based analytics also can adapt to changing conditions in real time, ensuring that no matter what happens, nothing will slip through the cracks, and order-to-delivery times will continue to be optimised.

Increase supply chain efficiency

As with managing a procurement timeline, individual people can only manage a supply chain as efficiently as the human brain will allow.

Analytics software goes past the limitations of the human brain, processing and interpreting more data points about a supply chain than anyone’s brain could possibly synthesise.

In the end, these big-data insights yield more precise predictions about how to optimise the supply chain – and better predictions yield better decisions.

Lower costs

The goal of global procurement is to achieve cost savings, so it makes perfect sense to use big data insights to optimise all opportunities to lower costs.

Analytics software can instantaneously and accurately compute more possible combinations of events and items and scenarios than any human brain could, and computers can also thus make the “sweet spot” recommendation that appropriately balances all of these competing factors.

Improve supplier-client relationships

Both the supplier and the procurement client benefit from big-data insights. The supplier gets access to invaluable information that helps the supplier more effectively allocate its resources, as well as make plans to deliver on time and on budget.

The client benefits by no longer being forced to actively manage every aspect of the procurement process. Rather, a computer-based management approach frees the client to focus on building and enhancing relationships with suppliers, and on developing creative, out-of-the-box solutions that further enhance procurement processes.

Eliminate arbitrary decision-making

As much as businesses like to think their managers are making sound decisions, some will inevitably make decisions based on emotion, gut instinct, and self-interest.

Big data insights dramatically reduce the chances of this by forcing managers to not only use data-driven analytics to make decisions, but also to be prepared to defend those decisions.

As more businesses turn to big data insights to drive global procurement strategy, it’s important to provide adequate resources to support this transition and to provide adequate time for this transition.

When big data insights are integrated effectively into procurement processes, businesses can count on shorter order-to-delivery times, increased supply chain efficiencies, lowered costs, improved supplier-client relationships, and less arbitrary decision-making.

With more than 30 years of experience working with and providing excellent customer service to companies of all sizes, Rick Bender now is the Sales Director at CenterPoint Group.

CenterPoint is a management consulting firm that specialises in reducing purchasing expenses of businesses in areas such as office supplies, janitorial supplies, and industrial supplies.  

5 Common Failures in Technology Implementation

Technology should provide huge benefits in procurement. So why do so many projects fail at the implementation phase?

failure at implementation

 

Join our webinar on the 7th of November and find out how to drive successful technology implementation.

If you’ve been a procurement professional for any length of time, this is probably a familiar situation.

Your company has decided to implement new technology in the procurement function. A date for go-live has been set, and some training has been arranged for current users. There are grumblings about yet another system to be used, but that doesn’t fit with current procurement processes.

When you ask around, very few, if any, of the department have been asked to input into this decision. The company certainly doesn’t seem to have spoken to people who are actually going to be using the system.

When the time comes, the technology is implemented, and training is rolled out. The procurement team accept the new system (perhaps grudgingly), and start to use it.

Within a few weeks, the (very short) honeymoon period is over, and the issues and bugs have appeared. Far from improving or simplifying the processes, the technology isn’t working out as planned. It’s begun to make even simple tasks more difficult.

Within months, the shiny, new, purpose-built technology is being used for the bare minimum that the procurement team can get away with, and they have begun to come up with novel ways to work around the system.

Difference Between Success and Failure

While situations like this may be decreasing in number, they still occur with uncomfortable regularity. When it comes to technology across organisations, not just in procurement, implementation is the stage in the process that is most associated with the success or failure of the project.

Ahead of the free webinar between Oracle and Procurious, Darryl Griffiths, Acting MD at Enrich, and implementation expert, shares his key reasons for why implementations fail.

  1. Alignment of Strategy and Technology

Ensuring that the business, procurement and operational strategy all aligns is the first step in this process. However, too often, strategies aren’t aligned, or have been created in isolation without proper discuss.

Without fully understanding the strategy, the objectives for the technology implementation can’t be fully understood. This can lead to the wrong technology for the project being selected, and not being fit for purpose against the objectives.

  1. Lack of Change Management Plan

The plan for how the technology is going to be implemented should be laid out clearly from the start. Frequently, organisations work towards their go-live date, but give little thought to the short, medium, and long-term plan following the launch.

Too few plans take into account training requirements, or how new users will receive this training when they start in the department. 

  1. Lack of Communication or Champions

Without good communication, it’s likely to be a fight to get buy-in. Without buy-in, the implementation is doomed to failure.

Organisations don’t take into account the end users of the technology. This leads to the ‘why’ of the project never being disseminated.

This leads to the perception of new technology being forced on them, and breeds resistance. This resistance undermines the project, creating a situation where users are expecting the technology to fail, rather than having an open mind on how it can help them.

  1. Poor or Out-of-Date Data

The old technology didn’t work properly because the data wasn’t right. But there’s no data clean-up been carried out before the new technology is implemented. Which means the new system won’t work any better.

There is a vast amount of data available to procurement, which technology is frequently implemented to help sift through. However, putting poor data into the system, as well as not keeping the data up to date, will inevitably result in bad data out.

  1. Built to Last vs. Built to Change

In years gone by, products were built to last. It was common for things to last 10 years or more. However, in a marketplace and environment where agility and flexibility are valued, a built-to-last system may not fit the bill.

If the system hasn’t been built to be changed easily, then it’s going to go out of date very quickly. And it’s unlikely that budget will be available for a new system after 1-2 years, when it was designed to last 10 years.

Secret of Success

It’s easy to pin-point where technology implementation fails, but far harder to ensure that it’s a success from the outset. However, if the right strategies are in place, and all the planning is carried out, procurement gives itself a greater chance of success.

If you want to find out more about how to manage your implementation, and hear more from Darryl on how you can set yourself up for success, join our free webinar on the 7th of November.

Darryl will join Oracle Business Development Direction, David Hobson, in a discussion chaired by Procurious Founder, Tania Seary. The webinar is aimed at helping Procurement Leaders come to terms with volatility, understand the role and benefits of technology, especially cloud, in procurement strategy, planning and decision making.

For more information, and to register, visit our dedicated page.

Setting KPIs for Beginners: Measuring Success

Now we have our KPIs agreed, how do we measure our data in order to ensure success in supplier relationships?

measure success

Catch up with part one and part two of this three-part introductory overview of the role and relevance of KPIs to support Supplier Relationship Management (SRM).

So, we’ve established the why, the what, and the how for setting KPIs. Now we need to understand how we are going to measure the KPIs in order to provide meaningful reports, and set a recipe for success!

Systems for Capturing KPI Data

In a perfect world, KPI data should come from automated systems. However, when you receive the data from the supplier, you may want to corroborate some of it with your own.

Commercial software vendors like SAP-Ariba, Coupa, Oracle, Emptoris and others have features that monitor and track some KPIs. The base functionality comes through the core purchasing systems. Some organisations, however, choose to develop their own reporting systems to ensure they have the features and flexibility they need.

Another option is to use manual systems and processes. This could include disseminating data through spreadsheets, email or any other format that users have access to.

These methods are simple and can be very effective if applied consistently, but obviously take a lot more time than automated reporting. One concern with manual systems is the higher potential for human error.

Typical Data Points for Measuring KPIs

The types of data points you can collect depend on the system you’re using. Below is a sample list – keep in mind that your list will depend on your organisation’s tools, systems and reporting requirements.

  • At the point of ordering: you can check the order against the contract to track compliance.
  • At the point of receipt: you can verify whether goods are delivered in full or delivered on time.
  • At the point of invoicing: you can check invoice accuracy and blocked invoices.
  • At the point of inspection or usage: you can collect quality metrics, including defects and out of specifications.
  • At the completion of the order: you can poll end-users to gather feedback on the ordering process and the goods or services delivered.

Multi-Supplier Performance Dashboards

These dashboards can be used to compare several suppliers across the same or multiple categories, depending on your objectives.

Comparing the suppliers in this way can be powerful motivator. For example, you could use the comparison data to push your suppliers towards best practice.

Alternatively, you could identify the least competitive suppliers for elimination, or identify other improvement opportunities. If your objective is to reduce your number of suppliers, KPI data could help you make a decision based on the suppliers’ ranking.

Recipe for Success

Keep the following five tips in your procurement toolkit for the next time you’re drafting KPIs and thinking about how to get the most out of your supplier relationships:

  1. Avoid an adversarial approach. Remember, this is all about relationships – and about people. People are more relaxed and inclined to come to an agreement when they aren’t in an adversarial environment. As a procurement professional, you’re going to lead your supplier to success through innovative and progressive means. Essentially, you are the champion of their cause to your senior management.
  1. Work collaboratively with your supplier to develop each KPI and agree on how it will be used. Let the supplier know which KPIs are critical to your organisation – the ones you’ll be listing on the dashboard and sharing with senior management. This enables the supplier to work with you to develop the best approach for success.
  1. Have regular reviews with the supplier – both formal and informal. Always keep the lines of communication open.
  1. When issues do arise, address them as soon as possible. Workshop with the supplier on how to best solve the issue. Remember, don’t focus on the symptom, but try to identify the root cause of any problem and find a solution that will work for everyone.
  1. Let your supplier know how they’re performing compared to others suppliers, while keeping their identities anonymous. This is a form of benchmarking and can help motivate suppliers to improve.

That wraps up our three-part series on setting Key Performance Indicators! Hopefully this will set you on the path to KPI success, but if you have any comments or questions, you can ask them in our new Procurement Tools and Templates Group.

5 Biggest Challenges Facing Public Sector Procurement

Public sector procurement managers face a different set of challenges to their private sector peers. But which are the biggest challenges?

challenges public sector procurement

The procurement profession is increasingly becoming a core component of an organisation’s innovation and process-driven strategies to reduce costs, increase efficiencies and make advancements. As a result, procurement managers are feeling the pressure to remain agile and at the forefront of change.

When it comes to the public sector, however, there are numerous and unique roadblocks to successfully implementing these strategies, systems and processes into existing operations.

Procurement managers in the public sector often have a specific framework within which they are required to work. Generally these framework have an increased focus on probity, and lack the traditional supply chain model.

However, public sector procurement departments are responsible for some of the highest levels of spend in any given economy. In most countries, state and federal departments and agencies are responsible for purchasing for public services, including healthcare, infrastructure, and education.

In recent years, the spend by public sector agencies in both the UK and Australia has been measured as over 40 per cent of national GDP. With scrutiny over how money is spent, and any inefficiencies open to public criticism, public sector procurement professionals face a tricky balancing act.

As such, the public sector can both be a source of great knowledge and best practices for those in industry. Yet, they also face their own particular set of challenges.

Key Challenges for Procurement

In July, GovProcure launched a survey aimed at finding out, directly from government procurement managers, what their biggest challenges are for 2016 and beyond.

After analysing the results, the 5 main challenges have been identified so far as:

  1. Realising true benefits from data and analytics in the procurement division
  2. Ensuring the benefits of embedding sustainable procurement practices are fully realised
  3. Balancing outsourcing with maintaining high quality internal capacity
  4. Getting the most out of suppliers
  5. Developing strategies to engage effectively with Indigenous suppliers

Do you have any challenges to add? There’s still time for you to get involved and have your say in the survey. You can complete the survey here.

The final results will be shared with the audience at the GovProcure 2016 conference later this year. The event will host a panel discussion specifically designed to address the challenges identified in the survey. The session will also give procurement managers tangible ideas for improvement in the areas that matter to them most.

Let’s stop just talking about the challenges we face, and work together to overcome them.

The GovProcure 2016 conference in Sydney brings together public sector procurement managers from all levels of government each year to focus on in on opportunities to improve, collaborate and ultimately deliver more value to their organisations.

To find out more, download a GovProcure brochure here.

Rising Oil Price Shows Green Shoots of Commodity Recovery

As oil prices hit their highest level for 15 months, there is hope that this signals a recovery for other commodity prices too.

green shoots recovery

On Wednesday last week, global oil prices reached their highest levels for 15 months. The US Energy Information Administration reported that domestic crude oil supplies had dropped by 5.2 million barrels in the week ending October the 14th.

The oil price was further spurred on by an announcement from Saudi Arabia regarding future oil production. The announcement confirmed that non-OPEC producers have shown willingness to join efforts to limit global crude output.

The reduction of the ‘glut’ in oil supplies helped to buoy global markets, and sparked discussion on the recovery of other commodities. So is a reduction in supply going to lead to a global commodity recovery? Or is it too premature to say?

Green Shoots of Recovery

Talk of the recovery was lead by the Chief Executive of the world’s largest mining company, BHP Billiton. In the company’s first quarter production report, Andrew Mackenzie, stated that, “Fundamentals suggest both oil and gas markets will improve over the next 12 to 18 months.”

This viewed echoed earlier positive quotes from another resource giant, Rio Tinto, regarding the oil and gas markets. Increasing demand from China is anticipated to drive commodity prices up from the last quarter this year, and through 2017.

Also benefitting from production decreases from China itself are commodities such as iron ore, whose price has risen 35 per cent this year. Metallurgical coal prices have tripled in the same period for the same reason. Prices of zinc too are at their highest level since the middle of the year, as production is decreased.

The recovery comes after five consecutive years of falling prices, mainly due to falling demand from China. At one point during last week the commodity market stood on the edge of being a “bull” market for the first time since 2011.

The strength of positivity behind the commodity market also lead to better performance for US markets. This is welcome news for many companies after a particularly volatile year.

Rises Expected to Continue

The recovery doesn’t appear to be a short-term thing either. The price of a barrel of oil is expected to rise to around $55 during 2016. Beyond that, it’s estimated that the price will continue to rise, reaching $70 during 2017.

Rising prices are good news for other industries which have struggled in 2016. Maritime shipping has seen an overall loss of around $5 billion this year, with Hanjin being a high-profile example of the industry’s woes.

However, if rising prices are combined with increasing volumes, the shipping and transportation industries could see a recovery too. As more shippers move forward with scrapping large numbers of ships, it’s hoped that an increase in demand could help drive more profits next year.

However, there is also the feeling that the only way that the maritime industry will fully get back on its feet is through M&A. There have been large moves in this area this year, but not enough to combat the prolonged over-capacity seen in the industry.

Consumer Goods Could Suffer

However, the rising prices aren’t good news for everyone. As we saw in last week’s news, as commodities and raw material prices rise, so does the cost of manufacturing goods. Unilever’s proposed price rises that were rejected by retailers came partly as a result of this.

Palm oil, crude oil, and aluminium are all contributing to rising costs for consumer goods. Allied with fluctuating consumer demand, even at a time of year where sales would be expected to be high, it means difficult times ahead for manufacturers.

And although the likes of Unilever, P&G, and Reckitt Benckiser have seen increased revenues recently, this has been attributed more to increasing prices, rather than an improvement in demand.

As ever, what is good news for one group, inevitably turns out to be worse news for others.

Do you think oil prices are a sign of economic recovery? Or could prices going too high actually lead to decreasing spend as goods become more expensive? Let us know below.

While we tracked the rising price of our seasonal shopping, we were on the lookout for the week’s big headlines…

Another South Korean Shipper Facing Bankruptcy

  • STX Offshore & Shipbuilding Co., South Korea’s fourth largest shipbuilder, has applied for bankruptcy protection in the USA.
  • The move is designed to stop creditors seizing US-based assets while the company searches for a buyer.
  • One creditor is New York-listed Teekay Tankers Ltd., who won a $32 million arbitration award last year for non-delivery of four oil tankers.
  • Although STX has received billions of dollars to keep it afloat, the issues in the industry have hindered any recovery.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal

How does the NHS Spend its Money?

  • Ever wondered how the NHS spends its money? Think there’s a lot of waste?
  • The BBC has launched a series of articles aimed at answering the public’s questions about the NHS.
  • Though spending is being cut across the service, it remains the most cost-effective health system in the world.
  • However, this counter-balanced by outcomes being at lower levels to other countries who actively spend more on healthcare.

Read more and Get Involved on the BBC

Facebook launches “Workplace”

  • Facebook has launched a business collaboration tool, said to be ad-free and not connected to users’ regular Facebook accounts.
  • Businesses can sign up as an organisation for a small fee per user that drops as more users sign on.
  • The tool offers group chat, video calls, live video and a news feed, with relevance algorithms just like regular Facebook.
  • Though many collaboration platforms already exist, Facebook is hoping to build on the familiarity of their public platform for user experience.

Read more at Facebook

Strike Puts Jim Beam Distilleries Under Pressure

  • Over 200 workers at Jim Beam distilleries in Clermont and Boston are striking over staffing shortages and long hours
  • The shortages come as the distilleries struggle to keep up with growing bourbon demand.
  • Bourbon is a $3 billion industry in Kentucky, providing an estimated 15,400 jobs and providing 95 per cent of the world’s bourbon supply.
  • Negotiations are expected to resume this week between striking workers and Beam Suntory, owner of the Jim Beam brand.

Read more at the Chicago Tribune

European Business Abandoning Manual P2P Processing

New research has revealed a move by European business towards a completely digital P2P environment.

automatic p2p european business

Canon, world leader in imaging solutions, recently announced that just 3 per cent of Western European businesses believe that manual P2P processing will continue into the future.

The finding originates from The Future of Purchase to Pay (P2P) 2016, a Canon trends report compiled by ICM Unlimited. The report asked finance and procurement leaders how they believe the world of P2P would to evolve over the next few years.

The study, conducted by ICM Unlimited, and developed in conjunction with Purchasing Insight, is the result of 706 online interviews with business influencers and decision makers spanning 12 European markets.

The respondents were sourced from board level directors within corporate finance and procurement functions, and from businesses of varying sizes.

Spend Under Management?

Most businesses report that they have yet to fully control spend using Purchase Orders (PO), while half say they have less than 50 per cent of their spend under control. Despite this, however, there is almost universal agreement that the P2P process will be automated in the future. Over half of the European companies have already begun that journey.

The report found that while there are concerns around cost and productivity, businesses seem motivated to explore how P2P technology can help. Half of finance decision makers (50 per cent) feel their department productivity is below average, while 42 per cent of procurement leaders feel their department is operating below the desired level of productivity.

However, the trend towards automation in finance sees no sign of slowing down. 23 per cent of European decision makers are saying that their businesses will achieve full digital transformation for P2P in the next two years.

It seems businesses view manual processing of P2P as wholly or partly to blame for the situation. This is shown by 10 per cent of businesses in Europe saying they have already achieved full digital transformation of P2P.

Increasing European Collaboration

Rachel Griffiths, Business Process Consultant, Canon UK, comments: “In this challenging market, European businesses clearly feel that they need to get a better grip on P2P. They want to be able to access and pay for goods and services in the most cost effective and efficient way possible.

“Efficiency and productivity are key elements to any successful business. And technology is seen as the best platform through which to improve in these areas. In order to boost these factors through technology, businesses will need the support of trusted partners.

“At Canon, our expertise at providing cutting-edge technology not only solves business challenges, but supports the delivery of superior results in any business function, including P2P,” Griffiths said.

This view was echoed by Pete Loughlin, Managing Director at P2P consultancy firm, Purchasing Insight.

“The selection of a partner for P2P is very important and European businesses want to collaborate directly with solution vendors for this challenge.

There is a remarkably strong sentiment towards working with a single vendor across the entire P2P spectrum, rather than cherry picking point solutions. This ability to work with a single partner is what will provide end-to-end P2P solutions and services, under several delivery models. This will be crucial to the successful transformation into a P2P excellence organisation.”

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #19 – Challenging Traditional Recruitment

One procurement recruiter says the onus is on them to change traditional recruitment practice to uncover new talent.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Time to Change Traditional Recruitment

Lee Gudgeon, Client Engagement Director at REED Global, says that the increasing role of procurement has highlighted a shortage of candidates with the right skill sets available to come into the profession.

Lee argues that procurement recruiters also need to up-skill to drive new practices. This will allow them to recognise relevant skills and capabilities required in procurement, in other functions, and open up the market to people that might otherwise have been overlooked.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

Change Your Career Thinking

Did you enjoy Lee’s Big Idea? Are you thinking about a change in career? Then take a look at the Procurious Career Boot Camp.

Our Career Coaches are challenging procurement professionals to make a positive change to their careers. You can hear all our podcasts, and read all our great content by enlisting here.

Catch up on topics from becoming a CPO, and taking your conscience to work, to increasing your cultural intelligence in procurement, and many more.

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 17,500 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Setting KPIs for Beginners: Types of KPI

We know the why in the role of KPIs in Supplier Relationship Management. But we also need to be able to identify which type of KPI will bring the best results.

KPI for beginners

Catch up with the first part of this introductory overview of the role and relevance of KPIs to support Supplier Relationship Management (SRM).

So now we have established the role of the KPI in the SRM process, we need to think about the type of KPI we’ll use. Much of the decision making around this will be based on what procurement is measuring with the KPIs.

Remember – procurement should discuss KPIs with other stakeholders and, where possible, involve suppliers too. This engagement could make the difference between success and failure.

Types of KPI

Here’s an overview of the three different types of KPIs:

  1. Quantitative – these are measurable, numeric and objective, like rating on a scale of 1 to 10. An example of a quantitative KPI would be the number of late deliveries per quarter.
  1. Qualitative – these KPIs are more subjective. An example could be how responsive the supplier is to a request – let’s say you have a special order that needs to be delivered to an unusual location. It’s a one-off request, but if the supplier makes the delivery it would save you significant costs in transport and you know they make deliveries to that location for other customers. Is the supplier reluctant to change the delivery location, and is there a fee involved? Is the fee reasonable?
  1. Cultural – are the KPIs aligned with your organisational values? Let’s say your organisation has a drive to always buy locally-made products. You want KPIs to capture whether your suppliers are buying locally as well.

Remember, there’s no one-size-fits-all set of KPIs. Whether you are working on direct or indirect categories, manufacturing or distribution, you need to match the KPIs to the supplier.

For your Toolkit: KPI Checklist

This checklist is a quick summary to confirm if your KPI will stand up to scrutiny.

  • Is it measurable? If it’s not measurable, than what good is it? How will you know if your supplier is meeting the required standards?
  • Is it meaningful? Do you or anyone else in the organisation care about it – if not, why collect it?
  • Is it actionable by the supplier? There’s no use measuring a data point and feeding that information back to the supplier if the supplier is unable to act on or improve the situation. If it’s not within their sphere of influence, they probably won’t accept the KPI to begin with.

Keep the KPIs simple, easy to understand and easy to measure. Ensure they support your overall business strategy and objectives by aligning them to your customer requirements.

Experience shows it’s better to capture a few vital measures that can be tracked consistently and repeatedly. This is much more effective than measuring randomly and or inconsistently.

Institutionalising the measurement process and regularly reinforcing it with suppliers and stakeholders will provide a common ground and common language, support a collaborative environment and make it easier for everyone to understand, participate and achieve.

Finally, you want to reinforce the value of the data collection to support improved business performance – that is, now that you’ve collected the information, make sure you tell the right story.

Contract Level KPI Reports

The dashboard (or scorecard) summarises your KPIs and measures them against a particular supplier.  This tool can be used internally to review a supplier’s past or current performance. It’s also important to share this information with the supplier so they are aware of the data and can act upon it.

KPI status reports should be delivered in a timely manner to enable you to address stakeholder concerns quickly and responsively. The reports need to include all the relevant information your stakeholders require – this includes the good and the bad.

You don’t want the senior management finding out bad news from the inter-office grapevine or worse, the media. This is your chance to deliver important details relevant to the success of the business. It’s your news and you want the kudos that go along with identifying and sharing it first.

You also want to define a clear escalation process to address issues and problems as they arise. For example, in a supplier review meeting you may realise the supplier’s data doesn’t match yours.

The supplier is reluctant to change their process based on your data, when their own data says everything is okay. You need an agreed escalation point to review and resolve this disagreement.

Finally, you want KPIs that will deliver predictive measures, not just historical. This allows you to stay one step ahead by being in a position to identify and act upon issues before they become serious.  Predictive measures will also help you to identify targets for the supplier to meet and beat over the course of the contract.

All of this information fits into the reporting documentation to demonstrate how and why you’re spending your organisation’s money. The highlights of this report can be summarised in the dashboard and presented to senior management.

Stay tuned for the third and final article in this series, which explores systems used to capture KPI data, typical data points for measuring KPIs, and multi-supplier performance dashboards.

What the Numbers Say – Behind the Scenes at Career Boot Camp

Numbers don’t lie! Over 6,500 procurement professionals took our Career Boot Camp challenge. Were you one of them?

cbc by numbers

As the dust settles on one of Procurious’ biggest events this year, we’re taking a look at what the numbers say about what our Boot Campers were most interested in.

Which topics were the most popular over the course or Career Boot Camp? Which of our podcast presenters had the biggest audience? What were the podcasts and articles most shared on Twitter?

Membership Boom

First up, the great news for all Procurious members is that our online community has grown bigger and stronger than ever.

Just over 870 new users signing up over the course of Career Boot Camp. That’s 870 more procurement and supply chain professionals for you to share knowledge with and add to your ever-growing professional networks.

On top of this, a staggering 6,500+ visitors listened to at least one of our free podcasts, while nearly 20,000 people read one of the great article that were published during the campaign.

It was great to see so many of you engaging with the podcasts and the content. If we’ve all taken just one lesson from Career Boot Camp, then we can start getting our careers on the right track!

Most Viewed Podcasts

We shared 15 podcasts, coming from a range of fantastic Career Coaches. If you missed out on hearing any of these, you can now catch up with them in the Procurious Learning area.

But which of the 15 podcasts were the most listened to?

  1. Give Your Career a Cardio Boost” – Founder at Procurious, Tania Seary
  2. Incubate Your Big Ideas on the Job” – VP Strategy and Market Development at Coupa, Gabe Perez
  3. Five Surefire Ways to Become a CPO” – CEO at ISM, Tom Derry
  4. Become a Global Player” – Cultural Diversity Expert, Dr Tom Verghese
  5. Take Your Conscience to Work – Finding Meaning in your Procurement Career” – Business and Enterprise Director at Social Enterprise UK, Charlie Wigglesworth

The interesting thing about this top five list is that it’s such a mixed bag of topics. We’ve gone from Tania Seary’s “Kick-Off” podcast that got Career Boot Camp off to such a great start, to topics on progressing in your organisation.

Not to mention the fact that two of our most popular podcasts came from Tom Derry and Gabe Perez, representatives of two of the profession’s important organisations (ISM and Coupa).

Looking further down the list, we see two topics that are front of mind for nearly all procurement professionals. Our increasingly global marketplace is putting demands on our cultural intelligence and diversity knowledge. Dr. Tom Verghese’s message really hit home with you all it seems.

Then we had the topic of social value and social enterprise, with Charlie Wigglesworth from Social Enterprise UK. All professionals, but in particular procurement’s Millennials, want to make a wider difference in their careers.

Working with social enterprises struck a chord with you, and allowed us to build on our learning on the topic from Big Ideas 2016.

Best Reads

As well as article from our Career Coaches, we also invited our influencers and community to share their thoughts. We received an overwhelming number of articles (thanks!), and they really helped spread the word about Career Boot Camp.

Amongst the content were some articles that seemed to inspire you all with the career message. Our Top 5 here were:

  1. Only 24 Hours in a Day – Manage Your Time Wisely (Procurious HQ)
  2. Does Your CV Pack a Punch for a Real Live Human? (Andy Wilkinson, The Chameleon Career Consultancy)
  3. Career Espresso – 5 Minutes a Day Fast-Track to Success (Tania Seary, Founder, Procurious)
  4. The Top 5 Ways to Stand Out In Procurement (Anna del Mar, Head of Learning & Development, Future Purchasing)
  5. How To Land Your Dream Job? You Gotta Work For It (Lucy Harding, Partner and Global Head of Practice at Odgers Berndtson)

The top five most read blog articles show that Procurious readers value practical, actionable career advice.

From tips on how to start on the path to landing a dream job, down to detailed advice on time management, the most popular articles delivered an array of best-practice career advice.

Social Media by Numbers

We also spread the good word on Career Boot Camp across our social media platforms. The articles were well shared and read across the board.

Within the articles, there were a few topics that got people coming to see what Boot Camp was all about. These were:

  1. Does Your CV Pack a Punch for a Real Live Human? (Andy Wilkinson, The Chameleon Career Consultancy)
  2. The Top 5 Ways to Stand Out In Procurement (Anna del Mar, Head of Learning & Development at Future Purchasing)
  3. Irresistible Procurement Candidate? Have a Finger in Every Pie (60 Second with Rhonda McSweeney, Group Manager of Procurement and Contract Management at CS Energy)

It again shows that people were interested in the really detailed tips and career advice. But at the same time, they were interested to hear what our CPOs and influencers had to say for their own career advice too.

#CareerBootCamp: What Twitter Had to Say

The Career Boot Camp hashtag was tweeted out more than 1,200 over the course of the campaign, and reaching a potential audience of just under 400,000 users.

Once again, the Procurious HQ team can’t thank all our followers and supporters enough for their help with this. Your help allowed us boost our numbers and reach a truly global audience.

Global Activity for #CareerBootCamp
Global Activity for #CareerBootCamp

It’s great to see such large numbers of procurement professionals taking an interest in their careers. We hope you got as much out of Career Boot Camp as we did, and that you’ve already started making changes for your procurement career.

Although Career Boot Camp is over, there’s no need to despair. You can still listen to all fifteen podcasts via Procurious for FREE here.

Love It or Hate It – The Importance of Supply Chain Stability

A disagreement relating to rising supply chain costs has highlighted the importance of supply chain stability.

marmite supply chain stability

Early on Thursday morning, the top news headlines weren’t about conflict or celebrity scandal, but the future of a famous British staple. Maligned and loved in equal measure, Marmite was the topic on everyone’s lips.

The sudden interest in the salty, yeast-based spread came about due to a very public spat between Tesco and Unilever over rising product costs.

According to reports, Unilever had requested that Tesco, and other UK retailers, raise the price of their products in store by 10 per cent. However, when Tesco refused to pass on this cost to customers, Unilever stopped supplying certain goods to the retailer.

Tesco responded to this by halting online sales of Unilever products. This sparked concerns of a prolonged shortage of goods on supermarket shelves.

However, by Thursday evening, the situation was resolved and the stand-off ended. It’s expected that Unilever goods will return to the Tesco website in the next few days.

It’s understood that Unilever gave some ground in negotiations, leading to an agreement between the companies. Asda has also publicly commented that it successfully negotiated with Unilever on the price increase.

Rising Supply Chain Costs

Unilever’s reason for the requested price increase was the continuing fall in the value of the pound. This has in turn led to higher import costs for goods into the UK.

While many of its products, including Marmite, are manufactured in the UK, Unilever imports products and raw materials from its base in the Netherlands.

Since the Brexit vote in June, the pound has fallen in value by over 17 per cent. As the pound dropped to its lowest level since June 23rd on Tuesday, it was reported that some airport Bureau du Change had been offering exchange rates of less than one Euro per pound.

Graeme Pitkethly, Unilever’s Chief Financial Officer, was quoted on Thursday morning as saying the price increases were part of “normal business“. But, while the price increases may be a normal part of business, experts have warned that this may just be the beginning.

As the UK’s exit from the EU comes closer, it’s expected that consumers will see rising prices for many products. As the UK imports more than 60 per cent of what it consumes, the FMCG industry will be one of the hardest hit.

Items such as bread, milk, bananas and wine are expected to increase as manufacturers and retailers stop being able to carry the increasing import costs. A rise of between 8 and 10 per cent is expected on clothing, while petrol will rise an estimated 4 or 5 pence per litre in the UK before the end of the month.

Importance of Stability

At a time when margins are being squeezed, the importance of supply chain stability is huge.

A survey published by the UK Food and Drink Federation (FDF) showed that 63 per cent of manufacturers are suffering from decreased profit margins. As well as this, 76 per cent a seeing higher ingredient costs too.

With 96 per cent of the UK’s food and drink businesses small or medium-sized, larger organisations need to be aware of the impacts of margins throughout their supply chains.

Some organisations will try to put increasing costs back on to manufacturers, without taking into account the long-term impacts. Any further supply chain disruption on top of what is happening already could potentially drive prices higher again.

While prices rises for consumers are probably inevitable, increasing supply chain efficiencies and demand forecasting can help to limit the damage.

Helen Dickinson, Chief Executive of the British Retailers Consortium, said: “Retailers are firmly on the side of consumers in negotiating with suppliers and improving efficiencies in the supply chain to control the inflationary pressure that is building through the devaluation of the pound.

“However, years of falling shop prices and higher costs have left limited scope for retailers to continue absorbing this pressure. Everyone in the supply chain will need to play their part in maintaining low prices for consumers.”

By building a greater understanding of the costs through the supply chain, retailers and manufacturers can try to overcome a lack of stability collaboratively.

Do you work in procurement in retail or FMCG? What are your experiences of the recent price rises? Let us know below.

Away from the worries of empty shelves, we’ve stocked up on the week’s big procurement and supply chain headlines.

GM in Court Over Price Bargains

  • A court in Massachusetts will heard a case last Friday, brought against GM by a now bankrupt supplier.
  • Clark-Cutler-McDermott, alleges GM knowingly led the company into a bad faith deal, and encouraged them to take on more debt.
  • GM have requested the case be dismissed, arguing CCM is trying to pass the blame for poor management.
  • The case will help to shed more light on the highly-criticised bargaining practices allegedly happening in GM’s supply chain.

Read more at Supply Chain Dive

Samsung Galaxy Note 7 US Recall Begins

  • Samsung have begun the process of recalling a further 1.9 million Galaxy Note 7 devices, bringing the total to nearly 3 million since the beginning of September.
  • A fault in the Note 7’s battery has led to it overheating, with users experiencing smoking, sparking, or on-fire devices.
  • The recall is expected to cost Samsung an estimated $2.3 billion.
  • The company has seen $21 billion wiped off its market value since Tuesday last week.

Read more at The Guardian

MPs Call for End to Antibiotic “Overuse”

  • A group of MPs has called for the curtailing of the “systematic overuse” of antibiotics in supermarket meat supply chains.
  • Conservative MP Zac Goldsmith tabled a motion calling on UK supermarkets to adopt policies prohibiting routine mass-medication of livestock because of the emergence of antibiotic resistant bugs.
  • The motion has so far received the support of 21 MPs from across the parties.
  • Goldsmith tabled the EDM after a report found resistant E. coli in supermarket pig and poultry meat.

Read more at Supply Management

Amazon Fined by FAA Again

  • The FAA has proposed a fine of $78,000 for Amazon for breaching regulations on shipping of hazardous materials.
  • It’s the online giant’s fourth fine in as many months, with more likely to come from the UK.
  • The latest fine relates to the shipment of an ethanol-based hair tonic, without the correct documentation for flammable goods.
  • The issues highlight the hurdles Amazon faces in scaling up its own logistics and transport operations.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal