All posts by Procurious HQ

Coupa R15 – delivering agility and measurable value

David Hearn, former CPO Indirect Procurement at Kaiser Permanente, Sun Microsystems and Juniper Networks, talks to Procurious about how Coupa’s latest product releases (Coupa R15) deliver more value to businesses.

Coupa R15 InvoiceSmash

One of the benefits of being a leader in cloud-based spend management solutions is that you can push innovative enhancements to customers rapidly and efficiently. Coupa does so three times per year, with each release being something of an event as customers eagerly await the latest improvements to the platform.

We’re talking with Indirect Procurement guru David Hearn about which of the more than 45 new features he’s most excited about in Coupa Release 15.

Hyperlocalised Languages and Suggest-A-Translation™ (Patent Pending)

People access Coupa in over 100 countries and more than 20 different languages. Coupa has recognised that their customers have unique language requirements, and also that every organisation has a business language of its own. Hyperlocalised Languages allows customers to modify any of Coupa’s 20+ languages for their own purposes, with changes limited to their organisation only and not impacting other customers. Coupa also added Suggest-A-Translation to collect end-user translation suggestions and route to the customer administrator for real-time updates. This personalises the cloud platform in ways never before seen in this industry and is a key reason for the patent pending status.

David says: “The hyperlocalised language feature helps all users of the platform feel included in the management of the tool which is a huge benefit to getting 100% adoption. Language is important, and if an employee in Japan (for example) thinks that an on-screen word doesn’t fit their organisation’s business vocabulary, they can simply suggest a change to better suit their local business needs.”

Unified Platform Innovations and Enhanced Analytics:

Coupa has updated its sourcing recommendations engine to add real-time monitoring expenses, along with a new supplier risk recommendations engine, an inventory trends dashboard and enhanced embedded analytics functionality that adds more visibility and control. The platform embraces ‘suite synergy’, which means applications are fully unified, and the user experience improves with the use of multiple applications.

David says: “I can’t stress enough the importance of having everything seamless on one platform. Having the Coupa platform provide recommendations across all the ways an employee spends money is a game changer. The entire end-to-end process is electronically sharing data and pro-actively prompting procurement teams with new ideas for better sourcing. This enables those teams to focus on being strategic – and that’s a huge value. These latest updates help companies be more agile and make decisions faster”.

Contract Collaboration

Contract Collaboration is a new Coupa application that brings real-time authoring to contracts and extends Coupa Contract Lifecycle Management. It removes the need to use Microsoft Word for redlining documents passed around via email. The new application provides automatic versioning, captures key terms and conditions and transfers them electronically into the ordering system.

David says: “For as long as I’ve been a CPO, we’ve struggled with the entire lifecycle management of contracts. This latest application from Coupa captures the upfront authoring collaboration and links it to the actual transaction – no one has done this before in a unified suite that captures all spending from expenses, to invoices, to requisitions. There’s no longer a need to manually input the contracts terms and conditions into the system; it auto-fills the whole process. It frees up time to focus on better sourcing instead of clerical duties. It also reduces the risk of contract errors.”

Check out Coupa’s great video on Contract Collaboration (watch for the procurement professional smashing up his keyboard in frustration at Microsoft Word). 

InvoiceSmash

While we’re talking about smashing things, Coupa InvoiceSmash enables suppliers to automatically parse emailed PDF invoices so details are auto-filled into Coupa. One of the most exciting aspects of this product is its machine learning, which ensures the same mistake won’t be made twice and minimises the need for human intervention. The application is currently available in an early access program.

David says: “No one wants to use their limited headcount budget to fund clerical duties of manually entering data from invoices.  It’s archaic. Many have tried using OCR for invoice processing, but this is expensive and the human review and rework on invoices is extensive. InvoiceSmash automates this mundane data entry through accurate digital data extraction and means companies can remove most of their clerical team members and re-invest back into the business.”

Coupa released a clever parody video showing AP and AR professionals on the couch with a relationship counselor – their “marriage” can only be saved by InvoiceSmash.

And much more in Coupa R15:

For the full list of R15 updates, visit http://www.coupa.com/newsworthy/press-releases/release-15/

“The grass is greener where you water it” – Millennial wisdom at ISM2016

ISM and THOMASNET’s 30 Under 30 Supply Chain stars share their views on talent retention, the future of learning, and the importance of mentorship.

Millennials

ISM CEO Tom Derry is always at his most passionate when talking about millennials in procurement. He’s a huge advocate for young people coming into the profession, and is delighted that the number of millennials attending ISM’s annual conference has swollen by 166% over last year.

You could feel this change in demographics as you walk the halls of the Indianapolis Convention Centre. Excited, eager and engaged young people are networking with each other and taking every opportunity to meet seasoned professionals at the conference. The buzz is also palpable online, where the tech-savvy millennials are continuing the conversation on channels like Twitter, Procurious and LinkedIn.

30 Under 30 Supply Chain Stars

Now in its second year, the 30 Under 30 Supply Chain Stars award showcases millennials who are proactively tackling the ever-changing supply chain challenges facing global companies. The award was the brainchild of a partnership between ISM and THOMASNET.com, who were concerned at the fact that by 2525, 75% of the U.S. manufacturing workforce will be retired and there currently are not enough people coming into the field to backfill these roles. An entire generation of very senior leaders is on the cusp of retiring, and millennials will have to step into senior roles earlier than expected. “ISM and THOMASNET’s mission”, says Derry, “is to help them get ready”.

This year’s group of 30 winners were drawn from a host of diverse organisations, including big players like DuPont, Johnson & Johnson, Chrysler, John Deere, the U.S. Postal Service, Cisco and Shell. Smaller organisations are also represented, along with a smattering of the big U.S. tertiary institutions.

It’s something of a cliché to say that these young people demonstrate wisdom and insight well beyond their years, but they do. You only need to spend five minutes in conversation with these stars to dispel the stereotypes about an entitled and lazy generation. Their enthusiasm is infectious, along with their can-do attitude and eagerness for new challenges.

Here are three of the big issues discussed at ISM2016 by this year’s 30 Under 30 Winners:

  1. How organisations can retain millennials

Amy Georgi, 30 Under 30 Megawatt Winner and Program Manager at Fluke Electronics (Pennsylvania), bucks the retention trend. “I’ve been with the same company for nine years now”, she says. “In your career, you come to decision points – either your company responds well and you stay, or they don’t respond well and you leave”. Georgi also notes that millennials are not concerned with an 8am to 5pm work schedule – it’s all about outputs rather than clocking in, and flexibility should be a given as long as you continue to deliver and achieve.

Aisha Khan, Global Change Management and Communications Lead, Spend Management Strategy, Johnson & Johnson (New Jersey), comments that it’s important to be able to change roles while staying within an organisation. “Technology helps”, she says. “In the past, a lot of knowledge was lost whenever someone changed roles, but now we have databases that manage client and business relationships so successors can step into the role more easily.”

Georgi comments that organisations may complain about job-hopping millennials, but in an atmosphere of layoffs and pay reductions, employees understand that loyalty goes both ways. She does believe, however, that job-hopping isn’t the answer. “In Seattle, for example, it’s very easy to move around between the big organisations – Starbucks, Amazon and Microsoft – but colleagues of mine who have hopped around often find that their expectations are disappointed. I believe that the grass is greener where you water it. If you put a lot in, opportunities will grow and things will work out.”

  1. The changing face of learning

Logan Ferguson, Improvement Leader at DuPont (Delaware), stresses that organisations need to focus on offering millennials constant opportunities to learn and grow. ISM’s Mastery Model and eLearning opportunities, including the newly launched eISM provides the flexibility and adaptability that busy millennials require. “Online learning helps when I can’t make my training dates, and I can skip over content if I’m already confident in that area”, says Ferguson. “But for me, there’ll always be a place for face-to-face training, because some of the conversations that come out of the training sessions are potentially more valuable than the training itself.”

“Sitting in a classroom is very outdated”, says Khan. “E-learning and micro-learning isn’t just for millennials – older people love it, and they’re just as busy as we are. It’s the most effective way to engage and retain information, and that’s important for me in my change-management role.”

  1. The importance of mentorship

Having a mentor appears to be a strategy for success shared by all of the 30 Under 30 Supply Chain Stars. Khan comments that she and her fellow winners wouldn’t be here today without mentorship. “But beyond mentorship, sponsorship is incredibly important. Young people need to find leaders who’ll go into bat for us.” Georgi agrees: “The key is to find the right match for you.”

It’s not only about finding a mentor, but becoming a mentor yourself. Caitlin O’Toole, Associate Commodity Manager at Stryker (California), took great pride in an intern she mentored one summer. “It was amazing to watch her grow”, O’Toole says. “At the end of her senior year, she accepted a full-time job at Stryker and now runs the shipping team as a supervisor. It was great to be a part of her success, and I also learned so much from her.”

Read more about ISM and THOMASNET.com’s 30 Under 30 Recognition Program.

Smarter relationship management with ClientLoyalty

Procurious caught up with Kent Barnett, Chairman and CEO of ClientLoyalty at ISM2016, Indianapolis USA.

solving_loyalty_equation

CPOs worldwide recognise the need to keep track of supplier relationships to reduce costs, minimise risk, and uncover opportunities to grow their businesses. Voice of the supplier surveys are common, yet the technology employed is often archaic. Typically, stand-alone web-based surveys are sent out, with the results downloaded into spreadsheets and painstakingly interpreted by analysts. Subsequent surveys are often not linked to the ones that have gone before, and even if they are, it’s left to human analysts to make intelligent connections and interpret the trends.

“This is the gap we discovered in the business services space”, says Kent Barnett, CEO of ClientLoyalty. “Organisations rarely use data to manage the voice of the supplier process, and hence miss out on an enormous opportunity to employ a continuous improvement methodology. They also fail to put that data to work by translating the information into meaningful action.”

The potential impacts of failed business relationships are huge. For buyers, it means wasted time and painful switching costs, while for suppliers, it means churn. In Barnett’s words, “a revolving door is never good for business”. That’s why ClientLoyalty’s founders saw a need to create a supplier performance management system that would build long-term, meaningful relationships between buyers and suppliers.

How ClientLoyalty works

The easy-to-use system is built to optimise relationships through transparency. Users can input operational metrics (KPIs), which are reported using a simple green, yellow and red approach. The system gathers direct feedback and social sentiment, using in-built algorithms to scan the web and track suppliers’ reputation ratings.

The data is delivered in the form of alerts (risk flags), dashboards, and report-out tools. “We call it a data-driven solution”, says Barnett. “The system uses NPS (Net Promoter Score) and the AI generates recommendations on how to reduce detractors and raise your score. Six Sigma is another important part of our measurement methodology – it’s all about smarter relationship management.” All data is benchmarked across ClientLoyalty’s growing client base, showing the low end, high end, and where your supplier falls.

The artificial intelligence kicks in with recommendations on how to improve performance, and is one of the most valuable aspects of ClientLoyalty’s system. This aspect addresses the major gap and frustration many CPOs have with voice of the supplier surveys – there’s really no point in gathering data on relationship strength if you are not going to do anything with that information. ClientLoyalty’s automatically generated recommendations provide a factual base to create a targeted action plan that will improve supplier relationships and save you money.

The results

“We’re creating a business culture that’s based around accountable performance, one company at a time”, says Barnett. “The key is having clear and transparent communications, with the ultimate goal of turning business relationships into business partnerships.”

ClientLoyalty is software that optimises relationships between B2B buyers and suppliers, helping organisations continuously improve by analysing direct feedback, social sentiment and operational data to create stronger bonds of loyalty. If your organization is a buyer of goods and services and needs to manage critical supplier relationships, or a supplier of goods and services and needs to manage strategic client relationships, ClientLoyalty can help you connect with your business partners using data-driven management tools.

Alan Mulally – The Secret to Success in One Slide

“This is everything I know, folks” – Former President and CEO of Ford, Alan Mulally, shares the sum of his knowledge in one slide at ISM2016.

Alan Mulally

ISM’s keynote speaker Alan Mulally has one of those CVs that’s exhausting just to listen to. Alongside his nine-year stint as President and CEO of Ford, he served as Executive Vice President of Boeing, and CEO of Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

He was named to the Google board of directors in July 2014, served on President Obama’s US Export Council, and the advisory board of NASA.

He was named in Fortune’s 50 Greatest Leaders list, voted one of Time Magazine’s 100 most influential people in 2009, and voted 2011 CEO of the Year by Chief Executive magazine. Mulally is also a fellow of the UK’s Royal Academy of Engineering. 

One Slide to Say it All

“If it isn’t a Boeing, you shouldn’t be going”, says Mulally. He worked at Boeing for no less than 37 years, notably as a chief engineer for the avionics and flight management systems for a number of major Boeing projects, including the 747 and 777. As CEO of Boeing Commercial, he launched the 787, and was at Boeing during the 9/11 attacks, horrified to see a commercial airplane being used as a weapon.

Boeing was shaken to its core by the event, with production dropping from 620 planes a year to 280. “Not many companies can sustain a loss like that and remain viable”, says Mulally. Eventually, Boeing returned as the number one avionics organisation in the world.

The average airplane has about four million parts, and at the height of a new project, you might have over one million people working on the design. This is where Mulally learned how to develop a skilled and motivated team, and his principles and practices around working together led him to success after success at both Boeing and Ford.

Mulally brings up a one-page chart with 11 bullet points.  “This is everything I know, folks”, he tells the audience, and he means it. Whenever an audience member asks a question, he brings this chart back up on screen, selects the relevant point, and talks to it. Here’s the list in full:

Principles and practices around working together:

  • People first
  • Everyone is included
  • Compelling vision, comprehensive strategy and relentless implementation
  • Clear performance goals
  • One plan
  • Facts and Data
  • Everyone knows the plan, the status and areas that need special attention
  • Propose a plan, positive, “find a way” attitude
  • Respect, listen, help, and appreciate each other
  • Emotional resilience – trust the process
  • Have fun – enjoy the journey and each other.

Making sure “everyone knows the plan” is achieved through colour-coded project charts. “Every Thursday morning, we’d link up everyone around the world and colour-code the charts”, Mulally says. “Red means we’ve identified a problem – which is great – and we’re working on it.”

Ford Motors Turnaround

Mulally took these colour-coded charts over to Ford when he took on the role of CEO at the behest of Bill Ford, grandson of Henry. There he found a very different culture, and at first, people didn’t “get” the colour coding. “We had about 320 different charts”,

Mulally says, “I explained the coding, and the business leaders went away and had their charts colour coded. At the following meeting, I was surprised to see chart after chart all colour-coded green”.

The organisation was forecast to lose 17 billion that year, yet there wasn’t any red or yellow to be seen. The problem, Mulally discovered, was a culture in which business leaders would hide problems, making issues disappear rather than highlighting them as opportunities.

When a leader named Mark Fields was finally brave enough to place some red on his chart (due to a major production issue), Mulally responded by clapping in the leadership meeting. “People were looking at me, looking at Mark, waiting for him to be fired”, he says. “They thought the clapping was a signal for some bouncers to come in and remove Mark from the room!”

But Fields wasn’t fired. Instead, Mulally treated the production issue as a rallying point, showing Ford’s business leaders how to come together to figure out the problem, and also demonstrating that he valued Mark’s honesty by seating him next to the CEO at each subsequent meeting. Mark’s charts went from red, to yellow, to green.

And the following week? 320 beautiful, rainbow charts.

Deep Trouble

When Mulally took over at Ford, the company was in deep trouble with the aforementioned $17 billion loss in 2009. Ford was sized for 26 per cent market share in the US, but only had 16 per cent, losing money on every brand and vehicle. Mulally responded by focusing on the Ford brand over all others and consolidating the nameplates down from 97 to 15.

He launched a restructuring plan to turn around the losses and market share, and his cost-cutting initiatives led to the company’s first profitable quarter in two years.

In 2006, Mulally led the effort for Ford to borrow $23.6 billion, mortgaging all of Ford’s assets to overhaul the company and protect it from recession. This decision meant that Ford was the only company of the “Detroit Three” (Ford, GM and Chrysler) that did not have to take a government loan during the automotive industry crisis of 2008–9.

Value of Procurement

Mulally recognised the enormous value of procurement, especially in his aggressive cost-cutting endeavours. He promoted procurement to a leadership position within the company – something which had never been done at Ford – and ensured all of the business units around the world were working together with procurement.

Suppliers were also a major part of Mulally’s turnaround, and Ford rose from a position of second-last preferred customer, to number three today.

Today, Ford is the number one brand in the US, and the fastest-growing car manufacturer globally. It builds the first, third and sixth best-selling vehicles in the world presently. Mulally attributes this success to his eleven-point slide – in the end, it’s all about building the right culture and motivating your people.

The Double Edged Sword for Fast Fashion Brands

The impact of fast fashion can be seen on the high street and in the newspapers. But the trend may be about to take down one of the world’s most recognisable brands.

Gap Brands

There are few people in the world who wouldn’t recognise Gap’s brands on the high street, in shopping malls, or on the Internet. However, the fashion and retail giant is facing up to major issues thanks to the ever-growing fast fashion trends.

With consumers moving their shopping habits away from in-store purchasing, Gap may seek bankruptcy in order to help it transform its business model and organisational set up.

Sinking Sales

All three of Gap’s major brands – Gap, Old Navy and Banana Republic – have seen sales decrease again in the first quarter of 2016. In April 2016, Gap sales dropped by 4 per cent, Old Navy by 10 per cent, and Banana Republic by 7 per cent.

The company is now on a run of 24 straight quarters without a growth in comparable sales, and 13 straight months of declining sales. In the face of this, Gap’s shares are down by 9 per cent since the start of the year, leading many analysts to suggest that these brands still aren’t learning lessons from fast fashion retailers such as H&M, Uniqlo and Zara.

Gap is yet to successfully match the design-to-shelf timelines of fast fashion, with many of its products still taking up to nine months to hit the shops. This is roughly double the length of time that it takes fast fashion trends to reach consumers on average.

Wider Impact

It’s not just Gap who are suffering from the fast fashion spread. Other US-based brands, including J. Crew, Abercrombie & Fitch, have experienced a sales downturn, while traditional retail icons, such as Sears and Macy’s, have both closed a number of stores this year.

In Australia, Wesfarmers Ltd, the country’s biggest company by sales value, announced its worst yearly profit in two years, and looks set for its first net loss in almost 20 years. The organisation puts its decreasing sales down to the impact of fast fashion brands on its in-country discount stores.

Double-Edged Sword

However, not all is rosy in the garden for the fast fashion retailers. Uniqlo appear to be struggling to gain a foothold in the US market, opening fewer stores than anticipated, and with slower than anticipated sales.

Chief Executive, Tadashi Yanai, has gone to the USA to assess the company’s strategy and to work out how to raise the brand’s profile outside of major cities. The company has consistently lost money in its US operations since expanding there five years ago, but still maintains a plan to open over 100 stores in the country in the coming years.

Could this be a turning point for retail brands? Or is it just the natural progression of a business’ rise and fall, just sped up in line with the increasing pace of change in trends and demands? Whichever it is, it will be interesting to see how the fashion industry changes in the coming years.

We’ve been keeping track of the major stories making the procurement and supply chain news this week…

Procurement “Underpaid and Unrecognised”

  • A new salary survey report from Next Level Purchasing Association (NLPA) has suggested that procurement professionals are being underpaid.
  • The Purchasing & Supply Management Salaries 2016 report has shown that average global salaries for the profession have decreased by 7.5 per cent.
  • This leaves the average global salary around $53,000 USD, although the average covers professionals at all organisational levels, and across six continents.
  • The NLPA has suggested the best way for professionals to combat this is to get themselves recognised for value contributions to their organisation.

Read more at Supply Chain Quarterly

ISM Announces Annual Awards

  • ISM has announced its Persons of the Year, Affiliate of the Year and Affiliates of Excellence Awards at ISM2016
  • The Persons of the Year Awards sit across five categories: Education; Innovation; Leadership; Marketing & Communications; and Volunteer of the Year.
  • The Affiliate of the Year Award, won by ISM Cleveland this year, recognises excellence in core competencies, membership growth, and professional development opportunities.
  • ISM Cleveland was also one of the eight affiliates recognised with Affiliate Excellence Awards, for demonstrating an awareness and distinction in their professional operations.

Read more at ISM

Oil Settles Under $50 as Supply Worries Resurface

  • Oil prices touched  the $50-per-barrel mark on Thursday 26 May as production outages brought a faster-than-expected recovery to an oversupplied market.
  • Global benchmark Brent crude oil was down 35 cents at $49.40, having earlier risen as high as $50.51 in intraday trading.
  • Adding to outage concerns, a source at Chevron said the producer’s activities in Nigeria had been “grounded” by a militant attack, worsening a situation that had already restricted hundreds of thousands of barrels from reaching the market.
  • Investors will be watching next month’s OPEC meeting for signs of an output hike now that oil had reached $50.

Read more at CNBC

Adidas Unveils New Robotic Factory in Germany

  • Adidas, the German maker of sportswear and equipment, has announced it will start marketing its first series of shoes manufactured by robots in Germany from 2017.
  • The company is facing rising production costs in Asia where it employs around one million workers.
  • It plans to open similar factories in the UK or France following a test period in the third quarter of this year.
  • Arch-rival Nike is also reportedly developing a robot-operated factory.

Read more at The Guardian

Hyperloop Reveals New Material for Capsules

  • Hyperloop, the revolutionary transportation system and brainchild of Elon Musk, has announced more details on the manufacture of their travel pods.
  • Vibranium, more commonly known as the material used for Captain America’s shield, is the name for a new alloy created specifically for Hyperloop.
  • The material is made of woven carbon fiber, and the company claims it is ten times stronger and five times lighter than steel, and eight times stronger and 1.5 times lighter than aluminum.
  • Vibranium has also been designed to be a ‘smart’ material, able to relay real-time data on temperature, damage, structural integrity.

Read more at Futurism

The Carrot and Stick Approach to Open Booking

Open booking is a massive problem for organisations globally, and one of the largest compliance challenges facing procurement.

Open Booking

In the US, over 50 per cent of hotel bookings, and 24 per cent of airline bookings occur outside the parameters of corporate travel programmes. The issue costs organisations $36 billion per year, and is one of the largest compliance challenges for procurement.

But what can be done about it?

Travel Management

Ethan Laub knows travel software. He founded a startup called TripScanner, a travel booking system giving clients the ability to book on any travel website while achieving compliance with their organisation’s travel policies. His startup was acquired by Coupa in mid-2015, and Laub now works at Coupa as a Director of Product Management.

Here at Coupa Inspire, Laub is running a session on open booking. Most of the audience members manage travel in some fashion, and all of them are frustrated by compliance issues. The consequences of open booking are potentially very serious. According to Laub, it can effect:

  • Risk management: if there’s an emergency, you need to know where your employees are and be able to contact them immediately.
  • Sourcing: open booking hampers procurement’s ability to negotiate discounts with travel providers.
  • Policy: making sure people are spending smart and within budget.
  • Visibility: not having any data on travel spend, hampering your ability to make decisions. 

What drives open booking?

Laub asks for a quick show of hands on why people would decide to avoid the corporate travel system. The top five reasons are:

  1. Better Deals: employees who claim they “got a better deal” outside the approved system.
  2. Conference Booking: conferences with hotel discounts where bookings must go through the conference portal.
  3. User Experience: people are increasingly confident in booking personal travel and are unfavourably comparing the quick and easy experience with clunky corporate travel booking.
  4. The Sharing Economy: people preferring to use companies like Uber and AirBnB, often unavailable on the corporate site.
  5. Airlines and Hotels Pushing Direct Bookings: otherwise individuals can’t claim loyalty points, free Wifi, or other perks.

What’s the solution?

Having established that open booking is a serious issue, and explained why people are avoiding company travel sites in droves, Laub recommends travel managers take an approach that best suits their organisation’s culture.

Stick Approach

  • Prohibit open bookings and refuse to reimburse.
  • Flag out-of-policy post-bookings.
  • Escalate repeat offenders to managers.

Carrot Approach

  • Improve User Experience

Over the past 10 years, consumer sites have become increasingly user friendly, while the policy-focused corporate booking tools haven’t kept up. There are a lot of attractive, easy-to-use applications on the market that can improve UX for your site. Some tips:

  • Ensure you have as few steps as possible
  • Explain to travellers why things are the way they are (policy)
  • Communicate the realities of the travel program.
  • Nuance the site to enforce your policies behind the scenes: users shouldn’t be able to see the out-of-policy options
  • Show fare comparisons to prove your negotiated fares are the best option.
  • Reward savings

If the employee comes in under their travel budget, the company shares half of the savings with the employee. This can be considered part of the gamification process of employee management.

  • Clear guidelines

Ensuring that you have clear guidelines for your employees is key. Employees need to understand when it is okay to book outside of the system, and when they need to be following process.

What does the future hold for business travel management?

Check out this video from Coupa that shows the exciting future of corporate travel artificial intelligence. This system anticipates all of your needs and is so intelligent that you’ll fall in love with it – in the case of this hapless user, literally!

eISM – Introducing the Future of Learning

People don’t want a one-size-fits-all solution for their professional development. eISM aims to provide a set of flexible options to take e-learning forward.

eISM Learning on Demand

Whether skills are learned through small chunks, longer competency-based training, or direct job experiences, there’s no one-size-fits-all solution when it comes to gaining career knowledge and experience.

ISM’s Senior VP of Programs and Product Development, M.L. Peck, understands this, and has made it the foundation of ISM’s exciting new eISM initiative. “E-learning is the future of learning – it’s how our customers are consuming information”, says Peck. “But just like face-to-face learning, it has to allow for individuals’ learning styles”.

That’s why ISM has come up with no fewer than three completely different methods for varied learning styles within its eISM offering: Just-in-Time learning, Self-Guided learning, and Guided Learning. It’s up to the user to choose the method that best fits in with their busy schedule and learning style.

ISM’s e-learning is designed to support ISM’s Mastery Model, providing the training needed to equip practitioners with the skills and certification to master various competencies and sub-competencies within the model.

The content itself is pulled from ISM’s impressive 101 years of supply chain leadership, drawing upon its global network of subject matter experts to create a remarkable library of digital knowledge.

Just-in-Time Learning

Peck talks about the “just-for-me, just-in-time, and just-enough” approach. For example, if you have a negotiation in an hour and need an answer immediately, all you have to do is search for your answer based on Mastery Model competencies and sub-competencies. You’ll find the answer they’re looking for in a short video of no more than 15 minutes in length (micro-learning). Information is delivered in multiple, engaging methods, including:

  • whiteboard animations,
  • live interviews (Q and A’s) with executives and leaders in industry,
  • short lectures from industry experts,
  • fun activities, games and flashcards.

Self-Paced Learning

Self-paced learning courses are longer, on average an hour in length each. Users are given access to a wealth of knowledge with which they can create their own schedule and work at their own speed. This method is ideal for exploring a broad topic, or for diving deep into a sub-competency.

Guided learning

Nothing will replace the benefits of face-to-face learning, but eISM’s Guided Learning comes close. It includes an online instructor and peer-learning, ideal for people who want to make contact with the subject-matter experts or who are uncomfortable with learning a completely new concept alone.

The facilitated courses range from three to five weeks in length, running five days per week, in which the learner logs on and completes an activity of approximately 40 minutes each, or participates in a 1-hour weekly webinar (to be viewed live or recorded). The facilitator sends reminders to complete exercises.

Getting started

For more information on eISM, including subscription and pricing, visit the Education Area on ISM’s website. The best way to start is by using ISM’s self-assessment tool, which will rate your skill-set against the Mastery Model sub-competencies and identify gaps in your knowledge.

From there, find the learning approach that best suits you, whether it’s small, focused micro-learning, longer self-guided courses or the facilitated classes. “People are craving content that address specific needs at specific times”, says Peck. “eISM offers our customers that choice”.

Selling While Shy: Introverts in Sales

While it sounds counter-intuitive to declare introverts make the best salespeople, their characteristics may truly make them a perfect fit for a sales job.

introverts1

Last month, Procurious looked at the work of Susan Cain, and assessed whether introverts could thrive in procurement. Now, on the other side of the coin, with help from College Match Up, we look at why introverts actually might be the best sellers too.

Best Sellers

Introverts make up 50.7 per cent of the personality types in the United States. An illustrated chart of the introverted personality types shows the percentage of different introverts in the general public.

Sales jobs are expected to increase by 5 per cent in the next decade, and by 2024 there are a projected 778,000 new jobs to be created. As these jobs are created, new people will be searched for to fill them, and industry specialists will be looking for a particular skill set for a good salesperson.

Traditionally, the most defined skills for people in a sales role have included:

  • Assertiveness,
  • Self-awareness,
  • Empathy,
  • Problem-solving skills,
  • Optimism.

Not exactly a set of attributes that you would associate with introverts or introverted people. So why would introverts be useful, and potentially better, in these roles?

Key Attributes

Well, introverts are often quiet and thoughtful which works well in a sales setting, because customers are often put off by the high-energy assertive employees.

Introverts themselves prefer to be helped by other introverts, and at the same time, introverts communicate best one-on-one, which is great for a sales role, because they can really connect with their customers.

Introverts are known to form few deep attachments rather than many, shallow friendships. In a sales environment, this works because they can form deeper relationships with their customers than extroverts, leading to people trusting them more.

Finally, introverts are known for being reflective. This again ties into the sales environment, as they will be looking back on their performance and working out how they can do things better next time.

Need Convincing?

So, what kind of career options are there for introverts who want to try working in sales? Introverts might try out being advertising agents, real estate brokers, sales engineers, or travel agents to name a few.

If you still need convincing, you can check out this infographic from College Match Up:

Introverts in Sales

So what do you think? Do you think that introverts would make better sales people? Could there be a way to leverage an introvert relationship between buyers and suppliers? Tell us your thoughts in the comments below.

Technology Will Expose Supply Chain Deficiencies in Near Future

In the not-too-distant future, technology will reveal everything about products, and expose all the supply chain deficiencies that exist.

Supply Chain Deficiencies
Molly Harriss Olson, CEO, Fairtrade Australia and New Zealand

Smartphones, embedded with the technology that enables consumers to scan items in the supermarket and see the entire supply chain process, will happen sooner rather than later, according to Fairtrade Australia and New Zealand CEO, Molly Harriss Olsen.

“We’re getting to the point that we can build these technologies. Mark my words, it’s on the way and it will be instantaneous. The world of connectivity isn’t coming – it’s here,” she told the room.

Cleaning Up Supply Chains

While the procurement industry well and truly knows about the challenges of cleaning up the supply chain, the fact that the technology that would automatically expose supply chain deficiencies was met by furrowed brows. As she made the statement, you could literally hear a pin drop in the large conference room.

Fairtrade assists marginalised producers (mostly in the agricultural space) and addresses issues like child labour, environmental issues, water usage, waste management, ensuring the employment of women and helping these farmers to have profitability in their farms and a robust foundation upon which they can succeed.

This includes the 30 million coffee farmers around the world who are at the mercy of speculative financial markets.

She impressed on the procurement professionals in the room that they had the power in their hands to either resolve the problems the planet faces in the future, or contribute to it.

“The biggest leadership decision you need to make as a procurement leader is implementation. Once you make that, you can’t even begin to imagine what the impact might be.”

Moving Away From Economics

Harriss Olsen was asked by a major Australian food brand representative, whether Australian businesses were embracing the initiatives implemented by Fairtrade.

“On the whole, I’d say we’re on the edge of embracing it. I’d urge you to take the next step. We need to stop making every decision based on economic grounds. We are either part of the solution, or we’re part of the problem. All our decisions are based on improving the planet. Virtually everything we can buy is traded on the stock market, and value the farmer gets on a daily basis,” she says.

“It might come as a surprise to you that while we got rid of slavery some time ago, there is still an extraordinary amount of it going on today. And until is blows up in your face, you often don’t know what you’re dealing with it.”

Coupa Inspire: Rethinking the Possible with Rob Bernshteyn

Lights, music, action! Hugo Britt recounts his experience of the spectacular opening keynote at this year’s Coupa Inspire conference.

Coupa Inspire

The Faculty’s Hugo Britt recently attended Coupa Inspire ’16, a dynamic conference bringing the Coupa community together in San Francisco, California. 

Doof, doof, doof, doof.

I’m sitting in the Grand Ballroom of San Francisco’s stunning Westin St Francis hotel and the place is packed. The Coupa Inspire ’16 conference is just about to be launched, and all the seats are taken. People are lining the walls and spilling into an adjoining hall, complete with a big screen set up to cope with the numbers.

Outside the hotel lies San Francisco’s famous Union Square, most of which is taken up by an enormous pavilion bearing the Coupa Inspire logo. This is where the exhibiters spruik their products, and also where the 2000 or so delegates gather for breakfasts, lunches and networking.

The tent itself is generating a lot of interest among the locals – I was stopped by onlookers on more than one occasion, who asked me what the tent was for and what was going on in there. You could even hear the word “Coupa” shouted by tour guides from the top decks of the red buses regularly cruising past the square.

In the tent it’s dark, with spotlights flashing around the room, and the music is turned up LOUD. I can feel my ribcage vibrating: doof, doof, doof, doof. The guy at the sound desk receives a cue and, unbelievably, doubles the volume. Into this buzzing, clubby atmosphere, walks Coupa CEO Rob Bernshteyn, and the crowd roars.

Cultural Buzz

Coupa has to be applauded for the vibrant culture it has created. The 600-strong Coupa team’s enthusiasm is infectious, and the marketing is superb, giving the whole conference the atmosphere of a celebration. This celebratory buzz can be felt in the brilliant ‘Freedom‘ video, featuring the team lip syncing and dancing around their head office and Union Square.

Bernshteyn stresses that Coupa isn’t a technology company. Rather, it’s a “value as a service” organisation. Simply put, it’s about discovering, realising and optimising the value for its customers.

The numbers are impressive. Coupa has been adopted by hundreds of businesses globally, representing millions of users, and over two million suppliers on its open business network. Together, Coupa users conduct tens of millions of transactions per year, with approximately $200 billion in spend under management.

Building on Data

All of this activity on the system generates a vast amount of data, and the developers at Coupa take full advantage of its potential. “Think about what can happen”, says Bernshteyn, “when we combine the insights around the billions of dollars running through our system”. Customers have access to real-time benchmarking that shows how you are tracking against the entire Coupa community.

Bernshteyn also takes the opportunity to launch Perfect-Fit Benchmarks, which enable users to understand savings, invoice cycle time and more by industry and by category. This vertical application means the AI can predict the right time to buy specific products and services based on historical data.

Bernshteyn circles back to Coupa’s catch-cry: rethinking the possible through measurable value creation.

The software’s popularity comes down to the platform’s simplicity, efficiency and ease-of-use, designed to gain maximum visibility of what you’re buying and who you’re buying it from. The phrase “suite synergy” (at first I thought they were saying “sweet” synergy), is used constantly at this conference, referring to the single unified platform that has vanquished the decades-old frustration of software products not speaking with each other.

As Bernshteyn leaves the stage, the DJ enthusiastically takes the opportunity to rattle our eardrums again. I walk past him on the way out, and he has an excited gleam in his eye – he knows that we’ve got a huge event ahead, with more inspirational keynote speakers (including Sir Richard Branson), more exciting product launches…and plenty more opportunities to turn the volume all the way up.

Stay tuned for more from Coupa Inspire in the coming days!