All posts by Procurious HQ

Cloud, Not Laughter, The Best Procurement Medicine

A spoonful of Cloud makes the medicine go down. Healthcare patients in England could benefit from a move to Cloud eSourcing.

laughter medicine

This article was written by Daniel Ball, Director at Wax Digital.

Healthcare organisations are under constant scrutiny to deliver high quality care to patients. In England, it’s The Care Quality Commission which regulates all health and social care services to ensure fundamental standards of quality and safety are met.

The findings of its reviews are published to the general public. This puts organisations not coming up to scratch at risk of suffering from a negative public reputation.

Improving Quality of Care

However, help is at hand from The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership (HQIP). The organisation works with healthcare organisations to identify areas where quality of care can be improved.

The HQIP is an independent organisation responsible for managing clinical audit contracts on behalf of NHS England. It was launched to promote quality in healthcare, and, in particular, to increase the impact that clinical audits can have on healthcare quality improvement.

Commissioning and managing clinical audits means having to source a range high quality external experts to carry them out. To do this, HQIP recognised that best practice procurement tendering processes were needed to to run an audit.

HQIP saw the value in moving to an eSourcing platform so that it could speed up the procurement process. It knew that if it was able to source experts quicker and do away with paper-based, manual tender processes, it could save itself valuable time and resources.

Moving to the Cloud

HQIP decided to go with Wax Digital’s cloud based web3 eSourcing. This allows the organisation to publish tenders electronically and make use of existing templates. It also enables suppliers to submit responses online.

The system also offers a mix of automated and manual scoring facilitates, with subsequent contract awards also taken care of electronically via web3.

Its project management function also allows HQIP to plan its eSourcing activities so that all relevant information is stored in one central place, which can be easily accessed by system users.

Judith Hughes, interim Head of Procurement at HQIP said: “As we’d aimed for, Wax Digital web3 has greatly improved our processes. Moving away from paper-based tendering has significantly reduced the time it takes to review and award teams for projects.

“It has also helped further ensure our quality guidelines are upheld and we now have a much more efficient way of engaging with our suppliers and them with us.”

An increasing number of healthcare organisations can benefit from the speed and efficiencies offer by cloud-based software. Innovation starts within the supply chain. By rolling out eSourcing technology, HQIP enjoys a more efficient supply chain for audit management. This in turn can aid healthcare organisations meet required care standards, and improve the quality of service for patients.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #15 – Thinking the Unthinkable

Modern leaders, in the C-suite and in Government, aren’t equipped to deal with unthinkable events due to a lack of skills, or sense of denial.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Managing Unthinkable Events

Nik Gowing, visiting professor at King’s College, London, says that we are seeing a very human sensation of feeling “overwhelmed”. This is happening to executive level leaders in both the public and corporate sectors.

Building on his ‘Thinking the Unthinkable’ study, Nik argues that leaders aren’t equipped to deal with ‘unthinkable’ events, either through a lack of appropriate skills, or through denial, or wilful blindness.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 16,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Fools Rush In – Take the Time To Be Cautious

Being cautious doesn’t mean you’re not ambitious. It’s not always a good idea to throw caution to the procurement wind.

be cautious

Miguel Caulliez, Chief Procurement Officer at Nokia, explains why it doesn’t always pay to make spur-of-the-moment, opportunistic decisions as far as your career is concerned. We should be cautious and take the time to assess what is right.

Miguel, who has worked for Nokia since 2010, values innovation and diversity in the talent he employs and lauds the benefits of having solid career mentors.

1. What were your first 3 jobs?

  • Financial Analyst at Auchan
  • Category Manager at GE
  • E-Business Leader at GE

2. What’s one thing you know now, that you wish you’d known at the start of your career?

I think it’s important to try to not be too opportunistic. Take the time to be cautious when choosing which industry you want to work in. Changing function is a challenge, but changing industry could be an even bigger, and unwelcome, challenge.

3. What key skills are critical for procurement in the next 5 years?

Procurement pros need to be curious and have a willingness to disrupt. They should also fully understand what innovation means and be able to work innovatively.

4. How valuable have mentors been in your career? 

Mentors have been essential throughout my career. I could not and would not have achieved what I have done without, particularly two of, my mentors.

5. What does it take to work at Nokia? What are you looking for when you hire talent?

 Opportunities are unlimited at Nokia, so I am always looking for talent who can find their own way and work independently.

I see it as my responsibility to give a framework to my teams, but I very much appreciate the diversity in opinions, backgrounds and methods.

The Procurious Career Boot Camp will increase your stamina, get you in the best career shape of your life and help you to punch above your weight.

It’s not too late to sign up. Enlist here and get access to our 15 free podcasts from some of the best career coaches around. Don’t miss out – your career will thank you for it!

All Hard Work and No Networking Equals Incomplete Career

All the hard work in the world won’t compensate for a lack of networking skills. It’s your network that’s going to take you to the top.

hard-work

Johanne Rossi, CPO at Caltex, and The Faculty’s ‘CPO of the Year’ for 2016, asserts the importance of procurement professionals honing their networking skills as a career-boosting priority.

She also discusses her approach to motivating and retaining employees, lists the key skills procurement professionals require and explains why the perception of procurement as an “un-sexy” profession is responsible for the talent gap.

1. What were your first 3 jobs?

  • Management Consultant with Accenture in France, UK and the USA
  • Head of eSourcing with CPGmarket (consortium between Nestle, Danone and SAP)  in Germany and Switzerland
  • Supply Chain Lead with Nestle in Australia and South Africa

2. What’s one thing you know now, that you wish you’d known at the start of your career?

One thing? There are so many things I wish I knew about myself, about others and about the corporate world. The ride would have been so much smoother and quicker!

One thing that really stands out for me is the realisation that working very hard is only going to get you so far. Networking and influencing is the true currency for career success.

3. How can CPOs attract and retain millennials?

Millennials or not, my main focus is people. Most of the people I work with are millennials anyway!

I try to work with the following ideals in mind:

  • Inspire people to come to work and have fun.
  • Care about people: listen to who they are and let them focus on what they love, are good at or have an interest in.
  • Embrace and share with employees the fact that I am vulnerable and a bit crazy.
  • Share with my employees my vision, which has to be ambitious, aligned to the corporate vision and make them proud to be part of the team.
  • Recognise accomplishments and praise people in front of others.
  • Develop people and keep them excited.
  • Don’t tolerate poor performance.
  • Don’t treat everyone equally, encourage and recognise the top performers.
  • Focus on people and relationships, not process and rules.

4. Does the procurement talent gap exist? Or is it just a perception problem?

The gap may lie in the fact that Procurement is not yet viewed as the sexy profession it actually is, and as such the most talented people are not coming to us in spades.

Having said that, things are changing. More and more incredibly well-rounded and brilliant people are joining the Procurement ranks. This is super exciting to watch!

Procurement is an amazing way to solve business issues, get leadership visibility and learn new skills while making a difference to organisations.

5. What’s more important for your hires – attitude or aptitude?

Definitely mindset. We need people with a growth mindset, who “embrace challenges, persist in the face of setbacks, see effort as the path to mastery, learn from criticism and find lessons and inspiration in the success of others”[1].

6. What key skills are critical for procurement in the next 5 years?

I feel procurement professionals need to be well-rounded with the following competencies:

  • Influencing and communicating well.
  • Facilitating and working cross-functionally.
  • Seeking results and being accountable.
  • Building relationships.
  • Solving problems and thinking strategically.
  • Managing total value chain costs, being analytical and understanding risks.
  • Being humble, innovative and ethical.
  • Being agile and handling complexity and ambiguity.

[1] Source: Taken from Carol Dweck, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success

The Procurious Career Boot Camp will increase your stamina, get you in the best career shape of your life and help you to punch above your weight.

It’s not too late to sign up. Enlist here and get access to our 15 free podcasts from some of the best career coaches around. Don’t miss out – your career will thank you for it!

Feel the Burn! Introducing Week 2’s Career Coaches

Repeat after me: I Can Do This. You don’t fail Career Boot Camp, until you quit. And these career coaches won’t let you.

career coaches

Career Boot Camp got off to a flying start last week. Our 17,000 Procurious athletes were pumping iron every day thanks to some top tips from our week one career coaches.

It’s understandable if your muscles are starting to ache now, but stick with us until the end of the boot camp programme to reap the benefits of a strengthened and honed career plan.

Don’t Abandon Your Regime Now!

Euan Granger, Procurious’ Community and Content Manager, is confident that the Procurious boot-campers will stay committed, even as we approach the half way mark.

“People abandon their exercise regimes for many reasons. However, stereotypically it comes down to lack of time, lack of enjoyment and lack of motivation. We’ve crafted a programme that is succinct, snappy and easy to access for those who are short on time and, crucially, maintained a communal, interactive environment for those taking part.

“Procurious members can learn and share ideas or responses to our podcasts with 17,000+ others. It’s the perfect way to keep motivation and positivity at a high.”

It certainly helps that our Week Two career coaches are no less qualified. Coming up are podcasts from the Chief Executive of a B2B marketplace with over fifteen million listed items, and a widely-published, and very recognisable, speaker and procurement author.

The podcasts will, again, cover a range of diverse topics including networking, online presence, personal branding and Big Ideas.

DAY SIX – Monday 26th September

gabe-perez‘Incubate Your Big Idea on the Job’ – Gabe Perez, VP, Strategy & Market Development, Coupa Software

Biggest Boot Camp Achievement: Holder of the World Record for number of Procurement-Push-Ups in one hour

Your biggest and best ideas can not only improve your organisation, they can catapult you into more impactful roles. Gabe Perez draws on his experience in sales, implementation and solutions consulting, to develop go-to market strategies across Coupa’s solutions portfolio.

Whilst with Coupa, Gabe has held a number of diverse roles including project managing and running the pre-sales team globally.

In his podcast, Gabe will discuss how to incubate your big ideas, why so many ideas don’t get executed correctly, or at all, and how to ensure that yours does. 

DAY SEVEN – Tuesday 27th September

stuart-brocklehurst‘Coach of the Year: Become the Manager Every Team Wants’ – Stuart Brocklehurst, Chief Executive, Applegate Marketplace

Tips for Staying Motivated in Week 2: Believe in yourself. Acknowledge the achievements you have made so far. Don’t compare yourself to others. This is YOUR boot camp journey.

 Who are the best managers? Is it the ones who win popularity contests? Or the straight-shooting, confident leaders with a “magic formula” for bringing out the best in their people?

Stuart Brocklehurst shares the skills it takes to stand out as a successful leader, while also earning the respect, and trust of your team.

Based on his widely diverse career so far, Stuart will also be offering some top management tips, including why it’s important to say no, how to articulate your vision, and gaining the trust of your employees. 

DAY EIGHT – Wednesday 28th September

tania-seary‘Use the Force: Network Your Way to the Top’ – Tania Seary, Founder, Procurious – the world’s first online procurement network

Choice of Work-Out Snack: Hard-boiled-eggs and spinach

You never know when effective networking is going to enhance your career, your personal life, or unearth a key connection that could add millions of dollars in value to you or your company.

With her passion for all things supply management, Tania is changing the way procurement professionals learn, advance and exert their influence.

In her podcast, Tania will discuss creating relationships, how to network authentically, and how to balance social and formal networking.

DAY NINE – Thursday 29th September

jason-scheer-a‘How to Make Yourself More Valuable Online’ – Jay Scheer, Senior Digital Marketing Manager at THOMASNET.com

Mentor Muscle Mass: 99%

If we’ve learned anything in this digital age, it’s that establishing a strong, social presence is critical to getting ahead in your career.

Jay’s role at THOMASNET.com, the go-to resource for supplier discovery in North America, includes overseeing content creation, website optimisation and social media. As such, he is a font of knowledge as far as the value of online presence is concerned.

Jay will discuss what procurement professionals can do to improve their presence online. This includes dispelling the notion that personal and professional accounts should be separated, and how to showcase your individuality.

DAY TEN – Friday 30th September

sigi-osagie‘Unleash Your Procurement Mojo’ – Sigi Osagie, Leadership Advisor, Mentor & Author

Favourite motivational Song: Eye of the Tiger

How do you harness the mojo you were born with to reach your fullest potential in procurement? Sigi Osagie arrived in the UK as a penniless immigrant. before forging a successful corporate career. He draws on his personal experiences to inspire readers and audiences through his writing and speaking.

Sigi’s thought leadership has been featured in several publications including Supply Management, Engineering and Technology and Lean Management Journal.

His podcast will address how to invest your most critical resources in your career development, how to build and manage your persona brand and why the importance of believing in yourself should not be underrated.

Find Career Boot Camp a little too fast-paced last week? You can catch up on any missed podcasts here.

The Procurious Boot Camp will increase your stamina, get you in the best career shape of your life and help you to punch above your weight.

It’s not too late to sign up. Enlist here and get access to our 15 free podcasts from some of the best career coaches around. Don’t miss out – your career will thank you for it!

Knowledge is Power – And The Path To Success

Knowledge is power and the path to proactive procurement. If you don’t have the facts and knowledge, you can’t make the right decisions.

knowledge-is-power

Laura Faulkner, Head of Supply Chain Services at RBS, explains how understanding stakeholder needs can help procurement be much more proactive. Having the knowledge of all stakeholders and the strategies of your organisation with regards to customers, products and innovation.

She also touches upon the benefits of mentoring, why the basics of good procurement shouldn’t be forgotten and the significance of curiosity as a key skill for procurement professionals.

1. What were your first 3 jobs?

My first job was at Polaroid as a Materials Buyer for their Film Division which I started as soon as I finished university. I  worked closely with the Planning department and the Production Lines.

I joined GSK two years later as a Facilities Buyer initially focusing upon Soft Services and then the Fit Out and Servicing of the new HQ GSK House.

Following that, I joined Ernst & Young to work on the development of their new HQ at London Bridge. This was all before I grew my career at RBS from 2002 to where it is today.

2. What’s one thing you know now, that you wish you’d known at the start of your career?

When I set out I believed that as long as you understood the needs of the stakeholders you worked with, then you could deliver the right supply chain solution. I soon discovered that this approach is too reactive.

It’s also important to know as much as possible about the organisation you work for, including its strategies for customers, products and innovation. 

It’s only possible to truly and proactively add the most value and deliver a supply chain that ensures long term success once you have the knowledge of what is driving the general business. We need to help our organisations join up the dots across all areas.

3. How can CPOs attract and retain millennials?

CPOs need to be flexible and offer as broad an experience of the profession and the organisation as they can. It shouldn’t be seen as a failure if, after a time in Procurement, a graduate decides to take up an opportunity in another area of the business.

Instead, look at this as Procurement being a bedrock of talent development and an exporter of young talent. And always offer a return ticket!

4. What key skills are critical for procurement in the next 5 years?

Having curiosity and an inquisitive mind are key. Procurement professional can keep learning about their organisation, supplier capabilities or technological trends. This will help to offer insight and add true value to your business.

As ever, understanding your Stakeholders is the key to success. Take the time to map out key relationships and assess current status, including what’s needed to make them the best they can be.

Finally, we need to focus on getting the basics right, from contractual rigour to KPI compliance. Push the boundaries of what we can offer through SRM and technology innovation, but don’t forget the basics of good procurement.

5. How valuable have mentors been in your career?

Mentors have been, and continue to be, absolutely key in my career. I have valuable people I reach out to inside and outside my current organisation, and I am always keen to consult with these people before any big decision.

6. What are you looking for in high potential recruits for RBS?

Curiosity, intellect and enthusiasm. What more could you ask for?! 

The Procurious Career Boot Camp will increase your stamina, get you in the best career shape of your life and help you to punch above your weight.

It’s not too late to sign up. Enlist here and get access to our 15 free podcasts from some of the best career coaches around. Don’t miss out – your career will thank you for it!

Supply Chain Review Pressure Following Chicken Scare

Public confidence in supermarkets and their supply chains has taken another hit, following a scare about contaminated chicken.

chicken

A recent report has found that one in four chicken samples bought from major supermarket chains contain antibiotic-resistant E.coli. The findings are again putting pressure on supermarkets to tighten their supply chain quality assurance processes.

While supermarkets have worked hard to improve supply chain traceability, this report shows there is much work to be done. It also serves to highlight a wider issue in the food supply chain – the use of antibiotics.

There is on-going criticism about the overuse of antibiotics by humans, but use of the drugs on livestock is contributing to increased resistance to antibiotics by so-called “super-bugs”.

Issues Raised in Chicken Testing

The study of chicken samples was carried out by the University of Cambridge. It revealed that from 92 chicken pieces, including whole chicken, thigh pieces, drumsticks and diced breast meat, 22 pieces contained potentially deadly bacteria.

The “superbug” strain of E.coli was found in chicken samples from all leading UK supermarkets, including Tesco, Waitrose, Aldi and Morrisons. Similar strains were found in supermarket pork samples tested in the same study.

The findings raise concerns about the quality of factory farming in the UK, as well as the end-to-end supply chains of the big retailers.

Dr. Mark Holmes, part of the research team that conducted the study, suggested that more resources needed to be put into assessment of antibiotic resistance in animals in the supply chain.

“These results highlight the need for improvements in antibiotic stewardship in veterinary medicine,” Holmes said. “The levels of resistant E.coli that we have found are worrying. Every time someone falls ill, instead of just getting a food poisoning bug they might also be getting a bug that is antibiotic resistant.”

Supply Chain Quality Assurance

Quality control software experts InfinityQS suggest that, while the supermarkets themselves might argue that their quality assurances are sound, the findings suggest this is not the case.

“It’s clear that a disconnect exists across these supermarkets’ supply chains. It’s likely they’ll have stringent procedures in place for their own food traceability, but it’s imperative these are adhered to amongst their suppliers.”

The company suggested that closer relationships with both suppliers and farmers was necessary. This could mean a more pro-active approach to site visits to where they source food from, and understand how they could help farmers to make improvements.

“An effective supply chain process will ensure that controls are in place to manage the necessary people, activities, resources and data throughout the supply chain.

“If done correctly, that product will be delivered with the correct documents, with an agreed quantity, adhering to a set quality standard and all sent at the right time to the right place.”

Antibiotic Overuse Creating Resistance 

The report also serves to highlight the wider issue of overuse of antibiotics in humans and animals. As well as depleting global supplies of antibiotics, systematic overuse is creating resistant strains of potentially deadly bacteria, including E.coli.

It’s predicted that, by 2050, one person will die every 3 seconds around the world from antibiotic resistant bacteria. Globally, 70 per cent of bacteria have now developed antibiotic resistance, including to traditionally ‘last line of defence’ treatment.

It’s estimated that around 40 per cent of antibiotic use in the UK is for animals in the food supply chain. The drugs are frequently given to large groups of completely healthy animals, with the intention of stopping the spread of infections. Mass medication accounts for an estimated 90 per cent of all animal antibiotic use in the UK.

Intensive farming practices, and keeping large groups of animals in close quarters, is to blame for such practices. In such crowded conditions, even one unhealthy animal can have devastating consequences.

However, as farming practices change, and retailers aim to ensure higher animal welfares standards, this issue may be lessened. Retailers have also been urged to pay a higher price for meat such as chicken and pork. This would relieve productivity pressures on farmers, and reduce intensive farming too.

Will this change your dietary habits? How can procurement get more involved in changing the underlying issues? Let us know in the comments below.

careerbootcamp-logo-final

Career Boot Camp Reminder!

The Procurious Career Boot Camp kicks off in earnest this morning with the release of our first podcast! Today, as well as every day for the next 15 work days, we’ll be releasing a podcast at 9:30am (BST).

You can access everything you need to enlist for Career Boot Camp here. If you have any questions, read this, or get in touch.

We’ve been on the look out for all the top stories in procurement and supply chain this week. And here they are…

Bailout Rejection Makes Hanjin Liquidation Likely

  • The chances of a bailout for stricken shipping company Hanjin look unlikely, increasing the possibility of liquidation.
  • The bailout was needed to help the company combat $5.4 billion debts, and allow it to unload cargo at ports.
  • However, with decisions still to be made, the South Korean Government criticised the company for “economic irresponsibility”.
  • The company is conducting sales fund the release of $14 million worth of stock currently stuck on its cargo ships.

Read more at Supply Chain Dive

Sewing Robots to Join Garment Workforce

  • A company called Sewbo has developed a robot that can sew, and intends to replace humans in the garment manufacturing process.
  • The machine uses stiffened, pre-cut garment pieces and feeds them into a sewing machine, before dropping the completed garment into hot water to remove the non-toxic stiffener.
  • Automated clothing production provides a potential solution to labour abuses and sweat-shop conditions in the developing world.
  • However, large-scale automation would also put millions of people in the garment industry out of work.

Read more and watch the video at Engadget

Study Says Petrol Must Be Phased Out by 2035

  • According to a Climate Action Tracker report, the last petrol powered car will have to be sold by 2035 to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius.
  • A ceiling of 1.5 degrees was the most stringent goal set by world leaders at the Paris summit last December.
  • Current projections suggest that electric vehicles will make up only 5 per cent of the world’s car fleets by 2030
  • This means aggressive measures will be required to shift rapidly away from fossil-fuel powered vehicles much earlier than expected.

Read more at Fortune

“Poor Procurement” To Blame For Detention Centre Cost Blowout

  • Australia’s scandal-ridden offshore detention centres for asylum seekers have come under intense scrutiny once again.
  • An audit of the centres revealed “serious and persistent deficiencies” in the relevant department’s management of the contracts.
  • It identified failures in the open tender process for security, cleaning, catering and welfare services, with costs blowing out from a $351 million contract in 2012, to a current $2.2 billion contract.
  • The report also criticised the original open tender process, and negotiations that took place with suppliers in 2012.

Read more at The Guardian

Are Employees the Weak Link in Company Cyber Security?

Are your employees leaving the door open for cyber attacks? Here’s how to help them reduce the cyber security threat.

employees weak link

Employees are a significant risk to their employer’s cyber security according to research by specialist global executive search and interim management company Norrie Johnston Recruitment (NJR).

The research forms part of NJR’s cyber security report, ‘How real is the threat and how can you reduce your risk‘. The report shows that:

  • 23 per cent of employees use the same password for different work applications.
  • 17 per cent write down their passwords.
  • 16 per cent work while connected to public Wi-Fi networks.
  • 15 per cent access social media sites on their work PCs.

Such bad habits and a lack of awareness about security mean that employees are inadvertently leaving companies’ cyber doors wide open to attack.

This research is supported by a report which incorporates the advice from fifteen experts in the field. In it, Benny Czarny, Founder of OPSWAT, discusses the top tips to avoid massive data breaches.

With Sony recently setting aside $15M to investigate the reasons for, and remediate the damage caused by, last year’s data breach, many of our customers—from large enterprises to small business—are wondering what they need to do to make sure they aren’t the next big data breach headline.

The good news is that most data breaches can be prevented by taking a common sense approach, coupled with some key IT security adjustments.

1. Employees’ security training is an absolute necessity. 

I cannot emphasise this point enough, as your network is only as safe as your most gullible employee. Even the most sophisticated security systems can be compromised by human error. The Sony breach started with phishing attacks.

And people still also use USB devices from unknown sources, which is allegedly how the Stuxnet worm was delivered.

2. Access to executable files should be limited to those who need them to complete their duties. 

Many threats are borne via self-extracting files. Therefore, limiting the number of employees who are allowed to receive this file type limits your exposure.

Your IT department absolutely needs the ability to work with executable files. Bob in accounting? Not so much!

3. MS Office documents and PDFs are common attack vectors. 

Vulnerabilities are identified in MS Office and Adobe Reader on a regular basis. While patches are typically released very quickly, if the patches are not applied in a timely fashion the vulnerability can still be exploited.

As an everyday precaution, document sanitisation is recommended to remove embedded threats in documents.

4. Data workflow audits are essential. 

Data can enter your organisation through many different points – email, FTP, external memory device, etc. Identifying your organisation’s entry points and taking steps to secure them is a critical step in avoiding data breaches.

At a minimum, scanning incoming and outgoing email attachments for viruses and threats, and implementing a secure file transfer solution, should be considered.

5. Store sensitive data in separate locations. 

Simple data segregation could have mitigated the impact of the Sony breach. The hack exposed both internal communications and unreleased video files.

Had the videos and emails been stored on two separate systems some of the damages may have been prevented.

6. Internal and external penetration tests are critical. 

Internal testing is a valuable tool, but hiring an outside party to attempt to breach your network will identify security holes your team may have missed.

7. Keep your security architecture confidential. 

You may be excited about your innovative networking solution or new cloud-based storage system, but think twice about making any of that information public!

8. Remember that traffic generated internally to your security system may still be suspect. 

For example, the Sony malware connected to an internal security system to impersonate legitimate traffic to disguise its malicious nature.

9. Multilayer defence is needed. 

I like to describe defence in depth by comparing it to the defence systems you might see at a castle. It could be defended by a large stone wall, followed by a deep moat, followed by a draw-bridge, followed by an iron gate, etc.

A single layer of defence is not sufficient for your data. It must be protected by multiple systems working in parallel. That way if one layer is breached your data is not exposed.

10. Finding your weakest security link is your top priority. 

Every office has one, and it will vary wildly from organisation to organisation. It might be the employee with their passwords taped to their monitor. It might be the deprecated Linux server everyone seems to have forgotten about.

You might not be looking for those weak links, but rest assured that cyber attackers are. The question is: Who will find them first?”

To read more useful and practical insights into topics including how to assess the scale of your risk level and managing the immediate aftermath of a security breach, download the full report.


Looking for an introduction to Cybercrime? Check out this article from Cloudwards. 

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #14 – Procurement Must Evolve

Procurement must evolve if it’s going to survive. It needs to leave its comfort zone and showcase real value for the organisation.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Evolve to Survive

Dapo Ajayi, CPO at AstraZeneca, believes that procurement as a profession must evolve in order to remain relevant.

Dapo argues that procurement needs to stop being process-based, and leaders must develop new skills in order to deal with ambiguity, and enable evolution into a profession that can work with the business to enable value.

Catch up with all the delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

Want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016? And maybe what we have planned for 2017? You can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today. Get connected with over 17,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Irresistible Procurement Candidate? Have A Finger In Every Pie

Why cross-divisional experience will make you an irresistible procurement candidate.

irresistible procurement candidate

Rhonda McSweeney, Group Manager of Procurement and Contract Management at CS Energy,  tells us why cross-divisional experience and team diversity are so important in the procurement function by drawing on her twenty years of corporate experience.

Considering her background in medical science, Rhonda explains how she has grown to value the transferable skills she learnt in the early stages of her career before moving into procurement roles and how this has influenced how she recruits and builds teams.

1. What were your first 3 jobs?

I didn’t work in procurement at the beginning of my career and, in fact, started out as a medical scientist.

I later took on the position as a regional manager for a global diagnostic firm before progressing, within that firm, to national sales and marketing manager.

My third position was at The Global Travel Group where I was a business leader in acquisition and integration.

2. What’s one thing you know now, that you wish you’d known at the start of your career?

I have learnt that medical science, and science generally, as an undergraduate degree wasn’t irrelevant to the GM Commercial roles I’ve filled in the latter half of my career.

The ability to think analytically, understand concepts, and also to understand problems and carry out root cause analysis, is very applicable in a business environment and not unique or exclusive to a career in science! 

3. How can CPOs attract and retain millennials?

Millennials need help from CPOs to understand how procurement can provide a very unique and privileged view of a business.  Procurement offers insight into to all aspects of a business; from operations and business services, to manufacturing and sales, to marketing, and beyond.

Gaining this insight helps to create a very well rounded business individual. I like to promote it as “free business learning”, being able to have insight into the other divisional areas that you wouldn’t necessarily be subjected to otherwise.  I think this is a great fit in the era of millennials who are typically on the “fast-track”. 

4. Does the procurement talent gap exist? Or is it just a perception problem?

Depending on your procurement mindset, it could be a combination of the two. I like to attract a diverse team in which there are cross-divisional backgrounds, for example, engineering, operations, or sales to name a few, while also ensuring a mix of individuals with strong commercial, contract, and/or supply chain backgrounds.

I have always tried to achieve this mix and have found that I can up-skill, and cross-skill, when necessary. I look for strong behavioural attributes on all accounts  to trump any technical learnings with the firm belief that these can be taught.  Having an enquiring mind, grasping concepts, working successfully across boundaries and establishing relationships and strong communication cannot be taught!

5. What’s more important for a candidate – attitude or aptitude?

It is important to have a mix of both. If I had to have a bias, I would sway slightly towards attitude. The ability to ask the right questions, and acknowledge that you do not have all the answers,  can resolve any aptitude gaps.

6. What key skills are critical for procurement in the next 5 years?

Cross-divisional experience is fundamental in procurement. It is so beneficial for employees to complete rotations within a business, therefore experiencing as many aspects as possible.

This will produce a well-rounded, commercial individual, who will create a compelling candidate for the procurement industry. This experience, balanced with the right behavioural attributes, will be essential going forward.