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Big Ideas Summit 2016 FAQs

Procurious want to arm you with all the information you need and want ahead of next week’s Big Ideas Summit. We’ve gathered together your Big Ideas FAQs and answered them here.

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What is it?

The Big Ideas Summit is a unique online event uniting procurement and supply chain professionals from around the globe to drive innovation and inspire change.   

When is it?

21st April 2016. But a lively conversation has already begun on Procurious!

Expect to see most of the action between 09.00 – 17.00 (GMT) as we share video insights, quotes, photos and summary articles direct from London.

If you can’t join the action live, not to worry.  The thought-provoking discussions and debate will continue long after, and we’ll be sharing video footage of all our Influencers Big Ideas throughout April and May on Procurious.

Where is it?

Although our Top Influencers will be meeting in central London, due to its digital nature Procurious members across the world can get involved from the comfort of their office, armchair or even from the beach!

And brand new in 2016, Procurious members can now also use our iOS App to follow the action. It’s already available in the Apple iTunes store and is free to download. 

How can I join in?

You’ll need to be a registered member of Procurious – join here for free if you haven’t already. Then simply access the Big Ideas Summit Group (which can be found here) to soak-up thoughtful opinions, participate in insightful discussion, connect with our Influencers and share your own Big Ideas with the Procurious community.

We’ll also be live tweeting throughout the day, so make sure you’re following @procurious_ to share and respond to our tweets. 

Do I have to be a member of Procurious?

Yes. Participation as a digital delegate at Big Ideas Summit is free and open to all members of Procurious.

By joining Procurious, you will not only have access to all the Big Ideas Summit content, but join a community of over 13,000 like minded procurement peers and gain access to all Procurious’ free resources, including being able to:

  • Upskill on the move with 80+ eLearning modules
  • Get your procurement questions answered by experts
  • Find out about relevant professional events around the globe
  • Become a digital delegate in the global think-tank, Big Ideas Summit 2016

Will Big Ideas be live-streamed?

Procurious boasts a global audience of 13,000+ procurement professionals, from more than 140 countries. If we were to cater to all of these time zones, it would be a tough job – so rather than live-streaming (and keeping you awake at awkward hours), we’ll share video with those who have registered.

We will be using Periscope to live stream short videos from the day, but these videos – and all the Big Ideas videos – will be made available to you in the days that follow.

Is there an App for Procurious?

Sure is! Because we know you want to stay connected on-the-go, we’ve just launched our first Procurious App.  It’s now available (free, of course!) on the Apple iTunes Store.

The Procurious App will make it easier than ever to access procurement news and eLearning, take part in discussions and invite your colleagues to get involved with The Big Ideas Summit.

I’m on the fence – why should I take part?

Here are five compelling reasons to join your fellow Procurians and stake your claim to the wealth of knowledge on offer:

  1. An Audience With 50 of the World’s Top Procurement Influencers
  2. Get Your Questions Answered By World-Class Experts
  3. Make Powerful New Contacts Around The Globe
  4. Share Your Own Big Idea and make your voice heard
  5. Access Exclusive Content & Learnings 

Who are the ‘Influencers’?

The term ‘influencers’ refers to the invited thought-leaders who will be sharing their Big Ideas with the room and you – the Procurious community.

Our experts span the worlds of procurement, technology, social media, journalism and academia. There will be CPOs from organisations including:  AstraZeneca, RBS, Crown Commercial Services, The World Bank..and many more.

Who are the sponsors and media partners?

The Big Ideas Summit is made possible by our partners IBM, ISM, The Hackett Group, and Coupa.

We’re also pleased to welcome Spend Matters UK as our official Media Partners.

I’ve got a Big Idea of my own…

Great to hear! You can Tweet us your Big Ideas @procurious_ remembering to use the hashtag #BigIdeas2016.

Leave your Big Idea on Facebook – you can find us at www.facebook.com/procurious

And of course you can tell the Procurious community all about it by joining the Big Ideas Group page and posting it to the community feed.

Who is behind Procurious?

You can read all about us in Our Story.

Where can I learn more?

We’ve created a special website to promote the Big Ideas event, visit it at right here.

Plus you might be interested in the following stories:

And many more on the Procurious blog.

How The ‘Brexit’ Could Change Public Procurement

Although the UK referendum isn’t until June, an increasing number of reports are now discussing the potential impact of the ‘Brexit’ on public procurement.

On June the 23rd, UK voters will go to the polls in order to decide on the UK’s future as part of the EU. The referendum promises to polarise opinion, much like the Scottish Independence Referendum in 2014, but there is an increasing focus on what it will mean for public procurement in the UK, as well as supply chains crossing UK/European borders.

EU Procurement Directives, required to be taken into account for all public procurement activity within the community, are widely recognised, and even more widely discussed. While there are critics of the Directives, many believe that they are key to maintaining a fair and equitable process in sourcing activities.

Brexit Impact

Although the EU procurement directives receive a lot of bad press, they were set up with a specific purpose in mind – elimination of trade barriers resulting from discriminatory and preferential procurement practices. It was hoped that this would assist countries across the EU realise savings in public procurement, and create a level of transparency in activities.

Further changes have been made to the procurement directives in the past 12 months, aimed at simplifying and modernising the public procurement process. The directives also have their supporters, who argue that they help to maximise competition, achieve value for money, and enable social benefit and innovation in purchases.

There are also arguments made that, had the UK not joined the EU Common Market, now the European Union, it would have still ended up with public procurement regulations that would not have been vastly different to what exists now.

The impact of a UK exit, or ‘Brexit’, is still largely unknown, and can only be estimated in terms of costs to both the UK economy and UK businesses. However, from the point of view of procurement regulations, some parties are stating that it wouldn’t have an immediate impact on current UK procurement rules.

In fact, any changes to procurement law in the UK public sector would be low on the Government’s priority list. And if there were changes, the rules would end up being very similar (where they have been successful), or some industries, like agriculture, would have to maintain EU standards in order to continue doing business on the Continent.

Supply Chain and Procurement Costs

But what about costs to import goods and the wider supply chain impact in the event of the ‘Brexit’? Well, there still isn’t a consensus when it comes to this either. Some reports show a potential drop of 8 per cent in import costs, but that this could potentially be offset by rising labour costs, partly due to a loss of access to low cost, or cheaper, labour.

Open Europe, a think tank, predicted a worst case scenario of a 2.2 per cent fall in UK GDP, but a potential 1.6 per cent growth in GDP, by 2030. There are also concerns that any possible saving the UK might see in tariffs and not paying money into the EU, would be swallowed up by having to cover subsidies paid to certain industries by the EU.

For both UK and European businesses with supply chains operating across borders, there would be a loss in freedom of movement, both goods and services, and labour. Some goods could be subject to as much as 35 per cent export tariffs, while pan-European partnerships could be lost or cancelled.

While a ‘Brexit’ is by no means a certainty, both British and European companies should start preparing for it happening. Actions like monitoring alternatives suppliers, assessing logistics decisions, and work with existing suppliers to put deals in place, all help to reduce the risks that businesses are exposed to.

What are your (non-political!) thoughts on the ‘Brexit’? Is your business likely to be exposed to the impacts? Let us know in the comments below.

As ever, we’ve been scouring the ‘net this week for top headlines to enjoy with your morning tea or coffee…

Using Waste to Plug Power Gap

  • Using the energy from processing waste at anaerobic digestion plants in the UK could help to solve the country’s energy issues
  • However, there are warning that if the AD technologies aren’t promoted better, they could be lost before they even manage to prove benefits
  • Despite favourable tax breaks, environmental benefits and cost savings, the UK lags a long way behind European countries such as Germany in the number of AD plants it has
  • There are currently 434 plants in the UK, some of which support large retailers (Sainsbury) and manufacturers (Diageo) in their operations

Read more at Supply Management

Brazilian Retailer to Clean Up Supply Chain

  • Brazil’s largest grocery chain has pledged to stop selling beef reared on deforested land in the Amazon rainforest
  • Retailer, Pão de Açúcar, also promised to stop buying beef produced by workers living in slave-like conditions, or cattle produced on land grabbed from local communities
  • The new purchasing plan is set to be in place by the 30th of June, at which point the business will stop dealing with suppliers linked to deforestation and modern slavery
  • The firm operates 832 stores across Brazil and has pledged to help its suppliers improve their practices ahead of the June deadline.

Read more at Thomson Reuters

Love Your Waste to Save Money

  • New reports have shown that Scottish households waste the equivalent of 26 million beef burgers (2,900 tonnes of beef) each year in food wastage
  • Zero Waste Scotland has launched a campaign aimed at reducing this waste by using leftovers as part of other dishes, something that could save each household up to £460 per year
  • Confusion over dates on labels, caution about meat safety and worries over freezing and reheating can lead to good meat being thrown away even thought it is still fine to eat
  • In February, Scottish environment secretary Richard Lochhead pledged to cut food waste in Scotland by a third by 2025, to save businesses and households at least £500m

Read more at Supply Management

2016 Enviro Challenge Launched

  • Enviro Challenge’s challenge day for 2016 is set to take place next week in the Waikato, Auckland, Bay of Plenty, and Central Plateau regions of New Zealand
  • The day is aimed at inspiring schools to develop sustainability and leadership skills in high school students
  • Students are also asked to develop, or continue developing, a project for their school with measurable outcomes, and encouraged to think long term
  • Students will be working on initiatives that will have ongoing positive impacts on their schools and their communities, which this year include renewable energy and biodiversity

Read more at Sun Live

Big Ideas 2015 Flashback: Investing in People

We’re looking back at some of the most popular ideas from Big Ideas 2015. Dapo Ajayi talks about the benefits of investing in people’s capabilities.

Dapo Ajayi, Chief Procurement Officer at AstraZeneca, a delegate in 2015, and returning again as a panel speaker in 2016, discusses her idea that procurement organisations need to invest in the capabilities of its people.

According to Dapo, procurement has the expectation of delivering exceptional results, but without investing in people, then the profession cannot be successful, either now or in the future.

The starting point for this is creating a different mindset in the procurement profession. This will help people see they can be the leaders the profession needs. However, this needs to start with the current crop of leaders.

 

 

Dapo also believes that platforms such as Procurious help this investment, as it provides connections in procurement on a global scale. By opening the minds of procurement professionals to what is happening across the broader business environment, in other industries and sectors, there are huge opportunities for development.

See more Big Ideas from our 40 influencers from the Big Ideas Summit 2015 on Procurious.

If you’re interested in finding out more about the Big Ideas Summit 2016, visit www.bigideassummit.com. You can also join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Showcasing Your Big Ideas – Addressing Supplier Compliance

Ahead of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st, we’re on the hunt for your Big Ideas. Market Dojo discuss why they think 2016 will see an increased focus on supplier compliance.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, which takes place on 21st April,  we will be asking our speakers and attendees to record their ‘Big Ideas’ live on camera for the whole of our Procurious community to see.

But we also believe that every single procurement and supply chain professional has a unique vantage point in the industries, communities and businesses they work in. You have been submitting your Big Ideas to us, and so far, we think they have been great!

Market Dojo, e-Sourcing Software Provider

Market Dojo believe that in 2016, organisations will be required to have an increased focus on supplier compliance, throughout their supply chains.

With new regulations and policies coming into force, particularly around Modern Slavery in the supply chain, organisations will need to get to grips with their supply chains, and understand how their supplier operate. This will not be limited to Tier 1 suppliers, but throughout the supply chain.

Companies will need to take steps to increase supplier compliance. This can be helped by having simpler, and more user-friendly, supplier engagement systems.

How to Submit Your Big Idea

We don’t mind if you film your submission on your phone, tablet, laptop or PC. However, to help you out we’ve compiled a list of some of our recommended methods for reaching out.

Once you’ve completed your film, you can reach us by email ([email protected]); on Twitter (@procurious_) or via Google Drive or Dropbox (using [email protected]).

You can find all the information you need on recording and submitting your Big Idea here.

Want to know more about Big Ideas 2016? Then visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas in Big Companies

Making significant changes in a business can be challenging and is often especially difficult in big companies where it’s hard to get your voice heard, and break through protocol and resistance at the top.

Here at Procurious, we’ve been asking for you to submit your Big Ideas ahead of our Big Ideas Summit 2016.

We firmly believe that every procurement professional has a unique vantage point in the industries, communities and businesses they work in. Your Big Idea, inspired by some of the amazing experiences and insights you have, could be the one to change the face of the procurement profession.

Red-Tape and Resistance

However, getting your ideas heard and implemented is often easier said than done. Change can be implemented more readily in smaller businesses or start-ups, where there are fewer employees and greater flexibility, and roles are more diverse or interchangeable.

In big companies there is more red-tape and resistance to change. It can be difficult to make your voice heard by the right people when there is a fixed hierarchy and more stakeholders to consider. If you want to be a game-changer in a big company, having communication skills and the confidence to assert your innovative ideas is key.

As for the people at the top of these organisations, it’s their task to ensure they are inspiring intrapreneurship and considering the potential for great ideas to come from anyone, and anywhere, whether it be a graduate or a supplier.

Communication

People at the top need new ideas and new perspectives, so the chances are they will appreciate an employee taking the initiative to pitch an original idea. If you are fortunate enough to have this opportunity, don’t be complacent. Prepare, rehearse and ask for feedback from colleagues and friends.

It is crucial to deliver a slick and compelling pitch, which captures the attention of those listening. How you sell your idea, and convey your passion for it, will make all the difference.

Your audience needs to know what is so great about your idea, how it stands out, and if it will be worthwhile. You should consider how this change can be implemented within your organisation, and how you can measure its success.

What problems does this idea solve for your business? If you can’t articulate these points in a concise and convincing way, your voice won’t be heard and your ideas will be discarded, no matter how fantastic they are.

Commitment to Your Big Idea

Excellent communication, despite its importance, might not be quite enough to seal the deal with your Big Idea. It often takes greater persistence than just one great pitch.

Big companies, and those at the top of those big companies, can be averse to change and reluctant to take risks particularly if the change proposed is a big one. Chris Lynch, CFO at Rio Tinto, believes that, in larger companies, “the bigger the idea, the greater the resistance.” A flawless business plan might not be enough to relieve any hesitancy your employers have.

Your confidence, passion and perseverance are key. If you give up at the first hurdle, your idea can’t have been worth fighting for, and colleagues or employers will doubt you ever had the courage of your convictions.

Additionally, you can demonstrate your drive and commitment by doing your homework. Don’t get caught out by not being up to speed and seeming unprepared. Make sure you’ve done the background reading, made contingency plans and considered every eventuality. Again, your audience will be impressed by your motivation.

It can take years for an idea to come to fruition within big companies, and you might face a series of hurdles along the way. Don’t give up on yourself or your ideas. Keep dreaming big.

Inspiring Intrapreneurship

It is not solely the responsibility of the employee to push for change in large organisations. Senior decision makers and those at the top can help by being encouraging and harvesting intrapreneurship.

Even if one particular idea doesn’t tickle your fancy, the person pitching it is someone to be encouraged and supported as a future innovator and game changer.  These are the people on the inside who can think outside existing limits, the ones with the creative skills to reinvent companies and drive change.

As far as procurement goes, there is always room for the intrapreneurs who will become leaders, influencing entire organisations and developing breakthrough solutions for a variety of organisational issues.

A Big Idea Can Come from Anyone

It doesn’t matter if someone is experienced or inexperienced, a recent graduate or a long-term employee, they can still contribute a great idea to a large company. The best ideas could come from someone or somewhere you least expect.

As procurement professionals it is important to listen to our suppliers as much as our employees. No enterprise is an island, and collaborative change can be the most rewarding of all. Our partners on the outside can see what we on the inside can’t, which is why it’s important to heed the advice and suggestions suppliers make. It is a valuable approach to perceive suppliers not simply as an expenditure but as value-adding co-workers.

As the pace of change increases in business and procurement, and new trends and technologies are developed all the time, organisations cannot afford to be close minded when it comes to new ideas. You never know what you are going to hear if you open your door and create a culture of innovation in your company.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Calling for Your Questions at Big Ideas 2016

Procurious needs your questions to pose to our speakers at the Big Ideas Summit 2016 and put them to the test.

It’s not long to go until 2016’s Big Ideas Summit on 21st April but there’s still enough time to have your voice heard. Procurious are calling for your questions now.

The Big Ideas Summit is open to all of our Procurious members. It doesn’t matter where you are in the world, we want you to help shape the agenda. You can start by registering your attendance in our Procurious Big Ideas 2016 Group.

From new technologies in manufacturing and the true cost of supply chains, to how social media is enabling new conversations and why procurement needs to be more agile, we’ll be discussing it all with help from 50 of the world’s most influential procurement and supply chain leaders and thinkers.

But we need your input too!

Where Do I Come In?

We want the Procurious community to put our speakers to the test by asking them the toughest questions. In the Big Ideas Group, the conversation has already begun – participants are asking questions, vetting their big ideas, and reading exclusive, advance insights from the presenters.

Your contributions needn’t stop ahead of the event, either. On the day we would love your contributions to discussions on the event’s key themes and topics, and further questions based on what you’ve been hearing. We’ll be monitoring and updating the group and our twitter account throughout the day to see what’s being said.

Through this virtual, think-tank event, Procurious’ 13,000+ members will have the chance to interact with our speakers, senior executives, thought leaders and CPOs and with the wider Procurious community, gaining insights into the future of procurement.

Who Will Answer My Questions?

We’ve managed to secure a high calibre list of thought leaders and keynote speakers, including:

  • Dapo Ajayi, CPO, AstraZeneca
  • Christopher Browne, CPO, The World Bank
  • Elizabeth Linder, Politics & Government Specialist, Facebook
  • Gabe Perez, Vice President of Strategy & Market Development, Coupa
  • Tom Derry, CEO, The Institute for Supply Management (ISM)
  • Chris Sawchuk, Principle & Global Procurement Advisory Practice Leader, The Hackett Group

You can find out more about our speakers here.

It’s not only those present at the Big Ideas Summit who will be engaging in debates and answering questions. The entire Procurious community will also be answering questions, and responding to your thoughts and ideas via the group or on twitter, providing ample opportunities to solve procurement problems and drive change.

How Can I Submit My Questions?

Submit your questions and start discussions via our Big Ideas Summit Group.

If you’d prefer to use Twitter you can tweet us your questions via @procurious_ using the hashtag: #BigIdeas2016

You can also stay up to date, and get involved in real time via LinkedIn or Facebook, also using the hashtag #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t forget to visit our bespoke site: www.bigideassummit.com ahead of the event.

The True Cost…Of Everything

Do you know what the true cost of your supply chain is? In an age of ethics and transparency, ignorance and apathy are no longer acceptable, says Lucy Siegle.

Lucy Siegle - True Cost

When it was first released, viewers of the True Cost movie, the award-winning feature length documentary, were shocked and appalled as they learned the true cost of fast fashion.

The human rights and sustainability issues were all there for us to see.

The true cost of most of our supply chains are not fully known and this is a quest for most procurement pros. That’s why we’ve invited Lucy Siegle, broadcaster, writer, journalist, and trail blazer in sustainability and ethical living, to inspire and instruct us on how to be better.

Lucy is at the forefront of the fight for a sustainable approach to supply chains, that protects the planet and its people.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, Lucy Siegle will challenge CPOs and experts on how they view their supply chains. She’ll be asking what can be done differently to prioritise sustainability. She says:

I love big ideas – who doesn’t?! But I also like small ideas, incremental steps and ideas that are yet to be fully formed. So what I’m always interested in hearing and alert to is how we can get ideas of all shapes and sizes implemented. And how we can build momentum behind change.

It’s no secret that we face a number of big issues in supply chains from resource scarcity and contraction to degraded human rights (and in some cases slavery) in supply chains. What are the mechanisms for shifting the dial on these issues, and putting these big ideas into motion?

What got you involved/interested in sustainability in the first place?

I guess the idea that you can change negative outcomes. I first heard about women like Vandana Shiva in the 1970s – the original tree huggers if you like. These women protected old growth forests in Northern India, not just by placing themselves between the tree and the logger, but by strategically educating and empowering local people to take a stand.

I was also lucky as a kid that a curriculum experiment in the 1980s meant that I got to take Environmental Science as a subject from the age of 12. I was hooked! Sustainability is the science of resource use, ecology and environmental science mixed with psychology and creative marketing. That’s a heady combination to me!

You spoke recently about the ‘forgotten people’ in the fashion supply chain. Why do you think consumers have lost sight of the origins of their clothing?

Because very simply fashion has become a vehicle for turbo-charged capitalism and globalisation. The problem probably began as soon as the Spinning Jenny (invented in the UK) gave us a fast way of spinning cotton. But the real speed has picked up in the last 10-15 year as fashion’s become the ultimate free market poster industry.

Fast fashion (as we call the phenomenon of high volume, low cost, outsourced production) isn’t just a fashion option, it’s a domineering, all conquering, pervasive model. It wipes out all other production methods (goodbye mid-market, slow fashion), ensures that consumers become addicted to buying cheap and in bulk, forsaking all other previous standards (such as quality, wearability, longevity) and dictates trend, price and lifespan.

The consumer becomes overwhelmed and brainwashed by price, speed and brand. Nothing else matters, least of all the ethics of who made the piece and in what circumstances. Fashion is now made and marketed by big brands as if it’s disposable, and who bothers to invest in the backstory of disposable products?

The True Cost movie highlighted some truly shocking practices in fashion supply chains. What can we, as procurement professionals, do to change this?

Well there’s a lot that can be done. Firstly there’s the reputational lever. The True Cost as a movie exists because the Rana Plaza complex in Bangladesh collapsed, killing over a thousand garment workers.

The director of that movie, Andrew Morgan, was so moved to see TV footage of two small boys searching in the rubble for their garment worker mother that he investigated how this could possibly happen. He had no interest in fashion. So highlighting these supply chain truths is very important.

The risk of reputational damage can really lead to a lot of change. Increasingly we’re also seeing anti-slavery legislation (from Dodd Frank to our own UK anti-slavery bill). There’s a perception that this just means corporations will employ a load of lawyers to get around these rules and regulations. Perhaps the short sighted corporations will, but excellent supply chain professionals have the opportunity to show how these regulations should be used to effect positive change and link compliance to improvement.

I also think there’s huge scope to ally the human with the environmental. We shouldn’t just ever think green, but think holistically ethical – environmental and social justice. That’s the only way to plan for the longterm.

I’m also big into collaborations. I’ve seen some really strange collaborations – including between Greenpeace and fishermen, which I would never have seen coming. In fact they used to be sworn enemies. But these collaborations have ended up being hugely successful in ethical terms. Some of those should be with lawyers.

It’s also worth looking at legal remedies too. We’ve noticed (or rather our lawyers have noticed!) that ironically some of the speed and devil-may-care approach to production in ‘host’ low wage economies are in direct violation of WTO rules.

Have you come across any good examples of good procurement/supply chain practices in the fashion supply chain that we can learn from?

Lots of individual supply chains have great merit. So there are some on leather (an incredibly intensive, impactful commodity – and no, it’s not a harmless byproduct!) that I’ve investigated where climate scientists have worked directly with rancheros in the Amazon and then designers in Italy to create zero deforestation accessories for Gucci.

Or I’ve also investigated a progressive jeans company that’s one of few fashion companies to pay its sewers a living wage. I’ve also worked a lot on brands like Patagonia that explores aggressive transparency and some pretty counter intuitive advertising to get the message across.

And what about the surf-wear brand I came across that spent years working with a  farmer to breed a particular type of endangered sheep?! I’ve come across many examples, from the seriously certified trail-blazers to the certifiable! But what’s difficult is of course scale and outreach.

Lucy Siegle will cover these topics, and more, during her keynote address at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Showcasing Your Big Ideas – Supplier Enabled Innovation

Ahead of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st, we’re on the hunt for your Big Ideas. Keith Bird talks about how procurement can “crack the code” on supplier enabled innovation.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, which takes place on 21st April,  we will be asking our speakers and attendees to record their ‘Big Ideas’ live on camera for the whole of our Procurious community to see.

But we also believe that every single procurement and supply chain professional has a unique vantage point in the industries, communities and businesses they work in. You have been submitting your Big Ideas to us, and so far, we think they have been great!

Keith Bird, GM at The Faculty Management Consultants

Keith believes that, as the procurement environment changes, organisations need to make sure that they are seeking out new, innovative solutions, or risk falling behind their competitors. A key way of doing this is to work closely with suppliers, and leverage the benefits of supplier enabled innovation.

According to Keith, procurement is uniquely positioned to make supplier enabled innovation a reality. The profession sits in a position to communicate with stakeholders, but also has the ability to focus on new ideas while still focusing on cost consciousness.

Keith also argues that successful SRM is a critical element of supplier enabled innovation, and that leaders should be investing in their teams’ soft skills to aid this.

Connect with Keith at The Faculty website, and follow the company on Twitter: @TheFacultyHQ

How to Submit Your Big Idea

We don’t mind if you film your submission on your phone, tablet, laptop or PC. However, to help you out we’ve compiled a list of some of our recommended methods for reaching out.

Once you’ve completed your film, you can reach us by email ([email protected]); on Twitter (@procurious_) or via Google Drive or Dropbox (using [email protected]).

You can find all the information you need on recording and submitting your Big Idea here.

Want to know more about Big Ideas 2016? Then visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas 2016 – Meet Our Speakers: Peter Holbrook

The Big Ideas Summit is just a couple of weeks away! We caught up with Peter Holbrook, CEO of Social Enterprise UK, to discuss the rising prominence of the social enterprise agenda.

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is the Chief Executive of Social Enterprise UK, the UK’s national trade body for social enterprise. The organisation works with its members to raise awareness of social enterprise, generates political engagement for social enterprises, and works with private sector organisations to explore and connect with social enterprises, helping them integrate these businesses into their supply chains.

Peter is passionate about the potential of communities and non-profit organisations to be much more enterprising and involved in business, and is helping to drive the social enterprise agenda across all sectors and industries.

Peter was awarded a CBE in 2015 for his service to social enterprise.

At the Big Ideas Summit, Peter will join a high-profile panel to discuss social and sustainable procurement and ethics, their impact on the procurement profession, and what procurement leaders could and should be doing to embed these practices. Peter says:

Meeting pioneers and enlightened leaders is always a privilege. Procurement has huge impact, potential and possibility – I’m looking forward to meeting kindred spirits, and agreeing further progress.

Tell us a bit about yourself.

I’m a practitioner, networker and advocate for social business – the growth and innovation in this sector is astounding. I’ve been happy to be a part of it for over 20 years.

What are the main challenges that face social enterprises in the UK?

Public awareness of social enterprise still requires a great leap forwards, and many social enterprises still require greater scale.

What’s the biggest success story in the Social Enterprise industry you have come across?

There are plenty of examples but my current favourite is the FairPhone – a crowdfunded social enterprise that has brought to a much needed market the world’s first fair trade smart phone.

Fairphone is the world’s first modular smart phone. It has been designed to be easily repairable by users, to last years longer than other smart phones, and is free from any conflict materials or minerals in its supply chain.

You can find out all you need to know about the Fairphone here.

Many procurement professionals think that buying social or sustainable goods is more expensive – in your experience, is this true?

Our evidence shows that in over 50 per cent of cases social businesses are more competitively priced than their private sector competitors. It’s about creating added value not necessarily added costs.

What should procurement leaders be doing to help drive the social and sustainable procurement agenda?

Become champions for social procurement! Procurement can ensure your brand and company values are reflected within your supply chain. Be bold!

Peter Holbrook talk about these topics in more detail during a panel discussion on turning social enterprises into your ‘ideas suppliers’ at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: How to Be a Digital Delegate

You’ll have seen announcements for Big Ideas Summit 2016 on Procurious recently. Now, here’s how you get involved as a digital delegate.

“Sounds great, but how does this concern me?” you may well ask.

Well here’s how. Just like our event in 2015, we’re billing the Big Ideas Summit 2016 as a ‘digitally-led’ conference, which means you can be anywhere in the world and still get involved as a Digital Delegate. You’ll be able to catch the day’s discussions as they happen. Interactivity is key!

As a Procurious member, you’ve read all about our Influencers, the issues affecting procurement and supply chains and you might’ve even come-up with a question or two. You’re now ready to get really involved and here’s your chance.

How can I participate in the lead up to the event?

  • Join the Group – If you haven’t already, make sure you’ve joined our Big Ideas Summit 2016 Group on Procurious. You can find it in the ‘Groups’ area of the website.
  • Submit your questions now – You can submit questions for the various sessions, and to all our Influencers, in a number of ways. Do this in the event group, or via social media on Twitter, LinkedIn or FacebookDetails of the event’s scheduling are available here, and there’s still plenty of time to come up with a question. But make sure you do so before the event.
  • Check out our related content – In the few weeks before the event, we’ll be publishing a whole host of content, including articles on key themes and topics, interviews with our influencers, discussions, and guest blog posts from our sponsors and delegates.
  • Tell us your Big Ideas – On the 21st, we’ll be asking our influencers to tell us their Big Ideas for the future of procurement. But we’re also giving you the chance to tell us what you think. Very soon we’ll be asking the community to submit their own Big Ideas videos – stay tuned to find out how!

How can I participate on the day?

  • Keep your eyes peeled – The group will be the place for a digital delegate to get updates from London as they happen.
  • Check out our Twitter feed – We’ll be live-tweeting from the event all day, keeping you up to date with all the discussions. Join in by following along with our tweets, and Tweet us @procurious_ using #BigIdeas2016 so we can pick your questions up!
  • Like our Facebook page – If you’re a keen Facebooker you can get all the day’s updates via our Facebook page, including photos of key moments, and of our Influencers in action. If you haven’t already, you can like Procurious on Facebook here.
  • Follow us on LinkedIn – If LinkedIn is your platform of choice, you can follow Procurious, and join our company Group too. We’ll be sharing our content on LinkedIn with our followers and looking for even more people to get involved.

What about after the event?

  • Keeping the discussion going – Following the event, we’ll be sharing all manner of great content on Procurious. This will include blog posts on what happened at the event, footage from each session, and our influencers’ very own 3-minute ‘Big Ideas’ videos. Once again, the only way to access these videos will be to join the Group.
  • Invite others – The more people that join our discussions and get involved, the better! Use the Procurious ‘Build your Network’ feature to send invitations to your colleagues, peers, managers, friends and email contacts. Tweet your Twitter followers (remembering to use #BigIdeas2016), post to your LinkedIn network, or Facebook news feed.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.