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Tributes Continue To Pour In As Global Procurement Community Mourns David Noble

As procurement leaders from around the world send in their personal tributes to mark the sudden and untimely passing of CIPS CEO David Noble, the common theme is one of sadness and shock.

Through these moving tributes, a picture is beginning to emerge of the significant legacy that Mr. Noble has left behind for the profession.

Leave a tribute to David Noble on the Procurious discussion board.

In many ways, the world is divided into two hemispheres when it comes to the professional bodies representing procurement and supply management.

Whether you belong to CIPS or ISM, you can be confident that you’re a part of an organisation with an incredibly long history (85 years in CIPS’s case, over 100 years for ISM), with a network of hundreds of thousands of professional colleagues globally.

It seems fitting, then, that after the Group CEO of CIPS passed away suddenly late last week, the CEO of ISM was one of the first to reach out with a moving tribute for his peer:

I know my personal shock and grief is shared by the global procurement community upon learning of the passing of CIPS Group CEO David Noble. David was more than a trusted ally and colleague. David had a vision of the evolution of procurement that included putting procurement, through licensure, on a footing equal to other formally recognised professions. His moral vision and leadership was also instrumental in CIPS’ crucial role in the passing of the U.K.’s Modern Slavery Act in 2015. ISM extends its deep condolences to David’s wife, his family, and our esteemed colleagues at CIPS.  Tom Derry, CEO, ISM.

Since yesterday’s sad announcement from Tim Richardson, the CIPS Chair of Global Board of Trustees, Mr Noble’s passing has been reported across industry publications including Supply Management, Spend Matters and Procurious. Yesterday’s article on Procurious included early tributes from Sam Walsh, former Rio Tinto CEO and CIPS president; Procurious Founder Tania Seary; Santos CPO David Henchliffe; and Visna Lampasi, General Manager Group Procurement for Woolworths Ltd.

Tributes continue to pour in, led by Mark Lamb, CIPS General Manager for the Asia-Pacific region.

At CIPS, we are deeply saddened to lose our leader and colleague, David Noble. Indeed, it is not simply a loss to CIPS, but also to procurement globally. David was always passionate about the role that procurement plays and how it can change people’s lives for the better. His legacy will long be remembered: CIPS is now recognised as the global professional body for procurement with an impressive global footprint and is improving procurement around the world. He was particularly vocal about ethical procurement, eradicating bribery and corruption, and ensuring that supply chains are free from modern slavery. As I reported to David, I will particularly miss his leadership which has seen CIPS go from strength to strength around the world. Mark Lamb, General Manager CIPS Asia-Pacific.

It is very shocking and sad news for all of the CIPS family and procurement professionals around the globe. David Noble was the voice of the profession in many arenas, and his visionary leadership has led to the success of the institute, its members, and the profession globally. He will be greatly missed, and I do sincerely hope that he rests in peace departing so early in life, and that his family and loved ones find solace and patience at this difficult time of their lives. Sara Abdellatif Omer FCIPS, Member, CIPS Global Board of Trustees

Like many across the global procurement community, I was shocked to hear of David Noble’s passing. Today is a very sad day for our profession, but more importantly, for David’s family, friends and colleagues. David’s legacy will touch every corner of the world. He inspired and advocated for a generation of procurement professionals while his leadership of efforts to eradicate slavery across the supply chain impacts millions of workers without their own voice. Philip Ideson, Host and Producer, The Art of Procurement

I was shocked and saddened today to hear of the passing of David Noble. I have known David as a friend since he joined CIPS in 2009 and worked closely with him on the development of the Ethical Procurement Guide with Andrew Forrest and the Walk Free Foundation. David was instrumental in getting the UK Government to introduce the Modern Slavery Act 2015, and has been a true leader to the procurement profession over the past 8 years. My condolences go out to his family and friends, and his colleagues at CIPS. He will be sadly missed by the Institute. Kevin McCafferty FCIPS, Executive General Manager – Procurement, Broadspectrum 

During my tenure as the only CIPS Trustee representing countries outside of the UK, David was always supportive in bringing a global perspective to CIPS as he worked diligently towards a global goal. Whist David and I had our differences with regards the establishment of the global governance structure, we were always able to share a pint at the bar and have great discussions around the profession. He always had a keen interest in what was happening in the Australian market and how the profession was developing. When I last met David, he was his usual vibrant self, full of energy and looking at ways to continually grow the institute and profession. David’s loss will create a void that any successor would have significant challenges to fill. My condolences to David’s family. Stephen Rowe FCIPS, CPO, Spotless. 

“David was the reason I joined the CIPS Board. He was such a strong advocate for the profession and his visionary approach for CIPS was an inspiration. He believed that the procurement profession was significantly undervalued and with steerage it could drive significant changes in the world, whether that be in eradicating modern slavery or sustainable sourcing. He was a warm-hearted Northerner who was well respected and someone who I’d known for many years. He will be sadly missed. Alison Parker FCIPS, Member, CIPS Global Board of Trustees, MD, HSBC

I was shocked to hear that our leader David sadly passed away on Friday. I first met him in the UK many years ago, before he was CEO of CIPS, and very much admired him in his Procurement roles. He has worked relentlessly for CIPS over his seven years’ tenure to bring value to our profession. David will leave a large gap and I am saddened I will not get to see him in London at our Annual Congress Meeting, just weeks away. Hannah Bodilly FCIPS, Global Congress Member for Australasia, Head of Strategic Sourcing, Bank of Queensland

I first knew David when I was on the CIPS Council (as it then was) back in the noughties. David always had a clear view on where he felt the profession needed to go. He gave strong leadership and direction in globalising CIPS to be the recognised worldwide body that it is today. Whilst being a leader at CIPS he was also a champion for the profession as a whole – his promotion of key causes, such as the Anti-slavery remit being a notable one,  which has such global resonance right now. He raised the profile and importance of procurement across public and private sectors alike, as well as with the media. He also forged links with other Institutes and bodies worldwide. His passion for the profession was without doubt and under his direction CIPS was re-branded. Like the broader profession, CIPS has flourished and grown in importance and stature.
He will be greatly missed by all who knew him and he will be a tough act to follow. Barry Ward, Procurement Brand Manager, Global Business Services, IBM

David and I worked together at Novar (formerly Caradon) for over seven years, arguably during a “golden era” of professional procurement in that organisation. Like many others who worked with him and for him during that period, I have many fond memories of David. From his absolute and authentic passion for our profession (years prior to him achieving his ambition to be part of CIPS), his relentless desire to support the technical development of his team (achieving one of the first CIPS Excellence awards when they launched the program) and his love of football (which many bruised ankles can attest to). He was an authentic, committed leader and a true gentlemen. My heartfelt condolences to his family and the CIPS organisation who have lost a fantastic champion and a great bloke. Very glad to have known him if only for a far too short period of time.  Andrew Brightmore FCIPS, Executive Director at Compass Group Australia 

David was a true advocate for our profession. Through CIPS, he led the charge with the licensing and professionalisation of procurement. His focus was on all areas of ethical practice, culminating in the 2015 Anti-Slavery Act, which was supported by the Vatican. His pragmatic and honest approach delivered the real transparency required when you lead a professional body with ethics as a pillar. Creating growth in any industry is a challenge, so his achievements in growing a membership organisation should also be highlighted as another major accomplishment. I am, and always will be, a proud Fellow of CIPS and a colleague of David. He will be missed by all. Mike Blanchard FCIPS, Deputy Chief Executive – Operations, Tertiary Education Commission, New Zealand 

A legacy of thought-leadership

A valued contributor to the Procurious Blog, Mr Noble appeared at the Big Ideas Summit in 2015. His thought-leadership published on Procurious includes:

Leave a tribute to David Noble on the Procurious discussion board.

Global Procurement Profession Mourns Passing of CIPS CEO: David Noble

Tributes are pouring in from procurement professionals around the globe in response to today’s news that David Noble FCIPS, Group Chief Executive of The Chartered Institute of Purchasing & Supply (CIPS) and one of the profession’s strongest advocates, passed away late last week.

CIPS have announced that  David Noble has unexpectedly passed away on Friday after a short illness.

Mr Noble’s legacy to the procurement profession includes his adroit leadership of the world’s largest procurement and supply chain professional body and his championing of the Modern Slavery Act.

Sam Walsh, former Rio Tinto CEO and CIPS president, commented that:

David will be sorely missed. He managed and grew CIPS into a truly global and financially successful organisation focused on improving and obtaining recognition for the Profession.

His initiatives such as training, licensing of Procurement Professionals, establishment of standards for anti-corruption, anti-bribery and anti-modern slavery have led to CIPS being highly regarded by Governments, Employers and Members.

CIPS loses an accomplished leader

Mr Noble took on the role of CIPS Group CEO in June 2009 after the previous CEO, Simon Sperryn, departed after only one year at the helm. Despite being parachuted into a difficult role as an “emergency appointment”, Mr Noble rapidly stabilised and increased CIPS’ finances and oversaw the steady growth of the member base to over 100,000 professionals internationally.

Prior to his captaincy of CIPS, Mr Noble was Group Supply Director at IMI plc, a FTSE 250 UK multinational company specialising in advanced engineering technology, where he was responsible for a £1billion spend. Mr Noble was also known for his pioneering of Category Management and Strategic Sourcing at Motorola in the mid-1980s. Although the majority of his career was in manufacturing, Mr Noble’s experience of the public sector, the distribution industry and large scale turnkey power station projects served him well when he engaged with the leadership of these sectors in his role as CIPS Group CEO.

Mr Noble held an honours degree and was elected a fellow of CIPS in 1994, also serving on the fellowship selection panel, the CIPS management board, the Cabinet Office Government Procurement Reform Board and the London Olympics Supplier Arbitration Board.

A global advocate for procurement

According to Keith Bird, Managing Director at The Faculty Management Consultants, Mr Noble’s global vision for CIPS means that his passing will be felt around the world. “Personally, I will remember David for his vision and tenacity. Expanding the CIPS network globally is a remarkable legacy to leave behind.”

At the time of Mr Noble’s death, CIPS has over 115,000 members across 150 countries, with offices in Africa, the Asia-Pacific, UK, North Africa and the Middle East, with partnerships in China, Poland, Romania and Sweden.

Procurious Founder Tania Seary commented that Mr Noble’s advocacy for licensing the profession will be his greatest legacy:

I last met with David at the Institute of Company Directors in Pall Mall. He was so proud of CIPS’ membership growth and its increasing levels of online engagement. CIPS, like ISM, is an important backbone to our profession – through his advocacy, David has strengthened procurement’s posture.

Similarly, Santos CPO David Henchliffe remembers Mr Noble for the work he has done moving the profession forward in one of its key areas of growth, Australia:

I worked with David as the Chair of the CIPSA Professional Advisory Group for more than 5 years. He was a tireless advocate for advancing the profession and the Institute in Australasia and will be sadly missed. I would like to extend my condolences to his family and friends.

A modern-day abolitionist

Mr Noble was a giant figure in the crusade against modern slavery, inspired by a meeting with Andrew Forrest of the Walk Free Foundation in 2012. Since then, he aligned CIPs with the cause, partnering with Walk Free to educate the organisation’s 100,000+ members through the establishment of the Ethical and Sustainable Procurement Guide.

CIPS also provided guidance to the Home Office in the creation of the 2015 Modern Slavery Act, which led to Mr Noble journeying to Vatican City in 2015 to witness the historic signing by faith leaders of a joint declaration committed to the eradication of modern slavery by 2020. He also attended a meeting at the White House to discuss how CIPS can support the G20’s Anti-Corruption Implementation Plan.

An incredibly hard act to follow

It is believed that Mr Noble’s passing will create a significant leadership gap for CIPS, as he was personally driving many of the organisation’s key initiatives. Many of the partnerships and relationships formed at the highest level were linked to Mr Noble’s personality, and the confidence and trust he inspired in others. At present there is no clear successor for CEO within the executive team. There has been some movement recently among CIPS’ leadership, with a new Chief Operating Officer joining late last year, and the Head of Finance retiring soon.

Mr Noble’s role as advocate, spokesperson and thought-leader for the profession meant he was regularly called about to comment on the biggest issues affecting the profession, from slavery, to Brexit, to finance and the manufacturing landscape.

Visna Lampasi, General Manager Group Procurement for Woolworths Limited praised Mr Noble for his pioneering spirit:

David was a driving force.  He put his personal brand and energy behind licensing the profession, making the Modern Slavery Bill a reality and a creating a number of other firsts for CIPS.  He was a major contributor to procurement’s development and will be sadly missed.   It is a great loss, not just for the profession, but for his family and friends.

A legacy of thought-leadership

A valued contributor to the Procurious Blog, Mr Noble appeared at the Big Ideas Summit in 2015. His thought-leadership published on Procurious includes:

Hope For the Best And Plan For The Worst: Dr Linda Yueh Talks Trump and Trade

Dr Linda Yueh, a renowned economist, broadcaster and Adjunct Professor of Economics for London Business School, discusses how supply managers can react to the major shifts in globalisation, trade and protectionism under Trump.

pittawut/Shutterstock.com

Yueh spoke with Philip Ideson as part of Procurious Even Bigger Ideas, a 5-part podcast series sponsored by State of Flux. You can access the series exclusively on Procurious. 

As the world watches President Trump’s next move to discover which of his campaign promises he is likely to deliver on, Dr Linda Yueh hopes that the potential impacts on globalisation are being overexaggerated.

“It’s hard to see how any one country could turn back globalisation, because globalisation isn’t just about trade agreements. National borders have less meaning now than they did in the past. That being said, protectionist sentiment is certainly on the rise.”

Protectionism is costly to trade 

Donald Trump successfully tapped into the feeling that globalisation hasn’t benefited lower-income, lower-skilled people as much as those of higher income and higher skills.

“Can this be rectified? If we’re starting a new phase of globalisation, there could be a reluctance to proceed at the pace we’ve had over the past couple of decades. If globalisation is going to work, we all have a responsibility to ensure policies around trade are more equitable so it doesn’t impact on any particular group.”

According to Yueh, the increase in protectionist sentiment around the world is likely to impact the cost of doing global trade. “Business need to be wary around protectionist sentiment being translated into additional customs checks, higher tariffs on exports and imports, or taxes on where a company locates its production.

Practically, protectionism can lead to enormous supply chain disruption. Goods or farm products can get held up at the border – for fresh fruit such as tomatoes, a few days’ delay can be devastating. Protectionism would only lead to higher costs, and ultimately that’s bad for the consumer because the cost will affect them”.

What about China?

Withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership is consistent with President Trump’s focus on American jobs, American wages, and his Made in America campaign. “Trump made it clear that America First is the overriding economic principle,” says Yueh.

The TPP was going to link America with Pacific Rim countries and was part of the previous administration’s “Asia Pivot”, designed to increase their influence in Asia. The TPP didn’t include China so it was a way of asserting America’s role in the region. The big question is whether putting America first means withdrawing from international supply chains, leading to an economic impact that may not actually be so good for multi-national American companies.”

Yueh comments that there’s an indication from China that they may be willing to step into a stronger leadership position in the global economy as America withdraws.

“We’ve heard China’s views of globalisation from President Xi Jinping at the World Economic Forum in Davos. I’ve also heard from other Chinese policy-makers at various meetings around the world that China has always been reluctant to take a strong leadership position in the global economy. Their main focus has always been on domestic development.”

“If there’s a void, power will fill it. I think that’s essentially what we’re seeing. I would stress that the Chinese position is to support globalisation, because globalisation has helped its economy. It’s contributed to its remarkable growth, but they’re reluctant leaders – they’re not leaping into this space.”

In Yueh’s opinion, we’re unlikely to see a trade war despite Trump’s posturing on the topic. “I think there’s too much to lose for all counties. In reality, businesses will continue to sell to consumers all around the world. They produce overseas because that gives them a supply chain advantage. Political rhetoric won’t change this”.

How should supply managers react to uncertainty?

Yueh advises that procurement and supply management professionals should:

  • Plan ahead for supply chain and market access disruption
  • Follow closely the policies as they appear
  • Look ahead to how you would reorganise your supply chain and the location of where you would deliver your services, depending on the industry that you’re in.
  • Plan out scenarios that anticipate increases in cost and work out ways to grow the business taking into account potential disruptions.

“When we see big structural shifts in policy, it can take some time before we understand the impact on businesses. All you can do is to look at your strategy for the years ahead and be alert to policy changes, whether it’s around TPP, NAFTA or the timeline for Brexit, and plan scenarios accordingly. To quote a former British Prime Minister, “You hope for the best and plan for the worst.”

Procurious Even Bigger Ideas is a 5-part podcast series available exclusively to Big Ideas Digital Delegates. Sponsored by State of Flux, this series features interviews with five of the most intriguing power players at this year’s Big Ideas Summit in London.

Drones To Deliver Medicine, Not Missiles, To People In Disaster Areas

Autonomous flying drones will soon be drafted into disaster relief efforts to greatly improve the effectiveness of the world’s most challenging supply chains.

Lauren Elisabeth/Shutterstock.com

Establishing a supply chain in an area hit by disaster holds its own completely unique set of challenges. The speed at which the supply chain needs to be established, the unplanned nature of the event, critical safety concerns and the lack of stability in the area can all exacerbate the challenge.

Perhaps the greatest worry, though, is simply getting access to the people in need. That’s where technology can make a world of difference.

Solving the access problem

Flood events, earthquakes and other disasters can lead to an incredible amount of rubble and debris which needs to be shifted by bulldozer before aid workers can reach the people in need. It can take days before an effective path is cleared to enable trucks to begin bringing up the tonnes of supplies required to feed, house and treat those affected by disaster.

Problems with access by land are compounded when air and sea transport facilities are also damaged. We saw this in 2010, after a magnitude 7.0 earthquake (followed by over 50 aftershocks) devastated Haiti.

The disaster led to anywhere between 100,000 to 160,000 deaths and the collapse of 250,000 residential buildings. Other countries and international organisations dispatched humanitarian aid in the form of rescue teams, medical teams and engineers, but chaos at the airport caused by a damaged air traffic control tower led to some of these crucially important flights being turned away.

Helicopters would seem to be the obvious solution when planes cannot land and bulldozers haven’t yet done their work, but that’s where aid agencies come up against funding issues – even the largest of the international organisations simply can’t afford the fleet of helicopters that would be required to deliver effective immediate disaster relief on any scale.

How flying drones can save the day

Imagine an international aid agency ship mooring off the coast of a disaster-affected area, such as Peru or Japan, and acting as an aircraft carrier to deliver immediate relief to people in need. Instead of having jets or helicopters taking off from its flight deck, however, it is packed with small, autonomous robot drones.

The first drones to go out would be for the purpose of mapping and observation – they’d stay up at altitude and monitor the area, assess damage, and help direct the delivery efforts with real-time information. Soon, the sky between the ship and the disaster area would be thick with a swarm of buzzing drones; carrying food, water, clothing and medicine to victims and then flying back to the ship, resupplying, and taking off again.

A helicopter, of course, could carry human passengers and vastly more weight, but for the scale required to be effective, a fleet of autonomous drones is significantly less expensive than a fleet of helicopters. Drones are currently severely limited in the amount of weight they can carry, but capacity is expected to improve. At present they’re ideal for light-weight, high value items such as medicines or blood. They could also be used to fetch medical samples and bring them back to base for analysis. Other applications may include:

  • Deliveries into conflict zones where a helicopter may be shot down
  • Coordination of search and rescue activities from above
  • The provision of internet to disaster zones.

Problems to be solved

There are some challenges to be overcome before drones can go into action when the next disaster inevitably hits. For example, if drones are to work in conjunction with helicopters and other aircraft, air traffic safety must be a priority to avoid mid-air collisions.

There are also some extremely negative perceptions of drones in war-torn areas, such as Afghanistan and Iraq. There, drones are either regarded as spy-craft, or as dangerous, weaponised systems capable of delivering a missile to any point on the ground. A humanitarian aid drone would therefore be met with suspicion and fear by people in need.

Similarly, a report from the Swiss Foundation for Mine Action found that humanitarian aid workers are concerned that drones are “too distant from people and inhumane”. This raises an important point about the role of aid workers, who are not only there to assist people and deliver much-needed supplies, but provide human comfort; something that a faceless drone cannot do.

Drones will soon be a common sight in disaster zones, if only in an observational or mapping role at first. While drones are unlikely to completely replace helicopters and trucks, they can play an essential role in supporting and complementing other means of delivery, particularly when access by land has not yet been established. Supply chain managers working in humanitarian aid can look forward to incorporating drones into their means of delivering assistance and, ultimately, saving lives.

In other news this week 

A milestone week for Procurious

  • Procurious delivered its signature event, the Big Ideas Summit, in London on Thursday last week, with speaker highlights including Oxford University’s Linda Yueh, CAPS Research Managing Director Deb Stanton, Barclay’s Chairman John McFarlane and Futurist Mark Stevenson.
  • On the eve of the event, Procurious also announced that its community has grown to 20,000 supply management professionals worldwide.
  • Procurious has also launched its new Corporate Site, with the first major client being the UK-based Society of Procurement Officers (SOPO).

Read more via Yahoo Finance

UC Berkeley recycles 3D printers’ plastic waste

  • In response to a surge in plastic waste generated by over 100 3D printers on campus at UC Berkeley, PhD students have launched a 3D Printer Filament Reclamation Project.
  • The campus-wide system takes used 3D printer plastic, grinds it up, melts it down and produces a spool of recycled plastic that can be used again in the campus’s 3D printers.
  • The recycling system is expected to be replicated in businesses using 3D printers on an industrial scale to minimise, or even eliminate, waste products from the printing process.

Watch UC Berkeley’s video here

Toyota and General Motors hold top number of renewable energy patents in the US

  • Research company CB Insights has analysed over 50,000 US renewable energy patent grants between 2009 and 2017 to identify the number of patents, the top patent holders, and trends in renewable energy patents.
  • Over 26,000 U.S. patents related to renewable energy have been granted in the 8-year period to date, with the number peaking in 2014 at 4268. The top four areas are solar, wind, fuel cell and bio-energy.
  • LG has emerged as the top patent holder in solar, GE for wind, GM and Toyota for fuel cell patents, and Xyleco and Shell for bio-energy.

Read the full report here.

[Image credit: Pixar]

The Big Ideas Summit 2017: The After-Party

No one likes to reach the end of a great procurement  party. Luckily there’s still a whole lot more Big Ideas Summit content to come…

Join The Big Ideas Summit 2017 group to access all of yesterday’s discussions and exclusive video content.

Yesterday Procurious gathered 50 of procurement’s top thought leaders in London for the Big Ideas Summit 2017.

We heard from a number of  inspiring speakers, sparked exciting discussion and shared our Big Ideas for procurement in 2017. Conversation topics ranged from economics to futurism, from cognitive technology to  releasing creativity and everything in-between.

It was wonderful to see some familiar faces at this year’s event and lots of new ones too.

Big Ideas By Numbers

But the fun didn’t stop in London. Our digital delegates from all around the globe followed the day’s events via social media.

3,400 people visited Procurious to access Big Ideas content discussions and videos.

On twitter, the #BigIdeas2017 hashtag  was tweeted 1,850 times and had over 6.4 million impressions.

The Big Ideas Summit After-party

Don’t worry- The Big Ideas party isn’t over just yet!

Throughout the next week, we’ll be uploading all the video content into the learning section on Procurious. You’ll hear from each of our attendees on their Big Ideas  for procurement.

Whether it’s scaring yourself daily, paying your bills or turning statements into questions there’s a whole range of thought provoking advice to take on board.

Here’s a little taster of what’s to come:

If you’re feeling inspired by these videos, there’s still time for you to submit a Big Idea’s video. You’ll find a reminder of how to do so here.

Turning Statements Into Questions

Our first Big Ideas video comes from Creative Change Agent, James Bannerman. James wants procurement pros to start turning statements into questions in order to unleash their creative genius.  Check out the video to find out more.

You can hear more from James in our podcast series, Even Bigger Ideas. 

Even Bigger Ideas Podcast Series 

Want to hear more from some of our speakers? The final Even Bigger Ideas podcast was released today. Futurist Anders Sorman-Nilsson talks about how we can seamlessly transition between ordinary, analogue world to the extraordinary, digital world and who will thrive in this era of cyber disruption. You can listen to the Even Bigger Ideas Podcast Series here.

Want to catch up on all of yesterday’s Big Ideas Summit activity? Join the group here

You Appointed WHO As The New CPO?

Increasingly, companies are appointing CPOs from outside of the supply management profession. What does this tell us about C-level expectations of procurement, and why are supply management professionals missing out?

Want to follow all of the action today? Register as an online delegate for the London Big Ideas Summit 2017 here.

This is the moment you’ve been waiting for. Years of hard work and a brilliant career in supply management has brought you to within a hair’s breadth of fulfilling your dream – to become the Chief Procurement Officer of your company. Starting at the most junior level, you’ve worked your way up the ladder to your present position as second-in-charge of the procurement function. Your boss announced his retirement last week, and you’re quietly confident your turn has come – after all, there’s absolutely nothing about the organisation’s supply chain that you don’t know.

You step into the meeting room where the out-going CPO and two other executives are seated around a table. Disconcertingly, they stop talking when you walk in and look at you guiltily. Getting straight to the point, they tell you they’re excited to announce the new Chief Procurement Officer is … Jennifer from Marketing.

Is Procurement Being Usurped?

Has this happened in your organisation? There’s every chance that when it comes time to choose a new CPO, the C-Suite will appoint someone from a non-supply background. This means that a colleague of yours in a completely different department may one day swoop in to steal the job that you’ve been working towards for years.

While CEO-level expectations of the CPO continue to blur and broaden, the skill-set required to meet those expectations can now potentially be found in any department. The fact that supply managers are still reporting difficulty in educating their businesses on the value procurement can bring to an organisation doesn’t help the situation. If a CEO (wrongly) believes that a supply manager has spent his or her career focused solely on cost, then they are likely to look elsewhere for candidates for the top job.

Deb Stanton, Executive Director of Research and Benchmarking organisation CAPS Research and former Global CPO of MasterCard, has observed the trend of CPO appointments from outside of the profession. CEOs are no longer as interested in appointing CPOs who possess the traditional skill set that is earnt over years working in supply chain. A savvy marketing professional, or a cost-conscious operations manager who understands how supply management works, makes a very attractive candidate for CPO.

So, what does this mean?

  1. CEOs are looking for a different set of skills for the next CPO

The CPO of the future may have little idea how a tender is run, but they must:

  • Be business-savvy and understand the organisation as a whole
  • Know how procurement works from a customer’s perspective
  • Be completely aligned to overall business strategy (not just the supply management strategy)
  • Have a strong knowledge of the business’ finance function
  • Be focused on the core customer and external audiences
  • Embrace changing technology and external disruptive forces
  • Be an influencer and relationship management expert.

Deb referred to CAPS Research’s “Futures Study 2020”, which projects the skills required to manage a procurement function into the future.

  1. The CPO doesn’t necessarily need supply management expertise

The complex and varied skill-set picked up through a career in supply management may no longer be enough to satisfy the requirements for the job of CPO. CEOs may even regard procurement’s traditional audience of stakeholders, end-users and suppliers to be too focused.

That being said, technical procurement skills do matter, and are still vital for any procurement team’s success. In the example above, the disappointed candidate who missed out on the top job can still play a vital role in educating and supporting the outsider CPO with their supply management knowledge.

What’s the solution? If you believe the CPO role rightfully belongs to you, rather than someone from a completely different department, then make sure you broaden (rather than narrow) your focus as you move upwards in your organisation. This means familiarising yourself on a macro level with the whole business, bringing the core customer into every decision you make, and being known as an influencer who can clearly articulate the value you, and your function, brings to the business.

As Deb pointed out today, procurement professionals are in a unique position to overlook an entire business. They’ve got every chance of seeing where the opportunities are so let’s use it an not lose it!

Don’t forget to register as a digital delegate so you can keep up with the rest of today’s events.

Neurodiversity – Your Secret HR Weapon

People with Neurodiverse profiles have historically endured stigmatisation and struggled in the workplace. John Floyd explains why, and how, this is changing and what we can do to accommodate and embrace differences. 

Want to follow all of the action today? Register as an online delegate for the London Big Ideas Summit 2017 here.

We know the best performing teams are made up of a diverse group of people, whether that be gender, age, ethnicity or educational background. One of our Big Ideas Speakers, the Headmaster of Bruern Abbey, John Floyd, has just thrown “neurodiversity “ onto the list of must-have employee profiles, to help strengthen and enhance team output.

Recently rated by Tatler as one of the best Prep Schools in the UK, Bruern Abbey specialises in educating boys with dyslexia and dyspraxia. It is the only preparatory school of its kind in the UK and John Floyd is its outstanding headmaster.

John is a firm believer that learning difficulties, or learning differences, should not preclude academic success. In fact, after developing the right learning strategies at Bruern, many of the boys from go on to some of the best senior schools in the country.

Unfortunately, not everyone with dyslexia or dyspraxia is lucky enough to go to Bruern Abbey. Education systems around the world aren’t necessarily set up to accommodate those with neurodiverse profiles such as dyslexia, dyspraxia, ADHD and autism. Of course, this extends to the workplace as well.

It is estimated that:

  • 5-10 per cent of the population has dyslexia,
  • 5-10 per cent of the population has dyspraxia
  • 5-7 per cent of the population has ADHD
  • 1 per cent of the population has autism

People with neuro-diverse profiles (and there’s a lot of them!) learn differently, think differently and apply their skills in alternate ways. As John succinctly puts it, “The term neurodiversity means that someone has a brain a little bit different to the majority of people”

Turning their differences into a virtue is a great opportunity for any team leader.

Diversity wins out

Organisations are starting to realise that employing people with neurodiverse profiles and optimizing their approach to work is great for business.

A few examples include:

  • MI5’s sister service GCHQ (the Government Communications Headquarters) employs more than 300 employees with neuro-diverse profiles and are actively recruiting more.
  • Organisations such as Microsoft and EY are trialing programs to recruit individuals with neuro-diverse profiles such as Asperger’s.
  • Last May the Labour party in the UK decided to appoint a shadow minister for neurodiversity.

Employers recognise that employees with neurodiverse profiles might offer heightened analytical skills, lateral thinking and a more naturally investigatory mindset than their peers.

How do you manage neurodiverse team members?

Everyone in your team will have different strengths and weaknesses. The opportunity for you, as a leader, is to optimize every member of your team to allow them to reach their peak performance. The key is to determine who has which strengths and to tailor the opportunities and development to suit that individual.

If you’re expecting a prospective employee’s CV to land on your desk with a neurodiverse label plastered across it, think again!

As John pointed out today, “If you start to see some badly written emails from a team member, you’ll know you shouldn’t assign them to write the press releases. But there will be a whole host of things they can do for you, and probably do better than anyone else!”

John gave a few examples of areas in which those with neurodiverse profiles might particularly excel.

Get them to do the interviewing

Dyslexics often have highly developed and fine-tuned listening and oral skills. They are the most studied of all neurodiverse profiles.

Compensating for having potentially struggled with reading and writing throughout childhood, many of them develop excellent verbal and listening skills.They are likely to be a resilient bunch and great under time pressure. Dyslexics  have learnt how to work well under stress.  having been up against it ever since they were first asked to do school-work.

It could be worth relying upon them to conduct interviews with prospective employees. They might be the most socially engaging person on your team and the most capable at listening to, and evaluating, a candidate.

Let them solve the problems

Adults with dyslexia and Dyspraxia quite literally think differently and are good at cracking codes or seeing patterns in problems that those who read with ease would overlook. They’re also great at re-inventing, re-evaluating and thinking laterally.

Give them the time-sensitive or juggling tasks

A number of adults with forms of neurodiversity such as ADHD can deal with juggling a number of tasks at high speed. It’s what they do all day anyway. For most of us it would be exhausting!  They might come up with too many ideas and try to execute them too quickly but they’ll never run out of steam and they’ll be utterly committed.

John concluded his talk today by urging us not to hesitate in employing somebody with a neurodiverse profile. They’ll be grateful to be employed, they’ll be your most resilient team members and they’ll work diligently.

You can guarantee that they’ll be thinking differently about something long before you’ve even entertained the thought that there could even  be an alternate option.

Don’t forget to register as a digital delegate so you can keep up with the rest of today’s events.

Big Ideas Summit 2017: Access All Areas

The Big Ideas Summit 2017 is happening in London today. To give you a look at all the goings on throughout the day, we’ll be going live on Facebook with behind the scenes footage from all areas of the event.

Check back here regularly for new footage!

Procurious Founder, Tania Seary introduces The Big Ideas Summi…

Procurious CEO and Founder, Tania Seary introduces The Big Ideas Summit LIVE

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

 

Renowned Futurist Mark Stevenson tells us ‘what’s next’.

Mark Stevenson, Futurist at Big Ideas Summit 2017

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

 

Linda Yueh, Fellow at Oxford University and Adjunct Professor at LBS gives a Global Trade Outlook.

Linda Yueh, Economist on the Global Trade Outlook

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

 

Daniel Falkiner from Sibylline speaks about the top 10 global risks in 2017.

Dan Falkiner on the Top 10 Global Risks in 2017

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

 

Panel: Risky Business with Ramsay Chu, CPO, Rio Tinto & Michelle Baker, CPO, SAB Miller.

Our first panel of the day

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

 

Chris Cliffe filming his ‘Big Idea’.

Behind the scenes – Chris Cliffe from CJC

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

 

Barry Ward, Senior Procurement Brand Manager at IBM: The Giant Leap for Procurement.

Barry Ward from IBM talking Cognitive Procurement and Watson

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

 

Chris Sawchuk from The Hackett Group: Creating Agility in the Digital Age.

Chris Sawchuk from The Hackett Group

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

 

Paul Smith from YPO and SOPO talks us through how Procurious is helping SOPO reinvent the way public sector procurement professionals work and collaborate.

Paul Smith from SOPO talks to the audience

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

 

John Floyd, Headmaster of Bruern Abbey, highlights why, from dyslexia to ADHD, neuro diverse profiles are now helping your team think out of the box.

John Floyd, Headmaster at Bruern Abbey, talks to the audience about neuro diversity, and why neuro diverse profiles help your team think outside the box.

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

 

Paul Blake from GEP on Digital Procurement Transformation.

Paul Blake from GEP on Digital Procurement Transformation

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

 

John McFarlane, Chairman of Barclays Plc wraps up The Big Ideas Summit 2017 with the last keynote of the day.

Chairman of Barclays, John McFarlane giving the final keynote of The Big Ideas Summit 2017

Posted by Procurious on Thursday, February 23, 2017

The Big Ideas Summit 2017: We Have Lift Off

The Big Ideas Summit will take flight in just a few hours time.  Want to know what’s in store? Look no further…

Register as an online delegate for the London Big Ideas Summit 2017 here.

The big day is finally here! Procurious is all-set to spark vigorous discussions, light up social media across the globe and crowd-source ideas for the future of procurement.

We’ll be addressing everything from Procurement 4.0 to Cognitive Technology and Global Economics. We’d also still love for you to submit any questions for our speakers via the Big Ideas Summit group.

Here’s what’s coming up today!

Part One Pivot – Rethinking What’s Possible

 Be Brave Or Dead – Mark Stevenson, Futurist

Mark is an entrepreneur, author, broadcaster, musician and expert on global trends and innovation. Mark would describe his role as helping people and organisations to ask the right questions about the future.

Mark’s Big Idea

Be brave or be dead! Wherever you work and wherever you end up in the next 15-20 years, remember that it’s going to be a very turbulent time. Ask yourself: what’s my best effort for myself, my family and for society (and remember they’re all related). If you don’t, you can prepare to be very irrelevant and very unhappy!

Trumpism In the Supply Chain – Linda Yueh, Fellow at Oxford University & Adjunct Professor at London Business School

Uncertainty, uncertainty, uncertainty is how Linda explains 2017. At the moment, it’s over President Trump, European politics: elections and Brexit, and the slowdown in growth of China and other major economies. Thankfully Linda’s message to CPOs is one of caution but reassures that it’s not time to panic.

Linda’s Big Idea

Keep calm but be sure to keep an eye on what’s happening around the world as the globalisation landscape is shifting significantly. Global trade won’t end tomorrow but it is going to look rather different in the coming years.

Part Two Scrum – Procurement in the Digital Age

Watson: What’s The Big Idea – Barry Ward, Senior Procurement Brand Manager, IBM Global Procurement

Barry has drawn a parallel between the cognitive technology journey of Watson and the space programme and moon landing journeys of the last century. For IBM, developing and deploying Watson is something like the moonshot in the 1960s where IBM technology helped NASA make the lunar landings possible. 

Barry’s Big Idea

Cognitive technology is merely in its infancy in terms of where it can go. This journey will mostly likely take 50 years or more to be fully realised. Millennials have the chance to be there at the outset. They will see cognitive technology evolving and developing throughout their entire careers. But first we need to know how to get on them on board and enjoying the journey. 

Creating Agility In The Digital Age – Chris Sawchuk, Principal and Global Procurement Advisory Practice Leader at The Hackett Group

Chris has nearly 20 years of experience in supply management, working directly with Fortune 500 and mid-sized companies around the globe. He believes that agility is the defining trait of the procurement team of today and the future. He reminds us that many of the problems procurement will face in the coming years have not even been thought of yet!

Chris’ Big Idea

The future is an ‘Unknown Unknown’, but with a match fit, agile procurement team, at least you’ll be prepared for what comes next. 

Reinventing The Public Sector Wheel – Paul Smith, Executive Director YPO & Board Member SOPO 

Paul has been the driving force behind Procurious’ first private, “corporate” version of the platform, which launched in January 2017. SOPO are using social media to reinvent the way in which public sector procurement professionals work , network and collaborate.

Paul’s Big Idea:

Bring together local government via social media to collaborate and network

Part Three Reboot – Building Your Workforce

Unlocking The Creative Genius In Your Procurement Team
James Bannerman, Creative Change Agent. 

James Bannerman is author of non-Fiction best-seller Genius: Deceptively Simple Ways to Become Instantly Smarter. He believes the maxim that organisations must innovate or die has never been more true thanks to rapid technology developments and fierce competition. In procurement, CPOs need to foster their intrapreneurs and work to achieve what James calls a ‘return on inspiration’.

James’ Big Idea

Miraculous and fully-formed ideas won’t simply land at your feet. Procurement pros must attempt, what James calls, “deliberate creativity.”

Unlocking The Case For Neuro Diversity – John Floyd, Headmaster at Bruern Abbey

John wants to dispel the negative connotations that are so often associated with conditions such as dyslexia and ADHD. He explains that neuro-diverse profiles are actually a bonus for employers because of their different approaches to solving problems and finding answers. 

John’s Big Idea

One in every ten team members should be someone with a neuro-diverse profile.

Panel Interview – Graham Lucas, Managing Director at Michael Page

What are the best Procurement Teams already doing to set up for success? What are the trends in creating more innovative and engaging Procurement workplaces?

Graham believes that for procurement to survive in the digital age, it might not even be called procurement! Those who try to resist the coming changes, are more likely to be part of the redundancy.

Graham will be joined on the panel by Gautam Singh, The Smart Cube and Juliet Sotnick, Babcoc.

Digital Procurement Transformation – Paul Blake, Senior Manager, GEP 

Paul Blake leads the technology product marketing team at GEP. He’ll be addressing the topic of digital procurement transformation. Paul believes that if procurement continues to accept the technological status quo as some kind of given, it’ll continue to be fed the same poor diet. Procurement must start to challenge the hard-and-fast rules we’ve adopted for so long without question.

Paul’s Big Idea

There is no point continuing to do things as we have always done, just because that is the accepted status quo. Instead we should be embracing change and adapting to future possibilities.

Procurement Talent 4.0: Future Skillsets to Build Your Procurement Organisation – Deb Stanton, Executive MD, CAPS Research

Following conversations earlier in the day about what will evolve in the next 50 years, Deb will bring us back to the here and now. Procurement teams should be focused on ‘doing the do’ and getting the basics right whilst keeping their eyes on the horizon 

Deb’s Big Idea

“Be bold, but nice” is my favorite motto and advice that I give all supply chain professionals.  We need to be bold enough to challenge, ask the right questions, and bring new ideas forward; yet do it in a way that people still want to work with us.

Leadership, Tough Love and Long-Term Partnerships – John McFarlane, Chairman, Barclays PLC

With a background that includes being Chairman of Aviva and CEO of Australia & New Zealand Banking Group, leadership is an area in which John has become an expert. But guess what? He has also worked in procurement! In 1969 he joined Ford as a buyer!

John’s Big Idea

I would encourage longer-term partnerships with supply chains and encourage procurement to approach this with a win-win mentality. It’s win-win or no gain. Aim to be the customer of choice so suppliers approach you with best products.

Stay up to date with the day’s events and submit your questions for our speakers via our Big Ideas Summit Group. Follow us on Twitter via  @Procurious_  using the hashtag #bigideas2017

If I Could Turn Back Time: Advice To My Younger Procurement Self

Imagine if you could go back in time to when you started your first job. Wouldn’t you love to reassure yourself it was all going to be ok or offer some advice on how to navigate the next few years of your career? 

ashatan-f/Shutterstock.com

Procurious recently launched Bravo, a new group seeking to address gender disparity in the workplace, and celebrate and empower women working within procurement.

As part of the Bravo campaign, Procurious will be interviewing a number of high profile procurement leaders and seeking their advice on how we can help other women to get ahead in their procurement careers.

Michelle Baker is Global Procurement Director: IT and Business Services Categories at  SABMiller Procurement.

In this interview Michelle discusses the issues that affect women in the workplace, advice she would offer her younger self and why she loves procurement!

Michelle will also be attending this year’s Big Ideas Summit as a panelist to talk about Global Risk assessments.

What have been the most successful approaches organisations you know have taken to decrease gender disparity?

  1. Putting gender disparity on the leadership agenda of issues to address.
  2. Balanced slates in recruitment.
  3. Making gender disparity a talking topic across the whole company, irrespective of people’s gender.

What has been your most rewarding experience and greatest accomplishment to date?

Leading and developing people in diverse global teams (and not just gender diverse, but race, religion, age, sexual orientation  etc.) has been fantastically rewarding personally.

My greatest accomplishment in the workplace is  that I am still curious and excited about the work I do after so many years:  IT’s evolution has  meant I have to constantly hurry to keep up!

What issues currently affect you as a woman in procurement?

I don’t think diversity is an issue exclusively to procurement.

But, looking back, I think the absence of positive role models in senior roles made it more difficult to navigate corporate politics than it needed to be.

Who are the most influential women in your life?

Too many to mention!  I have a healthy group of friends and family that go back to my early days at university in South Africa and many others scattered across the countries in which I’ve lived.  They each offer their own special support, whether they know it or not,  in my development.

Why is procurement the perfect career for you?

It keeps me endlessly curious and allows me to have direct contact with what a range of senior stakeholders in my company are doing and trying to achieve.

If you could offer your younger self two pieces of advice, what would they be?

Find a mentor, and never stop learning.

Some of the Procurious team joined Michelle at a Women in Procurement Breakfast last year at ProcureCon IT.

Following an  insightful discussion,  everyone said  the two pieces of advice that they would offer their younger selves.

Michelle put together this fantastic infographic to represent the group’s responses.

Let us know the two pieces of advice you’d  like to offer your younger self via the Bravo group. 

Join the  Big Ideas 2017 conversation and register as a digital delegate