All posts by Procurious HQ

Easter Procurement – How Do They Make Yours?

They have been a staple in the Easter diet for many children (and adults too!) for decades. But just how does Cadbury make the Creme Eggs we enjoy so much?


The humble Cadbury’s Creme Egg has been an Easter staple since its launch nearly half a century ago. Global sales of the eggs are over 500 million per year, with the UK alone accounting for approximately 200 million per year (that’s around 3 each per year in the UK), with the majority of these manufactured in Birmingham, UK.

The Creme Egg brand has a value in itself of £55 million, which certainly isn’t bad for a confectionery item that’s only available between January and Easter each year.

Like them or loathe them, Easter just wouldn’t be the same without the instantly recognisable purple, red and yellow packaging (or green, blue, red and yellow if you happen to live in the USA). It’s no small feat to produce the volume of eggs to satisfy global demand, at such a specific time of year to take full advantage of the condensed sales period.

Before we delve into the supply chain and production process, some facts about this famous egg…

All Gone a Bit Egg Shaped – Fun Facts!

In fact, all Cadbury-manufactured chocolate is banned in the USA, Creme Eggs amongst them. The Hershey Company has the rights to manufacture all Cadbury chocolate in the USA and the move was to limit competition with imported items.

This is down to the recipes being altered slightly to adjust to different tastes, as well as to account for some ingredients that are banned in certain countries.

More on this below, but let’s just say that it did not go well…

Not only are the Eggs themselves shrinking thanks to ‘shrinkflation’, but in 2015 the multipacks dropped from six to five eggs. But that probably helps with the next fact…

  • They are really unhealthy (but you knew that and it doesn’t really matter anyway).

Each egg contains around the same volume of sugar as two bowls of really sugary cereal. And at around 6 teaspoons of sugar, it’s what the American Heart Association considers to be a full day’s worth of sugar.

Raw Materials

The Creme Egg that we buy and eat today has been in production since its introduction in 1963. It’s recipe has been the same since this time, using the same key ingredients. There was a brief period in 2015 when Mondelez, who currently own Cadbury, and Kraft, their parent company, changed the recipe. This involved changing the use of Cadbury’s Dairy Milk chocolate for the egg’s shell to a cheaper, cocoa-based shell.

And much like the ill-fated New Coke recipe, the outcry was much the same. After much protest the recipe was changed back, but not before the organisation had seen a loss in sales estimated at £6 million in 2015. FYI, for those of you outside the UK, don’t get a Brit started on what their feelings are on Cadbury’s chocolate in general since the firm was taken over by Schweppes and then Mondelez!

The key ingredients we’re looking at here are, of course, cocoa and, in Cadbury’s own words, “a glass and a half of milk in each bar”. The majority of the milk in the UK, over 50%, is supplied by dairy farm co-operative, Selkley Vale farmers, from Wiltshire and Gloucestershire.

The cocoa is a bit more complicated and, in the past, a lot more controversial. As with most chocolate manufacturers, Cadbury sources its chocolate from countries with high volumes of cocoa production – Ghana, Cote d’Ivoire, Indonesia, the Dominican Republic, India and Brazil. Previously fully affiliated with Fairtrade, Cadbury drew criticism  of practices and its supply chain when it dropped this in 2016 in favour of a new scheme, Cocoa Life.

The scheme, which is, as of 2019 working in close partnership with Fairtrade, aims to use over $400 million to aid 200,000 cocoa farmers worldwide. Not only will this mean that more Cadbury chocolate is made from sustainably sourced cocoa, but farmers will still have benefits in line with Fairtrade goals, such as improved income, competitive pricing and tailored investment suited to their needs.

Cadbury has been able to leverage its supply chain well in recent years to provide a solid and stable foundation for its production in the UK, Canada and the USA. How do they go from that to the magic end product?

The Production

Ever wondered how Cadbury manages to get the very unhealthy, yet absolutely delicious, fondant filling into Creme Eggs? Had discussions over whether it’s an injection mould for the outer shells and then the fillings? Then wonder no more!

It’s actually quite simple really. The two halves of the shell are made separately and then filled with the fondant to create that ‘fresh egg’ look inside. The halves are then shut in a book mould to create the final product, that is then wrapped for sale. If you want to see everything in action, there’s a great video on YouTube (and below…) from Bloomberg on the full UK production process.

Probably the most bizzare thing in the whole production process, apart from the fact that there’s someone working for Cadbury whose job title is ‘Easter Shift Manager’, is that all of this happens in winter. Supply chains are year-round anyway, but production processes need to be done in such a way that the hundreds of millions of eggs are ready for shipping for the 1st of January.

There you have it – a brief history of, and the not-so-secrets behind manufacturing one of the pillars of Easter. Now, I don’t know about you, but we’re off to the shops for a few Creme Eggs before they disappear for another year…!

Leading Under Fire Is Leading With Heart

Leading with empathy in the face of adversity


When the Prime Minister of New Zealand declares the tooth fairy and Easter bunny as an essential service, it brings warmth to the otherwise repeated drudgery of Government press conferences. It brings a smile to those facing the grind of lockdown and isolation – even if only for a moment.

“You’ll be pleased to know that we do consider both the Tooth Fairy and the Easter Bunny to be essential workers, but as you can imagine at this time, of course, they are going to be potentially quite busy at home with their family as well with their own bunnies.” Jacinda Ardern 6.04.2020

You can watch a short clip from the press conference here

Credit: Radio New Zealand

The way was paved long ago

Leading with warmth and heart is not a style of leadership that is learned and it does not appear overnight, you cannot pretend or try to switch it on. What was called an “Ardern effect” during her election campaign is now proven to be a signature style.  

What she was once criticised for now defines her. Ardern has an undeniable charismatic ability to relate to people. This is what cements her as a leader, when things get tough and when really crappy things happen to us, she is there to be our strength when we can’t hold ourselves.

Her response to the mosque attacks showed the world who New Zealand is. I was at a mosque in Wellington when she arrived unannounced to express her condolences. While the spontaneous songs that erupted through the crowd were captured by the media, what was not captured is what I saw. I saw her slowly approach the building taking time to look at all of the chalk drawings on the footpath that local children had made. She then took the time to embrace a Muslim woman who audibly gasped in shock that she was there right in front of her and so close – this is the same woman who stood at the gate handing out tissues to us well-wishers and providing us support while we tried to process the incomprehensible act.

While the Imans’ and Muslim leaders were being strong for us, Ardern became their strength. The strength she provided was through human connection and a hug. Warmth and heart. The cameras weren’t there and that’s what really counts. Her values are inherent to her as a person, she does not switch them on and off.

COVID-19 Ardern style

When the COVID-19 viral filled cloud looked to be approaching our shores and spreading, Arden was met with a barrage of criticism from the opposing side. Their volleys were able to land while she held off pushing us further up the alert levels, knowing that level 3 and 4 would begin to impact the economy.

As soon as NZ showed a potential case of community transmission she acted. “Go hard and go early” was her slogan and it seemed to work. We closed the border and went into lockdown.

Next, the nay-sayers said we didn’t have enough test kits and that we weren’t doing enough testing. This was only a lag due to supply issues. As of yesterday, NZ has the highest testing rates per capita in the world.

Leading with empathy in the face of adversity is perhaps the toughest gig of all. But it didn’t take long for the measures to start to make an impact and NZ was soon revered worldwide as a leader in this situation.

We aren’t just flattening the curve, we’re smashing it.

How does she do it?

She stays cool, calm and collected but she never switches off her heart. She acts when required but won’t be bullied or pressured into pulling the trigger too soon. She has a few trusted advisers and what must be an epic home base to support her.

We can all take lessons from her style and not step into a persona at work. Be yourself 100% of the time and lead with compassion. Ardern provides the perfect template of an authentic leader in action.

This article is solely the work of the author. Any views expressed in it are those of the author and do not necessarily represent or reflect the official policy of the New Zealand government or of any government agency.

Want to keep up with the latest coronavirus and supply chain news? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news in a content series via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. We’re stronger together. Join us now.

Can China Continue To Be Trusted As The World’s Factory?

After the coronavirus, can we still trust China to be the world’s leading manufacturer? Find out here.


With the coronavirus pandemic now spreading its deadly tentacles into most countries of the world, the temporary blip we all experienced when China (albeit briefly) went offline and disrupted 94% of the world’s supply chains seems a thing of the past. But is it? Many experts were asking then – just like they are now – whether the coronavirus could be the end of China as a world manufacturing hub. And the answer seems to be divided into two camps. 

Firstly, there are those that believe China’s dominance is so well-established that no other country could ever compete, or not anytime soon. They believe that although geopolitical issues and rising costs in China are a concern to some, that China is simply too good at what they do. They believe that it would be nice to have our eggs in more baskets, there is simply no other feasible basket. 

Then, there are those that believe the opposite, and specifically, those that believe it is now Mexico’s time to shine. Given its close proximity to the US and cheaper labour costs, these experts believe that Mexico is uniquely positioned to become a manufacturing hub, and more and more businesses will soon realise this. 

The Mexico vs. China question is exactly the type of debate we love having at Procurious, so we invited a number of the world’s foremost experts on the topic to have it in our latest webinar, ‘Alternate Sources of Supply: Is it Mexico’s Turn?.’ This article will explain why some experts believe China will definitely continue to be the world’s factory … and why you shouldn’t consider moving your supply elsewhere. 

History 

2020 marks the 40th year of mass manufacturing in China and in that time, China has become so proficient at what they do, that nearly 30% of the world’s goods are manufactured there. Beyond that, there isn’t much that China can’t produce, and they’ve certainly become experts in a number of niches, from electronics to textiles and steel. 

It’s for this reason that Kobus Van Der Wath, CEO of Axis Group, a global supply chain advisory group, believes that other countries simply cannot compete with China: 

‘Manufacturing in China began in the early 1980s so that has meant that the whole world has been dancing with China for three to four decades.’ 

‘It’s hard – or honestly, close to impossible – to compete when you’ve got a country that has had such a long lead time.’

Wages and conditions 

Beyond China’s long history as a global manufacturer, many experts also point to wages and working conditions as a reason that China has retained its stronghold on production. And at the time of writing, both of these reasons seem just as relevant as ever.

China is the most populous country on earth, with just over 1.28 billion people. This means that from a supply and demand perspective, China has a competitive advantage insomuch as there is a near-neverending stream of low-wage workers available for factory work. China’s history has also contributed to this – until the late 20th century, there were a lot of rural poor in China, and millions have now migrated to cities to work in China’s factory cities.

Although some people point out that wages in China have increased – and they have – they are still very cheap. As of January this year, the minimum hourly wage in China is…

To finish reading this article, join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news over an 8-week content series via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. 

The article is available in the documents section once you’ve logged in. 


7 Reasons Why WFH Is So Damn Difficult Right Now

WFH can be a struggle! So what can you do about it?


Even experienced WFHers are struggling. So why can’t you get anything done?

And what can you do about it?

1. TOO MUCH ANXIETY:

Stress and worry makes it harder to concentrate because you don’t have headspace for anything else.

TIPS:

  • Switch off the constant Covid-19 newsfeeds – you need a mental break or you risk having a mental breakdown.
  • Set yourself clear deadlines to achieve specific small targets in a short burst of time. So, 1 hour to finish a pitch. This will help you focus on one task at a time. Don’t look too far ahead – nobody knows when this will end. Just plan a day and or a week at a time. You cannot control the coronavirus, so focus on what you can control.
  • Every time you achieve a small goal you will boost your dopamine levels (the reward centre of your brain). So, make sure you have plenty of them in a day.
  • Combine this with regular exercise to reduce your cortisol (stress hormone) levels.

2. A LACK OF ROUTINE:

Without the daily rhythm of the commute, lunch breaks, meetings and an evening spent winding down, you might feel lost.

TIPS:

  • Ever heard that saying 90% of what we do is habit? Well, we are creatures of habit…you just need to create new ones. Get up at the same time each day, shower and dress, “go” to your workspace, plan your day – including your breaks – and you will put yourself into work mode.
  • Plan your downtime too – it will give you something to look forward to. For example, at 5pm I will switch off my computer and sit on the balcony/decking/lawn and have a nice cool drink while chatting to friends on the phone. A clear differentiation between work and rest, will enable you to ‘get away’ from work even if you are still in the same physical space.

3. FEELING ISOLATED:

If you are used to a busy office, constant interaction with colleagues and clients, demanding deadlines and a mountain of things to do, sitting at home in isolation can leave you feeling flat.

TIPS:

  • Recreate the office vibe at home. You and your colleagues can use apps like HouseParty or Microsoft Teams so you can all see each other during office hours – and get input from the team (remember to mute your voice if you don’t want everyone to hear everything going on in your home). Or Skype or WhatsApp so you can “see” people and work collaboratively.
  • Work is not just about work – for most people it’s also about socialising. Recreate Friday night drinks on HouseParty or have a virtual lunch break each day when you sit and eat or snack while chatting.
  • Also boost your network – sharing with others is key. Procurious has a great feed that you can follow either online or on twitter. The added bonus is that you will link to more people and that could lead to more opportunities or great ideas for doing things differently.

4. TOO MANY DISTRACTIONS:

While some are struggling to stay focused because their home is just too quiet, for others the opposite is true. Noisy children, several TVs all blaring at once from different rooms or flatmates/partners who want to chat all day, make it impossible to achieve anything.

TIPS:

  • Have you have spotted people conducting conference calls in their cars while still parked on the driveway?  It’s probably the only quiet place they can find during lockdown. Do the same, find a quieter space… even if it is the car/shed/basement.
  • If you can, agree a “quiet” time for you to get work done. Also, consider when you do tasks that require concentration – for example, do your report writing in the early hours or later at night.
  • Either invest in noise-cancelling headphones or listen to music on your earbuds to drown out background noise.

5. YOUR TECH IS NOT UP TO IT:

This is a difficult one to deal with – while tech stores might not be open, you can order plenty online. However, there’s probably very little you can do right now to upgrade your internet connection. This can not only be frustrating but leave you feeling that you just can’t get anything done.

TIPS:

  • Keep your work tech for work – if you are spending your day laughing at silly memes or watching funny videos, you might (inadvertently) download a virus or click on a link that gets you hacked.
  • Ask your employer – can someone send a laptop to your home? Or can you be provided with remote access to office servers?
  • Restrict your household’s use of the internet during your peak working hours – so that your internet access does not lag (or lag too much).

6. YOU DON’T SEE THE POINT:

You might not have a job next week or next month and you could fall sick and end up on a ventilator. So, completing a project or meeting a deadline might not seem worthwhile.

TIPS:

  • Focus your energy on doing something positive. Set yourself some interesting, challenging and achievable goals. Do a 75-hour coding course, build a personal website or even KonMari your house…anything that will give you a sense of achievement and purpose. It’s highly motivating, so try it.
  • If your job is under threat, online learning is a must. Many courses are free and you might have plenty of free time to complete them. Pick courses that lead to recognised qualifications – the ones in demand by employers.

7. YOU HAVEN’T GOT ENOUGH/ANY WORK:

This is almost worse than having too much work. You might find that it takes you all day to complete what you used to achieve in a few hours. Or you are forced into job creation mode – trying to come up with useful things to do from clearing out your inbox to updating your online profiles. Without a little bit of adrenalin pumping through your veins you feel like you are just plodding.

TIPS:

  • Take on a few extra commitments: Volunteer in the community – it will force you to complete your work more quickly. Or set yourself a home fitness challenge. If you are a bit of a deadline junkie, it will give you the motivation to get your work out of the way.
  • Relish this time – in a few months, you may be firefighting at work to get things up and running and might look back on this time and wonder why you were stressed about not getting enough done. Perhaps we should all learn to enjoy living at a less frantic pace.

Want to share WFH tips and tricks with other procurement & supply chain professionals around the world? Join our Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group and connect with professionals all around the world in the same position as you.

Webiquette: Webcam Woes Procurement Professionals Must Avoid

8 simple steps for improving your webiquette while working from home


Washing drying on a radiator, all that junk you thought was hidden away on top of the wardrobe and the unmade bed in the background… all within screen shot. Yes, your webcam will show it all! Not very professional, is it?

While the hashtag of webcam #covidiots is going viral online, the chances are that you too are guilty of revealing more than you realise when you hold your virtual meetings with colleagues and co-workers, clients and customers

It’s not something new (check out this BBC TV interview from a few years back which went viral).

Judging from some of the experts broadcasting live to the world during this COVID crisis, many pundits are still getting it wrong.

Is it just me, or do you too get distracted by a crazy pattern on their curtains, the peeling wallpaper, strange colour scheme or whatever else these talking heads have in the background? I love looking at their books (I’ve read that too), their DVDs (who’d have thought they were a sci-fi fan?) and critically judging their taste in home décor. Yet I should be listening to what they are saying!

It’s also incredibly irritating to hear their phone pinging constantly (presumably their friends WhatsApping them to say “I can see you on TV”).

So how do you get your screen performance right?

STEP 1: LINE QUALITY IS EVERYTHING

If you keep cutting out, nobody can hear you etc. it’s not going to work. If this is an issue, when you have important meetings switch off everything else connected to your internet router.

STEP 2: WHAT ARE YOU WEARING?

Dress for the office – it will put you in the right frame of mind to talk business.

Don’t forget basic personal hygiene too. Wash your hair, shave/make-up (which ever is appropriate) and check your top is clean (yes marks show up on webcams). You don’t have to wear a suit and tie – something suitable for dress-down Friday is fine.

STEP 3: WHAT’S IN THE BACKGROUND?

The easiest way to get round piles of washing and stacks of junk is to blur the background something that’s easy with Microsoft Teams and Skype etc.  For example, for Skype simply hover over the video button and select “Blur my background”. Or why not chose a virtual background feature during your Zoom Meeting – a forest perhaps or maybe an image of busy office? You probably don’t have a green screen at home (for that TV look) but will need uniform lighting for Zoom to detect the difference between you and your background.

Alternatively “stage” a background –  scholarly tomes and framed academic certificates (to make you appear intellectual), an electric guitar and framed vinyl album covers (to give the impression that you are a serious muso) or posters from art exhibitions and museums (who knew you were such a culture vulture?).

STEP 4: GET YOUR POSITIONING RIGHT

If you are looking down at your laptop it’s not only incredibly unflattering, you will find it harder to have a natural conversation. So put your laptop or screen up higher so you are looking straight into the camera.

Think about lighting too. A bright overhead light might cast a shadow over your face and the same applies to side lighting. Just watch the pundits on TV… often the light colour is all wrong and they appear either washed out or slightly yellow. So you might want to experiment with different light bulbs.

Also make sure you are comfortable. Constantly fidgeting is distracting. You need to be sitting up straight to appear interested and engaged in the conversation. Leaning forward to prop yourself up with your hand under your chin or looking away to constantly check your phone will just scream “I’m bored with this”. At least try to appear interested.

STEP 5: TEST IT OUT

Enlist a family member to sit in front of your screen and talk – you can then get a good idea of what you might look like. Perhaps your chair might need changing or adjusting. Or is the light from the window casting an unflattering shadow? Is your camera now so high you can only see the top of your head?

You will never know unless you try it.

STEP 6: DON’T FORGET THE MICROPHONE

People can hear more than you realise – the screaming spouse shouting at your children to “shut up”, the washing machine and of course your phone.

But you don’t have to worry about background noise if you use the mute button. Keep it on at all times – other than when you want to speak.

And to make it easier to hear every word, consider headphones. Wireless earbuds are best as you won’t have to worry about an unsightly wire.

As with your screen test, do a sound test too so you can check people can hear you and whether there is a nasty echo or your microphone is picking up too much background noise.

STEP 7: PRACTICE YOUR PERFORMANCE

Remember, when you roll your eyes, or smirk at what someone says, they can see you! The same applies when you scratch your face, pick your nose or lift up a buttock cheek to pass wind.

If you’ve been in self isolation for a while you might have forgotten how to behave in an office environment. You might need to practice your webiquette.

STEP 8: SET – OR ASK FOR – AN AGENDA

You want to reply to a point, but so does everyone else. You all end up talking over each other… and that does not make for great communication.

So, it’s best (as with any meeting) to have an agenda with a running order which is circulated before the meeting and a chair (who acts like the host of a radio phone-in).

Remember, the whole point is to be productive. That can mean limiting the number of participants or limiting the time for each question/point.

How To Lead Your Team In A Crisis: Covid-19 Procurement News

How should you lead your procurement team during a crisis? Here’s what you need to do

“The ultimate measure of a leader is not where they stand in moments of comfort, but where they stand at times of challenge and controversy.” Martin Luther King Jr.

Martin Luther King Jr. was certainly onto something when he said that leaders are tested not in not the good times, but in the challenging times – and everyone can agree, we’re certainly experiencing the latter right now. All of us – literally every single one of us across every continent of the world – are experiencing our own unique stresses and pressures, and our leadership ability may not be our focus. But likewise, now is also the time when our teams need us most. 

So how do we lead amidst so much uncertainty? We talked to Justine Figo, People and Culture author, and Naomi Lloyd, Director Procurement and External Manufacturing Partnerships Asia Pacific at Campbell Arnotts, to get an insight into how to lead your procurement team during a crisis. 

Managing expectations

With the coronavirus situation changing weekly, if not daily, helping your team understand what’s expected of them, as well as manage the expectations of executive leadership, can be a challenge. But according to Justine and Naomi, what your team really needs from you at this time is a realistic challenge, and more clarity. 

Justine believes that leaders need to have the courage to challenge their team to be productive – but at the same time, understand that there might be significant barriers at the moment: 

‘Right now, it’s about taking stock of what is going on for everyone at the moment, and saying: “What is the best possible challenging standard I can set for myself and for my team?” 

‘Of course, you need to understand that people will be disrupted, but still have the courage to give them purpose, with compassion.’ 

Naomi believes while realistic challenges are important, what’s more important is that you realign your priorities with your team – and communicate your expectations clearly, with much more granular direction: 

Want to hear more of Naomi and Justine’s great advice? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news over an 8-week content series via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. We’re stronger together. Join us now.

How COVID Could Kill Excessive Pay?

Mind the Gap? We most certainly do but will it finally start to narrow?


Funny memes, inspiring posts and far too much fake news – we are being inundated with information to entertain, amuse, inform and frighten us while we are in lockdown or self isolation. However, one post that really caught my eye was about the value of people’s work – it reflects a sea-change in attitudes towards excessive executive pay. 


To give them their due credit, a significant number of sports stars are taking pay cuts, several celebrities have announced vast donations to Covid-19 relief efforts and even Lady Gaga is giving a percentage of profits from her beauty brand to support food banks. 

Mass altruism is a global phenomenon. 

But what about businesses? Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), it seems, is just a way to brand businesses as caring. So far, they are doing little sharing. 

With footballers deferring 50% of their pay and tennis ace Roger Federer donating 1 million Swiss francs to vulnerable families, why aren’t we seeing CEO after CEO lining up to do something similar? 

While “ordinary” employees are being laid off or furloughed, most of the C-suite seem to be keeping quiet on pay. 

WE WILL REMEMBER THOSE WHO GET THIS RIGHT – AND THOSE WHO DON’T 

There are few exceptions… and they will not be forgotten. Those executives who are sharing the pain are doing a fantastic PR job for themselves and their businesses. 

Take the CEO of hotel group Marriott Worldwide, Arne Sorenson, who will not be taking any salary for the balance of 2020 and whose executive team will take a 50% cut in pay. While Ford’s top 300 executives will defer 20% to 50% of their salary. 

However, considering the vast pay packets these top execs earn, a cut (or a lesser sacrifice of a pay deferral), seems pathetic compared to the generosity of sports personalities and stars of stage and screen.  

Yet as more and more leadership teams follow suit, other boards will be under pressure to make similar sacrifices on salaries – or they could fall foul of public opinion. 

When News Corp Australia announced that the executive team would take a “significant” pay cut in response to Covid-19 – showing that those at the top of the pay scale are sharing the pain of those at the bottom – it also added that executive perks such as entertainment and travel events were also being halted. It doesn’t look good to be seen to be enjoying the perks of a private jet at a time like this. 

It shows just how mindful organisations are of public opinion. 

There will come a point when bosses who haven’t budged on pay and bonuses will start to stick out…and it will be noticed. 

THE BALANCE OF OPINION IS SHIFTING – AND IT’S GREAT NEWS FOR SOME ORDINARY WORKERS 

At the other end of the scale, there is beginning to be more appreciation of those in essential but poorly paid roles. Take Food City supermarkets in Chattanooga, Tennessee making headlines for giving its 16,000 employees a total US$3 million bonus reflecting their hard work ensuring people can still buy food at this difficult time. 

In Singapore, frontline healthcare workers – who are at a higher risk of contracting Covid-19 – will be given a special bonus of up to one month’s pay.  

Across the world, there are similar stories of those at the bottom of the pay scale finally receiving some appreciation (in the form of hard cash).  

MIND THE GAP? WE MOST CERTAINLY DO BUT WILL IT FINALLY START TO NARROW? 

With trillions of dollars wiped off the value of the global economy – and the G20 pledging to inject $5 trillion to blunt the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic – any exec whose remuneration package is based partly on performance is in for a big financial hit. 

This could finally do something to narrow the phenomenal gap between pay at the top and bottom of organisations.  

CEOs in the USA earn 265 times more than the average worker according to Statista, while in S&P 500 Index firms this increases to is staggering 361 more for the top boss than the average rank-and-file worker. 

Yet back in the 1950s the typical CEO made only 20 times the salary of the average employee.  

SHAREHOLDERS MIGHT WIN THE DAY – AFTER SUFFERING SUCH HIGH LOSSES 

Shareholders have suffered some catastrophic losses. So they are likely to put significant pressure on executive remuneration committees to bring salaries back in line. 

Or, as global advisory firm Willis Towers Watson puts it: “there are reasonable expectations to see directional alignment in the change of realized executive pay relative to shareholder value”. 

BUT AT THE END OF THE DAY – IT’S PUBLIC OPINION THAT REALLY MATTERS 

In the UK new regulations requiring certain UK companies to disclose their executive pay ratios are also designed to shine a light on inequality. And it’s quite timely that the first reporting is this year. So, the requirement could not have come at a worse time for overpaid executives. 

With the UK’s Corporate Governance Code asking boards to create a culture which aligns company strategy with purpose and values – and explicitly requiring remuneration committees or RemCos to explain how pay policies for executives are appropriate in their annual reports – 2020 was supposed to be the year when the value of CEOs was brought into question. 

According to the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD) in the UK for every CEO appointed, another 100 candidates could just as ably fill the position. 

In a world where you cannot find 100 nurses or doctors or first responders to fill every vacancy, it is going to be hard for these RemCos to justify pay excess. And it is not just an issue in the UK. As with the coronavirus, this is a global issue and very much one that will dominate the corporate world in 2020. 

Want to join in on the coronavirus discussions? We have procurement and supply chain professionals from all around the world crowdsourcing confidence in our Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group.

Coronavirus: What You Need To Know According To These Procurement & Supply Chain Thought Leaders…

What do these thought leaders think about covid-19 when we asked them recently at Big Ideas Summit London 2020?


As of yesterday, the number of coronavirus cases topped 500,000 worldwide – doubling in just over a week.

While we can all do our part to stop the virus spreading, there is an added pressure on procurement & supply chain professionals with the business world on our shoulders.

So, we seized the opportunity recently at our Big Ideas Summit London to ask some of our favourite thought leaders what we can do when it comes to coronavirus.

This is what Group Procurement Director at Just Eat, John Butcher had to say when we asked him ‘What’s been your #1 risk with the coronavirus and how are you mitigating it?’…


Procurement Digital Transformation Lead at Diageo, Amit Sheth had a slightly different response when asked the same question…


Strategic Supply Chain Risk Expert and Professor of Supply Chain Management, Omera Khan had this brilliant bit of advice when we asked her ‘How can companies manage supply chain risk in times of crisis?’…


We’re living in extremely uncertain business and economic times at the moment with many sources indicating that a deep global recession is coming. So, what should procurement be most worried about? This is what Rachel Stretch, Consultant at John Lewis & Partners suggests…


Pressure is something that procurement & supply chain professionals everywhere would be feeling right now. So, last, but certainly not least, we asked legendary Rugby coach, Sir Clive Woodward ‘How do you work under pressure?’

Want to stay ahead of the curve with all things coronavirus and supply chain? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. 

Crisis Mode: What Will My Procurement Career Look Like This Year?

It’s been a disastrous year, but still, we’ve all got one big question: What will my procurement career look like this year?


Over the past month, many of us have been glued to our phones with a sense of dread, waiting for the next phase of the coronavirus crisis to hit. But with many countries now in lockdown, things in China slowly returning to normal, and early signs that the infection rate is declining in Italy, we can all breathe easily, knowing that life will, at some stage, return to normal. 

But what will that ‘normal’ look like, especially for our careers in procurement? There’s no denying that this year will be like no other year when it comes to what we might experience at work and what our career trajectory might look like. To find out exactly what this might be, we spoke to someone on the true frontline of procurement careers:  Imelda Walsh, Manager of The Source recruitment, a specialist procurement recruitment agency. Imelda’s insights are both fascinating and optimistic. In this uncertain world, it seems like procurement professions may have the opportunity to shine … here’s why. 

Critical business changes – and how work is being impacted 

With news that 94% of the world’s supply chains have been disrupted, there’s certainly been a lot going on at the organisations Imelda partners with, which include some of the world’s largest mining companies, banks and health organisations. Imelda says that the situation has been an ‘eye opener’ for many of her clients: 

‘There’s been so many risks they now need to focus on, including mitigating risks from their supply chain, working with local suppliers, or even workplace health and safety relationships with suppliers.’ 

Yet supplier risks haven’t been the only risks that businesses have needed to manage. With the majority of the world now working from home, Imelda says that her clients have been extraordinarily busy sorting out the logistics of what this might look like for their people: 

‘With clients moving to working from home, it has put a strain on their hardware and systems, which they are sorting through. But fortunately, many of them have invested in good technology over time.’ 

Is anyone still hiring?

If we’re in an industry that’s been affected by the coronavirus, which, realistically, is most of us, we all want the answer to the million-dollar question – is anyone hiring?!?

Want to hear more of Imelda’s fascinating story? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news over an 8-week content series via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. 

We’re stronger together. Join us now. 


How To Debrief Suppliers… And Why You Need To

Debriefing after a procurement process is an important chance for reflection and giving feedback to bidders. Follow these 5 tips to ensure you debrief efficiently.


Debriefing respondents after a procurement process can seem a thankless task – and provokes an audible sigh. 

This is not because there is no love for the market, it’s because you’ve just come out of a lengthy, action-packed process. A queue of the next million projects to do is staring right at you. 

Why should you debrief respondents? 

Debriefs are an easy way to add value to future projects. They develop market capability and the capacity of the market to understand you as a buyer. They offer you a chance for self-reflection and learning.

Read on for 5 tips on how to nail debriefs

1. Provide feedback in the outcome letter

The place to start in debriefing respondents is with a general statement of strengths and weakness in the outcome letter you send after the process. 

This is often enough for respondents to understand where they lost out. It can save you the time of having to engage with every company who participated in the process. Sometimes some simple, short feedback is all that is needed.

For example:

Thank you for submitting your response for [insert project name] opportunity. Your submission has been assessed by an evaluation panel and we are writing to inform you that you have not been successful on this occasion. The panel noted team composition and relevant experience as particular strengths in your response. However, the response lacked evidence in regards to methodology and project timelines. This is critical for us to assess how the outcomes will be achieved. 

2. Run a solid process

Following a solid process with structured evaluation and accompanying notes forms the basis of a good debrief. There is little point running around after the process trying to gather information. Good luck trying to get stakeholders engaged to have a conversation about something that is months old! 

Tip: when individual evaluators are marking the responses, make sure they are instructed to write statements of strengths and weakness as they go. Also, follow this up in a moderation meeting with the evaluation panel and ask them to summarise one positive and one weakness before moving on to discuss the next supplier. 

This will be captured in the minutes. Further down the track any member of your team can access the file and select enough information to create a debrief.

3. Don’t wing it

Have a template and complete it before speaking to a respondent. Two templates are helpful to fill out. 

One is a template that guides the conversation with the respondent and is for internal eyes only. The other is a stripped-down version of the same template that can be released to the respondent after the conversation. 

So, what should be in it?

  • An outline of the process undertaken
  • How many responses you received from the market and how many passed the first stage of compliance
  • A reminder that the purpose of the debrief is to provide feedback on their response, not an opportunity to relitigate the process that has been undertaken. Feedback provided is based on the respondent’s performance against other responses and not necessarily a direct criticism of them – rather, it’s a statement of how they performed against others 
  • Where they ranked and what the scores were (removing the names of any other suppliers)
  • (Optional) You can include a range of the pricing responses but I tend to just provide the ranking
  • How they performed against each evaluation criterion
  • The strength and weakness statements from the evaluation panel
  • Ask the respondent for feedback on the process and how your company performed
  • Remind them of how they can keep an eye out for future opportunities to work with your company

4. Involve the right people

Make sure you choose who to take into the debrief wisely. 

For example, the subject matter expert may not have the best social skills. Choose someone who has the right expertise and the right level of authority. 

Most respondents are happy to have feedback. It is very rare that I have had aggressive or angry suppliers. The mitigation strategy to combat this is to be prepared and restate that this is not a chance to relitigate the process. 

Save time and conduct debriefs over the phone.

5. Don’t forget the winner!

Debrief the successful respondent to ensure they understand what it was about their bid that made them stand out from the crowd. 

It helps to build the relationship before the contract is inked.

Recently I was involved in a project in which the financial breakdown with the response was so detailed that it helped to add weight to their response. It helped to evidence that they could back up their claims.

When delivering this news during contract negotiations, it was surprising to the successful company. They said it was extremely valuable for them to understand what we value and the reasons why. They stated it would help their future bids as it improves understanding of the buyer’s viewpoint.

So keep these 5 tips in mind to ensure you deliver swift and effective debriefs to suppliers.