All posts by Procurious HQ

Strategic Similarities of Football and Procurement

Understand your position and adapt to how the other player is performing – true of both football and procurement, says 30 Under 30 star, Logan Ferguson.

Football player

Logan Ferguson was one of the young professionals named in ISM and THOMASNET.com‘s ‘30 Under 30 Rising Supply Chain Stars‘ this year.

Procurious caught up with Logan to talk to him about his procurement career, what the award means to him, and his love for football (or soccer, for any non-Europeans…).

Logan Ferguson
THOMASNET.com and ISM 30 Under 30 Rising Star – Logan Ferguson
  • How did you come to choose procurement as your profession?

I have always been a strategic thinker, enjoying exciting opportunities to solve new problems. This passion led me into Operations Management in the Fisher College of Business at The Ohio State University.

I had the opportunity to work two enjoyable internships with Marathon Petroleum Company during my college years as a Global Procurement intern, which initially sparked my interest in procurement. The experience I gained during college propelled me on to my current career path.

  • You’re a keen football (soccer) player and fan – can you draw any parallels between playing the game and excelling in your career?

One of the main reasons I like soccer is due to the strategic nature of the game, and the fact that you have to be thinking and planning your next move at all times while you’re on the pitch.

The scenario is always changing, so you have to constantly adapt to what other players are doing. There are very similar elements that exist in procurement. When preparing for a negotiation, it is critical to understand your market position and develop your strategy for capturing the best contract pricing and terms accordingly.

Due to constant market changes, there is always an opportunity to find new ways to add value for the organisation. This constant change and the challenge it presents is exciting and keeps me on my toes.

  • Do you think procurement is an attractive career for millennials?

I think it is a great time to start a career in procurement. Many corporations now understand the value that can be delivered to their bottom line by developing a high performing sourcing organisation. This revelation has created new demand for talented problem solvers that can effectively fill these roles.

  • What’s your advice for young people entering the profession?

Learn as much as you possibly can in a wide variety of experiences.

Saying “Yes” to a lot of diverse opportunities not only gives you a greater breadth of knowledge but also builds your credibility in multiple areas of the organisation.

  • What does it mean to you to be part of the 30 Under 30 this year? And what will it mean for your future?

It is such an honour to be a part of the 30 Under 30 program. I’m extremely grateful for the recognition, and it wouldn’t have been possible without such a great support structure around me to recognise my accomplishments, and take action to nominate me.

The award is a testament to the opportunities I have had the privilege to be a part of so far, but I think the best part about the experience was getting to meet so many other successful young professionals through the program.

The greatest benefit the nomination has for my future is being a part of a network of high achievers, who I can contact to discuss work challenges and new, innovative ideas.

Why Supplier Segmentation Can Aid Risk Mitigation

Supplier segmentation could prove a useful tool for procurement in aiding risk mitigation in the supply chain. Sandeep Singh of Genpact explains.

Supplier Segmentation

In the first part of this series, we looked at the role of procurement plays in risk mitigation. In this article, Sandeep Singh, Vice President – Procurement and Supply Chain Services at Genpact, offers further advice on risk mitigation strategies, as well as how to create effective supplier segmentation.

What are good mitigation strategies for global supply chains in light of high impact factors like natural disasters and political instability?

To anticipate, prevent, and manage adverse events throughout their operations, global enterprises need enhanced visibility of their third-party risks. They need more efficient risk assessments to support targeted mitigation strategies, and the ability to predict potential outcomes throughout their operations.

Some of the mitigation strategies could include:

  • Having access to a list of risk assessed, qualified suppliers, who can serve as an alternate source of supply in case of an adverse event.
  • As part of a supplier selection process, adopting a multi-supplier strategy, where suppliers are located in multiple geographies, or where one supplier may have an ability to ship from multiple locations.

These mitigation strategies can easily be created by analysis of past trends and through leveraging digital technologies.

To increase the likelihood of third-party risk management (TPRM) initiatives achieving expected outcomes, organisations can adopt a Lean Digital approach, combining digital technologies, design thinking methods to focus on the end customer, and Lean principles that offer greater agility.

This approach tightly aligns risk processes to business outcomes, and helps overcome the challenges from legacy operations. This is done by driving the right choices end to end, rather than focusing on the individual parts of the process.

What is a good process to follow when carrying out supplier segmentation for risk management?

Multiple product or services, complex data structure and taxonomies, large supplier base across the globe and changing regulations makes supplier segmentation by risk a complex process.

Leading companies are increasingly relying on data-driven digital solutions, powered by the right set of business rules to conduct risk segment. The Lean Digital approach can make risk segmentation more efficient and effective. Typically to arrive at risk segmentation of suppliers, organisations can follows two broad steps:

Step 1

Segmentation based on:

  • Category or type of product or services suppliers are delivering or will deliver – an office stationery supplier may pose no risk, as compared a supplier providing IT services, or a supplier providing raw material for the manufacturing of an end product.
  • Location of supplier – a supplier located in a developing country can be prioritised first, as compared to suppliers located in developed countries.
  • Nature of supplier relationship – how strategic or critical is a supplier to an organisation’s business. It may be more sensible to focus on suppliers with a long-term engagement, versus a one-time purchase.

Step 1 can also be taken to understand and manage inherent risk. It can help organisations prioritise their needs around risk, and can save lot of time, effort and investment into managing risk.

Step 2

Organisations can assess suppliers’ relevant risk dimensions leading to their segmentation as low, medium or high risk. Risk dimensions, such as anti-bribery and corruption, and data privacy, need to be mapped with the category, or type of product or services, that supplier is responsible for delivering.

Further, a scoring methodology should be created, taking into consideration category and location of supplier, and then connecting it to an applicable risk dimension.

This scoring methodology should also consider weightings across various risk dimensions, so that the final output is a comprehensive risk score which can then be used for supplier segmentation into low, medium and high risk brackets.

Are there examples of good practice in supplier segmentation by risk, where organisations have mitigated their risks?

There is a good example of this through some of the work that Genpact has done with clients in the past. One pharmaceutical company wanted to improve its ability to assess its thousands of vendors and partners, particularly as regulators were taking a greater interest in third-party risk management.

The firm lacked standard processes for supplier risk management, could not provide timely or accurate risk reports, and could not keep up with the volume of assessments required. Genpact transformed the pharmaceutical firm’s TPRM operating model by defining and executing a scalable, five-step process for assessing third parties against its standards of excellence.

The organisation also introduced metrics, data-driven process management and technology to industrialise the process. This enabled more accurate and timely reports, reduced assessment cycle times by up to 40 per cent, and increased coverage to assess close to 100 per cent of the company’s third parties over a certain level of spend.

Genpact offers a number of procurement services that can be tailored to specific client needs, including end-to-end Source to Pay (S2P) services for both direct and indirect materials. Find out more by visiting their website.

Dubai Securing Its Future Through Innovation

Traditionally a prime hub for trade, logistics and communications, Dubai, the UAE, are looking to secure the future as a hub of business innovation.

Innovation - Expo 2020

On the 27th of November 2013, Dubai was voted as the host city for Expo 2020, an event that aims to bring together a global audience to discuss issues pertinent to every person in the world. Based on central theme of “Connecting Minds, Creating the Future”, Expo 2020 will also cover key sub-themes of sustainability, mobility and opportunity.

While the event will place the country at the heart of an event with an estimated 25 million visitors, it also helps to cement Dubai’s place as a centre for technology and business innovation.

Smart Cities

Dubai is already well on its way to becoming a ‘smart city‘, with huge sums of money being invested in making the emirate a hub for IT and technology. In September 2015, Dubai was named as the second-best city in the world for expats wishing to start a business, while the UAE was among the top 10 countries for expats to work in.

These titles run in line with Dubai’s aim to open its doors to the best and brightest technology innovators and entrepreneurs. As part of its investment in infrastructure during its ‘Year of Innovation‘ in 2015, provisions were made to assist small to medium-sized startups with technological assistance, aimed at creating growth in this sector.

And, as part of this drive to encourage more global technology organisations to come to Dubai, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of UAE and Ruler of Dubai, announced a $544 million fund to finance innovation in the city.

While the fund doesn’t actually go live in terms of investment until later this year, it is anticipated that it will provide funding to companies based in the UAE, as well as those providing “exceptional innovative ideas“, helping to drive growth and economic development across the region.

Innovation…and Procurement

All of this comes as part of the UAE’s ‘Vision 2021‘, which aims to make the country one of the most innovative in the world. And it’s good to know that procurement and supply chain have a key role to play in this process too.

In the coming months, a huge procurement and contracting effort will be undertaken to award build work for the site, infrastructure and transportation to support the hosting of Expo 2020. Dubai is forecast to spend around $8 billion on infrastructure mega projects in the build up to Expo 2020 including hotels, new metro links and malls.

Kicking it off last week, the RTA awarded a $2.88 billion contract for the construction of its Expolink metro. This will be followed by purchase of trains to service both the new, and existing, Dubai metro lines.

It’s estimated that Dubai’s Road and Transport Authority (RTA) will look to 30 per cent of the project cost through private funding, with public-private partnerships mooted for the remainder.

Is it too much to ask for to have a little innovation in the procurement process? While traditional processes might still hold sway, we can only hope that the profession can get in on the act in the next few years.

Need something to chat about in the tea room? Or something to enjoy with your coffee? Here are the week’s big headlines…

States Come Together for Purchasing Agreement

  • TheNational Association of State Procurement Officers (NASPO) has been formulating a collective procurement agreement which is expected to benefit 34 states in America.
  • The Value Point platform will give states purchasing similar items cooperative buying power as one organisation, rather then by state basis. 
  • The Cloud-based platform will enable information storage and allow for different payment structures. 
  • The final agreement is expected to be signed off in August and will the states to move forward with a cohesive, cooperative approach to procurement.

Read more at Government Technology

Rolls-Royce Announce Robot Cargo Ships

  • The Rolls-Royce led Advanced Autonomous Waterborne Applications Initiative (AAWA) presented their vision of autonomous shipping at the Autonomous Ship Technology Symposium 2016 in Amsterdam.
  • The group is working on a series of virtual decks, where land-based crew would control every aspect of the ship
  • There will also be drones and VR cameras to assist with spotting issues that humans cannot control.
  • Rolls-Royce aims to launch first remote-controlled cargo ship by 2020, with the aim for automated fleets to follow soon after.

Read more at Futurism

New World Bank Procurement Framework Live

  • The new procurement framework at the World Bank was officially launched on the 1st of July.
  • The new Procurement Framework will allow the World Bank to better respond to the needs of client countries, while preserving robust procurement standards.
  • The Framework also enables the Bank to work more closely with country partners in improving their own procurement systems.
  • Hart Schafer, World Bank Vice President for Operations Policy and Country Services, said, “The Bank can now offer a more modern and nimble procurement system to help promote sustainable development.”

Read more at The World Bank

US-Japanese Underwater Cable Goes Online

  • A 9,000km, six-fiber cable linking the USA and Japan, and backed by Google, went online at the end of last week.
  • The $300 million ‘FASTER’ cable is a project backed by a consortium of six companies including NEC, China Mobile, China Telecom, Global Transit and KDDI, aimed at better connecting the two countries. 
  • The cable can deliver up to 60 terabits per second (Tbps) of bandwidth, about 10 millions times faster than standard cable modems.
  • The cable will support Google’s Cloud Platform East Asia region, with dedicated bandwidth supporting faster data transfer and reduced latency.

Read more at Tech Crunch

How to Draft the Perfect CV

A good CV is critical to getting your foot in the door in the recruitment process. A perfect CV can help you get the job of your dreams.

Perfect CV

When it comes to finding a job, besides having the will and disposition to do it, it is essential to know how to present yourself! That is why you should be thinking very carefully about drafting the perfect CV.

A CV is a document that summarises detailed information about you. The importance of having a good CV generally lies in the fact that it is the first requirement when applying for a job. Your CV will be the main source of information —and first impression— that the company will receive from you.

The Perfect CV

If you are not really sure what type information to add to your CV or how to organise it, do not worry! Neuvoo have prepared a list of recommendations just for you:

  • Country Format

Check if the country where you want to apply for a job offer has a specific format before designing your CV, as this may vary.

  • Specificity 

Try to be as specific and to the point as possible in the information you add to your CV.

  • Personal Information

Add your personal information: full name, age, career and courses, address and contact information. Furthermore, along with your phone number, include an email address and, when possible, add the user name of your social networks.

Nowadays, many companies consider the content and the use you make out of them very important. Try to keep all that information in a visible place, it may be at the top of the page or, if you want to explore a design variation, you could add a left-hand column with all this information.

  • Skills Summary

Summarise the skills and abilities you have. It is essential for a business to know which are your strengths. They will take you into consideration if you have what it takes to perform well in your job.

  • Work Experience

Add previous work experience, in chronological order. Be specific in the tasks you performed. Include the name of the company you worked for and the period of time you were there.

  • Additional Information

Do not forget to mention the courses you took, additional studies and, if you master one or several languages, include them as well!

Vanessa Fardi is the Leader of US, Central America, and Latin America Team for Canadian startup neuvoo. Neuvoo is a job search engine that indexes jobs available online in one unique platform, without any charge for the source of the job. It was created in 2011 and is currently available in more than 60 countries.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #3 – Harnessing Cognitive Technology

Barry Ward says that the procurement technology landscape is fundamentally changing and moving towards the use of cognitive technology, impacting the skills required in procurement in the future.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Barry Ward, Procurement Brand Manager, Global Business Services at IBM, believes that, in order for procurement to successfully demonstrate the value it adds to organisations, it will have to bring in the right people, with the right skills, to allow it to harness the power of cognitive technology.

Catch up with all the thought leadership and ours delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

If you want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016, and what we have planned for 2017, you can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today, and connect with over 15,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Peer-to-Peer Learning – The Evolution of Professional Development

Learning is no longer confined to a classroom. Peer-to-peer learning is fast becoming the primary avenue for professional development.

peer-to-peer learning

The labour market is tightening, which means the need to engage, retain and up-skill your existing resources is growing. However, individuals and organisations are moving away from traditional approaches to learning and development, such as classroom-based learning, due to rising costs and geographically dispersed teams.

In the latest evolution of professional and personal development, there is a greater emphasis is now being placed on social media and peer-to-peer learning. And while, in the past, quality of content was seen as a major issue in using e-Learning, more high-profile organisations are realising the benefits of both creating and sharing their own content.

Peer-to-Peer Benefits

The nature of social media is inherently suited to peer-to-peer learning:

  • It is a highly effective method of sharing information – people can learn real-life, applicable lessons from subject matter experts from all around the world.
  • The e-Learning resources are very accessible – they can be accessed from multiple devices, at a time and place that is convenient for the learner (and their organisation too).
  • Perhaps most importantly, it’s a very cost effective way to learn – savings are made on travel, employee time, and residential courses, and the vast majority of e-Learning is totally free.

Take global mining organisation, Rio Tinto, as an example. The organisation has a very widely dispersed employee based, with over 35,000 people spread around the world. Realising the cost of bringing employees together for classroom-based training, Rio launched their own learning academy in 2014.

Employees have access to relevant, and high-quality, materials wherever they are, and can study at their own pace, at a time that suits them.

Procurement Podcasts

Across social media there are a number of portals and platforms that support peer-to-peer learning, offering free, downloadable e-Learning content in the field of procurement. One of these is SoundCloud – a free, online sharing platform for audio and visual content.

Soundcloud Podcasts

A simple search for ‘procurement’ on the platform provides over 500 podcasts from over 100 contributors, including the BBC and Buyers’ Meeting Point. The platform is easy to access via a web browser or its app, enabling users to listen to the podcasts on the go.

You can also find quality, procurement-related podcasts from a huge range of other sources. Here are just a few we have selected:

  • AT Kearney Procurement & Analytics Solutions – the renowned ‘Wave of the Futurepodcast series covers key topics for procurement leaders through interviewing subject matter experts and thought leaders.
  • Art of Procurement – hosted by Philip Ideson, the AoP Show invites procurement professionals and experts to share their views on the hot topics impacting the profession.
  • My Purchasing Centre – this podcast series has its finger on the pulse of the profession, sharing information and thought leadership on major topics and events.
  • Institute of Supply Management – ISM offers an ever-expanding library of audio podcasts covering a broad spectrum of supply management and general business topics.

Procurement Videos

If videos are more of your thing, you can find plenty available on YouTube (just don’t get lost with all the other videos you can inevitably lose an hour or more with…!).

One of our recent finds are videos from The Procurement Man (better known in real life as Neil Hudson). Neil has a selection of videos sharing his experiences and knowledge from a career in procurement. You can find his videos here, and see an example of one below:

And finally, you can of course find plenty of procurement and supply chain related videos right here on Procurious. Take your pick from procurement training, thought leadership and business research from a variety of experts from around the world.

However you choose to learn, and however you do your professional development, there is a good chance that peer-to-peer learning will be able to support your goals. Just find the right platform for you, and get stuck in!

Turning Point in SE Asia Supply Chain Challenges

A turning point has been reached in the challenges facing the South East Asia supply chain, say global consultancy Crimson & Co.

South East Asia Supply Chain

In the light of economic growth, rising affluence and booming consumer demand, many international businesses are seeking to capitalise on the growth in South East Asia’s developing markets.

The challenges in the South East Asia supply chain have reached a turning point. This is down to the scarcity of supply chain professionals, increased consumer diversity, and fragmented supply chains.

The many layers of suppliers, localised delivery and route to consumer practices, and lack of transparency and consistency in information flows, make it incredibly difficult for businesses to achieve the next wave of global growth.

SE Asia Supply Chain – Huge Promise

There is huge promise but transforming supply chains to reach market potential, handle diversified products, and provide outstanding quality and service to customers is a mammoth task. The businesses best able to overcome these challenges can transform their South East Asian supply chains to become a source of competitive advantage, and drive global growth.

With rising labour costs and the move away from an export-based economy, changes in China are creating opportunities for South East Asia in global manufacturing. This also positions global businesses to capitalise on growing demand in these markets.

For most companies the potential is clear. The challenge is how to address it.

The Time is Now

Richard Smith, Director of Crimson & Co Singapore, argues that the time to transform supply chains is now:

“South East Asia is an incredibly attractive region with rapidly growing markets and low cost operations. The challenge is how to address fractured supply chains and the shortage of supply chain skills.

“As companies move their factories from China to South East Asia, they should grasp the opportunity to carry out a full supply chain review to identify how they should configure their supply chains to better deliver on their current and future business strategies. Due to the significant costs involved in the transformation, businesses need to assess the real benefits and ensure it will deliver against objectives.

“Companies can accelerate their supply chain transformation by bringing best practice from elsewhere in their organisation, other industries and innovative local supply chain practices. Through understanding their businesses’ maturity and readiness to change they can identify where sustainable improvements can be made and how to leverage disruptive technologies to drive business performance.”

Challenges Remain

However Smith warns that a number of challenges remain across the South East Asian supply chain, such as high staff turnover, with employees quick to leave for higher salaries, as well as a lack of experienced professionals with supply chain knowledge across manufacturing, distribution, planning and supply chain management.

In order to ensure successful transformation, Smith also warns that knowledge and awareness of local culture and business landscapes is critical, with a long term focus on developing local supply chain knowledge and people capabilities. This can be done by establishing a physical presence in the region, and developing region-specific leadership and training programmes.

Smith concludes: “Opportunity abounds in the South East Asia region with unrivalled chances for market growth, logistics, sourcing and manufacturing. The time to reinvent networks and processes is now – transforming the South East Asia supply chain into a source of competitive advantage.”

Crimson & Co is a global supply chain consultancy, with a scope spanning supply chain strategy, planning, procurement, manufacturing, logistics and customer channels.

How the Leave Vote Will Impact Procurement and Supply Chain

It was an unlikely event just a week ago, but the Brexit has come to pass. Procurious looks to unpack initial thoughts on how the ‘Leave’ vote will impact both procurement and organisations as a whole.

EU Vote Leave

Last week, Procurious’ weekly news article reported on the potential impact of the UK Referendum on UK and European supply chains.

Now, with a weekend of uncertainty and speculation behind us, Procurious looks at the initial views on what the wider implications are likely to be for procurement now the ‘Leave’ vote is a reality.

Initial Response

Following the ‘Leave’ result announcement on Friday morning, the UK stock market dropped 8 per cent on opening, its worst one-day fall since 2008, although it recovered slightly during the day. The pound, too, fell dramatically in the early morning, with a 10 per cent fall taking it to an over 30 year low.

Across Europe, stock markets reacted in a similar fashion. Markets in France and Germany also fell around 8 per cent, while the Swiss Government were forced to stabilise the Franc as it dramatically appreciated in value.

Due to the unprecedented nature of the vote and the result, experts foresee a period of volatility in UK, European and World markets. The volatility has already had an impact on commodity prices, with oil prices dropping by over 5 per cent, both in Europe and the USA, while gold prices have risen by nearly 7 per cent.

In a bid to calm markets, George Osborne, Chancellor of the Exchequer, broke his silence to reassure markets that  “Britain is open for business” – but warning too “it will not be plain sailing”.

The Long Term

The long-term implications will take a while to become clear. The markets across Europe will stabilise, as will the value of the currencies of the member states. However, as has already been reported, the UK exit may precipitate other in/out referendums in Europe.

Far-right parties in France, Italy and the Netherlands were all quoted on Friday as saying that it was now time for their countries to have their own votes. Although further votes would result in increased volatility, these are unlikely to happen in the short term.

For now, all member states, the UK included, are still part of the EU, and are therefore subject to EU regulations and obligations under the single market.

Britain will most likely wait until at least October, when a new Leader of the Conservative Party is elected, to trigger Article 50 to start the EU divorce process.

Procurement, Trade and Supply Chains

Setting politics aside, and assessing the UK’s decision from a procurement and supply chain point of view, there are a number of factors businesses must consider in the short term, in the run up to the UK formally taking its leave from the EU.

Should the value of the pound remain low, this will bring both positives (think cheaper exports for British companies), and negatives (think more expensive imports of global products, and less bang for your buck in foreign currency exchange transaction), for procurement organisations.

The UK will also have to renegotiate trade deals, not only with European countries, but also with other countries around the world. Both UK imports and exports would be subject to tariffs, increasing supply chain costs of organisations with pan-European supply chains. However, it is worth noting that this will only happen in the event of the UK fully removing itself from the EU common market.

It is also worth remembering that this will not mean the end for procurement activities around Europe. Far from it. New trade deals, negotiations, supplier evaluations and supply chain changes, will all fall under procurement’s remit, making our profession as important for organisational value as it ever has been.

Prepare Now

A two-year waiting period for the UK to formally leave the EU doesn’t mean that nothing can be done in procurement. There are a number of strategies and actions that can be taken in order to prepare, and help to mitigate future risks.

Procurement professionals first need to understand if and how they are impacted within their current contracts and supply agreements. Assessing the current supplier lists to identify European suppliers, or suppliers with European Tier 2 or 3 suppliers, is a good starting point. 

It will be better to know now if critical, or bottleneck, suppliers will be impacted, so mitigations and contingencies can start to be planned. Within existing contracts, procurement must assess the potential impact of tariffs on pricing, and if they, or suppliers, will be in a position to renegotiate these contracts.

Finally, investigating alternative sources of supply for all products is a good step to take. This could be supplier based in the UK, or further afield. Another option in this regard would be assessing the possibility of exploring innovative supply solutions with existing suppliers.

UK and European businesses, including procurement departments, have time to prepare. The biggest mistake would be in leaving it too late to ensure actionable outcomes.

Are your supply chains likely to be impacted by the referendum result? How can procurement act to ensure they still have the best deals with suppliers? Let us know your thoughts.

Had your fill of politics? Need something to take your mind off it? Here are some headlines to peruse from the world of procurement & supply chain…

FAA Relaxes US Drone Regulations

  • The Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) has relaxed its regulations on the piloting of drones in US airspace.
  • Before now, operators needed to obtain a licence, requested on a case-by-case basis, to have permission to pilot a drone legally.
  • Now, the regulations state that commercial drones can be flown by pilots over the age of 16, below 400 feet, and with the drone in line of sight.
  • However, the changes will not affect the commercial drones proposed by Amazon, as the FAA is still carrying out further research on this use.

Read more at The BBC

Instagram Hits 500 Million Users

  • Social media platform Instagram has doubled its user base in the past two years, topping 500 million in the past week.
  • The last 100 million members have been added since September 2015, a considerably faster rate than the previous 100 million.
  • The site boasts 300 million daily active users, has surpassed its rival Twitter in monthly active users, and is now double the size of Snapchat.
  • The platform has further expansion plans, with much of it aimed at Instagram’s role as a platform for businesses.

Read more at Tech Crunch

Boeing Signs Deal with Iran Air

  • US-based Boeing has signed a deal with Iran Air to supply 100 jetliners.
  • It marks the first time that Boeing has done businesses in Iran since the Islamic Revolution in the country in 1979.
  • The value of the deal is unconfirmed due to a lack of information on the jetliners to be supplier, but it is estimated to be in the region of $11 billion.
  • However, any and all contracts that Boeing signs with Iran will be subject to US Governmental approval, something which could change following the November elections.

Read more on Reuters

Amazon Fined for Shipment Mishandling

  • Amazon has been fined $130,000 for two alleged incidents of mishandling of dangerous chemicals in its logistics operations.
  • The fines, one of $78,000 and one of $52,000, related to the shipment of two flammable substances by air, between Illinois and Florida in 2014.
  • This is the third fine in two weeks for Amazon from the FAA, following a $350,000 fine for a similar incident, also occurring in 2014.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal

Big Ideas Summit 2016: Big Idea #2 – Procurement Owns Talent

Mark Roberts, Global Procurement Capabilities Director at AB InBev, believes that procurement should be the gateway for new talent coming into the organisation.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, we challenged our thought leaders to share their Big Ideas for the future of procurement.

From ideas that have the potential to change the very nature of the procurement profession, to ones that got the assembled minds thinking about the profession’s impact outside of the organisation, the response we received was amazing.

Mark Roberts, Global Procurement Capabilities Director at AB InBev, says that procurement institutions and bodies need to do more to tell people what procurement is about, and organisations need to now be bold in order to attract the best and the brightest of new talent.

Catch up with all the thought leadership and ours delegates’ Big Ideas from the 2016 Summit at the Procurious Learning Hub.

If you want to find out more about Big Ideas 2016, and what we have planned for 2017, you can visit our dedicated website!

If you like this (and you haven’t done so already) join Procurious for free today, and connect with over 15,000 like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

National Women in Engineering Day – Raising Profiles

National Women in Engineering Day 2016 is all about raising profiles and showcasing why engineering is a great career for women.

NWED Raising Profiles

Thursday the 23rd of June isn’t just about the UK’s EU Referendum. In fact, there’s something happening on Thursday that it would be remiss of us to overlook, or let be completely overshadowed by the vote – National Women in Engineering Day 2016.

Building on Success

NWED 2016 is aiming to build on last year’s success, when over 400 organisations, including schools, colleges, universities and industry bodies, from across the world, got together to celebrate achievements of women engineers, and encourage more girls and women to consider a career in engineering.

But first, a bit of background. The first National Women in Engineering Day was set up by the Women’s Engineering Society (WES) as part of its 95th anniversary celebrations. The society wanted to highlight the opportunities available for women in engineering, at a time where the industry was suffering from a skills shortage.

The WES felt that by encouraging more girls and women into engineering, it would help to improve diversity, fill the skills gap and enable the  industry to cope better with future job requirements. NWED was created to support this aim, allowing organisations to set up their own events, and link together with others in order to maximise the impact of the message.

Importance of Raising Profiles

The sub-theme for this year’s NWED is ‘Raising Profiles’, something the organisers see as key to bringing more women into the profession.

Alongside the publication of the ‘Top 50 Women in Engineering‘ list in Thursday’s Daily Telegraph, institutions are being encourage to share the profiles of their female engineers, their stories and achievements.

Raising Profiles is also about changing the perceptions of engineering as a male-dominated, physical, dirty work, and showcasing the reality that not only are women just as capable as engineers as their male counterparts, but there are already examples of where women are succeeding at the top of the profession.

You can read about just a few great examples here.

Get Involved

While it might be a bit late to organise your own NWED 2016 event, there are still plenty of ways you can get involved:

  • Visit a local university to highlight engineering as a career
  • Make a plan to increase your corporate diversity and launch it today
  • Raise the profile and celebrate the achievements of your female engineers
  • Feature an article in your newsletter or on your website about your female engineers
  • Follow events, and help promote the cause, on social media at @NWED1919, and by using the hashtags #NWED2016 and #RaisingProfiles
Why Spread the Word?

You might be wondering why Procurious are profiling National Women in Engineering Day when we aren’t an engineering-related platform.

Well, besides it being a great campaign to get behind, it’s clear there is still work to be done. It’s estimated that the gender gap in engineering subjects has doubled in the past eight years.

Even with the awareness of NWED increasing, it can still fall victim to a lack of time for organisations to support it fully. As one female engineer at a global engineering organisation put it to us, “Personally I would love to see more support for it. I have supported the event in previous years and it is excellent. Unfortunately ‘business pressures’ tend to get in the way of greater support.”

We also firmly believe that procurement and supply chain could, and perhaps should, follow suit with similar events for this profession. After all, why should raising profiles be limited to engineering. We’ve talked previously about women in supply chain, and gender diversity, and NWED is a great example of getting a wide group of people involved in a common cause.

Isn’t it time to take a positive stance in procurement and supply chain? Procurious can provide the platform – can you provide the support?