All posts by Procurious HQ

Recommended reading: your procurement bookshelf

Need something to put on your Xmas list for Santa? The Procurious community can lend a hand… here’s some of the most popular choices.

Well, come on, we all know that Santa must have excellent procurement skills including elf negotiation, stakeholder management (keep your reindeer happy) and customer relationship management (seeing all those kids needs to be worth the effort!), as well as managing one of the world’s most complex supply chains (it’s not like he gets all his materials for toy making by magic, you know…).

So, Saint Nick will be well up on his procurement literature and here are a few ideas from the Procurious community of what you can ask him for:

  • Winning! – Clive Woodward (leadership)
  • Poorly Made in China – Paul Midler (production and ‘games’ in China)
  • The CPO – Schuh and Strohmer (supply transformation)
  • The Procurement Value Proposition – Chick and Handfield (supply management)

Getting To Yes

  • Getting to Yes – Fisher and Ury (negotiation)
  • Procurement 20/20 – Spiller and Reinecke (supply entrepreneurship)
  • Procurement and Supply Chain Management – Farrington and Lysons

Shackleton's Way

  • Shackleton’s Way – Morrell and Capparell (leadership)
  • The Complete Guide to Business Risk Management – Sadgrove
  • Leadership and Self Deception: Getting out of the Box – Arbinger
  • Good to Great – Jim Collins (change)
  • Negotiation Series – Herb Cohen
  • Supply Market Intelligence for Procurement Professionals – Barner and Jones

Who Moved My Cheese

  • Who Moved My Cheese – Spencer Johnson (change)
  • Strategic Global Sourcing – Sollish and Semanik
  • The Purchasing Chessboard – Strohmer, Perez and Triplat
  • The Straight to the Bottom Line: an executive roadmap to world class supply management – Rudzki, Smock, Katzorke and Stewart

And if all else fails, read the complete works of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan-Doyle.

Happy reading!

Have more? Leave your recommendations in the comments below.

Selling secrets of the supply chain

There’s nothing sexy about selling secrets – it’s just silly… as our top story demonstrates:

Selling secrets in the supply chain
Ex-Apple supply chain manager fined, sentenced to 1 year in prison for kickback scheme
  • Former Apple Global Supply Manager Paul Devine — who ran afoul of the law in 2010 for selling details of upcoming Apple products to Asian manufacturers — has been sentenced to one year in prison and fined $4.5 million for his role in the conspiracy.
  • Devine plead guilty to the crimes in 2011, but was only sentenced this week. He will begin serving his prison term — which will be followed by three years of supervised probation — on Feb. 19, 2015.
  • Alongside Singaporean partner Andrew Ang, Devine was charged in 2010 with 23 counts including wire fraud, kickbacks, and money laundering. Devine used his position as a senior supply chain manager to pass information about upcoming products to Apple suppliers, which used the information to gain leverage in negotiations with Apple and paid kickbacks to Devine and Ang.

Read more on Apple Insider

Agencies urged to raise concerns over Premier Foods’ investment payment scheme

  • Agencies that work with Premier Foods are being urged to contact the Marketing Agencies Association’s Pitch Watchdog anonymously to flag concerns over controversial ‘pay to stay’ payments, as it calls on government to take action.
  • The MAA has urged agencies to come forward to raise concerns over the practice, after it emerged food giant Premier Foods, which owns brands including Mr Kipling and Oxo, had been making “millions” of pounds from investment payments made by suppliers into the business.
  • Premier Foods launched an investment payment scheme 18 months ago as part of its strategy to consolidate its supplier base and invest in innovation, promotion and marketing by asking suppliers to make an upfront investment in the business. Suppliers accused the business of forcing them to make payments, or risk being cut off of its supply base.
  • Premier Foods backtracked over the controversial scheme over the weekend and said it would “simplify” its strategy to recoup money and discounts from its suppliers, claiming there was widespread misunderstanding and misrepresentation of the scheme. However, it defended the scheme as “standard business practice.”

Read more at Marketing Magazine

Reshoring boosts British manufacturer’s supply chain

  • A British manufacturer claims to have strengthened its supply chain and boosted local jobs by reshoring production from China. Vent-Axia, which produces fan and ventilation systems, has brought its manufacturing back to the UK, investing £350,000 in tooling for new production lines and associated building works.
  • The move has enhanced innovation in its products, sped up the research and development cycle and improved the company’s responsiveness to customers. Reshoring has also reduced its carbon footprint, the company told the Sussex Manufacturing Forum.
  • “We are now much closer to our market,” said Jenny Smith, marketing services manager. “We have cut our lead times from three months to a matter of weeks, which not only means that we have less cash tied up in inventory, it also enables us to respond much more quickly to market opportunities.”

Read more at Supply Management 

Hospitals eye mHealth to reduce supply chain costs

  • As health systems look to trim costs in 2015 to address the impact of the Affordable Care Act, they’ll want to look at the supply chain. And mHealth could come in handy.
  • That’s the opinion of Jump Technologies, an Eagan, Minn.-based developer of cloud-based inventory management solutions, which recently issued its list of predictions for the coming year.
  • The company sees mobile supply chain management solutions as an important part of the healthcare budget – especially as health system administrators focus on more important matters like EMRs, meaningful use, ICD-10 and regulatory issues. It references a 2014 survey by Jamie C. Kowalski Consulting, which found that nine out of every 10 hospital C-level executives and supply chain adminstrators see supply chain management as one of the top three areas for reducing expenses.

Read more at mHealthNews

Cyber criminals are targeting smartphone supply chains, warn researchers

  • A new mobile trojan dubbed “DeathRing” is being pre-loaded on to smartphones somewhere in the supply chain, warn researchers at mobile security firm Lookout.
  • DeathRing is a Trojan believed to be of Chinese origin that masquerades as a ringtone app, but can download SMS and browser content from its command and control server to the victim’s phone.
  • This is of concern to original equipment makers (OEMs) and retailers because the compromise of mobiles in the supply chain could have a significant impact on customer loyalty and trust in the brand. Mainly affecting lower-tier smartphones bought in Asian and African countries, this is the second significant example of pre-installed mobile malware that Lookout has found on phones in 2014.
  • Researchers said this signals a potential shift in cyber-criminal strategy towards distributing mobile malware through the supply chain.

Read more at Computer Weekly

Most popular discussions on Procurious

After a successful wrap a last month, there has been a fantastic increase in the number of new discussions, top answers and flow of information on the boards.

Off the back of this, we felt it was time to wrap up some more of the most popular discussions on Procurious.

Most popular discussions on Procurious

What trends do you think are going to be big in the Procurement world in 2015?

There have been a number of articles written on this subject in media and across the procurement space and this provided Procurious with its most popular discussion to date.

The most popular answer on the boards was Relationships, including strategic relationships, supplier relationships and stakeholder relationships, as well as the management of them all.

Comments on this answer also included systems to manage these relationships and ensuring that the relationships are open and that employees have the required skills to manage relationships effectively.

Other answers included:

  • Risk Management and Ethical Procurement
  • Using technology tools to enhance the procurement process
  • The use of social media (like Procurious…!) for procurement to engage in conversations, knowledge transfer and suppliers management
  • The basics – are organisations getting these right?
  • Linking the value that procurement generates to companies’ bottom lines
  • Deliverables and delivering the value obtained at the front end in relationships and contract management
  • An appreciation of cultural fit
  • The formation of ‘high performing’ procurement teams
  • Social and sustainable procurement
  • Cost reduction and outsourcing
  • Big data
  • The migration from Low Cost Country to Best Cost Country

A link was shared to a new initiative by Shropshire Council (UK) using WhatsApp to communicate with local people on a whole raft of matters (https://shropshire.gov.uk/news/2014/11/council-to-trial-the-use-of-whatsapp/)

One of the other ways to keep track of trends over the course of 2015 is to stay connected, either through Procurious or other social media. Make sure you are connected with 24 of the most influential people in procurement, as listed by Procurious – https://www.procurious.com/blog/procurious-news/24-of-the-most-influential-people-in-procurement

How does social media change the way you work in Procurement?

On the topic of social media and staying connected, this topic raised the question of what social media has offered that wasn’t available before and how it has changed the way people operate in procurement, individually or for their company?

The two most popular answers covered the immediacy of availability of information, both in finding out about suppliers, individual experiences and procedures, as well as across the wider procurement space. Social media helps the individual to easily find information that might have been harder to come by otherwise.

Another answer highlighted the power that it gives to customers to voice concerns on issues from service in stores, through to the full scope of a firm’s activities. All decisions are open for wider discussion in the social media environment, for positive or negative.

The answer also highlighted that organisations need to have a social media strategy in place to deal with and respond to these commentaries and deal with any ‘trolls’. But, it’s also important to make sure that any responses cover what they need to but can also be interesting and witty to help instil confidence in users.

Other answers covered the ability to have access to information that can then be validated later information that is found, as well as considering social media a tool that can be used to used to our advantage, while always maintaining an individual presence (don’t be a follower, make sure there is a human side!) and deciding for yourself which platforms to use.

Other thoughts:

To contribute to all of these discussions and more, head to https://www.procurious.com/discussions/

Amazon’s Christmas logistics robot army

The robots are coming… and they’re bringing Christmas presents!

In its latest bid to boost productivity and expedite delivery, Internet retailer Amazon is deploying a robot army – yep, just in time for Christmas.

Various sources are reporting that squat, orange, robots have entered several of its U.S. warehouses. The addition of these wheeled droids will save workers having to traipse the factory floor and scour long aisles chockful of Amazon goodies (sometimes up to 20 miles a day).

The addition of the robots is expected to bring in an impressive productivity boost – making picking and scanning 300+ items an hour a reality (compared to 100 previously).

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos told investors earlier this year that in total the company hoped to move 10,000 robots onto the factory floor. Such a move was only made possible after Amazon bought Kiva Systems’ material handling solution in 2012.

Influential procurement writers: share your favourites

In search of influential procurement reading…

Influential procurement blogs

Those members who regularly visit Procurious may have seen our recently published list of who we think number among the 24 most influential people in procurement.

Need a refresh? Check out the full 24 here.

Our list was compiled from prominent Procurious members, and those making a splash across other social media platforms (like Twitter).

https://www.procurious.com/blog/procurious-news/24-of-the-most-influential-people-in-procurement

In-keeping with the theme we want you to share examples of influential writing that has stuck with you. Perhaps a writer that has bowled you over with their insights, or a piece you feel will benefit others.

Nominate using the comments section below, listing your reasons (and a URL). We’ll collate the best into a future feature on Procurious.

‘Savvy’ procurement can save you millions if done right

How efficient is your procurement process? The BBC saved £1.1 billion during the last business year… That and more in our weekly news blast:

BBC savvy procurement

Procurement contributes to annual savings of £1.1 billion at BBC

  • “Savvy” procurement saved the BBC more than £70 million on goods and services this year, a report into the broadcaster’s efficiency has stated. Total category spend of £655 million across 11,500 vendors in 2013/2014 is managed via framework agreements or managed services, and competitive pricing led to savings across the function, according to Driving Efficiency at the BBC.
  • In one example, a competitive tender that resulted in Siemens becoming the single technology provider to the BBC, led to annual savings of £37 million. Additional savings via volume reductions through the adoption of strict policies and targets, and price negotiation with Atos (which acquired Siemens’ SIS division) have totalled £13 million over the 10-year contract. Two major contracts re-procured in 2013 and 2014 for facilities management and domestic radio transmission are also saving the corporation £20 million a year.
  • Since the start of the current 10-year BBC Charter in 2004, annual savings have grown to £1.1 billion. The report forecasts these will rise to £1.5 billion by 2016/17.

Read more at Supply Management

Next recruits Polish workers after ‘failing to hire enough British people’

  • Next, the high street retailer run by multimillionaire Tory donor Lord Wolfson, is bussing in hundreds of Polish people to work in its Yorkshire warehouse after claiming to have failed to hire enough British people. The company, which made profits of £695m last year, admitted that it began recruiting Poles for minimum-wage seasonal warehouse jobs 5-10 days before advertising the roles in the UK.
  • Next said it was not preferentially hiring Polish people, but had started the recruitment drive in Poland first because it needed more time to bring people over from the continent. The company has hired about 500 British and 240 Polish people for a total of 840 warehouse roles required over the Christmas shopping and January sales period. The spokesman said the jobs were advertised on Next’s website, in jobcentres and on UK recruitment websites. Next is still actively recruiting in the UK and Poland for 100 more staff.
  • The Yorkshire and Humber region has the second-highest unemployment rate in the country, after the north-east, with 7.2% of people out of work compared with the national average of 6.1%.
  • Next and its Polish recruitment agency have arranged a fleet of buses to drive the 240 Polish recruits 1,180 miles from Warsaw directly to its warehouse in South Elmsall, West Yorkshire. The first of the buses began arriving last month, with up to seven coaches travelling in convey according to the Daily Mirror, which first reported the Polish recruitment drive.

Read more on The Guardian

Cardinal tops healthcare supply chain ranking

  • Cardinal Health, the giant US group, has taken the top spot in Gartner’s Top 25 Healthcare Supply Chains for the fourth year in a row – despite having to absorb the loss of more than $20 billion worth business from Walgreens. Gartner said Cardinal continued to have the widest breadth of any company in healthcare. “It is a manufacturer, wholesaler, distributor, retail pharmacy and a connector at many points in between.”
  • Mayo Foundation was second. Gartner said it was a model of consistency, combining the balance of high quality of healthcare scores and solid bond rating with top echelon peer and analyst scores. Mayo continues to demonstrate leadership in the healthcare value chain by retaining and developing top talent.
  • Intermountain Healthcare stepped up a place to third. “Intermountain represents one of the closest things to a literal ‘City on a Hill’ in the world of healthcare providers through its $40 million investment in its supply chain centre,” said Gartner. GlaxoSmithKline came in at number 23.

Read more at Supply Chain Standard

How 3D printing is set to shake up manufacturing supply chains

  • 3D printing has come a long way in an extremely short span of time. Initially built by Charles Hull in the 1980s as a tool for making basic polymer objects, today, the technology has spurred remarkable efforts in several manufacturing sectors; from building intricate aircraft and race car components, to human organs and prostheses.
  • Now, the wider business world is beginning to understand the potential of 3D printing for cost-effective, efficient and environmentally-friendly manufacturing. It is little wonder that analyst firm, Canalys see the global market for 3D printers reaching $16.2bn (£10.3bn) by 2018. With increasing adoption, the technology will revolutionise manufacturing as well as the supply chain and logistics processes which surround it.
  • Though manufacturing in certain locations can be low-cost, managing a global logistics network isn’t; especially given the transportation costs involved. 3D printing can reduce these costs by enabling businesses to station local manufacturing centres closer to strategic markets, reducing the length of the supply chain and helping towards a reduced carbon footprint.
  • Regional manufacturing centres can also tackle inventory concerns, especially for the industrial spare parts and consumer sectors selling highly-customised products. 3D printing technology will enable manufacturers to easily produce goods to order, helping save money and minimise waste.

Read more at The Guardian

UAE women ‘eager to develop’ supply chain sector

  • The Chartered Institute Of Procurement & Supply for the Middle East and North Africa region (CIPS MENA) is considering establishing a sub committee and a mentoring pool for UAE women working in procurement.
  • A demand for both was identified at an Abu Dhabi event held in October entitled ‘The Impact of Women in Procurement’, which was attended by about 70 procurement professional from diverse industries with most participants being female UAE nationals.
  • Rebecca Fox, general Manager of CIPS MENA, said: “This event has shown that there is a healthy appetite amongst women for the procurement profession to be conducted according to the highest international standards in organisations of all kinds and in all sectors.
  • “Women in this region are eager to nurture and develop this discipline, and we can play an instrumental part in advising and supporting them across various industries. “Since we started providing service and training to organisations and professionals across the Middle East, we have seen strong levels of commitment from women to creating sustainable supply chains, and to the creation of further employment opportunities.”

Read more at Arabian Supply Chain

UK Logistics Deal Delayed Until 2015

  • Hardly had the dust settled from Babcock’s selection as the winning bidder to acquire the British state-owned armored vehicle repair company Defence Support Group (DSG) when a newspaper report emerged claiming the firm is in line to secure a major deal with the Ministry of Defence to transform the purchase, storage and transportation of commodities.
  • Babcock and its partner, DHL, in a team known as Defence Integrated Supply Chain Solution, has been in a head-to-head competition against US company Leidos with Kuehne & Nagel and others acting as subcontractors to win the Logistic Commodities and Services (Transformation) (LCS(T) program. An in-house MoD team has also been bidding.
  • An announcement on a winner for the LCS(T) program had originally been planned for November. That slipped to December and recently an MoD spokesman said a final decision naming the winner had been pushed back to 2015. But now a report in the Independent newspaper here Nov. 28 said that Babcock had beaten Leidos to the deal.
  • The MoD denied a decision had been made and said it was sticking to its new timeline for an announcement in 2015.

Read more at Euro Supply Chain Jobs

Arms procurement policy will be in country’s interests: Parrikar

  • Defence minister Manohar Parrikar on Sunday said that his arms procurement policy would be in the interests of the country.
  • “India’s interest would be primary in arms purchase,” Parrikar said, adding that after taking into account India’s interests other things can be considered in arms purchase. Parrikar was replying to media questions on the demand put forward by Rajya Sabha MP Sitaram Yechury that India should stop purchasing arms from Israel. “I do not know exactly what Yechury said, therefore I will not comment. But my arms procurement will be in the interest of this country,” Parrikar said.
  • My advice to the defence minister is that in the interests of India and world stop financing Israel and its attack on Palestinians. Buying arms from Israel means giving profits to Israel which are being used to kill Palestinians, Yechury said. “Parrikar’s patriotism would be tested as defence minister, let’s see what he does,” added Yechury.

Read more at Times of India

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to minimise export risks and protect human rights

An innovative pairing of government and tech are working together to protect human rights abroad. 

Protecting human rights abroad. Image Jeremy Schultz

The UK government has published its first ever cyber security guidance that provides advice on how to manage export risks, thus leading the way in ethical business export practices.

‘Assessing Cyber Security Export Risks’ is the first tech sector guidance of its kind in the world. It provides cyber security companies of all sizes with actionable advice, to help identify and manage the risks of exporting their products and services. It gives detailed background information and a framework to help companies develop their due diligence processes, manage human rights risks and identify national security risks. This reduces the likelihood of a buyer being able to use their technology to help perpetrate human rights abuses. It also reduces the likelihood of reputational damage to British companies.

Sounds a bit too UK-orientated. Why should I be interested in this?

On the face of it the guidance is catering for a suitably British audience, but let’s not downplay the importance of this publication. Guidance of this kind is truly a watershed moment – hopefully providing impetus, inspiration, and paving the way for similar initiatives.

Cyber security capabilities are used around the world to strengthen the integrity of critical national infrastructures, prevent the theft of corporate and personal data, and tackle fraud. Their export presents the UK with a significant economic opportunity. HM Government has recognised this and is working with industry through the Cyber Growth Partnership to help companies realise this growth, with the aim of increasing UK cyber security exports to £2bn by 2016.

Most often cyber security capabilities are used only to defend networks or disrupt criminal activity. However, some cyber products and services can enable surveillance and espionage or disrupt, deny and degrade online services. If used inappropriately, they may pose a risk to human rights, to UK national security and to the reputation and legal standing of the exporter.

Ruth Davis, Head of Cyber, Justice and Emergency Services, techUK said: “The advice in this document is designed to help companies reduce reputational risk and to have confidence in the deals they make. We believe that ethical business practice is key; human rights and a vibrant British cyber sector are two sides of the same coin.”

The Guidance sets out a risk assessment process that helps companies to: 

  • Look at the capabilities of the product or service they want to export and how it could be used by purchasers.
  • Examine the places where they are exporting to including their political and legal frameworks, the state’s respect for human rights and potentially vulnerable people.
  • Assess who the end purchaser of the product is and how they intend to use it.
  • Evaluate potential business partners and re-sellers.
  • It also provides advice on how to mitigate and build risk management clauses into the contract.

Dibble Clark, Cyber Lead at 3SDL, a Malvern Cluster cyber security company commented: “Recent events have put the human rights responsibilities of cyber export companies in the spotlight and there is particular scrutiny on our sector, both from governments and NGOs. The responsibility to respect human rights is something no company can ignore, whether large or small.

Rt. Hon Baroness Anelay, Minister of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs said: “This groundbreaking guidance will help cyber security businesses manage human rights risk by adopting effective due diligence policies and enable them to respect human rights wherever they operate.”

The building of Telstra man James Chalupa

Telstra man James Chalupa has taken deliberate steps to look more closely at his personal brand and what it means to him.

James Chalupa of Telstra

Taking his own brand more seriously has not only helped him network with a bunch of hugely influential industry colleagues, he’s also shared and picked up useful new snippets of information that has helped him tackle his role, too.

The Senior Vendor Management Specialist for the country’s major telco agrees that procurement professionals need to consciously consider how their own brand affects their ability to tackle their role.

“When I first started down this path, I started taking LinkedIn more seriously, extending my network as I met someone I wanted to stay connected with. I’m always trying to finesse information on LinkedIn and make sure it’s up to date and accurate. It’s just a really great tool for people to learn more about what I’ve done and what I’m working on now,” James says.

He’s also paid for higher LinkedIn subscriptions from time to time to further build his network.

James also makes sure he’s across relevant industry news and articles and is an active part of the broader procurement profession, fronting up to networking functions and industry events whenever possible, including The Faculty roundtable events.

“I’ll head along to breakfast events, where I’ll be rubbing shoulders with other procurement professionals from major brands. It’s extremely valuable to be at those events, because you’ll always meet someone interesting or learn something new.”

And while attending industry events isn’t specifically part of his job, he thoroughly enjoys the prospect of sharing thoughts and experiences with his industry colleagues.

“I’m a bit of an extrovert, so I really enjoy these sorts of opportunities. For me, personal branding is about being an active part of the broader profession. It’s about connecting with people and sharing your experiences of procurement. People I meet will share information about what they’re working on, and I’ll talk a little about what I’m working on too, within reason,” he says.

“When some of us get together and start to talk about what’s holding us back when it comes to technology, for example, and we’re all contributing to that conversation, you can get a very effective outcome pretty quickly. Someone will always know something that you didn’t know about a certain area.”

Taking a considered approach to personal branding has been hugely beneficial not only to his ability to connect with others, but his ability to do his job, James says. A recent conversation with a procurement professional working for a global FMCG brand about global sourcing initiatives revealed a new approach that fitted well with what Telstra was already working on, which prompted the company to look into more closely.

Black Friday/Cyber Monday: the real effect on supply chains

They say this is the most wonderful time of the year – but the growing transatlantic popularity of this sales phenomenon won’t just put strain on cash registers… The frenzied (sometimes violent) stampede of bargain hunters will undoubtedly place strain on supply chains and logistics networks too.

The effect of Black Friday on supply chains

According to Visa, £360,000 is expected to be spent every minute on Black Friday (28th November) – with a further £281 million forecast to be spent on the busiest day for online shopping; Cyber Monday.

Black Friday has long been established as a traditional sales bonanza in the US, and is predicted to see $2.48 billion spent online this year, up by 28 per cent. Meanwhile the more recent eCommerce follow up Cyber Monday is expected to increase by 15 per cent to $2.6 billion, and Thanksgiving Day itself has been predicted to see online sales of $1.35 billion, up 27 per cent.

Global IT services company IT Infotech have shared with us its thoughts on why retailers, logistics and delivery firms should be prepared for extra pressure through Black Friday to Cyber Monday.

The American tradition has been an increasingly popular import in the UK, with leading retailers including Amazon, Argos and John Lewis offering sales both online and in-store.

“UK retailers are already bracing their logistics operations to handle the Christmas rush, which can see as much as 70 per cent of yearly sales volumes achieved in the last two weeks of December”, says Venkata V, who works with some of the top retailers around the globe.

“However, with the US expecting one of the biggest sales periods in history this Thanksgiving, the UK should be prepared to see a spike in demand and more strain on their logistics. Even retailers not offering specific Black Friday discounts themselves can expect more demand as shoppers are inspired to hunt for Christmas bargains.”

The rapid escalation in demand created by sales events like Black Friday can be extremely lucrative, but also cause havoc on unprepared supply chains, as demonstrated by China’s recent “Single’s Day” event. The country’s biggest sales event saw the e-commerce leader Alibaba rake in sales of over £9 billion, but the day has previously slowed down delivery times from two days to over a week.

Saravana Kumar who heads Supply Chain consulting in ITC Infotech says: “Marketing, production and logistics teams should work closely together to make sure their operation can handle increased demand on the 28th of November, especially as they are likely to already be stretched by the Christmas period. Flexible retailers have a strong opportunity to capitalise on the sales event by reacting to demand and adjusting their pricing strategy on the fly, increasing and lowering prices as needed”.

“The increased complexity of omni-channel retail has made the supply chain more challenging, also presents an opportunity for well-prepared operations. Capacity should be available to quickly move stock for the most popular products around to meet increased demand online or in particular stores.”

Further comment is offered from Paul Doble, chief sales and marketing officer at DX, a leading independent mail, parcels and logistics end-to-end network operator:

“Throughout the busy Christmas trading season retailers must try to forecast as accurately as possible the volumes that will need to be sent, and then communicate these expectations to their logistics partners, who will take up a huge percentage of this volume. The alternative is the situation many retailers have faced in previous years, where through a combination of inaccurate planning, poor communication and unanticipated weather conditions, demand outstrips capacity and leaves retailers unable to meet their promises to online shoppers.”

Doble continues: “It’s a problem that is often exacerbated when retailers try to maximise the online shopping window, pushing back their Christmas order deadlines and thereby drastically increasing the risk of delayed deliveries when bad weather and other factors disrupt the supply chain.”

Doble concludes with a thought-provoking double-header: “Ultimately, when Christmas presents fail to arrive, it will be the retailer that bears the brunt of disgruntled Customers and negative publicity. As such, retailers need to be asking themselves the question: just how robust are my Christmas delivery plans?”

How to get the most out of Procurious

Want to make more of an impact on the Procurious network? We’ve compiled a handy checklist to help you make the most out of our online community.

So if you’ve ever caught yourself asking “How do I…?” Read on for our Procurious tips.

Frequently asked questions - Procurious

How to add a profile picture

Procurious is a place to share your knowledge, grow your network, learn from your peers and make meaningful connections. Surprisingly enough, one of the easiest ways to do this is by adding a picture to your profile. Learn how.

How to complete your Procurious profile

Nobody likes to leave a job half-done… This also rings true on Procurious where profiles are sometimes being left incomplete.
Do it now
.

How to grow your network and invite people

Whether it be inviting people using the ‘Build your network’ tool, LinkedIn, or personalised email link – you’ll be expanding your Procurious network in next to no time. Get building.

How to choose which updates you see

Procurious provides you with a choice of viewing modes; choose to view updates from the ‘Whole Network’ or ‘My Network’. Make a decision.

How to add a question on the  Discussions page

The ‘Discussions’ area on Procurious is buzzing with inquisitive minds. Go ahead and ask the community! Riddle me this.

How to learn a new skill

Procurious isn’t just a place to network – you can delve into our learning resources and teach yourself a thing or two in the process. We offer both free and paid learning materials, take a look.

How to tag Procurious members in your status and posts

You’re probably already familiar with tagging from using it on the likes of Facebook and LinkedIn… Well here’s how to use tags on Procurious. See how.

How to add additional email addresses to your Procurious account

Signing-up to Procurious to grow your professional network is all well and good, but what happens when you change your contact details, land a new role, or leave a company? Find out how.

How to RSVP to an Event

Our Events page contains both upcoming and past engagements. Here you’ll find essential info like the programme, speakers, fee, and other Procurious members who might be thinking of attending. Get your diary in order.

How to use Procurious on your smartphone or tablet

If you’re just visiting Procurious via your PC, laptop, or Mac, you’re missing out… Discover how to go mobile.

How to subscribe to the latest procurement and supply chain news

We want to make Procurious part of your daily online routine, so we’ve added a curated ‘News’ service . Get your daily news fix.

For more tips and tricks check out our expanded Frequently Asked Questions page.