Category Archives: Big Ideas Summit

Conference Season Is Upon Us!

Turn on the auto-reply, pack your suitcase and strap yourselves in – it’s #procurement conference season.

Why are so many great conferences packed into the same few weeks of the year? Yes, the weather is usually reliable, but having successive (or even overlapping) conferences forces procurement pros to pick and choose carefully. And your conference budget isn’t the only issue here – simply finding the time to step out of the office for more than one multi-day event (plus travel) can be very challenging.

Let’s have a look at some of the big events in your region.

EUROPE

SAP Ariba Live

Amsterdam, 23-25 April

SAP Ariba’s biggest event in Europe will be packed with interactive presentations and workshops, and offers the chance to meet some of the real thought-leaders and technical wizards from SAP Ariba itself (not just salespeople!). The agenda reflects SAP Ariba’s ongoing theme for the year, Procure with Purpose.

Procurious will be there! Don’t miss the Diversity and Leadership panel session featuring Procurious Founder Tania Seary talking about how procurement professionals can leverage our uniquely human qualities in the world of Industry 4.0, and the critical importance of supplier diversity for the future of procurement.

Related articles on #ProcurewithPurpose:

How Your Network Can Turbocharge Procurement – SAP Ariba President Barry Padgett

Exploding the 4 Social Enterprise Myths

Supplier Diversity? I Don’t Have Time For That!

… and be sure to sign up for our upcoming #ProcurewithPurpose webinar on Modern Slavery.

 

Procurious Big Ideas Summit

London, 26 April

You didn’t think we would forget to mention our very own flagship event? The Big Ideas Summit is an innovative, digitally led event with a small audience of 50 or so procurement influencers in the room, and hundreds of Digital Delegates interacting online. So, while you might not get a chance to attend in person, be sure to click the link above and register as a Digital Delegate to receive a treasure-trove of content and videos from the Summit.

Speakers include legendary IBM CPO Bob Murphy, ISM CEO Tom Derry, risk-taking and decision-making expert Caspar Berry, futurist and business-builder Sophie Hackford, futurist and urbanist Greg Lindsay, security expert Justin Crump and a whole host of procurement gurus from some of the biggest brands in the profession.

Related articles on #BigIdeas2018:

How to Prepare For Post-Brexit Procurement In The Dark

Why Diligence Is Due

6 Critical Skills You Need If You Want To Succeed In A Digital World

IBM CPO: You’re Finished If You Think You’ve Finished!

How to Turn Your Procurement Team into a Cracking Intelligence-Gathering Organisation

4 Ways to Engineer Serendipity in Your Workplace

Don’t forget to register! https://www.procurious.com/big-ideas-summit-digital-delegates

 

ASIA-PACIFIC

The 11th Annual Asia-Pacific CPO Forum

Melbourne, 1-2 May

The Faculty CPO Forum attracts the top CPOs from all across the region, but funnily enough, this event isn’t all that focused on procurement. Instead, the agenda is packed with big-picture thinking, with futurists, experts on disruption, sports stars, diplomacy and trade experts, and others all contributing to a thought-leadership extravaganza that has delighted delegates for over 10 years now. Includes the announcement of the 2018 Asia-Pacific CPO of the Year.

Procurious will be there! Be sure to keep an eye on the Twitter hashtag #CPOForum18 for blog articles and a running update from the 2-day event.

Related articles on #CPOForum18:

4 Things Supply Managers Need To Know About China’s Belt And Road

Leadership Under Fire

4 Things CFOs Really Want From Procurement

 

USA

ISM2018

Nashville, 6-9 May

If you haven’t been to ISM’s massive annual conference before, we can’t stress enough how BIG this event is. With an action-packed agenda featuring no less than 100 educational sessions to choose from, it’s vital that attendees arrive in Nashville with a plan.

Don’t miss out on seeing Huffington Post founder Arianna Huffington on stage, along with two giants of the U.S. Intelligence Community, General Keith Alexander and John Brennan. Keynotes aside, ISM2018 offers fascinating Signature Sessions, Learning Tracks, an Emerging Professionals Experience (featuring the inspirational 30 Under 30 Supply Chain Stars), and more.

Articles related to #ISM2018:

Navigating the World’s Largest Procurement Conference

30 Under 30 Stars Prove This Enduring Stigma Is Disappearing From the Profession

 

Other major events on the procurement conference calendar:

ProcureCon Indirect

Copenhagen, 16-18 April

REV2018 Jaggaer Conference

Las Vegas, 24-26 April

Featuring a keynote from Stephen J. Dubner, award-winner co-author of Freakonomics.

 Coupa Inspire

San Francisco, 6-9 May

Interestingly, Coupa Inspire is going head-to-head with ISM2018 this year with their event being held on 6-9 May in San Francisco. It’s another big one, with 100+ sessions and 8 keynotes including the Terminator himself, Arnold Schwarzenegger!

Ivalua Now

New York, 17-18 May

Know of any other major conferences (in April or May) that should be added to this list? Let us know in the comments! You might also want to check out Spend Matters’ conference recommendations.

6 Critical Skills You Need If You Want To Succeed In A Digital World

How should procurement professionals adapt in order to survive in a digital world? The digitally enabled workforce needs to nail six key skills…

This is a unique time for procurement organisations.

Never before have companies been able to derive more competitive advantage from superior procurement capability. The function’s role is shifting from a sourcing gatekeeper to a provider of insight and decision support, made possible by improved access to digital technologies, data and advanced analytics.

Investments in automation have helped make these organisations more efficient, allowing them to redirect headcount from compliance and operations-focused processes to higher-value activities such as sourcing and supply base strategy.

But this is only the part of the story.

World-class groups achieve their superior performance because they have higher-caliber people who apply their skills to effectively harness digital technologies and capabilities.

The Digitally Enabled Workforce Requires Six Key Skills

Effective procurement teams focus on people development from multiple points of view. Softer skills like relationship management and business acumen are important for managing customer relationships, while technical skills are necessary for analysing data and developing strategic insights.

The following skills are fundamental to the operations of procurement organisations in the digital era.

1. Business acumen

As economic volatility increases, category managers need to sit side by side with their stakeholders to make business decisions that impact the supply base.

It is crucial to understand complex business needs and be able to identify ways for procurement to address them using new technologies. Business acumen is fundamental to elevating procurement’s role as a trusted advisor.

2. Relationship management

Evolving the value of procurement requires working cross-functionally with a variety of stakeholders, from senior budget owners to line managers, as well as being a customer of choice and partnering with valuable suppliers. Procurement should have multiple communication channels open with business partners and customers to fully understand their needs.

3. Supply risk management expertise

In a market of increased risk and volatility, risk management capabilities are more valuable to the enterprise. For procurement, this no longer means simply reacting to events – now the focus is on predicting and avoiding risk using internal and external tools.

4. Strategic mindset

Understanding the broader market and aligning procurement’s vision with that of the business is fundamental to navigating change and extracting value from the supply base.

5. Data analysis and reporting

Big data will change the way procurement organisations use information. Those able to sort through the data and draw the right conclusions have the potential to add value to the organiSation. The tools are available today, but it will take years for widespread adoption, making analytics a prime vehicle for competitive advantage for early adopters.

6. Savings and financial analysis

Tying savings and value benefits to financial statements documents the business value contributed by the procurement organisation and drives profitability. Identifying direct procurement impact on the budget can be elusive but critical.

Digital Technologies Are Changing the Way Organisations Hire and Retain Talent

Access to new technology makes it possible to hire more effectively. By analysing demographics, job experience, recruiting data (like quality of resume) and environmental data, organisations can increase the effectiveness of new hires.

Even the culture of procurement groups is changing now that hiring standards have risen. Social media has provided new channels for knowledge and learning. Learning on demand is a common service delivered to employees, allowing access to training modules or experts from their preferred devices.

Joining networks of colleagues and outside communities to tap into knowledge and solutions to problems is common with tools like LinkedIn.

Strategic Implications

It is getting harder to find and retain people with transformation change experience and the ability to think strategically.

Unfortunately, procurement’s hiring practices, training and skills have not kept pace.

To compete, they must not let themselves be limited by organisational or geographical borders. By hiring globally, procurement deepens the potential talent pool and opens the door to new ways of thinking.

Next-generation procurement organisations are “borderless,” allowing for the free flow of ideas and talent regardless of geography. Leadership is distributed based on supply and customer priorities, not headquarter location.

The model that procurement must work toward is one that is capable of expanding, contracting and adapting rapidly as situations change, just like modern-day supply chains.

This article was written by The Hackett Group’s Laura Gibbons Research Director, Procurement Executive Advisory Program and Amy Fong Associate Principal, Procurement Advisory Program, and Program Leader, Purchase-toPay Advisory Program. 

How Your Network Can Turbocharge Procurement

Networks have the power to transform procurement teams and turbocharge the businesses they link together. So how do you get the best value from your network?

Since you’re here reading Procurious, I can already tell you appreciate the value of networks.

And you’ve probably realised that the wider your network of professional connections, the greater its value to you.

This network effect, where the benefit of a product or service increases as more people use it, has fuelled the growth of leading Internet companies for decades.

In procurement as elsewhere, networks enable participants to reach across the world, think big, and magnify their impact.

Meanwhile, as networks embrace cloud-based technologies, they allow buyers and suppliers to think even bigger — and to make an exponentially greater impact on the buyers, sellers, and ultimately customers who rely on them.

As innovations like artificial intelligence, machine learning, the Internet of Things, and blockchain reshape entire industries; networks are becoming not only faster but actually smarter at drawing meaningful insights from sprawling troves of seemingly unrelated data.

Envisioning the world as it could be…

In the process, these advances are helping procurement professionals to envision the world not just as it is, but as it could be — including their own role in it. When cloud-based applications take on many of the function’s day-to-day tactical activities, they free up procurement professionals to focus on strategic priorities such as strengthening supply chain resilience, safeguarding the brand from third-party risk, and cultivating new sources of innovation.

As a result of this digital transformation, procurement is evolving from its traditional role of generating cost-savings to fostering collaboration and, ultimately, driving much of the strategic value that fuels growth.

What does it mean to a business — to all its trading partners and other stakeholders — when, for the first time, cognitive insights allow it to get ahead of problems before they occur?

The implications extend well beyond operational risk. Consider the reputational risk associated with forced labour upstream in one’s supply chain. A network instills confidence across the value chain when it offers visibility not only into inventories, cycle time, and turnover ratios but also into the criteria that gauge whether a trading partner’s brand values align with one’s own.

Does a supplier have, for example, the governance structures in place necessary to root out forced labour, human trafficking, and inhumane working conditions? Customers and investors alike demand transparency into all these factors, and networks provide a comprehensive, real-time glimpse to simplify compliance. The result is peace of mind when advances in machine learning provide buyers and suppliers with options instead of data so that they can create ethical, sustainable supply chains, all while extending their competitive advantage.

At its best, technology enhances our business relationships, our personal ones, and the quality of all our lives. Yet, as anyone who’s ever experienced a hard-drive crash can attest, technology can sometimes serve at cross-purposes to this goal.

The same holds true for the software industry. The world’s most powerful networks can evaluate immense amounts of information, but unless they’re designed with the customer in mind they may as well possess the processing power of an abacus.

Procurement professionals have every right to expect that the network they rely on be intuitive, reliable, and — above all — consistent in delivering on their promises.

Does yours?

Demand it!

SAP Ariba’s James Marland, Vice President, will be speaking at Big Ideas Summit in London later this month. To find out more information and register to attend in person or as a digital delegate visit our dedicated site. 

This article was originally published on LinkedIn. 

How To Prepare For Post-Brexit Procurement In The Dark

Procurement pros know the worst and best case Brexit scenario… But how do we prepare when faced with such a lack of concrete insight? 

The Brexit process has been a triumph in politics over practicality.

We may know roughly what the government wants to achieve politically, but the practical solutions for achieving those goals and the real-world impacts these solutions may entail are still unclear.

Despite this lack of concrete insight, it is often falling upon procurement departments to scope and prepare remedies for the uncertain future.

International Supply Chains

UK supply chains are inherently international, with much of what we export made up of things we import, so any changes to the regulatory environment has the potential to cause disruption as supply chains adjust.

It is not yet clear just how much Britain’s regulatory environment will continue to be aligned with the EU post-Brexit, as the two main possibilities – something like Norway with continued single market membership, or something like a Canada-style free trade agreement – offer distinct paths.

In one we commit to maintaining alignment with the EU, but in the other we choose to break free from the EU framework in order to open ourselves up to trade deals with the likes of America, where the regulatory environment is significantly different.

The two options do not exist on a spectrum, rather being distinct sets of tools that we can use to forge our future trading relationships.

The Invisible Border

The government’s commitment to maintaining an invisible border between Ireland and Northern Ireland however, has somewhat tied the government’s hands in this regard, as it essentially makes full alignment the default option.

The government still seems intent on diverging eventually, but having put forward no reasonable suggestions as to how these two objectives can be reconciled, businesses are finding themselves having to plan for the hardest kind of Brexit. Modelling the impacts of WTO rules is possible, and whilst doing so is only indicative of the worst-case scenario, it is a useful exercise in highlighting the key risk areas where contingency planning should be concentrated.

What can international businesses do?

For international businesses, the first port of call is to establish a fresh emphasis on supply chain relationships and risk management.

Many businesses will need to evaluate the possibility of finding new suppliers in order to build a level of flexibility in their supply chains that can help mitigate any disruption. Both UK and EU businesses will be looking into the possibility of switching to domestic suppliers and attempting to beat down prices if the costs of international trade increase.

If Britain does indeed exit both the single market and the customs union, as per the government’s stated intentions, it is very likely that procurement departments will need to face up to changes in contract terms, tariffs, and new non-tariff barriers such as rules of origin alongside potential changes in the identity of suppliers themselves.

This means addressing the chance of increased time and hassle getting goods across borders, as well as potential changes in local regulations if new suppliers are located outside of the EU.

When will these changes happen?

Uncertainty around when these changes may ultimately come into play, and how much of an advanced warning businesses will be given is another major issue.

At the moment it is looking likely that changes will be minimal until at least 2020, but beyond this we can expect to once again enter the realm of politics trumping actual progress.

The reality is that in the absence of reliable information, many firms may continue to take a wait-and-see approach in the hope that disruption is minimal, and currently we don’t know enough about the future to reveal the most appropriate course of action. If one thing is clear, it is that Brexit has put the role of procurement within British businesses under the limelight.

Nick Ford will be speaking at Big Ideas Summit in London next month. To find out more information and register to attend in person or as a digital delegate visit our dedicated site. 

Why Diligence is Due

Ethical sourcing makes good business sense. Plus… it’s the law! Nick Ford explores how to exercise due diligence.

lovelyday12/Shutterstock.com

Pioneering U.S. academic fundraiser James W. Frick once cautioned prospective donors: “Don’t tell me where your priorities are. Show me where you spend your money and I’ll tell you what they are.”

For procurement professionals, how they source products and services and where they spend their budgets is not only commercially expedient, but also framed by strict international regulations. The risks contingent on neglecting – or wilfully evading – such rules have profound effects on an organisation’s reputation and, ultimately, it’s bottom line.

Due diligence is about managing risks in the supply chain responsibly; it does not ask companies to guarantee 100 per cent ‘ethical’ supply chains. Tracing the origin of a product, part or service is only one part of this.

The OECD Guidelines

Essentially, the overarching ethical sourcing and procurement principles are set out in the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises. According to Emily Norton, Campaigner at Global Witness, these are the most comprehensive set of government-backed recommendations on responsible business conduct and ethical sourcing in existence today.

The guidelines are far-reaching recommendations by governments to multinational enterprises operating in or from adhering countries. Currently, 48 countries adhere to the guidelines, including most in the E.U. They provide voluntary principles and standards for responsible business conduct in areas such as employment and industrial relations, human rights, environment, information disclosure, combating bribery, consumer interests, science and technology, competition, and taxation.

The OECD rules are buttressed by the UN Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights, endorsed unanimously in 2011. They make it clear that companies have a responsibility to make sure their activities do not fund harm and abuses. In many sectors, risk-based due diligence, as recommended by the UNGPs has emerged as a practical and effective way for companies to meet this responsibility.

EU Regulations

Spurred on by these ethical sourcing frameworks, a new EU regulation came into force in June 2017, the first of its kind to adopt a truly global scope. It requires EU-based importers of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold (ores and metals) to meet the OECD standard when sourcing minerals from any conflict-affected or high-risk area globally. Technology firms who import tin, tantalum, tungsten or gold in their metal forms into the EU, e.g. for manufacturing purposes, will be covered by the new EU law.

Unfortunately, the EU has chosen to ignore a whole category of companies bringing minerals into the EU. This includes firms who buy and sell products containing these minerals, who are outside scope of the regulation. The EU trusts them to self-regulate.

In Asia, Chinese industry guidelines were launched in 2015 for Chinese companies operating abroad, which are also based on the OECD guidelines and are global in scope.

US Regulations

Meanwhile in the US, Section 1502 of the Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act requires companies listed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to carry out checks on their supply chains where they believe their products contain tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold sourced from the Democratic Republic of Congo and its neighbours. Companies in the aerospace, electronics, medical devices, jewellery and clothing, among other, sectors are subject to this law.

Procurement executives at industry behemoths IBM and Walmart are currently experimenting with blockchain and radio-frequency identification (RFID) tags to clarify the provenance and passage of their products.

The Modern Slavery Act

Here in the UK, the Modern Slavery Act mandates that firms generating over £36m or more a year must produce slavery statements approved by their boards. A quarter of the FTSE 100 are currently non-compliant, forcing anti-slavery commissioner Kevin Hyland to contact them to address slavery in their supply chains. It is estimated that 16 million enslaved people are working for companies around the world.

Whether or not companies are caught by laws and regulations, all firms should be living up to the international OECD standard. This means checking whether their supply chains globally may contribute to conflict finance, human rights abuses or corruption around the world. They should be transparent about what they are doing.

Nick Ford will be speaking at Big Ideas Summit in London next month. To find out more information and register to attend in person or as a digital delegate visit our dedicated site. 

Flashback Friday – Can You Make Procurement Decisions Under Fire?

Are you struggling to lead or motivate your team through difficult times and under extreme pressure? We’ve got some top advice from someone who knows a thing or two about making decisions in extreme conditions…

Przemek Tokar/Shutterstock.com

Andy Stumpf spoke at the Chicago Big Ideas Summit 2017. Read more about our upcoming event  – The London Big Ideas Summit – on 26th April 2018 and find out how you can get involved. 

“There are only two types of leadership.” begins Andy Stumpf “good (effective) and bad (ineffective).”

In today’s world, senior managers often struggle to effectively  respond and adapt to change. But the world is full of change and it’s crucial that our procurement leaders are flexible enoughto respond to the unexpected, to “read the tea leaves and meet the challenges of the real world.”

Andy  began his U.S. military career at the age of 17, transitioning from the position of an enlisted soldier, to an officer, and then,  in 2002,  he joined the most elite counter terrorism unit in the military; SEAL Team Six.

The unit, which is tasked with conducting the nation’s most critical missions, has become the inspiration for a number of Hollywood movies and books.

If you ever needed a man who knows how to plan for and adapt to change, Andy Stumpf is your guy! He’s strategised and executed hundreds of combat operations throughout the world in support of the Global War on Terror.

At Procurious’ Chicago Big Ideas Summit, Andy will draw on his wealth of leadership experience to talk about the intersections between business and combat, decision-making and empowering procurement teams.

Building the greatest leaders

“Business and combat are defined by their similarities, not differences and the theories of successful military leadership and successful business leadership are identical” Andy believes. It’s possible to apply the same principles and philosophy to your procurement teams because it’s really only the arena that differs.

“60 per cent of the time, organisations want me to talk about leadership. In fact, the definition is always the same. What can change is the way in which you approach leadership.”

So, how do the military build strong and competent leaders?

“Leadership is about empowering your people. From day one in the military we are taught, and it is enforced, that in the absence of leadership you must stand up and take control.

“Instead of creating individuals that think reactively in nature, we instead create individuals that think proactively.  You don’t have to be in a leadership position now to think two or three steps ahead.  In doing so, when a decision presents itself you’ll already have an answer for it.”

Does Andy believe these skills can be taught or are natural leaders exactly that?

“neither successful teams or leaders occur by accident, these are skills that must be learned, practiced, and refined. Navy SEALs are successful because of how we select, train, and lead our teams.

“Nothing in that process happens accidentally, everything is calculated. We demand leadership and accountability from each individual starting from the first day of training. We prioritise the individuals to our left and right, and the goal of our team over personal success. This philosophy is diametrically opposed to what is often found in society, and requires a structured approach and prioritisation from leaders to be successful.”

And Andy has some strong words of advice for any over-confident leaders out there. “The 1st leadership principle within the SEAL Team is ego; if you have a massive ego you’re more concerned that your ideas and strategy is being used as opposed to striving for success of the team. You can’t meet the challenges of the real world this way!”

Plan, plan and plan some more!

“We plan for everthing in the navy. We often say that if you want to shut down the military, you simply need to shut down powerpoint!

“Every stage of a plan gets one slide and there might be between five and seven slides on the ‘what-ifs’, the contingencies. Where will we land this helicopter? Where is the nearest location for medical treatment and what alternate options do we have?” When, as Andy points out, precisely 0 per cent of planning goes as expected, contingencies are everything!

“You make primary, secondary and tertiary plans because you don’t want to have make snap decisions in a crisis. You need to be able to fall back on stable procedures”

And of course, it can’t hurt that contingency planning makes you look like something of a genius! “It’s really hard to make difficult decisions in a crisis because you’re in a time compressed environment and you may have people’s lives depending on you.  We plan for 24 -72 hours and there are 5 phases per plan. Each phase has 5-7 ‘what if‘ contingency plans because, at the end of the day, you don’t want to make decisions in a crisis, you want to be able to draw on a branch diagram.

“It’s the contingency planning especially in the SEAL teams that makes the difference between success and failure in moments of crisis.”

What can our procurement teams learn from this? Spend a lot more time planning, for starters! But Andy also reinforces the value in having baseline standards to fall back upon. “Businesses should always fall back on standard procedures so people can come together, with a clear knowledge of the protocol. This is especially crucial when you’re working under restrictive time constraints.”

Andy’s final words of advice? “Don’t get attached to your plan -get attached to success!”

Andy Stumpf spoke at the Chicago Big Ideas Summit 2017. Read more about our upcoming event  – The London Big Ideas Summit – on 26th April 2018 and find out how you can get involved. 

Data Is The Alpha And Omega Of The Future

Do you feel like your procurement team is in good shape when it comes to your existing e-procurement solutions? Sure you won’t get  “stuck” with an obsolete system? Eric Wilson talks on the importance of data. The event might be over, but you can still  register for The Big Ideas Summit Chicago to access footage  from the event. 

It’s not an exaggeration to say 90 per cent of today’s procurement technologies will be obsolete in the coming years. While much of today’s tech has some great functionality, when you put it up against the backdrop of a world where the big value is in the data more than the tactical functionality, it’s clear that they’ll simply be left behind!

Don’t believe me? Think this is “out there”? Let me elaborate…

Why can’t Alexa answer my questions?

Nowadays, many of us use Amazon’s intelligent personal assistant, Alexa, or similar AI applications. If you have, you’ll know that they’re not always adept at answering the questions we ask of them. Why? It’s simply because they don’t have enough data…yet!

Imagine machines that could:

  • Manage all your discrepancies for you
  • Detect fraudulent procurement
  • Code your non-PO invoices

This is the point at which technology gets a lot more exciting, and we’re not far from reaching these dizzying heights. The question procurement teams must ask is whether their organisation has the volume, quality and completeness of data to allow these machines to learn, provide accurate predictions and take accurate actions on the organisation’s behalf.  And to be sure of that, we need to look ahead…

The here and now won’t help you tomorrow!

I’ve spoken before on the downfall of Siebel as an example of what happens when organisations only live in the here and now, solving the problems of today without looking ahead to tomorrow.

In 2017, the situation hasn’t changed. But this time, it’s not just about Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). Procurement technologies, and technologies in general, have fully embraced SaaS and the big tech shift that’s coming next is data.

If the system you’re looking to install is not capable of actually capturing all your transactional data – and doing so in a centrally architected manner such that you can get more value from data beyond just the data that your organisation itself generates – then all those snazzy pieces of functionality, all that beautiful user interface, all those pretty little graphs aren’t worth a dime!

Not only will your existing business case completely fail.

Not only will you not receive the ROI you planned on today.

Tomorrow the system will be obsolete, and you might as well have selected Siebel!

When it comes to selecting SaaS procure-to-pay systems, business cases are built on the ability to:

  • Eliminate maverick spend
  • Identify opportunities for strategic sourcing
  • Consolidate the supply base
  • Automate approval processes
  • Automate matching
  • Eliminate paper
  • Take advantage of terms discounts.

Indeed, organisations build up very detailed business cases based on these factors. But the basic assumptions and prerequisites for those components of the business case to actually generate real ROI are based on three things:

  1. You get 100 per cent of your suppliers connected to the system
  2. You get 100 per cent of your end users actually using the system – all the time (not just some of the time)
  3. You run all your invoices through the system – 100 per cent of them – not just the indirect invoices, but also direct, facilities, vertical specific invoices, non-PO invoices, the whole gamut!

In procure to pay, if you don’t have those three things, not only does today’s business case fall apart, but more critically for this conversation, you can’t leverage the power of all that data in the future.

There’s no two ways about it: You can’t use artificial intelligence if you don’t have the centralised data for those machines to learn from. It is data that feeds AI and other emerging technologies – you need data more than anything else for success in the future.

And so, my key takeaway now and always is: when you are putting together your RFPs for systems, data better be first and foremost on your mind.

Want to see more from The Big Ideas Summit Chicago.  Register now  (It’s FREE!) to gain access to all of the day’s action including video interviews with our speakers and attendees. 

 

You Don’t Have To Be In Melbourne To Strike Gold Today

The Big Ideas Summit has landed in Melbourne! And there’s a plethora of inspiring and insightful content for you to sift through…

Everett Historical/Shutterstock.com

Some would say that Melbourne is famous for the Victorian gold rush of 1851. For a short time the gold output from Victoria, Australia  was greater than in any other country in the world.

Today as Procurious launch The Big Ideas Summit in Melbourne for the first time, we’re having our very own gold rush!  We’re pretty confident we’ll be exporting some of the best procurement content and thought provoking discussion  for you to dig in to!

And don’t worry if you’re not able to  join us in person for the event, you can still strike gold!  Simply sign up to Procurious and join the digital delegates group for The Big Ideas Summit Melbourne 2017 to access live content throughout the day.

Here’s what procurement’s top influencers (and speakers at Big Ideas Melbourne) have to say on the big ticket trends affecting procurement today!

Procurement and the Conversational Century

When he was born in July 2013, Prince George of Cambridge became the first royal baby to have his own hashtag…

Former U.S President, Barack Obama is the author of six of the top-ten most liked tweets of all time…

And pope Francis became the first pope to engage with a wider audience through Twitter…

The social media revolution has allowed for traditional institutions to create personal digital conversations with their audience. Welcome to the era of ‘The Conversational Century’.

Read more here

Line ’em Up: Five Ways To Take A Swing At The Biggest Challenges Facing Procurement

It’s  important that procurement teams address the biggest trends and challenges facing our organisation today. Telstra’s Alexandru Butiri shares five challenges – and five solutions – to trends that will resonate with procurement professionals everywhere from connecting the dots between disruptive technologies and earning a seat at the table!

Read more here

How To Train Your CEO To Get What The Business Needs

Procurement leaders in large corporations face a tough business environment. However, more than 50 percent of procurement functions are still seen as a service rather than business functions with only a small proportion of CPOs reporting into CEOs – the majority still report three levels down. How can procurement train their CEO to get what the business needs?

Read more here 

Eye On The Prize: 5 Ways Soft Skills Can Help You Focus On The Big Ticket Projects

Roll up! Roll up! See the procurement pro dazzle as they juggle 80 balls in the air!!

Sure, it might look impressive, but underneath that whirl of frenetic activity, are you actually adding any value?

When you prioritise keeping multiple balls in the air, you wind up ineffective and shortsighted. But the solution doesn’t lie in downloading the latest time-management app….

Read more here

Cogntive Process Automation Is So Much More Than Robots

With 45 per cent of business processes having the potential to be automated, it’s of little surprise that organisations are embracing the opportunity presented by technology. For many robotics and robotics processes, automation is the starting point.

Re-imagining the way the organisation operates at its core and using technology to enable new ways of working is what cognitive process automation is really about and that;s when the magic really starts to happen…

Read more here

Sprinting Outside Your Comfort Zone

Who could be a better pick to advise on endurance than an ultra-marathon runner?

As a former lawyer turned athlete, Samantha Gash has experienced challenges that require an enormous amount of persistence both within a corporate environment and on the running trail.

Samantha has seen first-hand how projects and big ideas will fail without the right mindset and the extraordinary achievements we’re capable of when we tap into our hidden reserves of persistence.

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Workplace Inclusion: Cut The Fluff

Business leaders are tired of hearing the “D” word – Diversity. Because the reality is that by and large  businesses already have diverse workforces.

Walk into most workplaces, and you will see some form of workforce diversity: age, gender, physical ability, sexuality, culture, thought. But the problem remains because we are simply not including these diversities where and when it really counts in business.

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Renegotiating Mindsets From Competitive To Collaborative

Procurement leaders are facing more pressure than ever in the current business environment. In the wake of prevailing disruption and increased competition from nimble technology-focused companies, the c-suite have become eager to see procurement leaders make their function deliver more and add greater value to the organisation.

When you change from seeing your top suppliers as competitors to enablers, how you negotiate with them will change dramatically…

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Why you should encourage dissent in your procurement team

From Brexit to the election of President Trump;  from numerous terrorist attacks to Spain’s crisis in Catalonia, unthinkables have been occurring at an alarming frequency throughout the past few years.

Unthinkables such as these disrupt everything that we presume to be stable and constant, they create an unthinkable environment and, unfortunately, they’re not letting up as we approach the end of 2017.

We know it’s important to change the way we do business to prepare for an uncertain future but how should we be managing our teams and who should we be recruiting to help the function, and wider organisation, face the uncertainties of the world today?

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Why You Should Encourage Dissent In Your Procurement Team

Think you’d prefer an easy life when it comes to managing your procurement team? Think again! If you truly want your organisation to flourish and cope with the unthinkable events coming your way, you need an organisation that’s rife with dissent!

From Brexit to the election of President Trump;  from numerous terrorist attacks to Spain’s crisis in Catalonia, unthinkables have been occurring at an alarming frequency throughout the past few years.

Unthinkables such as these disrupt everything that we presume to be stable and constant, they create an unthinkable environment and, unfortunately, they’re not letting up as we approach the end of 2017.

We’ve heard from  Nik Gowing, BBC Broadcaster and Visiting Professor at King’s College before on the importance of managing what he decribes as “the new normal” and preparing for an uncertain future.

If procurement needs to change the way we do business, how should we be managing our teams and who should we be recruiting to help the function, and wider organisation, face the uncertainties of the world today?

Say no to the conformists

“Leaders need to be liberated from that conformity which guaranteed their career progression. The challenge is how to achieve that” says Nik.

As much of the research conducted for Nik Gowing’s and Chris Langdon’s 2015 report Thinking The Unthinkable reveals – leaders are still extremely reluctant to embrace dissenting voices within their organisation.

“We tend to dismiss dissenting voices as cranks or extremists or whatever they are, which I think is dangerous. It’s very difficult within the system to fix this”, said one former top official.

But the alternative is blind conformity and fear of speaking out about key issues and unthinkables. What our organisations don’t need in the age of uncertainty,  is an army of “yes men” who, no matter what their ability or potential are restricted and confined by an ingrained workplace culture of conformity.

“You can take the best analysts in the world, and if you don’t demand outstanding advice from them, you won’t get it.You’ll just get dross”, said Ngaire Woods, Dean of the Blavatnik School of Government in Oxford.

Say yes to the mavericks!

A welcome alternative is to embrace mavericks and dissent in the workplace. As the Unthinkable report suggests, “rigorous conformity must be seen as at best a neutral qualification, but in reality it is more a negative.”

“If your policy options are all risk averse, then you tend to end up with indecision. If your policy options encompass and embrace the concept of managing risks, then you’ll take a managed risk in the context of the policy frameworks”, said a leading academic specialist in risk-management.

Our procurement teams should  encourage and reward maverick thinkers in their teams because they are the unique thinkers, the innovaters and the ones best placed to predict and cope with unthinkables.

But is this shift in workplace attitude achievable?

How to encourage dissent within your procurement organisation

  1. Stop hiring people like you

One surefire to fail in your attempts at nurturing a team of mavericks, is to employ a non-diverse team.

Diversifying the C-suite whether it’s by skill-set, age, gender, sexuality, outlook or race opens up enormous potential for innovation and different points of view.

A cyber-security specialist [said] “We are guilty of introducing people that are like us into the C-suite as opposed to somebody who is nothing like me but who may well have a different lens, a very different lens …We are recruiting people into our C-suites because they’re like us.

Creating new roles is another way to improve diversity within an organisation. The unthinkable report notes how organisations have employed, for example, a Chief Digital Officer, to manage and prioritise the massive amounts of company data, and Political Scientists who are hired, sometimes for the long term, to advisory boards and management teams of US companies including some in the US Fortune 500.

The ultimate aim is ensuring that all voices are heard to guarantee a range of opinions and input.

Most of us who are chairman or chief executives actually very consciously hire at least one person onto the board, who, by their very nature, is not conformist, is the awkward squad.

2. Build systems that ensure dissenting view find their way to the very top

Rigid organisational structures have a part to play in restricting innovative thinking.

One way to address this is to blur the workplace hierarchys  and encourage open discussion at all levels of the business, giving junior employees a platform, and the confidence to share their opinions and ideas with those at the very top.

They are leaders who encourage open, non-hierarchical debate with unambiguous signals for change that confirm an overarching intention to secure change of behaviour, culture and attitudes. One example is a principle adopted at one major investment bank. In staff meetings there is no longer a visible hierarchy with a chairperson sat at a top table. Attendees stand with a clear expectation that, “Everyone can speak about what they think might happen”.

This approach removes any fear of a “career penalty” for speaking out of turn or sharing a particularly obscure idea.

Part of this process demands that leaders encourage their team to be intellectually and morally courageous.

“They encourage their team to take some risks. They don’t punish you if you don’t succeed every time. I think that is the hallmark of real leaders.”

BBC Broadcaster and Visiting Professor at King’s College Nik Gowing will update delegates at the Melbourne Big Ideas Summit on why business and political leaders are struggling to prepare for unthinkables, and what needs to change.Grab a ticket here to secure your seat!

Renegotiating Mindsets From Competitive To Collaborative

When you change from seeing your top suppliers as competitors to enablers, and take a collaborative approach, how you negotiate with them will change dramatically.

This article was written by Sarovar Agarwal, Partner, Communications Media and Technology Practice at A.T. Kearney. 

Procurement leaders are facing more pressure than ever in the current business environment. In the wake of prevailing disruption and increased competition from nimble technology-focused companies, the c-suite have become eager to see procurement leaders make their function deliver more and add value to the organisation.

However, the 2016 Return on Supply Management Assets (ROSMA) Performance Check Study, “What Good Looks Like,” released by A.T. Kearney at the end of last year found that only 15 to 20 percent of procurement functions deliver high value to their organisations.

The study revealed that there is a top-tier of standout performers, a middle-tier delivering value, but performing well below the top tier, and a large group of bottom-quartile performers that add limited value. For procurement leaders focused on becoming top-tier performers and adding significant value to their organisations, we suggest the following approach.

Work smart, not hard

There has been an organisation-wide push toward productivity improvement by businesses, especially by harnessing the power of technological advancements. Procurement functions should be looking at this as a great opportunity.

Historically, procurement has focused on the smaller 2000 suppliers since this is the area of least resistance. In productivity terms, this is like the tail wagging the dog, rather than the other way around. With resources squeezed, procurement leaders are now irrevocably turning to the top 20 suppliers, rather than the complete 2000, because these are the mega vendor agreements that can affect the organisation the most, and where the most value can be added if managed effectively.

Meanwhile, technological advancements (like RPA) are now enabling automation of the large volumes of transactional activity that goes on in procurement, especially for the smaller group of suppliers, to ensure the function remains effective and productive.

If we apply the 80/20 Pareto Principle to procurement, a shift in focus to the top twenty suppliers, nurturing those relationships and making them more effective, will result in better deployment of resources and so more peas – or greater results. One key thing to note is that simply switching focus to the top 20 suppliers isn’t enough, you need to nurture those relationships too, which requires a change in mindset.

Competitive to collaborative

When you change from seeing your top suppliers as competitors to enablers, how you negotiate with them will change dramatically.

When you move into the top 20 suppliers, you are dealing with strategic categories which if led and managed well can make a significant impact on the business. The challenge for procurement leaders is that the relationship status with these suppliers is often complicated.

For example, in the telco world, Cisco is a supplier to every telco’s network, they are also a sell-through partner, and a competitor for the sell-through business.

Which is why it’s very surprising that all too often procurement brings a toolbox – for example RFP, vendor management, basic category management etc – to the negotiating table. This industrialisation of the procurement process is useful for the tail end – those 2000 suppliers with low resistance – but it cannot be used for the top 20 suppliers who have the potential to impact your business and your role in such a way.

The tools to handle these special relationships put better collaboration and engagement of vendor partners at the forefront of the strategy:

Top-to-top engagement: The biggest critical differentiator for the collaborative sourcing approach is top-to-top engagement between the company and the partners – that enables proactive involvement of the c-suite. This can help establish the right leverage and also enable internal visibility.

Business led: A high degree of involvement from the business owners will further align procurement’s interests with the business challenges and opportunities. This requires great communication and trust between functions and top-line management.

Strategic alignment: Procurement functions should start with an open mindset, rather than spell out all the asks at the start. All too often, the cookie cutter approach takes over, which doesn’t deliver the right long-term solutions. This will help deliver tailor-made solutions based on vendor insights.

Collaborative solutioning: Procurement departments should adopt transparent and collaborative solutions. They should conduct design and immersion workshops with partners, to take them along on the journey. 

Involved facilitation by procurement: Finally, they should drive proactive governance and risk management.

Procurement leaders are best placed to play the Lead Orchestrator role to this new way of thinking about the top 20 vendors. For those procurement leaders who are aiming to become a sustainable source of value for the business, the top 20 approach is smarter, more productive and gets better results for your function and for your position in the business.

The first step is changing your culture and mindset towards the top 20 from competitive, to collaborative; from contracting, to partnering – and this is often the hardest!

A.T. Kearney’s Enrico Rizzon will be speaking  at The Big Ideas Summit Melbourne. Join us LIVE to discuss the big-ticket trends affecting procurement – grab a ticket here to secure your seat!