All posts by Procurious HQ

US Pacific-Rim Trade Deal Hanging in the Balance

The future of a massive US trade deal looks to be in jeopardy following a US Senate vote on Friday.
United States Capitol Building

Democrats voted against a major part of the bill, despite a last-minute personal plea from the President himself. Without this bill being approved, there is a danger for Obama that the deal will fail to progress into law.

With many seeing the deal as ‘legacy defining’ for President Obama, it is clear that he will need to work hard to heal a schism in his own party before a second vote this week.

In a Nutshell

Nearly a decade in the making, the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) would partner the USA with 11 other countries around the Pacific Rim, securing enhanced trade relations and lower tariffs on exports, ultimately strengthening the US economy.

Significantly, China would not be involved in this partnership, with the US aiming to increase their influence in the region and have a greater say in policies and standard. This could then be used to improve labour and environmental standards in a number of countries.

With US trade in the region valued at an estimated $1,607 billion, this would further increase the revenues US service organisations, give organisations greater access to big markets in Japan and Canada, while providing protection for holders of patents and intellectual property in a region where infringements are common.

This would be particularly good news for California, which counts trade as a key driver of its own economy. Much of California’s trade, plus exports that are shipped through its major ports, goes to the Pacific Rim region and the countries involved in the wider negotiations.

Sounds Great, What Happened?

The key component of the bill, which was ultimately passed, centred on giving ‘fast-track authority’ to the President to negotiate future trade deals. However, this was one part of a two-part bill, with both parts needing to be passed in order for legislation to be created.

The second part of the bill dealt with Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA), assistance for retraining workers displaced or negatively affected by the movement of trade. US Democrats have traditionally been strong advocates for these provisions, but were unhappy with the strength of legislation within the bill protecting US employees.

Such weak legislation has been blamed in the past for a fall in US manufacturing and growing inequalities. Fearing similar consequences from the trade deal, the party rebelled and voted against the second half of the bill, halting its progress and creating an awkward situation for the President.

With the deal not hanging in the balance, its supporters fear that a failure will lead to countries such as Vietnam and Japan reversing economic reforms and policies allowing them entry to trade zones with the USA, as well as China strengthening its own position in the region.

All is Not Lost

There are positives to take on both sides. For the President, he has managed to pass half of the bill, for the trade deal itself, while keeping his own party on side, but at the same time garnering significant bi-partisan support from the Republican party.

This support is likely to continue this week when votes are recast. For the opponents of the bill, this allows a further week of negotiations and potentially concessions from the White House in their favour.

Whatever the outcome, the vote, and potential passing of the bill into law, will have a huge impact not only on the remainder of Obama’s presidency, but also the legacy he leaves behind.

Are you following this story in the US? Do you have an opinion on the trade deal or are you directly affected by its outcome? Get in touch with Procurious and let us know.

Meanwhile, here are the key headlines in the procurement and supply chain space this week.

Walmart’s corporate spin can’t defend shady food suppliers

  • A new report from the Food Chain Workers Alliance (FCWA) dives into the labor and environmental records of 22 of Walmart’s suppliers of popular food items, from chicken to bread to blueberries. The report, “Walmart at the Crossroads: the Environmental and Labor Impact of Its Food Supply Chain” (PDF) uncovers far more important problems than relaxing the worker dress code and increasing store temperatures…
  • According to Walmart’s “ethical sourcing” standards (PDF), all suppliers and their manufacturing facilities at a minimum “must fully comply with all applicable national and/or local laws and regulations, including but not limited to those related to labor, immigration, health and safety, and the environment.”
  • The report finds that Walmart has failed to enforce supplier compliance with its code of ethics for labor practices, environmental sustainability and local sourcing of food. Workers in Walmart’s stores and in its food supply chain endure a slew of labor abuses, including gender and racial discrimination, unfair treatment of immigrants, low pay, violations of freedom of association and even workplace accidents and fatalities.

Read more at Aljazeera America

Build Australia’s submarines in Adelaide, says former commission of audit chair

  • Tony Shepherd, a former president of the Business Council of Australia, said the government should have confidence that future submarines and frigates could be successfully built in Australia, if given the right procurement procedures and contractual arrangements and with construction in privately operated dockyards. .
  • He said it wasn’t fair to use the troubled air warfare destroyer project, running three years late and $1.2bn over budget, as the key criterion for decisions about local defence industry capability to undertake future naval construction in Australia. “We should have confidence that we can successfully build complex warships here, adding to our high technology base and giving us the intellectual property and local capability to maintain, modify and update naval vessels over a 30-year operating life,” Shepherd said in an article on the Australian Strategic Policy Institute website.
  • The government is now evaluating three international contenders for replacements of the ageing Collins-class submarines. It hasn’t stipulated that the new vessels be constructed in Australia. “The Abbott government should follow this well-proven, risk-reduction path,” he said.

Read more on The Guardian

In 2 years, 40,000 tonnes of grain went down the drain

  • At a time when fears of another drought year are looming large, an RTI application filed by TOI has revealed that the quantity of foodgrains damaged in Food Corporation of India godowns across the country recorded a drastic jump over the last two years when the country lost more than 40,000 tonnes.
  • Though the losses are attributed to natural calamities like cyclone and floods, experts say it is also an indication of poor storage facilities, pilferage and transit loss. The reply from FCI, responsible for procurement and distribution of foodgrains, shows that the damaged quantity rose threefold in five years — from 6,346 tonnes in 2010-11 to 18,847.22 tonnes in 2014-15.
  • The FCI reply is especially significant after a recent United Nations annual hunger report estimated that India had the highest number of hungry people in the world at 194 million. As on June 1, there were 568.34 lakh tonnes of foodgrains with the FCI’s central pool.
  • Former Union minister of state for food K V Thomas told TOI that the percentage of foodgrains damaged had reduced from 2.5 per cent of the total procurement in 2010 to 0.07 per cent of the total procurement in 2013. “The UPA government had taken several initiatives to bring this down. We renovated most of the existing godowns and also increased the storage capacity. The procurement rate of foodgrains was also higher compared to the current year.”

Read more at The Times of India

Boeing believed to have slashed hundreds of millions from Apache helicopter bid

  • Aerospace giant Boeing is believed to have sliced hundreds of millions of pounds off of its bid to make 50 Apache attack helicopters for the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD).
  • In a dramatic step taken to improve its chances of securing the contract, the US aircraft manufacturer has reportedly offered what is a “very significant discount”, according to sources cited by the Mail on Sunday.
  • The company has made the move in the face of a rival bid submitted by AgustaWestland, a UK company owned by Italian defence group Finmeccanica. It made the Apache helicopters that are currently used by the Army under licence from Boeing.
  • According to the newspaper, sources from Boeing said the maintenance of the helicopters could be carried out by its UK arm, ensuring the majority of the government’s spend remained in the UK.

Read more at Digital Look

CCG abandons NHS 111 procurement after being unable to find ‘acceptable’ provider

  • One of the largest NHS 111 services in the UK has had to ‘abandon’ re-procurement of its service after they were unable to attract an adequate permanent provider.
  • NHS Sandwell and West Birmingham CCG have been unable to find a NHS 111 provider to take over the service across 16 West Midlands CCGs from the local ambulance trust, which took over from NHS Direct on a temporary basis in November 2013.
  • Commissioners said that no bid – including the West Midlands Ambulance Service Trust – had demonstrated ‘value for money’ in delivering the scheme’s future ambitions, such as integrating with GP services or offering better mental health support.
  • The procurement process to deliver 111 services in the region for the next four years was launched on 28 November 2014, but now WMAST will retain the existing contract until the CCG launches its second procurement attempt this autumn.

Read more at Pulse

Procurious Big Idea #20 – Procurement’s Role in Cyber Security

The Hackett Group’s Melani Flores on this important trend that is impacting procurement.

Melani’s Big Idea revolves around Cyber Security and the need for procurement teams to manage their own data privacy risks. She also recognises that the future of efficient procurement lies in collaboration, but how secure are those flows of information?

See more Big Ideas from our 40 influencers

Lenovo expands commitment to supply chain visibility

Lenovo has run its supply chain on GT Nexus since 2010.

Lenovo expands commitment to supply chain visibility with GT Nexus

GT Nexus has renewed its cloud supply chain commitment to support business growth on the GT Nexus platform.

Supply chain visibility combined with analytics, rooted in deep trading partner connectivity on GT Nexus, enables Lenovo to operate a customer-centric supply chain and drive data and analytics in the chain, while continually identifying opportunities to improve performance and reduce cost. 

A $39 billion global Fortune 500 company, Lenovo is the world’s No. 1 PC manufacturer and a leader in providing innovative consumer, commercial, and enterprise technology. 

In comments supplied to Procurious Gareth Davies, director of Global Provider Management – Lenovo, said “GT Nexus gives us greater visibility and insights into the supply chain, enabling us to reduce transportation lead time variability, decrease in-transit inventory, and improve our customer centric perfect order fulfillment goals.” He continued: “Operating smarter and more efficiently through cloud based connectivity helps us better serve our customers.”

Lenovo tracks products as they move from manufacturing locations to retailers and end-consumers, using GT Nexus. Visibility spans transportation modes, geographies and business lines, enabling Lenovo to more accurately manage supply chain performance and segmentation. Orders often consisting of dozens of units are organised and tracked to provide the end customer direct visibility into expected arrival time.

“Supply chain visibility and intelligence are essential attributes at Lenovo, but the real competitive weapon is the ability to rapidly execute on this intelligence,” said Sean Feeney, CEO of GT Nexus. “Operating as a network allows Lenovo to be agile, responsive and adaptive to changes on both the supply and demand side. This is essential in the high tech industry where challenges such as product obsolescence, complex outsourced supply chains and demanding customers are prevalent.”  

Procurious Big Idea #19 – Purity of the Supply Chain

Listen to Danielle Stewart, Chartered Accountant (an interloper by her own admission), tell how her Big Idea was borne out of a shopping trip to London’s Westfield Shopping Centre with her daughters…

More needs to be done to combat this so-called fast fashion culture, measures need to be put in place to ensure the workers that manufactured the goods are well looked after.

See more Big Ideas from our 40 influencers

Collaborative robots will soon support human workers

The ground-breaking humanoid robot will increase safety, efficiency and productivity in the workplace.

Ocado Technology leads development of one of the world's most advanced collaborative robots

Development of one of the world’s most advanced collaborative robots begins today as part of an EU-wide initiative involving Ocado Technology and four of Europe’s leading technology research institutions.

Under the SecondHands project, Ocado Technology is coordinating a consortium of universities to create an autonomous humanoid robot. It will use artificial intelligence, machine learning and advanced vision systems to understand what human workers want and offer assistance with difficult maintenance jobs. For example, it will hand tools to human maintenance technicians and manipulate objects like ladders, pneumatic cylinders and bolts, abilities which cannot be found in any commercial robot. The objective is to increase safety, efficiency and productivity in the workplace.

“The ultimate aim is for humans to end up relying on collaborative robots because they have become an active participant in their daily tasks,” explained Dr Graham Deacon, Robotics Research Team Leader at Ocado Technology. “In essence the SecondHands robot will know what to do, when to do it and how to do it in a manner that a human can depend on.”

The initiative, which will span five years, and is expected to use seventy two person years (equivalent to 855 person months) of research effort to complete, aims to break new ground in robotics. Key areas of focus, include: 

  • Proactive assistance: the robot developed under the SecondHands project will have cognitive and perceptive ability to understand when the operator is in need of help, understand how this help can be given and provide relevant assistance
  • Artificial intelligence: The team will enable the robot to progressively acquire skills and knowledge needed to provide assistance. In fact, it will even anticipate the needs of the maintenance technician and execute the appropriate tasks without prompting
  • 3D perception: Advanced 3D vision systems will allow the robot to estimate the 3D articulated pose of humans and offer support when it is needed without being asked
  • Humanoid form and flexibility: A humanoid shape and human-like flexibility will enable natural collaboration between humans and the robot. It will feature an active sensor head, two redundant torque controlled arms, two anthropomorphic hands, bendable and extendable torso and a wheeled mobile platform

The SecondHands project, so-called because the robot will literally provide a second pair of hands to human workers, is part of the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation programme, which includes one of the worlds largest civilian robotics programs.

As coordinator of the project, Ocado Technology will work alongside University College London, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, La Sapienza University of Rome and Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne. The technology firm, which powers Ocado.com, will build a special testing facility in Hatfield where the robot will be subjected to rigorous real-world trials.

UK’s competitive position in advanced robotics research strengthened

The development of one of the world’s first autonomous robots comes amidst research by Boston Consulting Group that identifies the UK as a leading adopter of industrial robots over the next decade. The BCG research complements findings by the International Federation of Robotics, estimating that the global market for industrial robots was worth $9.5bn in 2013.

Ocado Technology taking a lead in robotics research in the UK

The development of this bleeding edge robot puts Ocado Technology at the forefront of companies working on advanced robotics in the UK. The company currently employs ten robotics experts, from leading robotics research institutions, such as The University of Edinburgh and Imperial College London.

‘Soft hand’ grasping skills

In addition to the SecondHands project, Ocado Technology is also working on a second, complementary, Horizon 2020 project: ΣΩMA (pronounced “SOMA”) will see the firm partner with a number of universities to explore new ways for robots to physically interact with their environment. It is hoped this will create a ground-breaking robotic hand which can be used in conjunction with SecondHands.

Emulating a human hand, the robotic gripper will know when to grasp softly – such as when picking an apple – or to grip more tightly, such as when lifting a bottle of water.

Chris Sawchuk: How Procurement Is Elevating Its Role

‘We have to be more flexible, we have to be more agile, to react to these sorts of things…’

Watch our third Big Ideas Summit keynote (part 1 of 3)

Watch Chris’ keynote in FULL here

Looking to the future, Chris Sawchuk, Principle and Global Procurement Advisory Practice Leader at The Hackett Group, spoke about organisational agility and the need for organisations to adapt and move quickly in a constantly-changing business environment.

From a procurement standpoint, Chris argued that it means learning from the likes of Uber and being more customer centric and delivering value beyond cost savings, while being more active in promoting itself as a function.

Procurious members can find Chris’ full keynote here. Not a member yet? Register for free.

Google reports progress in removing conflict minerals from supply chain

Google HQ

Google has reported on the company’s continued commitment to removing ‘conflict’ minerals from its supply chain.

In a report (which makes up part of the level of disclosure required by the US government to eliminate the sale of raw materials from West Africa and Asia to fund violence and terrorism), the tech giant filed significant improvements in its performance over the last year.

The firm can now say with some certainty that 57 per cent of its facilities do not pull on ‘conflict’ minerals to support production. While this figure may appear meagre, when you consider that last year the firm could only manage the same claim for 36 per cent of its facilities, it’s clear to see that significant progress has been made.

Apple too has shown similar improvements in this area, with the firm reporting in February of this year that 60 per cent of its facilities met a requisite level of compliance as opposed to only 30 per cent in the previous year.

These moves further highlight the fact that both consumers and governments now see supply chain activity as a direct reflection (and responsibility) of the buying organisation.

The Apple Company came under intense scrutiny earlier this year when a BBC inquiry and television show highlighted both slavery and questionable environmental practices taking place within the firm’s downstream sourcing activities. Read more here.

Regulation, relationships and waste leave a nasty taste in the mouth

All facets of the food supply chain came under scrutiny this week, but all for very different reasons. From relationships with suppliers to a sustainable way of cutting down on food waste, the supply chain that impacts us all is working hard to stay ahead of the game.

Why the food supply chain is making headlines this week

Conservative estimates put weekly food spend for families in the UK at £58.80, making for approximately £3,050 per year. In the USA, the figure is an average of $127 per week ($6,602 per year). However, it could be argued we could all do with taking a keener interest in where our food is coming from.

The often-cited examples of the Tesco horse meat scandal, the Nanna’s berry re-call in Australia and the potential large-scale issue of undeclared peanut use have all highlighted that organisations need a greater focus throughout their supply chains.

Poultry Supply Chain

New measures have been announced by a number of UK retailers to reduce campylobacter levels in chickens.

Between February 2014 and February 2015, the Food Standards Agency (FSA), found that nearly three-quarters of all chickens tested positive for the campylobacter. For those of you who are unfamiliar with this particular parasite, it’s the biggest cause of food poisoning in the UK.

In light of this, UK retailers have begun working with supply chains to reduce instances of the bug. Measures include rapid surface chilling, on-farm testing, new scientific research and the sharing of best practice, all aimed at increasing the levels of biosafety and reducing infection rates.

Supply Chain Exploitation

A recent report in Australia has highlighted ‘slave-like’ conditions in the food supply chains of some of the country’s biggest retailers. Four Corners, a ABC network programme, found that the biggest culprits were some labour hire contractors, using migrant workers with expired or invalid work visas.

It is widely believed that these practices are linked to supermarkets’ ‘race to the bottom’ on pricing. Increasing price pressures have lead to other companies in the supply chains looking at alternative methods to bring costs down.

Supply Chain Practices

Unethical practices and organisational responsibility have been pinpointed in a new report published regarding Wal-Mart’s supply chain. In the report, the Food Chain Workers Alliance (FCWA) alleges that Wal-Mart has not made good on promises to improve labour and ethical standards in its supply chain.

The report also details a number of violations of Wal-Mart’s own sourcing code of ethics in relation to workers, environmental impact and treatment of animals. Although Wal-Mart has yet to respond to the report, it is hoped that it may compel the retail giant to make changes to its supply chain.

Relationships and Regulations

Many of these issues can be traced back to the importance of having good relationships in the supply chain. At the British Meat Processors Association annual conference last week, BMPA president Peter Mitchell, argued that good supply chains are vital to the success of the meat industry.

Mitchell also argued that closer relationships with the FSA and UK government departments, as well as tighter regulations, were vital to the future of the meat supply chain.

Malcolm Johnstone, president of the Food Storage & Distribution Federation, also cited regulations in relation to meeting the exacting standards of the UK food industry. He called on the members of the Federation find new ways of managing facilities in line with regulations to increase efficiencies and keep pace with the market.

Food Waste

And finally, to finish on a positive note, Tesco have been in the news for good reasons as they announced new measure to combat the volume of food waste its stores produce.

A partnership with Fareshare, a food distribution charity, will link Tesco to local charities in order to hand over some of the estimated 30,000 tonnes of wasted food. Initially this will cover 10 stores, but Dave Lewis, Tesco CEO, hopes to roll this out across the UK and in other countries where Tesco operates.

The company is also backing proposed legislation in the UK to ban supermarkets from throwing away food that is approaching its best-before date, instead giving it to charities.

Do any of you work in the food supply chain? Do you have any examples of good practices that could be shared? Get in touch with Procurious and let us know.

Meanwhile, here are some of the procurement and supply chain headlines from this week.

Amazon Just Changed Its Iconic Shipping Boxes

  • As reported by Time magazine, Amazon now gets the honour of reportedly being the first company to use its packaging to advertise an un-related product. This marks the first time Amazon has allowed a third party to feature on its delivery material, reports the LA Times.
  • The company is rolling out ads on its delivery boxes in bright yellow to boost the new Minions movie from the Despicable Me franchise.
  • Boxes began being sent to customers last week. There are three different types of ads.There’s also a link on the box to a Minions page on the e-commerce site.
  •  While Amazon has used its packaging in the past to market its own products, this is the first time that it has done so for a non-Amazon product.

Read more at SupplyChain247

Cath Kidston promotes supply chain director to COO role

  • Cath Kidston has promoted its director of global supply chain and product development, Geert Peeters, to the role of chief operating officer.
  • The move comes after what the home furnishings and fashion brand described as “three successful years” of managing the business’s global supply chain.
  • Peeters’ supply chain career to date spans more than 25 years, and he has previously held senior roles at the likes of Levi’s, Bacardi and VF Corporation.
  • Commenting on his promotion, Cath Kidston CEO Kenny Wilson said: “I am very pleased to be recognising the significant contributions that Geert has made in helping Cath Kidston grow to where it is today.

Read more at Essential Retail

Shadow banking boom pushes China to edge of debt sustainability

  • Booming shadow banking growth has pushed China to the outer limits of its ability to service debt and keep its economy functioning smoothly, though spillover risks from a bursting of the credit bubble are containable, experts said on Monday.
  • With total leverage in the Chinese economy now topping 280 per cent of gross domestic product, it was clear that credit quality was deteriorating, Primavera Capital Group founder and chairman Fred Hu told delegates at a Fung Global Institute forum. “It is not yet the end of the world, but it is approaching the limit of debt sustainability,” Hu said.
  • Debt sustainability, the ability to service debts, is a key measure of solvency. Analysis by the McKinsey Global Institute earlier this year showed debt in the Chinese economy had roughly quadrupled between 2007 and the middle of last year to US$28 trillion, leaving it with a debt-to-GDP ratio more than twice that of crisis-wracked Greece.

Read more at South China Morning Post

The case for exempting projects from open procurement

An opinion piece from Public Finance.co.uk says that the proposed Garden Bridge across the Thames is an object lesson in how political initiatives can rub up against technocratic process. Reforming EU procurement legislation could allow big ideas to bloom.

It continues: Open and transparent procurement is an important defence against corruption, kickbacks and simple waste, but the European regulations set technocratic process against political accountability.  Mayors and other politicians will be approached with bright ideas from time to time. Surely they should have political space to judge how bright these are, and to implement them, subject to safeguards and controls – not least, the electorate’s ability to eject politicians who pursue vanity projects?

Read more at Public Finance

G7 leaders urge tough line on Russia at Alpine summit

  • Group of Seven (G7) leaders vowed at a summit in the Bavarian Alps on Sunday to keep sanctions against Russia in place until President Vladimir Putin and Moscow-backed separatists fully implement the terms of a peace deal for Ukraine.
  • The Ukraine conflict and a long-running debt standoff between Greece and its European partners dominated the first day of the annual meeting hosted by Chancellor Angela Merkel at Schloss Elmau, a luxury Alpine hotel in southern Germany.
  • Merkel is hoping to secure commitments from her G7 guests to tackle global warming ahead of a major United Nations climate summit in Paris in December.

Read more at Reuters

5 Things Procurement Organisations Should Start Doing Now

By Kay Ree Lee, The Hackett Group 

Stop paying lip-service to your internal customers: Here are five things Procurement organisations should start doing now to meet and exceed internal customer requirements.

Five things Procurement organizations should start doing now to meet and exceed internal customer requirements

“Procurement needs to be more proactive versus the Business initiating projects”

“Procurement needs to be an integral part of the team”

“Consult the Business before implementing any process improvement”

“Procurement needs to issue the POs in a timely manner. Waiting 3 days on a PO is unacceptable”

These are some comments we’ve recently heard when conducting a Stakeholder Survey (Voice of the Customer) as part of a broader Procurement benchmark for different clients. We often hear that Procurement is focused on meeting and exceeding customer requirements, but benchmarks from Hackett’s Procurement database shows otherwise.

The chart below shares that 30 per cent of Non-World-Class (Non-WC) organisations rated Procurement as an Administrator while only 15 per cent of Non-WC organisations rated Procurement as a Valued Business Partner. So, if this is the stakeholder’s perception of the Procurement organisation, what are some things you can do quickly to change this perception?

What is the Current role of Procurement in supporting business success in your area?

Other than changes to the organisation structure, there are five things that we believe Procurement can quickly do to improve internal customer perception and exceed internal customer requirements:

  1. All Procurement resources should be customer focused and empowered
  2. Dedicate specific Procurement resources to Help Desk activities
  3. Start conducting monthly training to educate internal customers
  4. Create a monthly/quarterly newsletter and share recent projects, success stories and upcoming projects
  5. Create an internal website to share Procurement information: FAQs, contact information, approved suppliers, success stories, process documents, etc.

1. All Procurement resources should be customer focused and empowered

We often hear the comment that perception is reality – unfortunately, there is some truth in this. As Procurement resources are typically focused on assisting end-users with different processes in Procurement, all Procurement individuals (whether they are internal client-facing or not) should be customer focused which means being helpful in problem solving and troubleshooting, being proactive, being a good listener, and feeling empowered to fix processes that are broken.

The term ‘fit-for-purpose’ or ‘fit-for-risk’ comes to mind when addressing broken processes. As Procurement works to address issues identified by its internal customers, it should determine whether the process is adequate or overkill for what the internal customer is trying to accomplish based on the value and appropriate risk appetite of the organisation.

2. Dedicate specific Procurement resources to Help Desk activities

Procurement activities are a complex string of processes. As such, we should expect our internal customers to have plenty of questions related to the process, status of transactions, etc. Dedicating specific Procurement resources to answer questions from internal customers is one of many ways Procurement can help address and resolve questions in a timely fashion. However, it is important to note that the more knowledge the Help Desk resources have about the usage of Procurement technology, status of sourcing events, process for sourcing, and a broad understanding of Procurement, the better they will be at being able to provide first-contact resolution.

3. Start conducting monthly training to educate internal customers.

Conducting monthly/ongoing training to internal customers will help provide them with the knowledge and latest information to perform their jobs. Ultimately, this will also help Procurement. There are various types of training that can be provided to include:

  • How to create transactions
  • How to create spend analysis reports
  • How to identify approved suppliers
  • How to use e-catalogs
  • How to manoeuvre the ERP maze

During these sessions, it would also be helpful to document the various issues that each of the internal customers faces. By addressing these issues, Procurement will be able to 1) ensure that internal customer requirements are met and 2) improve internal processes.

4. Create a monthly/quarterly newsletter and share recent projects, success stories and upcoming projects

Most of Procurement’s work goes behind the scenes and rarely do we share our success stories for one reason or another. However, creating a monthly/quarterly newsletter will help provide our Internal Customers with additional information on how the Procurement organisation is able to assist, help identify new projects and bring to light creative ideas from previous projects. In addition, it is also a way of demonstrating value that Procurement organisations bring along with some shameless self-promotion.

5. Create an internal website

While the monthly newsletter is focused on sharing the latest news, an internal website is another way of allowing our Internal Customers to perform self-service. There are various reasons to create an internal website including:

  • Sharing of information with our internal customers
  • Providing them a portal to log issues
  • Providing them ability to self-diagnose and resolve issues

As a member of the Procurement organisation, our role is to help support internal customers by listening, understanding, meeting and exceeding their expectations. Being front and center to our internal customers is important. Hopefully, these 5 activities can quickly help your Procurement organisation change your internal customers’ perception.