All posts by Tony Megally

How To Figure Out Your Next Leader Before Accepting A New Role

How do you really know what your manager might be like, beyond the surface-level impressions you get at an interview? 


Few of us think that when we change jobs, a new job is all we’re getting. With any move, we’re replacing everything.

Suddenly, we’ve got new colleagues to befriend. New rules and processes to adapt to. And, most importantly, a new manager.

This can be a blessing, or, as I’ve argued before, a curse – in more ways than one

After all, 75% of all people resigning are leaving their bosses, not their jobs.

But how do you know, from the outset, what you’re getting yourself into? How do you really know what your manager might be like, beyond the surface-level impressions you get at an interview? 

You ask!

One of most common mistakes I see candidates making is treating a job interview as a one-way street, thinking it’s simply an opportunity for the organisation to get to know them. 

But that’s only half of it – and not even the most important part. A job interview is your chance to see whether the job and business you might enter align with your values. And whether your manager will help or hinder you in your career aspirations. 

Clearly, though, ascertaining this when you’re the one being interviewed can feel uncomfortable. 

So if you want to do so in the most discreet yet professional manner, here are my top tips for figuring out your manager during the interview process.

1. Ask about work style

When it comes to work, people’s preferences can vary greatly. Some of us feel comforted when our manager sticks close by us, reviewing all of our work and helping to guide our decisions. 

Others want the exact opposite – we’re completely autonomous and we only want to contact our manager when there’s an issue we legitimately can’t solve. 

Whatever your preference, it’s critical you know what your manager wants, so you can discuss it. So in your job interview, ask your potential manager about their working style. Ask questions such as: 

  • How much input would you like into my work? 
  • What’s the approval process for decisions?
  • Or simply – What’s your working style? How can we best work together? 

Doing this will help you understand their style and whether you can compromise. Or whether things simply won’t work. 

2. Discreetly ascertain expectations 

Many candidates stumble when it comes to asking about expectations in an interview, especially if they want to ask about flexibility or work-life balance.

How do you do so and still ensure you look committed to the role? 

The answer is complex, and there sometimes isn’t one correct way to approach it. However, when broaching this subject, I’ve often found it helps to do so indirectly. Here a few things you can try: 

  • Discuss the benefits of work-life balance in your old role: Even if this balance was non-existent, try saying something like: ‘In my current (or previous) role, the business advocated for work-life balance and that helped my team perform better. What’s your approach with this?’ 
  • Enquire about the working arrangements of the team: Asking about the working arrangement of the team you’re entering can be a great way to figure out if flexible work arrangements are common are not. Consider asking something along the lines of: ‘What is the team’s schedule? Is everyone in the office on certain days or for certain hours?’ The answer should give you a clue as to whether everyone works full-time, in-office – or whether flexible work is more common. 

3. Understand whether they’ll drive your career and development

In an ideal world, your manager should be your biggest champion and your biggest confidant. They should sing your praises, develop you and help you solve problems. 

But understanding whether they’ll do this for you can be a challenge. It takes more than them just being a ‘nice person’ to help you get ahead.

To see how invested they are in your career and development, try asking the following questions: 

  • Tell me about the careers of those in my team: Asking about the careers of those at your level (and a few levels above) can give you a clue as to how your manager may have helped them get there. Ask questions such as: ‘How did they get to where they are now? What opportunities were they given? What was your role in helping them get there?’
  • Feedback and feedforward: Asking about professional development opportunities in an interview should be a given. But beyond that, you’ll need to understand how your manager will develop you. To understand this, ask them about feedback. How often will they be giving it? Will it just be at a performance review, or more regularly? 

4. Learn about your boss’s boss 

In and of itself, learning about your manager’s manager is a good idea. It’s likely they’ll drive strategy and culture for the broader team, so it’s critical you understand them. But beyond this, they can also give you insight into your own manager. 

When enquiring about this, ask broad questions so it doesn’t look like you’re trying to get too personal. You can ask questions such as: ‘What do you like about this business?’ And then get more specific, such as: ‘What do you like or admire about management in our team?’

Hopefully, you’ll start to understand the management style of your manager’s manager and, by association, what your own boss likes or expects. 

5. Get insight into challenges, opportunities and plans 

No business is ever perfect – and neither is any manager. Even the best managers can struggle in stressful situations, and it’s almost inevitable their staff may feel the heat as a result. 

To see what you might be up against in this respect, try asking the following questions: 

  • What’s been most challenging in this role?’ Understanding this can give you an insight into how often your manager feels under strain in the role, and as a result, how often you might expect to be stressed as a result. 
  • What challenges lie ahead in this role?’ Not understanding the ‘roadmap’ for your role, team and manager when you’re interviewing is a fatal mistake. If you’re entering a bumpy or uncertain road, you need to be prepared. 
  • What opportunities do you foresee?’ Opportunities are just as important as challenges, so make sure you ask about these. If your manager can see and describe plentiful opportunities ahead, you’ll know that they’re the type of manager who is often on the lookout, which is a great thing. 

Are there any other discreet or not-so-discreet questions you ask to understand a manager before you take a role? Have the answers you’ve received given you insight, or have things changed when you’ve settled into the business? Share your experiences below! 

Tony Megally is the General Manager of The Source, Australia’s leading procurement recruitment and executive search firm. If you’re looking to hire in the procurement space, or alternatively, you’d like to have a confidential chat about your next role, please contact Tony on 03 9650 6665 or via email on [email protected]

Don’t Overlook This One Critical Factor When Choosing Your Next Role

Many mention salary as a reason to look elsewhere. So, what possibly could go wrong when you chase the money?

When Tom* was headhunted for a procurement specialist role at a major energy supplier, his eyes lit up. It was literally his dream job – and at a salary $30,000 higher than he was being paid. 

What could possibly go wrong? 

Tom resigned immediately and started planning the lavish holiday on which he’d now be able to take his family. 

Yet less than 6 months later Tom found himself in my office, miserable. 

Tyrannical boss

It turned out that what had seemed like a lucrative move was anything but.

The long hours and high stress of his new role – combined with a tyrannical and workaholic boss – had made the situation untenable. 

‘I’ve learnt the hard way,’ Tom told me, ‘that it’s not all about money.’ 

As general manager of The Source, I meet hundreds of talented procurement professionals every year.

Like Tom, many mention salary as one of the reasons they want to look elsewhere. 

But I often tell candidates that money shouldn’t be the only reason for choosing a job. And in many cases it shouldn’t be an influencing factor at all. 

Here’s why. 

Flexibility and well-being are key

Workplace satisfaction research conducted over the last decade tells us that, contrary to popular belief, salary isn’t one of the driving factors when it comes to happiness at work. 

In fact, salary comes close to last on the list. 

What makes us truly happy at work is, in fact, a combination of permanent workplace flexibility, a commitment to health and well-being and the feeling that we’re doing meaningful and interesting work. 

We also need to feel respected at work. 

We need and want our leaders to notice and listen to us.

And, to an extent, we want them to praise us for our efforts.

In Tom’s situation, he had ended up with none of these. 

He wasn’t getting any respect. In fact, his new manager often berated him in front of other colleagues. 

He also had little flexibility. 

Despite the fact that the organisation had a strong policy on workplace flexibility, Tom’s workaholic manager made him feel like he could never take advantage of it. 

Finally, the lack of flexibility, high expectations and poor management had a knock-on effect on Tom’s health and well-being.

He was stressed and tired all the time – and struggled to stay motivated. 

Again, the organisation had a policy on employee well-being. But that hardly mattered to Tom, whose entire experience was being dictated by a manager he hated. 

People leave their bosses, not their jobs

After talking to me about his situation, Tom quickly came to another realisation about his poor career move.

And this time it wasn’t about salary. 

When you look at the drivers of workplace satisfaction, almost all can be achieved – or derailed – by your leader. 

This is something that’s enshrined in fact: 75% of all people leave their bosses, not their jobs. 

So if you think about it like that, risking leaving a good boss for the unknown can make the salary gain pale in comparison. 

Sure, that extra money might get you a great holiday, help you pay off your debt or buy you the car you’ve always wanted, but what are you giving up in return? 

Your job is a 40-hour-a-week, 48-week-per-year reality, and your career – which a manager can also make or break – is a lifelong endeavour. 

After a few months of searching, we eventually placed Tom in a new role, with a leader I know will give him the career experience he wants and deserves. 

But for all of you thinking of your next move this year, let this be a cautionary tale. 

How much does salary really mean? And how much emphasis should you place on that against working for someone who holds the key to your workplace happiness? 

I’d love to hear your experiences – please share them in the comments section below. 

Interested in some more career advice? Whether you want to move up in your career, change industries, or even need some extra motivation for the new year (and new decade!), start 2020 off with a bang in our upcoming webinar – Don’t Quit Your Day Job. Register here.

Tony Megally is the General Manager of The Source, Australia’s leading procurement recruitment and executive search firm. If you’re looking to hire in the procurement space, or alternatively, you’d like to have a confidential chat about your next role, please contact Tony on +613 9650 6665 or via email on [email protected]

*Name changed to protect privacy

Do What You Love – Chase Your Dream Procurement Job

You can’t just wait for your dream job to come along. If you want to do something you love, you’re going to have to chase your dreams.

Imagine working in a role that you love. Being completely satisfied with your work through pursuing whatever you’re most passionate about can make the difference between feeling discontented and uninspired, and moving to a happier, more productive and fulfilling life.

Here are my simple and practical tips towards landing your dream role:

  1. Define your key skills

What are you most passionate about? If you’re struggling to work that out, write a list of what you love to do, what interests you, and what comes naturally to you.

Think about feedback or comments (informal or formal) you’ve consistently received from peers, leaders, friends and family. How do others generally describe you? What do they often say you’re great at?

For example, you might be a fluent writer. Maybe you have the gift of the gab. Perhaps you enjoy analysing data and making meaningful sense of it. You could be a great coach, and know how to get the best out of others. Or are you the person with all the big ideas?

  1. Uncover the role fit 

Now that you’ve got your list sorted, identify and search for roles that call for those skills.

For example, if you’re able to think strategically, if you’re good at problem solving, have strong emotional intelligence and display outstanding interpersonal and communication skills, then a leadership role could be the way to go.

If you love working with numbers, data, spreadsheets and providing commercial insights then a role in analytics and reporting will suit.

Perhaps you’re highly relationship and customer focused with sound analytical, negotiation and commercial skills. Sounds like a career in Procurement might be right for you!

  1. Network, Network, Network!

The percentage of unadvertised roles is estimated to be between 70 and 80 per cent, which suggests your next amazing role is sitting somewhere within your professional and personal networks.

  • Start connecting (and reconnecting) with your networks – who can they introduce you to?
  • Form a relationship with a specialist recruitment firm. Recruitment consultants are a great source of information and can certainly guide you in the right direction.
  • Attend industry networking forums and events.
  • Actively connect with professionals on sites such as LinkedIn or Procurious, the world’s first business networking site for the procurement and supply chain profession. Get noticed by sharing articles, joining relevant groups and contributing to discussions, or for those that love to write, demonstrate thought leadership through regularly posting blogs (something I must do more often!).

Be proactive, targeted and considered in your job search. Whether you’re connecting face to face, on-line or over the phone, effective networking will be key to your ultimate success.

People generally like to help others so don’t be afraid to ask for assistance – you will also bring value to that connection in some way.

Go ahead, chase your dreams and do what you love!

The Source is a specialist Procurement mid to senior and executive recruitment and search firm with national reach. We provide tailored contract and permanent recruitment solutions to leading organisations in the Australian market.