All posts by Procurious HQ

5 Big Reasons to Register for Big Ideas 2016

If you’ve not yet had a chance to register for Big Ideas 2016 on the 21st of April, don’t worry, you still have time!

Register for Big Ideas 2016

There are so many ways for you to get involved with the Big Ideas Summit as a digital delegate. We want your input so you can help to shape the agenda and amplify your Big Ideas for procurement through our global procurement community.

The more people that are involved, the better and more meaningful our discussions will be. Together, we can drive change.

If you’re still not quite convinced that this is the event for you, take a look at these five compelling reasons to register for Big Ideas 2016 right now!

  1. Hear from our Top Speakers

When you join the Big Ideas Summit Group on Procurious, you will automatically register for Big Ideas 2016 and gain access to exclusive discussions and footage from the event. You’ll be able to hear from some of the most influential thought-leaders in procurement, supply chain and media.

We’ve secured a high calibre of thought leaders and keynote speakers, including:

  • Chris Sawchuk, Principal and Global Procurement Advisory Practice Leader, The Hackett Group
  • Gabe Perez, Vice President, Strategy & Market Development, Coupa Software
  • Paul Markillie, Innovation Editor, The Economist
  • Lucy Siegle, Journalist, Broadcast and Writer

You can find out more about our speakers here.

  1. Get Your Questions Answered

Take advantage of this unique opportunity to submit your questions, again via our Big Ideas Summit Group, to our influencers and see how they tackle your toughest challenges on the spot.

On Twitter? You can also submit your questions by tweeting us @procurious_ using the hashtag: #BigIdeas2016.

  1. Expand Your Global Network

The value of networking with your global peers shouldn’t be underestimated. There’s someone out there who knows the answer to your most pressing procurement questions. And they are waiting to share their experience and knowledge with the community.

They’ve walked in your shoes, so why not tap into their experience? The Big Ideas Summit is as much about championing the use of social media as it is the big issues.

If you’re new to our community and haven’t yet got involved, this is the perfect opportunity to do so.

We’ll be on the lookout for the digital delegates with the biggest and best ideas. And by leveraging our network of thought-leaders, we can work together to develop these ideas, introduce influential contacts to your network, and help make them a reality.

  1. Tell Us Your Big Idea

As well as hearing our influencers’ Big Ideas, by registering you’ll be able to submit your own. We believe everyone has a unique vantage point in the industries, communities and businesses they work in. So here is an opportunity to get your Big Idea across, and boost your own personal brand.

Procurious wants you to share your ideas with our community by creating a 60 second video. It’s super easy to do this on your computer, laptop or phone – whatever works for you! We’ve provided some more detailed advice here on how to submit your Big Idea.

  1. Access Exclusive Content from the Day

Expand your knowledge, stay informed, and be inspired through swathes of exclusive content only available to Procurious members.

On the day we’ll be updating the Group Page with photos from the event, highlights from our sessions, and updates on the discussions. In the days following you’ll be able to watch full videos from our think-tanks, as well as hear all of our influencers’ Big Ideas, digest articles and interviews from those who were in attendance.

So what are you waiting for? Even though there are just 3 days to go, you still have time to take advantage of everything the Big Ideas Summit 2016 has to offer.

Register for Big Ideas 2016 at www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Autism Works for Johnson & Johnson

Big Ideas can help provide greater benefits than cost savings. Timo Worrall tells Procurious how Johnson & Johnson are working with organisations like Autism Works to help a wider community find work.

Timo Worall - Autism Works

For people with autism, finding a job can be a near-impossible task, with recruitment processes stacked against them from the very beginning.

However, Johnson & Johnson, one of the world’s leading consumer healthcare organisations, is supporting organisations like Autism Works, proving that thinking outside of the box to include the people farthest away from employment opportunities is achievable. 

This Big Idea is part of J&J’s ‘Social Impact through Procurement’ initiative, which has committed to spend £15 million with social enterprises, like Autism Works, by 2020.

Timo Worrall, Senior Category Manager (FM EMEA) at J&J, heads up the team responsible for driving this procurement-led initiative through the J&J business in the UK.

At the Big Ideas Summit, Timo will join a high-profile panel to discuss social and sustainable procurement and ethics, their impact on the procurement profession, and what procurement leaders could and should be doing to embed these practices.

Procurious caught up with Timo ahead of the Big Ideas Summit.

I am excited to meet with people who may already be or are open to working with Social Enterprises. I hope by the end of the meeting everyone feels the same.

Tell us a bit about Yourself

I am a father of two boys, and live with my family in Woking. We have just started to renovate our 1950’s bungalow, and are presently living on a building site. The kids seem to like it more than my wife and I do, but we are looking forward to the end result!

What are the main challenges that face social enterprises in the UK?

Making the connection to companies who don’t yet know the value of working with Social Enterprises. Once they find these opportunities, how they can meet our sometimes complex requirements, and then grow in a sustainable manner that works for us both.

Can you tell us a bit more about Johnson & Johnson’s work with social enterprises?

We have a program called Social Impact through Procurement. Our goal by 2020 is to spend £15 million with Social Enterprises and create 150 jobs for those people furthest from the jobs market. We are presently working with a wide range of Social Enterprises across many categories.

One of these companies is Autism Works, who we made a video with to show how this particular social enterprise helps those with autism and other autism spectrum conditions.

What should procurement leaders be doing to help drive the social and sustainable procurement agenda?

Firstly understand it and tell your business stakeholders the benefits of doing this. Give your teams a little extra time to look for good social enterprises, and work with them to build sustainable solutions. Then tell the good news stories and build on the success.

Timo Worrall will talk about these topics in more detail during one of our panel discussions at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Don’t Get Left Out of the Global Digital Brainstorm

It’s just days away now! Join the global digital brainstorm at the Procurious Big Ideas Summit on April 21, and make your ideas heard.

Global Digital Brainstorm

Attention, procurement and supply management innovators – stake your claim in the future of your profession!

Time is running out to add your voice to the Procurious Big Ideas Summit, an unprecedented global digital brainstorm and think tank event scheduled for April 21. Make sure your ideas are heard as Procurious connects 50 top executives, with its 13,000 worldwide members to solve thorny issues and harness new opportunities – together.

“Procurement professionals are at the centre of the Big Ideas Summit, driving and shaping this global digital brainstorm,” said Tania Seary, Founding Chairman of Procurious, the leading free online business community for the procurement and supply management profession. “We are forging a new kind of innovation movement, where everyone has equal power to ignite significant change.”

Sponsored by IBM, the Institute for SupplyManagement (ISM), The Hackett Group, and Coupa, the free Summit will feature several provocative sessions. Leaders from these organisations as well as AstraZeneca, The World Bank, and more will address the mega-trends, disruptions, blind spots, risks, and technologies that are already leading to a “procurement revolution”.

Getting Involved

With so much at stake, the conversation is already beginning, as delegates submit advance questions for the speakers, discuss everything from supplier management to sustainability, and share videos with their own big ideas.

On April 21, the dialogue will be amplified as delegates log onto Procurious for digital and video updates, and engage on other social media channels to become even more involved. They will be checking out the action on Twitter, staying up-to-date with live tweets from the event, and tweeting back @procurious_ using the hashtag #BigIdeas2016. LinkedIn and Facebook will also be rich sources of event news and discussions.

From April 22 onward, the dialogue will continue as Procurious shares speakers’ and influencers’ Big Ideas videos, footage, blog posts, and more.

Last year’s event generated close to one million impressions, as the worldwide procurement community woke up to the power of collective innovation.

To join this year’s event now, go to www.BigIdeasSummit.com, where you will be able to register for free membership on Procurious, join the Big Ideas Summit group and shape the future of procurement by getting involved in what promises to be a fantastic global digital brainstorm.

Tweet this: Help innovate procurement at #BigIdeas2016Summit, April 21 www.bigideassummit.com

We’ve also been keeping an eye on all the procurement and supply chain headlines this week…

Japanese Earthquake Supply Chain Disruption

  • Two earthquakes in Japan at the end of last week, tragically killing 41 people, are set to cause major disruptions to Japanese and global supply chains.
  • Toyota are one of a number of manufacturers who will be suspending production at facilities in southern Japan due to a shortage of parts or factory damage
  • Organisations in Japan have been making changes to their supply chains to mitigate risks from natural disasters following the earthquake and tsunami in 2011.
  • It is thought that the current disruptions will test these changes, and new measures put in place to help mitigate these risks.

Read more at Reuters

Cybersecurity Worker Shortage

  • According to a recent survey, nearly two-thirds of Millennials were unaware they could pursue a career in cybersecurity.
  • This has raised concerns that there could be a shortage of cybersecurity workers in the coming years.
  • The survey, commissioned by Raytheon and the National Cyber Security Alliance, also showed that 58 per cent of the Millennials surveyed were not taught about ways to stay safe online.
  • Universities and colleges are now working to introduce programmes which integrate cybersecurity into existing computing and computer science courses.

Read more at Government Technology

SMART by GEP Contracted

  • SMART by GEP®, has been selected by a leading provider of building maintenance and facility services across North America.
  • Enterprise sourcing and procurement teams at the company will use SMART by GEP to streamline and automate their entire source-to-pay (S2P) workflow.
  • SMART by GEP provides complete source-to-pay functionality in one unified cloud-native platform.
  • SMART by GEP hosts $50 billion spend per year across 140 countries, for organisations such as AstraZeneca, DuPont and Maersk

Read more at SMART by GEP

H&M Releases 2015 Sustainability Report

  • H&M published its Conscious Actions Sustainability Report 2015 late last week, highlighting the actions the retailer has taken during the 12 month period on supply chain sustainability
  • The report shows a steady increase of sustainably sourced materials, and progress when it comes to the use of renewable electricity.
  • H&M now sources 20 per cent of its materials sustainably, as well as using 78 per cent renewable energy sources for its global electricity usage (up from 27 per cent in 2014).
  • The report also highlighted the signing of the Global Framework Agreement with IndustriALL Global Union and IF Metall, aimed at working towards payment of fair living wages

Read more at Business Wire

Big Ideas in UK & Public Procurement

Social value and collaboration – just the tip of the iceberg for the professionals in UK and public procurement.

Public Procurement

Ahead of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 this Thursday, we are taking a look at the key issues facing procurement in the coming years. We have asked experts and influencers in our community to share their Big Ideas on the themes we will be discussing on the day.

The concept of social value is one that has gained more traction, driven by public procurement professionals across the world. It also links heavily into the idea that procurement as a whole needs to collaborate and work together, something that we’ll also be discussing at Big Ideas.

We spoke to some of our UK-based professionals in the Procurious community to understand the big ideas in the UK and public procurement.

Helen Mackenzie, Head of Procurement, Scottish Local Government

Power Profiles - Helen MackenzieAs those of us working in or with public bodies across the world move forward through our journey of procurement reform, our challenge is now shifting from one where tackling corruption, compliance and procedures are key to one where we’re must add value whenever we can.

At the front end of the process, there’s been some innovative work looking at commissioning services using open problems. Barcelona and Stockholm have had some great results by shifting from specifying the service they wanted, to specifying the problem they wanted to solve.

Adding social value to public procurement contracts continues to be expected by policy makers. In Scotland, we’re including requirements to ensure fair work practices, including the payment of the living wage, and community benefit clauses, which have been used to create added value. For instance 1,000s of apprenticeships have been created as part of our contracts.

Ensuring our communities are involved at the heart of our procurement processes is perhaps the holy grail of public procurement. It’s something which isn’t easy to do, it’s going to require us to stretch our stakeholder engagement skills. The prize will be contracts which target resources where they are needed, people who feel public spending is actually being targeted at them and outcomes which will deliver real improvements in people’s lives.

If we’re successful in shifting our focus away from what we’ve always bought, to what we need to solve with community engagement and social value at the heart of what we do, we’ll certainly secure great contracts and we’ll make the savings we need to deliver in the process.

Jane Lynch, Lecturer, Cardiff Business School

Jane LynchLeading organisations today redesign processes for improving customer experience. This, they argue, leads to more effective business operations.

However, this may lead to initial process inefficiencies (i.e. higher process costs). Who and what should drive process improvement for our business? Is it the supply chain, the organisation’s strategy or is it all about the customer?

Chris Cliffe, Director, CJC Procurement Ltd

Power Profiles - Chris CliffeBig Ideas and innovation in procurement is certainly needed. However, not at the expense of the basics.

Think of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and apply it to procurement. As a profession, and as individual professionals, we cannot ‘self-actualise’ until we have satisfied the more fundamental needs of our roles. 

As a professional collective, we need to get a lot better at collaborating as individuals, and as a profession, to ensure that the ‘physiological’ and ‘safety’ needs are met, which in our scenario is the basics such as spend analysis, market knowledge, proficiency at transacting procurement processes (particularly the regulated public sector processes).

With that foundation satisfied, we can move on to the ‘Love & Belonging’ and ‘Esteem’ needs, which for us is where many of us still struggle. Being invited to the top table at our organisations as true business partners remains a consistent challenge. 

At this level, we need to be more proactive in demonstrating and promoting contract management and supplier relationship management achievements, not just (but also) procurement process cost savings and force our way in to the strategic conversations. 

From this point we can dream of ‘self-actualisation’.  All contract spend is compliant and being managed well.  Our deep market knowledge is maintained, valued and collaborated on with peers and suppliers alike.  We are highly valued by our executives, and the ‘go-to’ people for business advice and guidance. 

Many of us can only dream of that utopia, and unless we work together on the basics, it will only remain a dream and no amount of retweets will improve our futures.

There’s still time to register for Big Ideas 2016. Visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas in Procurement in North America

The procurement profession in North America is thriving. But what are the Big Ideas coming from one of the profession’s biggest regions?

Cliff Palace North America

Ahead of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st, we are taking a look at the key issues facing procurement in the coming years. We have asked experts and influencers in our community to share their Big Ideas on the themes we will be discussing on the day.

Here, our experts and influencers share their thoughts on the Big Ideas impacting organisations and industries on the other side of the Atlantic, in North America.

Justin Plokhooy, Director – Supply Chain Management, USAA

Power Profiles 1 - Justin PlokhooyTalent Management – It is clear, and has been for a couple of years, that supply is outstripping demand when it comes to the Procurement job market.  In 2016, firms will be challenged to do a better job in working with their current employees to better develop career plans (up to and including a path to the C-suite), and find challenging work to keep them from looking elsewhere. 

A work environment that has the right pay and benefits is always important, but even more important is the opportunity to have a more flexible work arrangement. Millennials have hung like a Sword of Damocles over the entire job market, and with that generation entering the workforce, firms must offer more mobility tools in how they execute work.

Procurement as a Service – Procurement organisations are struggling to get the right to execute on the work they have. The use of outsourcing and ProS has exploded over recent years and will continue to grow in 2016. 

Procurement organisations will continue to ask their employees to conduct more value added work and as a result the administrative functions will need a place to live. Moving those to a service provider will become a growing trend. This will also allow firms to become much more scalable and flexible in response to changing market conditions, quickly finding skills that may have taken much longer through a permanent hire. 

Driving out labor costs should not be the deciding reason to move to a ProS model, but that may end of being a benefit as well.  The “as-a-service” economy is here to stay and Procurement leaders should embrace the possibilities.  

Anna Spady, Marketing Manager, RFP365

Power Profiles 1 - Anna SpadyMore millennials = more mobile – Now that Millennials have outranked Boomers as the dominant workforce, we believe there are big waves in store for procurement.

We’re convinced this next generation of CPOs will demand mobile and agile everything, and simply won’t be content with the clunky processes we’ve had to use to compare, select, and communicate with our suppliers.

Even our clients in the most traditional of industries (government, healthcare, finance) are feeling this necessity. They’re creating iPhone apps to administer benefits packages, and using Twitter as a consulting platform. Similarly, Procurement will also be forced to pivot, because ultimately more millennials means a need to be more mobile.

Innovative evaluation – One big trend we anticipate in North America is a more innovative way to evaluate procurement technology. 

As a Marketer, I know that paid analysts and reviews are simply not as trusted as organic reviews from real customers. So it was interesting to read this Procurious discussion on the pros & cons of using review sources like Gartner. 

We’re convinced technology assessment methods like the Magic Quadrant will become increasingly obsolete. Because there are two big problems with these pay-to-play systems. 

First, they’re too niche, and the evaluations are exclusive to platforms that cover every area of procurement, excluding platforms who specialise in part of the procurement process. Their outdated criteria also makes makes outdated technology look like winners, and the factors aren’t up-to-date with what is actually on the market.

The second problem is their hefty price tag, which often excludes valuable options like newer, smaller companies, who might actually offer the best functionality. We believe the future holds more relevant and dynamic ways to find e-procurement solutions. 

Leveraging Technology for Vendor Selection – We’ve noticed nearly all the technology and tools on the Procurement market today focus on vendor maintenance (invoicing, contract management), while neglecting the critical process of selecting those vendors. 

Why have parts of the procurement process evolved (paper catalogs streamlined to the web, entire supply chains being monitored from a single console, etc), yet the actual selection and comparison process remains in something akin to the technology dark ages?

Our big idea is to see the rest of procurement catch up. To see the age of IOT and data applied to each part of the procurement process, starting with more sophisticated  vendor selection methods.

Do you work in North America? What’s your Big Idea for the future of procurement? Let us know and we could be discussing them on April 21st.

Want to know more about Big Ideas 2016? Then visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas in Procurement Technology

Procurement technology – you can’t get away from it! But what Big Ideas can we expect from this area in the coming years?

Procurement Technology

Ahead of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st, we are taking a look at the key issues facing procurement in the coming years. We have asked experts and influencers in our community to share their Big Ideas on the themes we will be discussing on the day.

Here, our experts and influencers share their thoughts on the Big Ideas impacting organisations and industries in the field of procurement technology.

Meghan Huynh, Content & Marketing Associate, Winddle

Meghan HuynhWhen we discuss the importance of collaboration, interdepartmentally and with external partners, it is a case for visibility and how it is key to better procurement process.

Not all processes are broken, but most are inefficient. This is where technology comes in – to connect contributors in a project and make sure that their status of the entire operation is updated in real time.

The bottom line here is let’s get everyone on the same page so that we can all perform to the best of our abilities. Procurement technology needs to give the opportunity to identify and eliminate inefficiencies through connectivity. When people are better connected, relationships can effortlessly develop which is known to increase productivity and accuracy.

The main idea to remember is that this can only be executed to it’s intention if end users and upper management truly believe in the possibilities that collaborative technology can bring, and are committed to improving the procurement process.

Anya McKenna, Marketing Manager, Market Dojo

Anya McKennaMarket Dojo‘s Big Idea for the Procurious Big Ideas Summit 2016 is that there will be an increased focus on the information companies hold on suppliers.

The Modern Slavery Act 2015 consolidates previous legislation and introduces new measures to combat slavery and human trafficking.

We’ve already seen companies take extra measures by adopting supplier on-boarding solutions. We predict this will become the focus of many more organisations.

Oliver Oram, Founder, Chainvine

Oliver OramPhysical flows captured and identified by digital finger prints through one shared ledge, would help achieve greater visibility of all corporate assets. One could imagine a scenario of fish being traced from tackle to table, via Blockchain technology. This near real-time tracking of elements in the supply chain have been, until today, too costly and difficult to audit.

Blockchain as a shared ledger among supply chain connections could today be identified as one of the best means of applying such a management interface. What is needed is that companies identify the most optimal meta-data structure to enable effective and simple ways of search and retrieval of such data.

The best way to implement such a change would be in picking small non critical business areas in which to apply this technology first, but ones that can show a real tangible value in using such a technology. Chainvine is now involved in more projects where we have begun to merge both digital and physical aspects of the supply chain and are exploring both transparency and efficiencies.

Simona Pop, Head of Sales & Marketing, InstaSupply

Simona PopIncorporating an online network aspect to the procurement process is a key move in simplifying buyer-supplier relationships. We are so accustomed to the efficiency of ‘one-click’ interactions in our personal lives, that not extending this technology into our business practices is nonsensical. 

Working smarter, not harder, and making use of clever online tools will be the main procurement trends going forward. Eliminating paper, a real time view on all spend, and cloud based location purchasing management will be the staples of successful, efficient procurement. 

Kate Lee, Senior Director of Research & Strategy, Fronetics

Kate LeeThe B2B buying process is not what it used to be. Unfortunately, many companies have not adapted their sales and marketing strategies accordingly and are, therefore, missing out on attracting, engaging, and acquiring customers.

Today, B2B buyers are spending more time researching and evaluating products than ever before. Key places where they turn to conduct research are social media and vendor-focused content (e.g. case studies, white papers, product data sheets). Given this, the average buyer now progresses nearly 60 per cent of the way through the purchase decision-making process before engaging with a sales rep. 

Given this new reality, it is important for companies to recognise that content marketing should be a part of their strategy. Content marketing gives companies a way to meet buyers where they are (online) and provide buyers with the information for which they are looking (knowledge). 

Do you work with, or have a passion for, procurement technology? Tell us your Big Idea in this critical field and we could be discussing them on April 21st.

Want to know more about Big Ideas 2016? Then visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Why Thinking the Unthinkable is a Wake Up Call for Leaders

The Great Wake Up – Nik Gowing, co-author of Thinking the Unthinkable, explains why these findings should keep us all awake at night. 

Thinking the Unthinkable

What if the very people we appoint – in business and government – to foresee, identify and handle the most unexpected, cataclysmic, and disruptive events, are shown to be perilously inadequate at the most critical of moments?

This is precisely the nightmare finding of research study: Thinking the Unthinkable – A New Imperative for Leadership in the Digital Age, co-authored by Visiting Professor at Kings College London, Nik Gowing.

The Great Wake Up

Setting the context for the Big Ideas Summit, and the C-Suite agenda more broadly, “Thinking the Unthinkable, is the ‘Great Wake Up’ for leaders – current and future.

Speaking ahead of his appearance at Big Ideas Summit, Gowing explains a proliferation of ‘unthinkable’ events has revealed dangerous fragility at the highest levels of corporate and public service leadership.

“From just the first weeks of 2014, a dramatic series of ‘strategic ruptures’ revealed the old assumptions for decision making and promotion to the top in public or corporate life were seriously wanting or worse, irrelevant,” explains Gowing.

The ‘unthinkable’ events Gowing refers to include critical moments such as: President Putin’s seizure of Crimea; the rise of the so-called Islamic state; the devastating outbreak of Ebola; the surge of refugees to Europe and the seemingly uncontrolled tumbling of the Chinese stock market.

None of these events had been seriously considered or tabled, let alone planned for by those at the highest levels of corporate or public leadership.

Failure in Leadership

And yet occur they did, one unthinkable event after another, sending shock waves reverberating around the globe and prompting concerns about the capabilities of those ‘in charge’ to foresee unthinkable events and handle their impact.

“The rate and scale of change is much faster than most are even prepared to concede or respond to. At the highest board and C-suite levels, leaders confess to often being overwhelmed,” says Gowing.

Recognising the strangeness of this new world, Gowing, alongside co-author, Chris Langdon, set out to understand why our leaders appeared to be in free fall at these most critical of moments. And finally, why it remains so difficult for leaders to think the ‘unthinkable’.

“The global pace of change is overcoming the capacity of national and international institutions”

– Chris Donnelly, Director, Institute for Statecraft

Gowing reflects: “What started as a modest research project 14 months ago has grown fast and exponentially into something far more substantive and deeply disturbing.”

Compiled through a series of over 60 one-to-one interviews with C-suite business leaders and top-level public servants, the findings of Thinking the Unthinkable reveal fragility at the uppermost levels of global leadership.

Thinking the Unthinkable confirms the current cohort of top leaders feel overwhelmed and under equipped to understand and work with the enormity of ‘unthinkable events’ that are unfolding.”

A terrifying level of wilful blindness, or ‘executive myopia’, to see and contemplate even the possibility that unthinkables might happen, let alone prepare to respond to them, is perhaps the most alarming finding of the research.

During their candid interviews, Gowing reveals the majority of leaders agreed that the decision-making norms and behaviours which got them to the top in the first place, no longer suffice.

Gowing emphasises: “Leaders need to be liberated from that conformity which guaranteed their career progression. The challenge is how to achieve that.”

Why TTU is Must-Read for Procurement Leaders

There are three key reasons why TTU is a must-read for all leaders – current and future:

First, relevance: Unthinkable events are happening with greater frequency and our leaders are less and less well equipped to handle them.

Second, rigor: Thinking the Unthinkable could not be more disturbing but do not mistake its alarmism for a mere piece of ‘click bait’. Serving as unprecedented database for the private, the research provides in-depth views of some of the world’s most influential corporate and public sector leaders.

Third, impact: Just as it sets the agenda for conversations at Board-level, Thinking the Unthinkable will help guide the conversations for Big Ideas Summit and will underpin our challenge to all delegates: What are the ‘unthinkable’ challenges we face next, and what do they mean for our models of leadership?

 To download the report and access additional content and context, visit the Thinking the Unthinkable website. 

At the Big Ideas Summit on the 21st of April, Nik Gowing will challenge current procurement leaders to consider what their ‘unthinkable’ events are, and how they are planning to tackle them.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Tea Farmers Text Their Way to Supply Chain Collaboration

From tea growing to real-time supply chain transparency, collaboration and online networks are creating tangible value and benefits for organisations.

Martin Chilcott - Supply Chain Collaboration

How do you get 50,000 tea farmers and distributors in regional India working together to build collaboration and supply chain transparency? Through a digital platform, of course. 

Collaboration for the “common good” is reaping real benefits. In some retail and organisational collaboration hubs, there are over 300 companies involved, with estimated operational savings at a combined total of €100 million.

Martin Chilcott, 2degrees CEO and Founder, gets to the point about the type of collaboration needed to cut costs, reduce risks and drive innovation within complex supply chains.

Why is collaboration so important, perhaps even uniquely important to sustainable business?

There are 3 main reasons why collaboration is more important than ever before in helping businesses survive and thrive in what are increasingly chaotic and uncertain times.

1. Firstly most of the environmental and social sustainability challenges businesses face are part of the challenge of the commons. No one company owns the atmosphere, the oceans, the fish stocks, or fresh water reserves. These are resources common to us all. And because of that they can only be managed sustainably through collaboration.

2. Secondly, today most businesses, have subcontracted or out-sourced and off-shored their purchases and operations to such an extent that they have become totally dependent on a geographically dispersed, and increasingly fragile supply-chain. For many companies up to 80 per cent of their risks and impacts lie in this supply-chain. You can’t coerce your suppliers (not for long anyway); and you can’t audit them into submission and compliance. Ultimately you have to work with them.

3. Lastly, brand reputation is no longer something solely in the control of the brand company. It’s one of those risks that lies outside the company in the supply-chain. That makes mitigating brand risk something that can only be done with the co-operation of your suppliers. It becomes a collaborative exercise.

Collaboration is perhaps an over-used word. What do you mean by collaboration and how is it changing?

At 2degrees, we think of collaboration as a strategic function. Traditionally it has been very expensive to do this with more than a few strategic partners because it involved being face to face. But technology is changing that.

Digital technologies and collaboration platforms like ours are enabling companies to work closely with thousands of their suppliers at a depth that was previously impossible. But more remarkably they are allowing those suppliers to work with each other unlocking knowledge and capability that was previously hidden in silos up and down value chains.

Large scale supplier-to-supplier collaboration, with operational managers from different organisations working together to solve problems, share best practice and find solutions, is now possible. To help differentiate it from traditional ways of collaborating and to capture the incredible connectivity and scale it is creating, we call it ‘fully-linked collaboration’.

What kinds of companies and individuals are involved?

The companies that are leading the way are the major FMCG and food companies like Unilever, and retailers like Asda-Walmart and Kingfisher; some banks like RBS; and pharmaceutical giant GSK. Still relatively small numbers right at the vanguard. They are bringing together their enormous supplier webs to work together.

When you get in to the detail, it is individuals that are working together of course. Operational middle management: energy managers, waste managers, factory managers, Health and Safety. All from different companies asking each other for insight and advice on whether to use a particular technology, or how to engage colleagues, or build a business case. It’s the solving of really practical problems together, that makes sustainable business happen.

How do collaboration platforms like 2degrees create value for the companies involved and what are the tangible benefits?

Well if you think about it, if you bring together 1,000 plus engineers and managers involved in say food manufacturing from different companies; that’s an extraordinary amount of experience and know-how. Normally that knowledge remains hidden, but collaboration platforms enable one company/one manager with a problem, to tap into that collective know-how to find someone who has already solved that particular problem.

The vast majority of problems that exist within a supply-base have already been solved by someone somewhere. It’s just a matter of being able to connect up with the right people and persuade them to help you. In some of our programs 100,000s of exchanges of knowledge have taken place, identifying solutions on technical matters like waste water separation or how to build a business case for LED lights, or voltage optimisation.

And these sorts of exchanges have led to investments being made. In one community of 300 companies, for example, we estimate they are generating over €100m of operational savings directly from these exchanges.

Is 2degrees part of a new wave of collaboration platforms in sustainability and if so what other ones are in your opinion worth noting?

Yes 2degrees is one example of how digital technology is supporting a new wave of fully-linked collaboration. But some really interesting others are WeFarm, which uses text message and cell phones to connect up small holder farmers in emerging economies to share know-how.

We partner with them on our Tea 2030 programme, and they claim to be connecting up approximately 50,000 farmers and growing fast.

Another interesting business is EcoChain that uses a technology called Blockchain (the technology behind Bitcoin) to create real-time transparency in supply chains around CO2, water, materials etc. Those are my favourites.

What are the strategic implications of this new wave of collaboration?

I think what is really exciting is that these technologies are enabling really big problems to be solved by co-ordinating thousands of companies and making the most of their hidden capabilities.

For instance, at the COP 21 talks in Paris, over 100 companies, including IKEA, Johnson & Johnson, Mars and Nike, committed to powering their operations with 100 per cent renewable energy by 2020 – supply base collaboration will be a key ingredient needed to makes this commitment a reality.

Helping suppliers face what is now inevitable, transition to becoming low carbon, sustainable businesses, represents a significant opportunity for large companies to cut costs and impacts, reduce risks and drive innovation across their supply-base. It provides an opportunity for Chief Procurement and Chief Supply-Chain Officers to transform their value-chains and generate a sustainable competitive advantage for their businesses.

The implications and possibilities of digitally enabled collaboration are very powerful indeed.

Martin Chilcott will talk about these topics in more detail during one of our panel discussions at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Procurement and The Conversational Century

The social media revolution has allowed for traditional institutions to create personal digital conversations with their audience. We are in the era of ‘The Conversational Century’.

Facebook Conversational Century

When he was born in July 2013, Prince George of Cambridge became the first royal baby to have a hashtag. There were over 3.5 million Facebook mentions of the young Prince in the 24 hours leading up to his birth.

And it’s not just royalty on social media. Pope Francis is the first Pope to engage with a wider audience through Twitter.

Elizabeth Linder, a Princeton University graduate, is at the forefront of the social media revolution. She has described the intersection between Facebook and the 21st century governance as ‘The Conversational Century’. Linder started working for Facebook as their Government and Politics specialist in 2008, when the company had fewer than 100 million users.

She built up Facebook’s Politics and Government Programme for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Her role includes advising political representatives, government agencies, public administrators, and think tanks on the intersection of Facebook and modern governance.

What is The Conversational Century?

Conversational Century

Social Media and networking play an important role in the practice of public diplomacy. Facebook, with its individual and country pages, presents opportunities for the public diplomacy sector to engage the public audience in a number of diverse ways. This engagement is part of the conversational century.

Linder defines ‘The Conversational Century’ as the new era in leadership, where leaders are turning outwards to have conversations with the public, aided by the latest social media technology. Social media is forcing traditional institutions and influential leaders to change their communication channels and dialogue.

Traditional institutions, such as the British monarchy, are actively using social media to engage with audiences, using a personal tone to create a digital conversation. The impact of the conversational century is seen through the shifting nature of communication, from a traditional, one-way channel, to a diverse, two-channel communication channel.

Back in 2010, when there were 500 million Facebook users, politicians running for office were only just beginning to explore new technology and start the transition to ‘digital elections’. Now, there are 1.39 billion Facebook users, hailing from a diverse range of backgrounds, languages, and socio-economic classes. This gives political candidates and institutes the opportunity to speak to a very broad range of people, all at once.

Linder described the British General Election of 2015 as a “conversational election“, during which politicians used social media to engage in real and authentic discussions with the public. A shift is occurring in the relationship between politicians, leaders and people in power and social media. These leaders now face the situation where they must contribute and engage with social media in order to stay relevant with their audiences.

Conversational Century and Procurement

Procurement leaders, much like political leaders, need to embrace the Conversational Century and the power of social media, in order to engage with a wide range of people and contribute to live dialogue.

Procurement itself will play an active role in the Conversation Century. Social media platforms, such as Procurious and Facebook, offer a unique opportunity for procurement professionals to share knowledge of what is happening in procurement. Companies and industries can showcase what they have done and what they are working on to an active and engaged audience.

Furthermore, as social media is increasingly integrated into corporate life, procurement can use it to play a key role in observing and analysing all sides of the business. It can be positioned between the customer side, internal stakeholders and the supply side.

The increased visibility of data resulting from the management of social customer relationships, social internal stakeholders, and social supplier relationships, will provide procurement with information-rich data which can potentially lead to increased collaboration, agility and faster decision-making.

Elizabeth LinderElizabeth Linder is a keynote speaker at Big Ideas Summit 2016 powered by Procurious. Elizabeth will be continuing the discussion about ‘The Conversational Century’ and how it will become an integral part of procurement.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas in Procurement in Africa

Procurement in Africa receives a lot of press, not necessarily all of it positive. But as the profession develops, more ideas will be generated by its professionals.

Procurement in Africa

Ahead of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st, we are taking a look at the key issues facing procurement in the coming years. We have asked experts and influencers in our community to share their Big Ideas on the themes we will be discussing on the day.

Here, our experts and influencers share their thoughts on the Big Ideas impacting organisations and industries in procurement in Africa.

Elaine Porteous, Freelance business writer in Supply Chain and Procurement

Elaine PorteousHow can procurement foster innovation from its key suppliers? Is it a case of triangulation or strangulation?

My contention is that many of the creative suggestions and innovative ideas arrive and die in procurement. Why?

  • I’m too busy for this
  • Not my job
  • Don’t know who to pass it on to
  • What is the supplier trying to get from us?
  • What’s in it for me?

If we talk about supplier innovation, we are asking our key suppliers to help us with a problem that we need to solve. But who engages with the supplier to discuss his ideas? Procurement.

And then what? The cycle begins again. My Big Idea is that procurement leaders need to teach procurement people how to deal with supplier innovation.

Procurement - Where Innovation Goes to Die?
Procurement – Where Innovation Goes to Die?

Mervyan Konjore, Managing Director & Social Change Measurement Specialist, Measure Value Ltd

Mervyan KonjoreMy Big Idea looks at Corporate Social Responsibility programmes and the gap between aspirations to make the world a better place, and creating a better world.

Many companies have adopted and integrated Michael Porter and Mark Kramer’s premise about the link between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility (CSR), by finding ways to incorporate suppliers in their value chain, upskill, train and capacitate staff and give back to communities where they operate. 

However, the impact of these social programmes are still largely assessed using either financial metrics or anecdotal reports, both of which fall short of capturing changes in behaviour such programmes strive to effect. 

As companies come under greater scrutiny regarding whether their social programmes transcend statutory compliance, the realisation that there is a need for different measurement metrics is slowly starting to dawn. 

There is a need for measurement metrics capable of helping companies determine the gap between aspirations to make the world a better place, and creating  a better world. Such metrics need to capture, quantify and determine the impact of and value created by CSR programmes. Quantifying the changes in behaviours can allow organisations to see the impact of these programmes in people’s lives.

Do you work in supply chain or procurement in Africa? What’s your Big Idea for the future of profession? Let us know and we could be discussing them on April 21st.

Want to know more about Big Ideas 2016? Then visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.