All posts by Procurious HQ

Procurious Big Idea #48 – Leverage Real-Time Supplier Feedback

Paul Rakovich, Global Market Sector Manager at BP, thinks procurement needs to stop supplier performance management being a transactional activity and create value by speaking to suppliers directly.

By leveraging real-time supplier feedback and data from sources like social media, procurement can use it to analyse and predict supply chain issues and crises before they happen.

See more Big Ideas from our 40+ influencers

Like this? Join Procurious for FREE and meet like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

Why More Women in Senior Roles Makes Sense

Should supply chains, and organisations as a whole, be working harder to bring more women into senior roles?

genderequality

Recent headlines, research and reports have firmly placed the spotlight on the subject of gender equality. The hack of Sony communications earlier this year very publicly lifted the lid on the lack of equality in salaries for world-famous actors and actresses.

It led to Jennifer Lawrence writing a passionate article on her feelings upon finding out how much less she was being paid than her male co-stars.

Procurement and supply chain are just a couple amongst a multitude of professions in which women are fighting for equality, not just in wages, but also promotion opportunities and organisational responsibilities.

The Business Landscape

Women constitute more than half of the total global workforce, but the figures are much lower when it comes to their presence in the boardrooms of the large organisations. Although recent reports in the UK showed that 26.1 per cent of boardroom positions on the FTSE 100 are held by women, overall there are just 10 per cent of top supply chain executive positions in Fortune Global 500 companies held by women.

Why is this?

There is some evidence that it can be down to perceptions of the roles. Research conducted by SCM World found that the majority of men (63%) and women (75%) believe that the natural skillsets of women differ from those of men, and that these differences are advantageous for supply chain management.

However, other research suggests that women are actually better equipped than their male counterparts for roles within the supply chain. Leaving aside the idea that women think less of themselves, what could be other reasons.

Held to Higher Account?

In many cases, female executives are both better qualified and better educated than male peers. A report from the American Management Association showed that:

  • Women are 33 per cent more likely to earn a college degree than men
  • 36 per cent of women (versus 28 per cent of men) in leadership positions hold STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) degrees
  • Female executives attended colleges and graduate schools that were ranked higher on average than the schools attended by men

In spite of this, it has been suggested that female CEOs may actually be held to a higher standard than male leaders, which causes them to be passed over and left behind when advancement opportunities arise.

Just 4.8 per cent of Fortune 500 CEOs are women and only 1.1 per cent earn $150,000 or more per year, compared with 4 per cent of men.

Women in Supply Chain

And this is where organisations are missing a trick. Attracting and retaining women within the supply chain sector is a realistic, common sense solution to many countries’ human resources challenges.

Add to this the fact that companies in the top quartile for gender diversity are 15 per cent more likely to have financial returns above their industry median, and you are looking at a recipe for success.

The benefits are further extolled in this webinar from Kinaxis and supported by Women In Supply Chain (WISC).

In the Real World

The imbalance is borne out when considered against industries and sectors in the UK, but, according to some members of the Procurious community, there may be a change occurring, however slowly.

Helen Mackenzie, Head of Exchequer Services at Comhairle nan Eilean Siar, argued that procurement and supply chain aren’t that different from other professions. Traditionally, and still in some areas, women still have to appear to be 20 times better than their male counterparts in order to progress.

However, the balance is shifting in Scottish Local Government, where 17 of 32 Heads of Procurement are female. Helen also went on to say that expectations of procurement are shifting, which could play into the hands of women, as the profession focuses more on trust, relationship building and communication, something that women often have the edge over their male counterparts.

Juliet Frost, a freelance procurement expert, also hasn’t experienced any discrimination where she has worked, although pointed out that only once has she worked in an organisation where there was a female above her in the hierarchy.

From Juliet’s point of view, it’s important to work for an organisation that values diversity across the board, not just gender related. This will permeate into the procurement team and allow for a greater balance.

Procurious GM, Lisa Malone, believes that the issue for many women is not just balancing motherhood with work, but returning to work full-time after a long period away from the workforce.

Women are joining the supply chain profession in almost equal numbers now, Lisa says, but the numbers drop off in the early-30s demographic, usually associated with family raising. It’s important for organisations to help these women return to the workforce and get back on a career trajectory.

‘Returnship’ Programmes

Some organisations are now actively helping women (and men in some cases too) return to the workforce after an extended, voluntary career break. These ‘returnship’ programmes (a term trademarked by Goldman Sachs) are higher-level paid internships, offering flexible working over a 10-12 week period, often alongside free childcare and mentoring for returnees.

Organisations including Deloitte, JP Morgan and RBS all offer similar programmes – you can find a good list here. The programmes have been credited with helping to bring women back into work, with a good percentage of women offered full-time roles once their ‘returnships’ have concluded.

And finally…

We’ll leave the last word to Women in Supply Chain, with this infographic on how they suggest addressing the growing labour shortage in supply chain management in Canada.

It just makes sense, doesn’t it?

WISC Infographic

Are Drone Deliveries a Good Idea?

There has been a lot of talk about drones delivering ordered good in the media recently. Both Google and Amazon seem to be progressing towards a ‘Jetsons’-like logistics chain faster than was thought possible.

a-german-company-just-left-amazons-and-googles-drone-delivery-plans-in-the-dust

It’s not hard to see the drawbacks to drone-led deliveries. Most people are happy to walk to the store to buy batteries and bread. If the latest Jamie Oliver cookbook arrives at their house, rather than tracking them down on their morning jog, they’ll be pretty happy with that too. The noise, too, is an issue – walking near a drone is akin to sleeping near a mosquito for many.

Beyond these issues, there are some other, more serious concerns that the drone movement could create in our lives.

Air Traffic Concerns

Drones are said to create a major headache for airspace controllers. In July of 2014, an Airbus A320 taking off from London’s Heathrow airport narrowly avoided a crash with a drone. The Civil Aviation Authority classed the incident as a ‘serious risk of collision’ which is highest classification it can give.

Helicopters too have reported close calls with drones. The US Federal Aviation Administration launched an investigation into an incident where a helicopter crew spotted a drone hovering just metres above them.

If Google and Amazon are able to get their drone program off the ground (pun intended) then the airspace is likely to be much more crowded and the risk of incident will be greatly increased.

Threats to personal safety

Drones too have created serious security threats with one crash landing onto the White House lawn earlier this year, sending the presidential residence into lock down.

German Chancellor, Angela Merkel, has also had a run in with the mechanised device. A drone, driven by a member of the German Pirate Party was crashed in front of her, raising fears for the leader’s safety.

And in Perth, Australia, a triathlete received a head wound when an errant drone trying to photograph athletes crashed into her during a race.

Threats to Privacy

And of course there are the inevitable concerns about surveillance and privacy that surround our skies buzzing with thousands of mechanised drones.

Even with relatively few drones currently patrolling our cities, there are numerous complaints from residents and business about the intrusive nature of drones on their personal space. This is only likely to increase should we continue to move toward drone delivery systems.

Animals hate them

Finally, and comically, it seems that it is not just people who hate drones. Animals too, seem to get rather frustrated with them as this video shows.

So rather than the postman being chased by a dog, it could now be the case that it’s a drone that’s chased by a dog (or perhaps a chimpanzee).

Imagine arriving home to find that your new Jamie Oliver cookbook had made it all the way from the Amazon warehouse to your neighbour’s place, where it was crash tackled and chewed up by your neighbours’ Golden Retriever.

Maybe this needs a bit more thought…

‘Rethink Supply Chains’ – The Innovation Challenge to Fight Labour Trafficking

The Partnership for Freedom launched its ‘Rethink Supply Chains‘ competition last week, aimed at providing a technological solution to help fight labour trafficking in global supply chains.

helping-20130926

In International Labour Organisation (ILO) estimates that there are 14.2 million people around the world who are victims of forced labour in industries such as agriculture, construction and manufacturing.

The goods and service provided through these industries are often purchased or used by consumers who are none the wiser, thanks to a lack of transparency in supply chains.

Formed in 2012, the Partnership for Freedom is an American-based public-private partnership, which brings together organisations and governmental departments such as the Department of Justice, the Department of Labor and Steven Spielberg’s ‘Righteous Persons Foundation‘.

The Partnership challenges individuals and organisations to create innovative solutions to human trafficking challenges. In 2013, it launched its first Challenge, “Reimagine”, and granted $1.17 million to fund two winning innovative models, aimed at improving the infrastructure of support for survivors of modern slavery in the United States.

Challenge Two – Rethink

Now, Humanity United, the organisation leading The Partnership for Freedom, has announced the second challenge in its set of three – Rethink Supply Chains.

With a fund of $500,000 for winning solutions, Rethink Supply Chains seeks new ideas, tools, and efforts that use technology to combat and prevent labour trafficking in global supply chains.

The challenge encourages developers, designers, advocates, and innovators to focus on one or more of the following areas:

  • Workers’ Voices: Tools that help workers to share information and foster community, access resources, and report labor violations to businesses, governments, NGOs, or each other in the most safe and secure ways possible.
  • Recruitment: Tools to improve the transparency and accountability of the labor recruitment process, encourage responsible practices for employers and recruiters, and empower workers to more safely navigate the recruitment process.
  • Traceability: Technologies that enable businesses, workers, governments, and NGOs to track, map, and/or share information on commodities, products, and labor conditions in supply chains at high risk of forced labor.

Eliminating Human Trafficking

Randy Newcomb, President and CEO of Humanity United, stated, “The scope of this issue is enormous. We need new actors, new skills, new data, new ideas and new energy to improve anti-trafficking efforts around the world.”

This was also emphasised by Ambassador Susan Coppedge of the U.S. Department of State’s Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in Persons, who said, “Forced labor has no place in our global supply chains nor in the goods and services we buy every day.  We look forward to the innovative ideas and designs we anticipate from this Challenge as we seek to eliminate human trafficking from the global marketplace.”

How to Get Involved

All the details you need to know about the competition can be found here. The deadline for initial solution submission is the 13th of December, with finalists being announced during January 2016.

Entries can be submitted by individuals who are resident in the United States, or organisations with the United States as their primary location for business. Rules and Terms & Conditions can be found here.

If you can’t take part, you can support the campaign and follow the competition on social media, via Facebook and Twitter. Also stay tuned to Procurious, as we will publish the finalists next year and keep you all posted with the winning solutions.

If you are thinking about taking part, please let us know! We’d love to tell everyone your story and why you think your solution will help to end human trafficking and forced labour for good.

Supplier Competition Unwinds Japanese Business Culture

Increasing competition in the global automotive market looks to be forcing an end to traditional working relationships in Japan.

1024px-Toyota_Group_Pavilion

A few months ago Procurious published a piece on keiretsu, a Japanese business practice involving very close links between suppliers and buying organisations. These practices are back in the news this week, as Toyota looks set to further unravel some of these links.

To summarise, keiretsu is a business practice that sees companies with overlapping business interests (normally buyers and suppliers) taking a financial share or interest in one another. This practice has traditionally been very common in the Japanese economy, and has been particularly popular within the automotive industry.

However, in the past two decades or so many Japanese organisations have moved away from this business practice and towards the more open supply market competition we are accustomed to in the west. Nissan abandoned its keiretsu policy about 15 years ago to reduce costs. Honda too has moved away from its preference for interlocked supplier relationships with Japanese suppliers.

Toyota sticks with it – until now

Toyota, however, has held firm on its keiretsu policy. Or at least it had until the beginning of this year.

Much of Toyota’s past success has been attributed to the company’s lean supply chain operations and, specifically, its keiretsu business practice. The close relationship the firm had with its suppliers (not to mention their shared financial interests), meant that these organisations were able to work collaboratively and innovate far beyond what was ‘normal’ in more traditional supplier relationships.

Recent decisions, however, suggest that these close relationships are starting to unravel. The most visible sign of this was when Toyota released its new Corolla earlier this year. The best selling Corolla was, for the first time, fitted with anti-crash technology that was produced by a German auto parts manufacturer. Blasphemy in the world of keiretsu.

A shift in capability or in strategy?

All of this poses a question – are Japanese auto parts manufacturers losing their competitive edge, or is Toyota actively looking to diversify its supply chain?

The answer seems to be ‘a little bit of both’. While it does appear that the gap between Japanese parts markers (once seen as the driver behind the powerful Japanese auto industry) and manufacturers across the rest of the world is closing or has closed, the decision to leverage foreign suppliers may in fact be part of a diversification strategy by Toyota.

Speaking on the strength of the foreign supply market, Toyota President Akio Toyoda was quoted as saying, “Competition in the global automotive industry is becoming fiercer”.

It is also clear that foreign manufacturers, like Continental, who supplied the Corolla’s new crash avoidance technology, have closed the gap on Japanese suppliers.

It is thought these organisations are maturing more quickly than their Japanese counterparts, because they have a broader customer base and a wider geographic spread, opening them up more opportunities, innovations and economies of scale. Japanese suppliers have missed this exposure through their arguably insular relationships with one (or very few) buying organisations.

Perhaps driven by this increase in global competition, Toyota has, over the last year, looked to diversify and unravel some of its interlocking supplier relationships. In April, the automaker took the bold step of installing a former Toyota executive, Yasumori Ihara, as the CEO of one of one of its leading suppliers (and keiretsu partner) Aisin Seiki Co.

Ihara’s role at Aisin was to slacken the ties between the business and Toyota, and look to make the organisation more competitive in the global market, a move that was thought to be beneficial for both Toyota and Aisin.

Where do you think the balance lies for Toyota? Open markets or close supplier relationships? Could western Businesses learn something from the keiretsu mantra?

Are Price Wars Impacting The UK Food Supply Chain?

The price war between supermarkets in the UK is frequently referred to as a ‘race to the bottom’ . But as the major retailers fight for market share, suppliers with already wafer-thin margins are the ones feeling the price war’s impact hardest.

supply chains

A report released last week by the National Farmers’ Union (NFU) in the UK, argued that, while trying to win customers, retailers were returning to “damaging short-term practices“, and heaping pressure on their producers and suppliers.

Numerous suppliers have argued that retailers have begun to prioritise price over quality and service, and trying to recover their decreased margins across their supply chains.

Over Supply Issues

Compounding these issues are two other factors – over supply and aesthetics – something that farmers and other industry stakeholders, including chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, have called out retailers on.

Although bound in some cases by EU Regulations on fruit and vegetables, many retailers are rejecting high-quality food (usually vegetables) as “imperfect”, even if the food in question is in good condition.

Around one-third of fresh food produced in the UK is never eaten, with vast quantities being rejected on cosmetic grounds. As well as the issue of rejection on quality grounds, supermarkets have also been accused of wasting tonnes of food that is over-ordered, so that they can have full shelves for customers.

Financial Distress

An estimated 1,500 UK food and beverage manufacturers in the UK are currently classed as suffering from “significant” financial distress. Although this figure has fallen by 4 per cent during the second quarter of 2015, it still represents a figure three times higher than in the same period 2 years ago.

Experts believe the cause of this distress is linked to a readjustment to supermarkets’ lower price strategies. With suppliers under pressure, industry professionals are calling for change in order to ensure a future for all parties.

Judith Batchelar, Director of Brand at Sainsbury, has argued that there needs to be a more “joined-up” approach across the supply chain, with collaboration between all the parties and steps taken to integrate the latest technologies and information systems.

Although admitting that Sainsbury itself had a long way to go in this respect, Batchelar argued that this was the best way to create long-term sustainability, and help to balance the inherent supply and demand driven industry fairly.

Fresh Strategies

In the US, retailer Target is also addressing its supply chain strategy for fresh produce in the wake of major stores closures across North America this year.

The food supply chain, described as a “Frankenstein” system by Target COO, John Mulligan, is seen by the organisation as a key element in its battle to regain its market share.

However, it’s not all bad news in North America. US-based agriculture co-operatives have announced record income and revenue figures for 2014, with incomes up 16.4 per cent and a total of $246.7 billion revenue for the same period.

The figures are credited to an increased reliance on co-operatives, increased involvement in communities and greater number of producers joining one or more co-operatives in the past year.

It is hoped that the success of the co-operatives can be repeated in the UK, increasing the importance of the co-operatives and bringing the same collaborative strategies supermarkets are talking about into practice and achieving tangible benefits.

Do you work in procurement in retail or for a supermarket? We’d love to hear your experience of these issues, as well as how you might have solved them. Get involved on Procurious.

In need of some news to share with your colleagues over morning coffee? Look no further than what we have for you…

Tata Demands Suppliers Cut Prices

  • The Indian Steel Giant, Tata, has been accused of “bullying” tactics towards suppliers by demanding a 30 per cent reduction in prices
  • The company recently wrote down the value of its UK assets, and has made over 2000 people redundant in the past few months
  • A letter signed by Lorraine Sawyer, procurement director of Tata Steel Long Products Europe, was issued to the whole supply base, initially asking for a 10 per cent price reduction across the board
  • The letter goes on to ask for “contribution from all…suppliers” and implies that suppliers who do not comply may end up losing business

Read more at The Telegraph

Nurse Saves NHS Trust “Thousands”

  • A nurse has helped save tens of thousands of pounds in Plymouth – by introducing new and more efficient equipment.
  • The Senior Sister, who also acts as an Clinical Procurement Manager, has saved Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust thousands of pounds over a 6-week trial period
  • Michelle Winfield said the key to saving money was “involving clinical staff in the choices and changes”
  • James Leaver, category manager for the trust, said, “We are seeing a real sea change in attitude with people no longer taking the historic view that procurement and finance are ‘imposing’ changes on clinical staff.”

Read more at The Plymouth Herald

BHP Billiton Shares Plunge Following Dam Disaster

  • Shares in Australian mining giant BHP Billiton have fallen sharply following the collapse of two dams at a co-owned iron ore mine in Brazil
  • What caused the dams to break is unknown, but it caused a wave of water, mud and debris to be released, engulfing nearby villages and killing at least 2 people
  • Shares in the company fell by 3.5 per cent on both the Australian and UK stock markets on Monday morning
  • The disaster has prompted calls for better regulation on the mining industry in Brazil, which is one of the country’s leading sources of export revenue

Read more at The Guardian

Obama Signs Illegal Fishing Laws

  • U.S. President Barack Obama has signed the Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing Enforcement Act
  • The legislation includes a number of provisions preventing illegally harvested fish from entering the U.S. and supports efforts to achieve sustainable fisheries around the world
  • Currently, U.S. fisheries law focuses on at-sea or dockside enforcement of domestic fishing operations and does not provide the tools needed to address imported seafood and fishing violations
  • It is hoped that the new laws will ensure that both the economic and environmental sustainability of the U.S. Fishing Industry are protected

Read more at Maritime Executive

Procurious Big Idea #47 – Measuring Social Values in Procurement

Olinga Ta’eed, Director at the Centre for Citizenship, Enterprise and Governance (CCEG), talks about how businesses need to measure themselves on their social values driven by procurement.

While previously intangible, social values can now be measured through big data, sentiment analysis and social media.

See more Big Ideas from our 40+ influencers

Like this? Join Procurious for FREE and meet like-minded procurement professionals from across the world.

From Novice to Master – Upping Your Social Media Game

Social media is disrupting the world of communications. It’s now just as easy to speak to someone on the other side of the world, as it is to speak to someone on the other side of the room.

real-estate-technology-news-how-eclincher-can-up-your-social-media-game_1430_40070820_0_14115342_960

Social media is no longer just for your personal life. From marketers who can reach consumers quickly and easily, to sales people able to speak to customers directly, the platforms are becoming increasingly valuable for professionals too.

Procurement is playing catch up, but the possibilities for the profession on social media are endless. Procurious wants to help more procurement professionals get involved with, and leverage, social media to help with their day-to-day work.

For the last year and a half, the Procurious team has been running workshops up and down the UK, as well as in Australia, highlighting all the ways procurement can make social media a valuable resource, allowing them to interact with stakeholders and suppliers, keep abreast of market trends and change the image of ‘brand procurement’.

How Procurement Measures Up

It wasn’t until recently that Procurious decided that it needed a tool to measure how professionals were doing on social media. We know how much procurement leaders love a good KPI, so we created something that individuals could use to keep track of how they were progressing.

Many of you will have heard of Klout, the most commonly used social media audit tool. Klout measures both personal and professional platforms, including Foursquare, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. The site is relatively easy to use, but it is hard to understand how your score develops.

Procurious took the theory behind this tool and created its PRISM (Procurement Relationships and Influence on Social Media) tool. PRISM takes into account the three platforms we feel are most readily leveraged by procurement professionals: Procurious, LinkedIn and Twitter.

We look at a number of criteria across all three platforms, including profile completion, number of connections, level of engagement and participation and publishing of original content. Where PRISM differs is that it also takes into account offline influencing activities including conferences and training courses attended.

Levels of Influence

Screen Shot 2015-11-03 at 16

Individuals are scored out of 100, and matched against one of four Influencer Levels:

  • Novice – Novices are just getting started on social media. They may have profiles on a couple of platforms that need spruced up, and they haven’t yet expanded their social media network.
  • Builder – Builders have found their feet on social media, have built good profiles, and have expanded their social networks. Builders are still searching for their voice on social media, but are generally good at sharing content.
  • Influencer – Not only have these individuals found their voice, but they are also actively participating in the conversations on social media. Influencers post content most days, ask and answer questions, and maybe even moderate groups.
  • Master – Well done! As a Master, you are an avid social media user, posting your own thoughts, sharing other people’s posts and creating original content on the platforms or maybe your own blog. The chances are very good that you are also a keen networker offline too.

Up Your Game

Even without a score, you’ll should have a rough idea of where you sit on the scale. Don’t worry if you think you are a ‘Novice’ – this is where most procurement professionals are!

The good news is you can take some really easy steps to up your game and your score at the same time.

If you don’t know where to start, find the platform that you feel most comfortable with and build your profile. If you need some inspiration, see what Tania Seary has to say about getting started and your next steps.

If you think you’re in the Builder or Influencer level, think about what groups you could join on Procurious or if there is a discussion you could either start or contribute to.

Done all of that? Good work. But even if you think you are a ‘Master’, you shouldn’t rest on your laurels. If you have a story to tell, or an idea for some content for Procurious, drop the team a note and we can chat it through. We also have an exciting article on getting started with blogging coming up that you don’t want to miss.

Workshops

If you want to get the most from PRISM, and get your colleagues involved too, the best way to do this is to get in touch with Procurious and organise a workshop for us to come and show you it first hand.

 

We can talk you through how the tool and scoring works, get you set up with initial scores and give you and your team some great tips and tricks to build both your individual, and organisational, social media brand.

Don’t get left behind on social media – take these easy steps, and before you know it, you’ll be well on your way to mastering the art!

Is Twitter losing its ‘Star’ Quality?

Twitter’s latest change to its user interface, replacing its ‘Favourite’ star with a ‘Like’ heart has raised the ire of its community. Has the social media giant made a huge misstep in the battle to remain relevant? Twitter-Heart-1

To the casual user, this might not seem like a big deal, but to seasoned users of the social media platform, it represents a change that no-one expected, or even wanted.

The chances are fairly good that the furore about the change will die down in the near future as users become accustomed to it, but there is also a chance that a very human resistance to change could ultimately cost Twitter some users.

New Users

In an explanation of this move, Twitter posted a blog stating that the change was to “make Twitter easier and more rewarding to use” and removing any confusion about the star for newcomers to the site.

The heart, in contrast, is immediately recognisable for what it signifies, has the same meaning in many different cultures and Twitter also stated that the new idea had gone down well in testing.

And it is new users that Twitter is aiming for in what is becoming a fiercely competitive social media market. It might seem strange that a company valued at approximately $22 billion, with over 1.3 billion accounts and over 300 million monthly active users, would be worried about its user base.

However, for many people, Twitter is actually falling behind in the market, with user numbers actually in decline. Twitter is also falling behind Instagram (now owned by Facebook) in terms of active users, while lacking the development of other sites (think Facebook ‘Dislike’ button).

Changes at the Top

Twitter permanently re-appointed Jack Dorsey as its Chief Executive back in June, and he immediately set about making changes, including letting go 8 per cent of its workforce.

Twitter also appointed Omid Kordestani, a former Google Executive and the Internet giant’s 11th employee, as its Executive Chairman in August. Both men have been charged with turning the platform around, increasing profitability and gathering new users.

It is thought that Mr Kordestani will look to target countries where Twitter is currently unavailable or blocked, such as China, in order to boost the site’s user numbers.

Simplicity vs. Usability

The major challenge Jack Dorsey appears to have, is in making the platform more user-friendly and accessible for its members. When even your Executive Chairman says they find the platform “intimidating” and has only ever sent 9 tweets, you know you have a problem.

For many, the simplicity of a chronological news-feed in 140 character bursts is also the biggest drawback of the platform. By presenting the tweets in chronological order it doesn’t show the information individual users want to interact with or value being able to see.

There is functionality to create lists, as well as use tools like Nuzzel and Tweetdeck, to organise tweets into a more valuable resource format, but users want the same functionality on the site itself, rather than having to set up accounts elsewhere.

It remains to be seen what impact today’s change to the interface will have, if any, in the long run on active users, and if it will ultimately be a success.

As active Twitter users ourselves at Procurious, we would love to see the platform develop, while still retaining the essence of a short-message news feed. Just as procurement professionals are beginning to see the benefits the platform offers, it would be a shame to see it fall by the wayside.

If you want to join the debate, follow Procurious on Twitter – we don’t mind a few extra likes!

Jamaica Invests in Procurement Capability

2

400 procurement professionals from the Jamaican public sector have undergone extensive training in procurement practices. Some of those involved in the initiative were sent as far away as Canada and the United Kingdom to receive their education.

The move comes as part of a concerted effort from the Jamaican government to transform its procurement operations and ultimately deliver a more effective and efficient public service.

Of the 400 people trained, 300 received instruction under a certification series delivered by the International Procurement Institute, 40 received training in procurement law from the Osgoode Hall Law School, York University, Canada, while another 60 people were trained in E-procurement by Crown Agents and European Dynamics in the United Kingdom.

Certification Critical for Reform

Malisa McGhie (Senior Procurement Analyst in the Procurement and Asset Policy Unit in the Ministry of Finance and Planning) discussed the training as critical for the ongoing development and success of procurement and the public service in Jamaica, claiming that the certification of procurement officers is a key component of the reform process.

“Procurement practitioners must also be trained in what the standards are and understand how to actually execute, those types of procurement, to meet international standards,” said McGhie.

Echoing discussions both here on Procurious and in the procurement media in general, Senior Director in the Procurement and Asset Policy Unit, Cecile Maragh, highlighted the importance in improving the profile of the procurement profession in Jamaica.

“We have to make sure that public procurement is seen as a profession and not a clerical function.  It is not just something that you receive specifications and go to tender. It requires analytical thinking, it requires market research, so persons undertaking this function must understand that public procurement is in fact, a profession, and it should be treated as such,” she said.

The Finance Ministry has committed to training a further 500 procurement professionals over the coming three years.