Category Archives: Big Ideas Summit

Big Ideas 2016 – Meet Our Speakers: Peter Holbrook

The Big Ideas Summit is just a couple of weeks away! We caught up with Peter Holbrook, CEO of Social Enterprise UK, to discuss the rising prominence of the social enterprise agenda.

Peter Holbrook

Peter Holbrook is the Chief Executive of Social Enterprise UK, the UK’s national trade body for social enterprise. The organisation works with its members to raise awareness of social enterprise, generates political engagement for social enterprises, and works with private sector organisations to explore and connect with social enterprises, helping them integrate these businesses into their supply chains.

Peter is passionate about the potential of communities and non-profit organisations to be much more enterprising and involved in business, and is helping to drive the social enterprise agenda across all sectors and industries.

Peter was awarded a CBE in 2015 for his service to social enterprise.

At the Big Ideas Summit, Peter will join a high-profile panel to discuss social and sustainable procurement and ethics, their impact on the procurement profession, and what procurement leaders could and should be doing to embed these practices. Peter says:

Meeting pioneers and enlightened leaders is always a privilege. Procurement has huge impact, potential and possibility – I’m looking forward to meeting kindred spirits, and agreeing further progress.

Tell us a bit about yourself.

I’m a practitioner, networker and advocate for social business – the growth and innovation in this sector is astounding. I’ve been happy to be a part of it for over 20 years.

What are the main challenges that face social enterprises in the UK?

Public awareness of social enterprise still requires a great leap forwards, and many social enterprises still require greater scale.

What’s the biggest success story in the Social Enterprise industry you have come across?

There are plenty of examples but my current favourite is the FairPhone – a crowdfunded social enterprise that has brought to a much needed market the world’s first fair trade smart phone.

Fairphone is the world’s first modular smart phone. It has been designed to be easily repairable by users, to last years longer than other smart phones, and is free from any conflict materials or minerals in its supply chain.

You can find out all you need to know about the Fairphone here.

Many procurement professionals think that buying social or sustainable goods is more expensive – in your experience, is this true?

Our evidence shows that in over 50 per cent of cases social businesses are more competitively priced than their private sector competitors. It’s about creating added value not necessarily added costs.

What should procurement leaders be doing to help drive the social and sustainable procurement agenda?

Become champions for social procurement! Procurement can ensure your brand and company values are reflected within your supply chain. Be bold!

Peter Holbrook talk about these topics in more detail during a panel discussion on turning social enterprises into your ‘ideas suppliers’ at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas Summit 2016: How to Be a Digital Delegate

You’ll have seen announcements for Big Ideas Summit 2016 on Procurious recently. Now, here’s how you get involved as a digital delegate.

Digital Delegate

“Sounds great, but how does this concern me?” you may well ask.

Well here’s how. Just like our event in 2015, we’re billing the Big Ideas Summit 2016 as a ‘digitally-led’ conference, which means you can be anywhere in the world and still get involved as a Digital Delegate. You’ll be able to catch the day’s discussions as they happen. Interactivity is key!

As a Procurious member, you’ve read all about our Influencers, the issues affecting procurement and supply chains and you might’ve even come-up with a question or two. You’re now ready to get really involved and here’s your chance.

How can I participate in the lead up to the event?

  • Join the Group – If you haven’t already, make sure you’ve joined our Big Ideas Summit 2016 Group on Procurious. You can find it in the ‘Groups’ area of the website.
  • Submit your questions now – You can submit questions for the various sessions, and to all our Influencers, in a number of ways. Do this in the event group, or via social media on Twitter, LinkedIn or FacebookDetails of the event’s scheduling are available here, and there’s still plenty of time to come up with a question. But make sure you do so before the event.
  • Check out our related content – In the few weeks before the event, we’ll be publishing a whole host of content, including articles on key themes and topics, interviews with our influencers, discussions, and guest blog posts from our sponsors and delegates.
  • Tell us your Big Ideas – On the 21st, we’ll be asking our influencers to tell us their Big Ideas for the future of procurement. But we’re also giving you the chance to tell us what you think. Very soon we’ll be asking the community to submit their own Big Ideas videos – stay tuned to find out how!

How can I participate on the day?

  • Keep your eyes peeled – The group will be the place for a digital delegate to get updates from London as they happen.
  • Check out our Twitter feed – We’ll be live-tweeting from the event all day, keeping you up to date with all the discussions. Join in by following along with our tweets, and Tweet us @procurious_ using #BigIdeas2016 so we can pick your questions up!
  • Like our Facebook page – If you’re a keen Facebooker you can get all the day’s updates via our Facebook page, including photos of key moments, and of our Influencers in action. If you haven’t already, you can like Procurious on Facebook here.
  • Follow us on LinkedIn – If LinkedIn is your platform of choice, you can follow Procurious, and join our company Group too. We’ll be sharing our content on LinkedIn with our followers and looking for even more people to get involved.

What about after the event?

  • Keeping the discussion going – Following the event, we’ll be sharing all manner of great content on Procurious. This will include blog posts on what happened at the event, footage from each session, and our influencers’ very own 3-minute ‘Big Ideas’ videos. Once again, the only way to access these videos will be to join the Group.
  • Invite others – The more people that join our discussions and get involved, the better! Use the Procurious ‘Build your Network’ feature to send invitations to your colleagues, peers, managers, friends and email contacts. Tweet your Twitter followers (remembering to use #BigIdeas2016), post to your LinkedIn network, or Facebook news feed.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas 2015 Flashback: The Disappearing Procurement Function

We’re looking back at some of the most popular ideas from Big Ideas 2015. Peter Smith talks about the disappearing procurement function.

Peter Smith, Owner and Managing Editor of Spend Matters UK/Europe, shared a more controversial view than other delegates for his Big Idea, that the procurement function would cease to exist in its own right in the next decade.

As a former Head of Procurement, and CEO of CIPS, Peter is uniquely placed to share this view of a disappearing procurement function. Peter believes that as organisations realise how much value procurement can add, and how much value they should be getting from it, they will realise that it’s too important to be left as it’s own function.

This will lead to a situation where every manager will be charged with getting the most out of their budgets and out of their activities, and to add value to the organisation.

Peter also argues that as technology advances and makes information more available to a wider audience, it disintermediates the procurement function. By making the data more transparent, it’s not just procurement who have access to it and can leverage it, but the whole business.

 

See more Big Ideas from our 40 influencers from the Big Ideas Summit 2015 on Procurious.

If you’re interested in finding out more about the Big Ideas Summit 2016, visit www.bigideassummit.com. You can also join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas in Social and Sustainable Procurement

Considered by many to be the next key frontier for business, Social and Sustainable Procurement are finally getting the attention they deserve.

Sustainable Procurement

Ahead of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st, we are taking a look at the key issues facing procurement in the coming years. We have asked experts and influencers in our community to share their Big Ideas on the themes we will be discussing on the day.

Here, our experts and influencers share their thoughts on the Big Ideas impacting organisations in the fields of social and sustainable procurement.

Matt Perfect, Founder of Something Great – “Impact Spending and Social Impact Measurement”

Big Ideas in Sustainable Procurement - Matthew PerfectI believe “Impact Spending” is the next frontier for defining ‘value’ in procurement. That is, spending on goods and services with the intention to generate a measurable, beneficial social or environmental impact, alongside economic benefits.

Some might say that the history of procurement can be traced by our broadening definition of value. In the old days, our decisions were mostly price-based with little regard for ‘value’ at all. The evolution of strategic procurement brought with it a greater understanding of the importance of quality and service and the ‘value for money’ equation was born. Increasingly, risk and innovation have been added to the mix, and evaluation models such as Total Cost of Ownership have become much more sophisticated.

It is becoming increasingly apparent (both in theory and in practice) that organisations can no longer separate their profitability and growth, from the impact their activities have in society. As such, procurement and supply professionals must be able to account for, and measure, the impact of their spending.

There is much the profession can learn from the emerging field of social impact measurement. By incorporating such measures as Social Return on Investment and Theory of Change into spending decisions, we will unlock the next wave of procurement value for our businesses.

Charlotte Spencer-Smith, Marketing at POOL4TOOL

Big Ideas in Sustainable Procurement - Charlotte Spencer-SmithRegulatory pressure on companies to report on CSR criteria in supply chain is increasing – the UK Modern Slavery Act and the Dodds-Frank Act in the US are recent examples. ISO/DIS 20400, currently under development, will provide clearer guidance about what is expected from organisations wanting to implement sustainable procurement.

Improved supply chain transparency will put pressure on procurement organisations to build category-specific strategies and make sourcing decisions with sustainability in mind. Criteria, such as sustainability and labour ethics, will be increasingly included alongside financial and risk data as factors that go into processes like supplier management, sourcing, and contract management.

Extended information and third party content, specialising in sustainability data for supply chains and procurement organisations, are on the rise. But it will soon be indispensable to have this information deeply integrated into people, process, and technology to make CSR-positive sourcing decisions as easy as possible.

It’s a crucial part of the wider picture of value-based sourcing: developing sourcing decisions beyond the purchase price.

Jordan Holzmann, Founder and CEO at Cruxcee

Big Ideas in Sustainable Procurement - Jordan HolzmannIn terms of the now, we are seeing procurement take an interest in what role they play in sustainability. Procurement is realising that they can make a huge impact in the way they source through the supply chain.

This is exciting to procurement professionals as their job now has a new lease on life, and they aren’t just feeling like they are saving money and going through the process of buying stuff. This will shape the procurement profession in the future too, as it becomes more strategic in achieving sustainability goals for the organisation.

In terms of the future, I see the concept of finite resources impacting the way we procure products. Concepts like cradle to cradle and circular economy are driving innovation through material use. Procurement will have to be more innovative than ever as the world shifts to more sustainable materials.

They must be on the lookout for sourcing decisions that make use of alternative resources, reduce waste and reclaim any unused materials. This also goes for materials that are toxic and do harm. Procurement must work to avoid these, and find materials that do not harm the environment.

Do you work in social or sustainable procurement? What are your Big Ideas in this area? Let us know and we could be discussing them on April 21st.

Want to know more about Big Ideas 2016? Then visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Generating Big Ideas Through Hackathons

Generating tangible big ideas within organisations can be a difficult activity. More and more organisations are using ‘hackathons’ to facilitate big idea generation.

Picture of Tech Hackathons

It’s interesting how language evolves to turn a word with negative connotations into something positive. The word “hack”, for example, has traditionally put fear into the hearts of the staunchest CEO. Just ask the management of hacked dating website Ashley Madison, or any of the big banks that channel a significant amount of their budget into building hacker-proof systems.

Yet large corporations all over the world are now embracing the concept of the ‘hackathon’. It’s something of a deceptive term, because rather than actual hacking (subverting computer security), the activity involves organisations making enormous amounts of data available to competing teams of analysts who then brainstorm solutions to specific problems.

Why Call Them ‘Hackathons’?

There are three possible reasons. Firstly, the word ‘hacker’ has come to symbolise a generation of intelligent and disruptive young people who know how to leverage technology to create meaningful change. Secondly, the activity itself usually involves a significant amount of data mining.

Finally, the phrase “there’s a hack for that” means that someone has come up with a smarter way of doing something, demonstrated by the increasing usage of terms such as ‘life-hacking’ or even ‘parenting hacks’.

Hackathons generally take place over a whole day or even longer, usually in a big space buzzing with engineers, analysts and other boffins. Participants leave their corporate attire at home and come dressed for comfort rather than style, prepared for a long and exhilarating day fuelled predominantly by coffee and sugar.

Every organisation runs hackathons in their own way, but the concept usually remains the same. The participants (hackers) are organised into teams with mixed skill sets, then are given a list of key technical challenges that the organisation currently faces.

The organisation then gives access to any data or information required to solve these problems, and the hackers get to work. At the end of the hackathon, the teams present their solutions and the organisation picks the winners.

Corporate Hackathons

One of Australia’s major corporate hackathons, Unearthed, is a 54-hour event run by some of the region’s largest resource organisations. Competing teams are given access to Big Mining data – specifically, transport, logistical, geospatial and geological proprietary data.

At the most recent Unearthed event, one of the teams worked out a way to integrate technology into tray trucks that detects when boulders are too large for rock crushers and sounds an alarm to prevent potential blockages. The organisers estimated that this idea alone would save millions of dollars for the sector, with the problem analysed and solved in a mere 54 hours.

Perth-based CPO Jackie Harris is hosting an internal hackathon in her organisation to solve some key challenges for 2016. “It’s all about understanding the barriers to innovation and stimulating ingenuity in the team. There are so many small-scale changes we can make in our supply chain that will have a huge impact on our bottom line.”

Harris gives the example of the complexities involved in working out the optimal deck space utilisation on a cargo ship. Through a hackathon-type event, there is now a piece of software that maps deck space and provides the solution for you. “Our organisation is lucky in the sense that we are data-rich and have a strong analytics team”, says Harris. “Hackathons are a fantastic way to showcase this team and bring their ideas to the fore.”

In the Procurement space, a hackathon is a fun and effective way to engage your suppliers and generate innovative solutions. Invite your suppliers to send their best and brightest to compete ‘live’ against their peers, come up with the most innovative solution to your operational challenges, and win the contract.

Not convinced? What you need to know is that hackathons:

  • create solutions to ‘unsolvable’ problems.
  • are fun, engaging and social events.
  • provide a focused environment to solve operational challenges without any distractions.
  • encourage a culture of healthy competition.
  • (most importantly) stimulate innovative thinking in your organisation.

Hugo Britt is a Research Consultant at The Faculty, helping to support The Faculty Roundtable, an influential group of Australian procurement leaders, who gather to share their experiences and insights. The Faculty will be hosting their ninth Asia-Pacific CPO Forum, the region’s premier procurement event dedicated to accelerating commercial leadership at the highest level.

For more information on The Faculty Roundtable or CPO Forum, contact Program Manager, Belinda Toohey.​

If you’re interested in finding out more about the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas 2016: Meet Our Speakers – Paul Markillie

The Big Ideas Summit is just a few weeks away! We caught up with Paul Markillie, Innovation Editor at the Economist, to talk about the megatrends transforming manufacturing.

Big Ideas Summit - Paul Markillie

Paul Markillie is Innovation Editor at The Economist. He has covered the automotive and aerospace industries globally and was the magazine’s first Asian-based business correspondent, writing about the rise of China as a manufacturing superpower.

Paul now writes about new technologies and their implications for businesses. He has authored a number of special reports, including “The Third Industrial Revolution” in 2012 and “New materials for Manufacturing” in 2015.

At the Big Ideas Summit, Paul will take us through the megatrends that are transforming manufacturing. He will explain how manufacturing is going digital and how that will disrupt the conventional economics of production and overturn established supply chains. He will give examples of how some companies are responding. He writes:

“I am particularly looking forward to the Big Ideas Summit because many of the things I talk about attract interest and curiosity. That can lead to some lively interaction, from which I often learn things from people who are already having to confront profound changes to the way they will do business in the future.”

According to the WEF, we are now in the Fourth Industrial Revolution – where does that leave businesses?

Four, three or some say half-a-dozen industrial revolutions have occurred. But however you measure these things, this one represents a fundamental shift because, as has happened in other industries – publishing, music, films, electronics, etc – the move to a digital world in manufacturing changes the rules comprehensively.

Developments like new materials, robotics, 3D printing and computer-aided design and simulation demolish the old notions of economies of scale, changing not just where companies locate factories but also how they organise themselves and arrange their procurement and supply chains.

What are the key impacts of new materials science for manufacturing organisations?

A good example is carbon fibre, already common in aerospace and now becoming more widely used in automotive industries. For example, BMW’s i3 electric cars start life in a Japanese rayon factory as a spool of plastic that looks like fishing line. This is carbonised at a plant in America and then shipped to Munich, where it is woven into carpet-like sheets on what appears to be a giant knitting machine.

When the sheets arrive at BMW’s car plant in Leipzig they are cut into shapes, stacked into multiple layers, injected with resin, cured and glued together by robots. That factory is unlike any other car plant I have seen, and so is its supply chain. And there are many other new materials coming that could change other industries just as dramatically.

These developments have increased the pace at which new products are developed – do you think supply chains can keep up with this demand?

If they do not, new supply chains will be developed. Or none at all: Tesla, for instance, is a new carmaker and quite vertically integrated. What suppliers need to remember is that many of these new manufacturing technologies allow a number of components to be integrated into one part.

So, for instance, a company making ceiling panels may decide to integrate thin-films of LED lighting into their product, thus offering a customer a product that no longer requires light fittings to be purchased.

What major changes do you think there will be in procurement and supply chain processes in the next few years?

First-tier suppliers will need to work much closer with companies in the development process. We already see some of this co-development. But there will also be huge opportunities for companies further down the supply chain to innovate. Second-generation robots are more affordable for medium and small companies; 3D printing processes are less wasteful of raw materials and allow greater production flexibility at lower volumes.

I think we will see some companies grasp these opportunities, which could re-order supply chains and lead to some companies that were previously suppliers of components making the leap to become producers of final products.

Paul Markillie will go into greater detail on all of these topics during his keynote at the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Planning Procurement’s Response To The Millennial Generation

Understanding how procurement can cope with, and ultimately benefit from, the disruption brought into talent management by the Millennial Generation.

Millennial Generation

Hackett’s 2016 Procurement Key Issues Study shows that talent management remains one of the top 3 of objectives as a critical or major area of focus for virtually all procurement organisations.

Looking deeper, organisations are targeting three specific areas to transform talent: improving leadership skills, honing business acumen, and building specialist procurement skills. The two perennial favourites, category management and strategic sourcing, make up the other top reported objectives.

The research also showed that the Millennial Generation represents one of the greatest potential impacts and challenges to managing talent in the next year or two. Additionally, most procurement organisations (especially those in Europe) continue to experience higher levels of staff churn and difficulty attracting great talent.

What do we mean by Millennials?

When we refer to the Millennial Generation, we are referring to those born in the 80s and now moving into management positions, or early 90s who are leaving graduate school to join the workforce. This workforce demographic is characterised by different attitudes, desires and motivations than earlier generations. Generations X and Y came to be known for their independence, interest in work/life balance, technical proficiency, and measuring success in both financial and social terms.

Millennials, on the other hand, are the first generation of digital natives – i.e. they’ve truly grown up with the internet and social consciousness.  They have high career expectations, desiring both immediate and high impact opportunities, flexibility in terms of schedules, embracing remote working and diversity in assignments (e.g. culture, fun and collaboration).

They plan for rapid advancement as well as frequent job changes. Case in point: 90 per cent of Millennials plan to stay in their job for less than 3 years. They are high touch, and expect frequent feedback. In summary, the millennial generation wants more from work than just a career at a good company.

How can procurement address the critical skills gaps?

Research conducted by the Hackett Group in the past on procurement talent management, has shown clear gaps in the essential business skills required for most procurement jobs. These are: strategic thinking and analysis, group facilitation, and relationship management skills.

When considering specialist skills, enhanced SRM and market intelligence expertise were identified in need of development for most roles, with supply risk, innovation and SCM expertise needed for specialist roles.

How do we respond?

As procurement leaders this situation poses challenging questions:

  1. What procurement value proposition will be the most appealing?
  2. Will higher attrition become the new normal for procurement?
  3. Is now the time to invest in knowledge capture and transfer?
  4. How can we create flexible work schedules and collaborative environments?
  5. Do we need to rethink the importance and type of training we provide?

In all cases, training strategies need to be modernised to reflect this accelerated reality, as well as changing learning styles and preferences. Strategies that get people up to speed faster, use more interactive, workshop and team based formats should be preferred. The 70-20-10 approach to learning is based around the idea that 70 per cent of learning comes through experience, 20 per cent from social learning with colleagues, and just 10 per cent through formal learning involving training or online courses.

This framework will see larger elements of learning being on-the-job, collaborative and workshop based, action orientated to better align to leaders and manager day jobs and current issues, and complemented with self-directed learning elements and social learning (e.g. LinkedIn, Yammer).

Hackett's Framework for Training to Integrate Millennials into the Workforce
Hackett’s Framework for Training to Integrate Millennials into the Workforce

Course materials need to be user friendly, but at the same time to support multi-tasking and access to on-demand, on-line tutorial content. Course design should incorporate the themes seen as important to younger generations – how procurement connects into CSR and sustainability, work/life balance, and career advancement.

The older generations of Baby Boomers and Gen X will need support and even training to adapt to this shift in to mentality and culture.

About Hackett’s Procurement Key Issues Study

The results of this annual study are gathered from executives from over 180 large and global companies operating in the US, Europe and rest of the world, with annual revenue of $1 billion or greater.

Find out more by visiting the Hackett website.

Chris Sawchuk is a keynote speaker at the Big Ideas Summit on April 21st. Chris will be talking about how procurement is applying key agile capabilities in the areas of leadership, talent, service placement and information-driven performance.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Showcasing Your Big Ideas – Procurement-as-a-Service

Ahead of the Big Ideas Summit 2016 on April 21st, we’re on the hunt for your Big Ideas. Philip Ideson discusses his Big Idea of procurement-as-a-service models.

At the Big Ideas Summit 2016, which takes place on 21st April,  we will be asking our speakers and attendees to record their ‘Big Ideas’ live on camera for the whole of our Procurious community to see.

But we also believe that every single procurement and supply chain professional has a unique vantage point in the industries, communities and businesses they work in. You have been submitting your Big Ideas to us, and so far, we think they have been great!

Philip Ideson, Host, The Art of Procurement

Philip believes that procurement-as-a-service delivery models will transform the procurement value proposition. Companies will be able to access procurement talent and technology “on-demand”. This means the cost of accessing procurement expertise becomes a variable cost rather than a fixed cost.  

The result? Organisations of all sizes can now access specialist domain expertise which allows us to pull value levers that over and above cost savings that elevate our role and transform our value proposition. 

Philip elaborates on this big idea further here. You can connect with Philip on the Art of Procurement website, or on Twitter at @aopshow or @pideson.

How to Submit Your Big Idea

We don’t mind if you film your submission on your phone, tablet, laptop or PC. However, to help you out we’ve compiled a list of some of our recommended methods for reaching out.

Once you’ve completed your film, you can reach us by email ([email protected]); on Twitter (@procurious_) or via Google Drive or Dropbox (using [email protected]).

You can find all the information you need on recording and submitting your Big Idea here.

Want to know more about Big Ideas 2016? Then visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

The Procurious Big Ideas Summit is Back!

The Procurious Big Ideas Summit is back and it’s bigger and better than ever before!

Procurious Big Ideas Summit 2016

We had a fantastic experience, and great fun, last year at the Big Ideas Summit, the world’s first digitally-led conference for the procurement profession. And it’s almost time to do it all over again at the Procurious Big Ideas Summit 2016.

If you aren’t familiar with the event, the  Big Ideas Summit gathers together 40-50 of the world’s brightest minds, such as established thought leaders, senior decision makers and industry experts, to discuss the future of the procurement profession.

What’s the Big Idea behind it?

The event is a unique opportunity for professionals to gain insights into the evolving global space of procurement. It connects senior executives, thought leaders and CPOs with digital delegates on a live platform.

Big Ideas 2016 aims to get current and future procurement leaders thinking about and discussing the key trends, risks and issues in the profession, and giving them tangible outcomes they can use to drive innovation and change in their organisations.

The key themes our speakers will be addressing this year include:

  • The technological “megatrends” impacting procurement
  • The True Cost of doing business in the fashion industry
  • How social media breaks boundaries for innovation and collaboration
  • Attracting and retaining the best Millennial talent
  • Creating and sustaining organisational agility

The face-to-face component of the event will take place in London on 21st April 2016. However, as with last year, we’re inviting over 12,000 procurement and supply chain professionals (co-incidentally, the same number as the Procurious community!) to join us as digital delegates.

This will amplify ideas and content through Procurious, as well as give our global delegates the chance to submit questions to speakers in advance as well as tune in, learn and participate in real time. 

Who will be speaking?

We’ve secured a high calibre of thought leaders and keynote speakers, including:

  • Tom Derry, CEO, Institute for Supply Management
  • Christopher Sawchuk, Principal & Global Procurement Advisory Practice Leader, The Hackett Group
  • Gabe Perez, Vice President of strategy and market development, Coupa
  • Elizabeth Linder, Politics & Government Specialist, Facebook EMEA
  • Lucy Siegle, Journalist and broadcaster, The Observer
  • Peter Holbrook, CBE, Chief Executive, Social Enterprise
  • Lucy Harding, Partner and Head of the Global Procurement & Supply Chain Practice, Odgers Berndtson
  • Martin Chilcott, Founder and CEO, 2degrees
  • Dapo Ajayi, Chief Procurement Officer, AstraZeneca

How you can take part

The Big Ideas Summit is open to all Procurious members. It doesn’t matter where you are in the world, we want you to help shape the agenda. Register your attendance in our Procurious Big Ideas 2016 Group.

On Twitter? You can also submit your questions by tweeting us @procurious_ using the hashtag: #BigIdeas2016

For more information about the day head on over to our bespoke event site at www.bigideassummit.com.

Why take part?

As savvy social networkers you’ll already be of the mind that social media can be used to create a global stir. We want to amplify these Big Ideas throughout the global procurement community, connect with one another, start meaningful conversations, and ultimately drive change.

All keynote sessions will be captured on film and offered exclusively to registered attendees. As a ‘digital delegate’ you’ll also be able to access a rich collection of supporting material including articles, interviews and video content following the event.

Who Is Sponsoring It?

For an event that explores the biggest trends impacting procurement we thought it only necessary to bring onboard similarly hot-ticket sponsors. The Procurious Big Ideas Summit 2016 is proud to be sponsored by the The Hackett Group, The Institute for Supply Management, IBM and Coupa.

We are delighted to be working with such great organisations and look forward to joining with them on the day to produce a fantastic event for you all.

If you’re interested in finding out more, visit www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.

Big Ideas 2015 Flashback: Building a Supply Chain Wiki

We’re looking back at some of the most popular ideas from Big Ideas 2015. Gordon Donovan examines the concept of a Supply Chain Wiki.

Gordon Donovan, Procurement and Supply Chain Manager at Metro Trains in Melbourne, shared his Big Idea last year around the concept of creating a Procurement and Supply Chain Wiki.

Gordon believes that there is a dearth of good information for procurement organisations around the full supply chain. This isn’t just the Tier 1 suppliers, but Tier 2 suppliers and subcontractors, and further down the chain.

This Big Idea focuses on harnessing the power of the community to build a centralised knowledge base for all.

Gordon admits that his Big Idea is quite daunting, but as he points out, it all has to start somewhere!

See more Big Ideas from our 40 influencers from the Big Ideas Summit 2015 on Procurious.

If you’re interested in finding out more about the Big Ideas Summit 2016, visit www.bigideassummit.com. You can also join our Procurious group, and Tweet your thoughts and Big Ideas to us using #BigIdeas2016.

Don’t miss out on this truly excellent event and the chance to participate in discussions that will shape the future of the procurement profession. Get Involved, register today.