Category Archives: Career Management

Five Simple Ways To Make Recruiters Love Your LinkedIn Profile

If you want to make great connections and open yourself up to new career opportunities, you need to be on LinkedIn. Here are proven ways to attract recruiters and hiring managers on the platform.


If you want to make great connections and open yourself up to new career opportunities, you need to be on LinkedIn.

But you must go beyond just having a profile on the business networking platform. You need to have a presence. 

It’s not enough to log in once a year to update your job title. You need to be far more involved if you want to build your personal brand.

And why does your personal brand matter? It’s your key to attract attention and build credibility with your peers and industry.

Every time you post, you are telling the world (and potential employers) who you are, explains Amy George from George Communications.

“Your profile, or lack of, is your brand,” George wrote in a recent post. “What you present on LinkedIn, or anywhere, is your story and your brand – and it speaks volumes.”

So if you are on LinkedIn, you should really be on LinkedIn says George. “Having sparse information isn’t helpful to your audience, and you are passing up important career storytelling opportunities.”

Can you really get hired by being on LinkedIn?

Yep, people really do get hired just by having an active presence on LinkedIn. Stats show 122 million people received an interview through a connection on LinkedIn.

LinkedIn is excellent for your career prospects, says Andy Moore, Digital Marketing Manager right here at Procurious.

“When you build a strong personal brand, you’re rarely short of career development, mentoring or employment opportunities,” Moore explains.

So how can you use LinkedIn to get attention from recruiters and hiring managers?

1) Get active

Apparently, only 1% of LinkedIn users post regularly

Are you part of the 99% who don’t? And what’s stopping you from taking advantage of this free, simple way to reach people?

Maybe you’re worried about what to post, which Moore says is a common concern.

That’s why you should write something that is authentic to you. “This can be your opinion on an issue, an article that speaks to you, or even proposing a simple question to your connections,” Moore advises.

“Writing from a place of sincerity can really reduce the social angst in deciding ‘what’ to post or ‘when’ to post. When we do something often, we feel less nervous about it as we have acclimatised.”

Moore suggests making it part of your routing by blocking out 15 minutes in your calendar each week to post something. Also use that time to ‘like’ and comment on other people’s posts that you find interesting.

Recruiters like to see candidates who use LinkedIn regularly, says Martin Smith, Managing Director at Talent Drive – a UK procurement recruitment specialist.

“We look for people that are…clearly active on their LinkedIn whether that’s someone that has written blogs, engaged in webinars or just generally engaged with their audience,” Smith says. 

“This allows them to stand out from their peers and if you can put some personality and authenticity behind that engagement that’s the key differentiator.”

2) Make it personal, but not too personal

A mistake Smith sees is people who blur their personal and professional lives on LinkedIn.

“Your LinkedIn is a professional network and there is nothing wrong with every now and then posting a day’s leave or a picture of your kids to show your human side,” Smith says. 

“[B]ut LinkedIn is a professional social media platform and should be used for work-related content, not what you had for breakfast or what your favourite 80s band was. Keep that for Facebook, TikTok and Instagram!”

If you’re stuck on how to balance human and business, have a look at this list of 80+ post ideas.

You should also aim to strike a human yet professional tone in the way you interact with other people on the platform, says Andrew MacAskill, Founder of Executive Career Jump.

“Pay into the ecosystem by providing comments, taking on mentees, appearing on podcasts and sharing valuable insights,” says MacAskill.

“The best way to get what you want is to help other people get what they want!”

3) Keep it clear and simple

When it comes to your own profile, MacAskill advises describing yourself with keywords that match the kind of role you want.

These keywords are unique to your skill set and make you more searchable on LinkedIn.

“Above everything else, candidates need to ensure they have the right keywords in their headline, ‘about’ box, and job detail to be found,” says MacAskill.

Recruiter Martin Smith adds another way to catch a recruiter’s attention: have a clear overview on your profile of what you do and where you are working at the moment.

“We see too often now people have very over-complicated LinkedIn profiles with grand titles such as ‘Procurement Leader/ Top 100 Procurement Influencer/FTSE 100 leader/ Thought Leader and engagement consultant,’” says Smith.

“This can make it confusing and can dilute the message on who they actually are and what they do.”

So drop the multi-hyphenated-super-title in favour of clarity.

4) Reach out to recruiters

Ideally, the recruiters come to you with suitable roles. And they likely will, once you spruce up your profile and get active on LinkedIn.

But if they aren’t chasing you yet, is it ok to approach them directly? Especially if they often post roles that seem ideal?

Of course, says Smith. But brevity is key. 

“Recruiters don’t want you sending them a 10-page document via LinkedIn on why you feel you are appropriate for the job,” Smith points out.

“The market is tough right now and is very candidate-rich and job-light which can be a challenge.

“But if you really want to stand out, send a personal yet succinct message to the recruiter on who you are, what you do and why you want the job with a follow up number and that will get the best engagement.”

Smith says recruiters are very busy at the moment trying to manage candidate expectations in a challenging market, so be considerate. You can still be persistent, but always be courteous.

“A recruiter will see every approach they have and if you look right for a role they will follow up,” Smith advises. 

And it doesn’t hurt to make connections with recruiters long before you need a job.

“Build your network, reach out to businesses that interest, build relationships with recruiters to help you with your search but ensure it’s a targeted and measured approach without too much distracting noise around the message you want to give,” Smith says.

Emphasis on the word ‘relationship.’

“Don’t be afraid to reach out to potential hiring managers and build a relationship with a soft approach,” says Imelda Walsh, Manager at The Source – the Melbourne-based procurement recruitment firm.  

“Don’t start the conversation asking about job opportunities of course. Don’t just connect with someone without following through with an introduction message to kickstart a relationship that can add value to both parties.” 

5) Ask for recommendations

You can also improve your chances by identifying the right people in your network to ask for LinkedIn recommendations, Walsh says. 

“Be strategic about who to ask for recommendations – professionals that are well connected and respected in your industry and that know the value you bring to a role/organisation,” Walsh advises.

And it’s ok to guide the people who are writing you a recommendation. 

Obviously don’t force words on them, but you can give some pointers to help them write something truly unique to you.

Aimee Bateman from the Undercover Recruiter suggests these guidelines:

  • What is my key strength (include an example) 
  • What did you enjoy about working with me the most (include an example) 
  • What word would you use to describe me and why (include an example) 
  • One problem that you had, which I helped you overcome and how (include example, their feelings, and your action points)

These can help your recommendations stand out from the generic but ever-popular: “Joe is a team player.”

Attract job opportunities to you

This might sound like a lot of work, especially if you’ve not spent much time on LinkedIn before. 

But in strange times like these, you’ll want every advantage you can get your hands on, adds Imelda Walsh.

“If you don’t have an online presence, it’s not a matter of ‘you might be missing out on roles,’ it’s a case of you will be missing out on opportunities,” Walsh warns.

So it’s worth investing the time to make your LinkedIn presence shine. 

And think of the possible rewards. “HR, hiring managers and recruiters will bring opportunities to you instead of you having to apply for roles through various company pages and job boards,” says Walsh.  

So if you’re tired of throwing your CV into the job board black hole, you might want to try the LinkedIn route to your next role.

How To Silence Your Inner Critic And Smash Your New Role

Ever felt like you’ll be found out for being a fraud in your new gig? Welcome to imposter syndrome! Learn to silence the inner critic with our 5 tips for how to smash your new role.


Nothing is worse than a first day in a new job with those horrible, awkward newbie nerves.

You’ve got the new job, the new promotion or the dream gig. You arrive on your first day with a certain amount of dread. How the heck did you pull this off? And now the realisation sets in that you have to walk the talk but you feel like you have no idea what you’re doing! Worse than that, you don’t know if you actually have the skills to do the job, what were they thinking? Send help!

Sounding the alarm

It feels like there’s an alert bell hanging over your desk, ready to go off at any second and announce to everyone that you have actually faked it – you are not qualified for the job and should now abandon your post and leave the building.  Welcome to imposter syndrome: it’s a psychological term coined by clinical psychologists Pauline Clance and Suzanne Imes in 1978. It refers to the internal process that an individual experiences of doubting their own abilities and believing they don’t have the skills to do the job. 

“…They think they are really not bright and have fooled anyone who thinks otherwise. Numerous achievements, which [should] provide ample objective evidence of superior intellectual functioning, do not appear to diminish the impostor belief.”

The good news is that these thoughts are likely to be only occurring in your head. The company would have reviewed your CV, spoken to your references and seen the positives and growth potential in you during the job interview. The way to move through imposter syndrome is to call it out for what it is (an internal reaction) and remind yourself that your identity and work self is not defined by your thoughts. In other words, your thoughts do not define you. Simply acknowledge them for what they are – negative thoughts – and send them on their way.

Image credit: https://www.rachelhill.co.nz/blog/whatisimpostersyndrome

Growing pains

Any new role or growth in our careers requires a stretch. This initial stretch can feel uncomfortable, particularly if imposter syndrome is hanging around like that bad smell in your office fridge. You can shorten the time spent in this awkward zone by being proactive and deliberate with your learning.  Take the reins back and take charge. 

Here’s our 5 tips to ensure you smash your new gig

  1. Replicate – find someone that you admire and assess what you think makes them successful. This can be someone in the organisation, outside of work even a celebrity. Having a work role model can be really helpful in figuring out what parts of yourself you’d like to turn up.
  1. Gap assessment – figure out the differences between where your role model and you are in your careers. What do you perceive as their strengths? What areas can you target for your own development? Working on these areas can help to build confidence.
  1. Your strengths – it’s great to have a development plan, but make sure you remember what your unique skills are. We all have different strengths and weaknesses, make sure you find situations to display your top skills
  1. Seek inspiration – creativity breeds growth and positivity. Surround yourself in positive situations and do things that inspire you, even if this only happens outside of work. Research topics that interest you, watch an inspiring film, meet with different people. Follow trends in other sectors and bring those principles or tools to your team or role.
  1. Absorb – as humans we are naturally self absorbed, especially during heightened times of stress or pressure. Ensure you take the time to look at what is happening around you. What conversations are happening? What projects are people talking about? Can you tag along to meetings? 

We all experience imposter syndrome from time to time and we are all prone to experiencing anxiety when starting new roles. Be prepared by knowing that these things are likely to crop up and address them as they arise. 

What Is CIPS And How To Get Accredited

Procurement, like many other professions, has made huge strides in supporting and providing accreditation to the many professionals that make up its membership.

So, the big questions are what is CIPS? How do I get accredited? And how could becoming chartered help turn the tide on global ethics?

Let jump right into it…


What is CIPS?

Originally the Purchasing Officers’ Association, it wasn’t until 1992 that the Association was granted a Royal Charter to become the Chartered Institute of Procurement (Purchasing) and Supply (CIPS) that we know today.

With a membership of over 200,000 professionals globally, the Institute is putting the profession on the front foot when it comes to providing accreditation for its members.

What does CIPS mean to us?

CIPS is seen as the voice of the procurement profession, a champion of the profession globally, led by current CIPS CEO Malcolm Harrison, while still retaining local roots in its many national associations and member-led branches.

The benefits of being a CIPS member are considerable. From connections to a network of over 200,000 global professionals, in as many varied industries and sectors as you can think of, to a constantly updating knowledge hub, with everything from the basics of procurement, right up to specialist subject areas. And that’s not to mention the webinars, podcasts and YouTube channel.

The core of the CIPS offering for procurement and supply chain professionals is in the professional accreditation that the organisation offers and supports.

Who can become a CIPS member?

The designation of MCIPS represents the gold standard for procurement professionals and is an internationally recognised award that brings the individual holder a number of benefits.

The qualifications are open to anyone working in the procurement and supply chain profession, taking them from Studying Members all the way to MCIPS, and potentially even a fellowship (FCIPS) for the senior advocates of the profession.

Will having CIPS accreditation advance my career?

In recent years, CIPS has brought its qualifications in line with other professional bodies and offers its members a chance to become chartered through its programme of Continuing Professional Development (CPD).

Joining CIPS and taking a full part in its activities as a member is no small investment, and the qualifications should not be undertaken lightly.

But, as a fully paid up member of the procurement profession, why wouldn’t you want to invest in your career and your future in this way?

As with other qualifications, achieving MCIPS does provide benefits to individuals.

Many global businesses see CIPS qualifications as the minimum standard for their procurement teams.

Due to the regard in which they are held, and the trust of the standard that they produce, many employers choose to support their staff by funding their studies.

You may not need MCIPS to work in procurement and supply chain, but having the qualification allows current and prospective employers to see that you have applicable training in your arsenal.

The annual CIPS/Hays Salary Survey and Guide helps to highlight just how important these qualifications can be. In 2020, 64 per cent of survey respondents stated that they requested MCIPS or studying towards it as a requirement for people applying for jobs with them.

It’s not only going to help you get through the door either. Professionals with MCIPS earn, on average, 17 per cent more than peers without the qualifications.

And at a time where the expertise of procurement and supply chain professionals is becoming more widely sought, having these qualifications could be the key to unlocking the full potential of your future career.

CIPS Chartership & the ethics exam

One of the key elements that CIPS has brought in along with its accreditation and, now, chartership, is its Ethics exam for individual members.

Any member, from student all the way up to FCIPS, is required to take the exam annually in order to keep their qualifications and membership up to date. The eLearning test covers the three key pillars of the ethical procurement and supply:

  • Environmental Procurement
  • Human Rights
  • Fraud, Bribery and Corruptions

The test is free for all members and can be purchased by non-members too. This works alongside the CIPS Code of Ethics, which organisations can sign up to as a public commitment to proper work practices in the field of procurement.

Over the past few years there have been several high-profile global events linked to poor ethical procurement practices.

At a time where global supply chains, and by association procurement, are in the spotlight, having a widely agreed and signed Code of Ethics, backed up by an annual ethics exam for individuals is crucial.

Supporting the ethical agenda is something all procurement and supply chain professionals should be doing.

Accreditation and Chartership provide the foundation for developing a profession that operates within these bounds and is something that should be an expectation for all professionals in the coming years.

Play your part and take the first steps on your chartership journey by joining CIPS today.

How To Write The Best Supply Chain Resume

Write the ultimate Procurement resume that is both eye-catching and optimised towards securing your ideal next Supply Chain role.


I have worked in executive supply chain recruitment for 16 years. I built a Supply Chain & Procurement career site that ranked number 1 in Google for a variety of top search terms. As such, I understand how important it is to build a strong resume that makes an early impact with the reader and really aligns you to role that you are applying for. 

Throughout this article we will explore the elements to focus on to set yourself apart from the competition and build a strong resume that conveys your skills, values and experience in the best possible way.

Early impact

I have read claims that the reviewer of a resume will make a subconscious decision on candidate suitability for a given position within around 7 seconds of opening/picking up the document. Although this may seem harsh, it goes without saying that if a role advertisement has generated 200 responses then it is more than likely the reviewer will not be reading all the content of each and every resume. This makes the opening page even more important.

Layout

Layout is always high on the list of priorities when it comes to creating an attention grabbing procurement resume. The reader should be able to find information readily and the presentation of the document is key to this being possible. Having reviewed thousands of supply chain and procurement related resumes in my time in recruitment, I can honestly say that layout needs to be your number one priority and should gear the resume towards the presentation of your best achievements and most impressive responsibilities held during your career.

For developing an eye catching design theme there are free tools on the internet such as Canva that offer a resume builder tool with access to hundreds of template themes.

Executive Summary

Many job seekers opt for an executive summary or profile at the top of the resume. This is absolutely fine however DO NOT get this wrong as this is the preface to the entire document.

Try to incorporate some of your biggest achievements into your opening profile with plenty of quantifiable data. For example:

MBA qualified Supply Chain executive with 20 years experience within the FMCG and Retail sectors leading teams of up to 600 indirect reports and P&Ls in excess of $600m

In one fell swoop you have provided the reader with an idea of your level of education, number of years experience, sector specific background, size of teams managed and level of budgetary responsibility.

Two or three sentences covering your responsibilities and biggest achievements should suffice to create a captivating opening statement.

Play to your Strengths

Another tip for resume layout is to play to your strengths: if you are educated to MBA or Masters level, or have a function specific Degree(s), then bring these to the forefront of the resume. A brief section for educational qualifications underneath Profile/Executive Summary will suffice. This could be particularly important for a recent graduate who has 6 months work experience but 4 years study in the procurement area – education can take on more of a priority than professional experience in such a case. If, however you do not possess any tertiary qualifications, you should bring your practical professional experience to the forefront and leave any reference to education towards the end of the document.

Career Summary

We have explored the creation of a concise opening statement with plenty of impact and the promotion of significant educational qualifications on the front page, now let’s consider a career summary.

Career summaries are a great way to provide the reader with immediate access to what your most recent role has been, how your career has gone to date, and should demonstrate a consistent increase in level of responsibility up until your current role. Times when career summaries should be avoided include recent graduates (for obvious reasons) and potentially interim contracts specialists. An interim contract project manager for instance may have worked at 20 or more companies in the last 5 years and therefore listing all the individual contracts in one list becomes exactly that – a list and not a summary! For an interim specialist or even a project manager it could be worth considering listing key competencies or areas of specialty – I would even recommend tailoring the resume further towards the opening by aligning all the contracts/projects that are most relevant – For instance “Examples of Strategic Transformation Projects”.

Having invested time in developing these areas of your front page, the reader now knows where you have worked, your level of education (if appropriate), some of your greatest achievements and is becoming well equipped to assess your suitability for the position … quickly!

Resume Length

Another point on layout is the age old question of how long the resume should be. The simple answer is the document should be long enough to include everything of relevance to the position you are applying for.

You should try and keep the resume to no more that 4 pages according to the Career Development Association of Australia.

Really focus on what you have achieved in the last 5 years, however if a role you executed 8 years prior is highly relevant (either due to specific industry sector or responsibilities) then develop this further. You should really be including just key highlights in terms of overall responsibility and achievements from your early career. If the last time you updated your resume was 6 years ago, then avoid simply adding to the document. The reason for this is times have moved on and your primary focus is what has happened in these last 6 years. By adding to the old version you will essentially be making the document unnecessarily lengthy and should first trim down the previous version always remembering to quantify responsibility and achievements to build credibility.

Order

Resumes should always be in reverse chronological order (seems logical?) as this highlights your most recent experience early in the document. I would always recommend including a brief description on the size, scope and nature of a business you have worked for. Yes, if you worked for 10 years with a leading bank then of course a resume reviewer from another bank is likely to be well informed on the company you have worked for. However, what happens if you decide to apply for a role in another industry sector? What if the resume reviewer is overseas and knows nothing of your organisation?

Then comes the role title, responsibilities and achievements. Procurement is an area where even the same job titles can have different degrees of focus and responsibility from one company to the next. You should leave the reader in no doubt as to the scope of your role/department/team/project. Never duplicate your job description on the resume: this is obvious to the reader. You can however use your job description as a point of reference to ensure you haven’t missed any key areas of responsibility.

Point of reference

Since your interview will involve questions, The trick around resume content is to include everything that is relevant but to leave enough for you to articulate further at an interview. Remember, you should easily be able to expand upon anything included on your resume at interview. Therefore, for any key achievements (most likely around strategic sourcing/spend reduction/ process formulation and optimisation/ stakeholder engagement/vendor management etc) you should be able to take the interviewer through the exact steps taken by you and the team. This last point is quite resounding since it never looks good to take sole credit for achievements that were part of a wider departmental/organisational agenda with many people involved. It’s absolutely fine to outline the parameters that you and your team drove to achieve a desired outcome if the contribution was significant to overall success.

Me, myself and I

Do not write resumes in third person sense e.g. “Stephen drove improved supplier engagement through….”. This gives the appearance the resume was concocted by another individual. In the same breath it is worth mentioning you should avoid using “I” frequently. In the previous example the sentence could start with “Improved supplier engagement through…”.

Target Roles

We can debate all day long about what makes an outstanding supply chain resume, however the main determining factor around the strength of a resume is what we are benchmarking the document against – i.e. the role to which the resume is being put forward. You could have a really strong general supply chain resume that details everything we have reviewed above, but when we look at the resume against a specific role it lacks depth in certain areas or spends too much time focusing on non-value added topics. If a job seeker is sitting down to write their resume, then as much as they should focus on what they have achieved to date, they should also consider what types of roles they will be interested in that meet their aspirations. Ensure you demonstrate the desired criteria and experience in your resume document for these types of positions. This will also strengthen your resume’s searchability in recruitment systems and it will also help you to concoct a strong Linkedin profile that can be found by headhunters searching for candidates against a role that fits your aspirations.

Social Links

Be sure to include your contact details and links to professional social media profiles such as Linkedin. If you notice that your Linkedin profile ends in a series of numbers you can actually change this through editing your profile and updating the profile URL (subject to availability).

Format

After having created an impactful and well presented resume you should consider saving the file in a couple of different formats.

Microsoft Word should form the basis of your resume building and editing however you may wish to convert to a PDF file for application submission. My recommendation when dealing through recruiters would be to ask if they would prefer the resume to be sent in Word or PDF format. Most recruitment firms will edit the resume with their own branding and remove and candidate contact details. This can become very difficult if the resume is in PDF format and lead to formatting issues.

The job market is currently at its most competitive and having the best possible resume increases your chances of securing an interview for your ideal next role. Do you have any other suggestions for what makes an outstanding resume? Let us know in the comments below!

What Should I Look For In A Mentor?

Finding a great mentor can catapult your career – here are the defining attributes of the perfect mentor to look for.


The saying goes that no man is an island, and in a career sense what that really means is: the office can certainly feel like unchartered territory without a mentor. A mentor is something even the most talented people in the world want and need – famously, Larry Summers mentored Sheryl Sandberg, and Maya Angelou mentored Oprah Winfrey. And everyone who has ever had a mentor knows that they can be the shining north star you need to succeed, and can help you navigate everything from difficult decisions to new opportunities. They can even become lifelong friends and sponsors within an organisation, helping oversee your ascension to dizzyingly heights.

Many – if not all – CPOs credit their success to a mentor or two along the way. And this year, with COVID making it one of the most challenging years to date for a lot of us, a mentor is more important than ever to help you navigate the murky waters of leading through and after a pandemic.  

But unfortunately, not all mentors are created equal. Some really go above and beyond, yet some are not quite as useful. But how do you know the difference from the outset? 

We spoke to two successful senior professionals, Sally Lansbury, Memberships Director at The Faculty Management Consultants and Helen Mackenzie, former CPO and Principal Adviser at Procurious, about how mentors have helped shaped their careers, and what exactly we should all look for in our next mentor: 

What should a mentor experience be like? 

Sally and Helen both believe that a mentoring experience should be an overwhelmingly positive one, where you get to tap into the wisdom of someone experienced, and use them as a sounding board to navigate challenging situations. Both women said that in their past, they’ve had both formal and informal mentors, and that these mentors have helped their careers in ways they’d never imagined. 

Sally found her previous mentors extremely valuable in that she was able to learn about them, as well as use them to help her navigate decisions: 

‘For me, I have found a mentoring relationship to be particularly important as I always learn so much from other people’s experiences.’ 

‘I’ve also found that mentors are great people to bounce ideas off when you’re unsure of something.’ 

Helen also felt that her mentors were great sounding boards, but found that they were particularly useful in a different way. When Helen was eyeing the top job (of CPO in the organisation she worked for at the time), she felt that her mentor helped her hone her leadership skills: 

‘The mentor I had leading up to my promotion to CPO was exceptional. She helped me understand what leadership skills I needed to take that next step.’ 

Since changing roles from CPO to consulting, Helen has herself had the experience of being a mentor, a role which she describes as challenging but ultimately rewarding. And in a nod to her leadership capability, Helen now typifies what we all aspire to in a mentor: 

‘Right now, I’m mentoring a young man in a leadership role who is trying to navigate how to do this in an inclusive way. It’s been challenging for me to think about issues like diversity and of course gender equality from this perspective.’ 

‘But that’s the beauty of being a mentor. You always aim to put in so much more than you get back in return.’ 

What qualities should you look for in a mentor? 

So how do you tell the difference between an exceptional mentor and one that might not be as valuable? Sally, who has overseen The Faculty’s Roundtable Mentoring Program, which has, to date, seen over 1000 people receive mentoring, has a good idea of the qualities you should look for. These, she says, are: 

‘The ideal mentor should have a growth mindset and a learning attitude. They should have a genuine interest in helping you, and be able to commit real time and energy to it.’ 

‘That also need to have current and relevant industry knowledge in the area that the mentee wants to develop in.’ 

Helen agrees that these qualities are important, but she says that you need to put more focus on the person, as opposed to the qualities. Specifically, she describes the ideal mentor as someone who isn’t the same as you: 

‘Your mentor should be different from you so they can give you another perspective on the world. We spend a lot of time these days on social media in an echo chamber with people who think the same as us.’ 

‘A mentor should give you the opportunity to challenge your thinking. But you also need to be able to relate to and trust them, otherwise the relationship won’t work.’ 

How do you know if your mentor isn’t right for you? 

If your mentor doesn’t have all of the above qualities, does it mean they’re not right or worse, that they’re not doing a good job? Not at all, says Sally. In fact, in a mentoring relationship, the ball is absolutely in your court when it comes to making the effort to make the arrangement work for you: 

‘With mentoring, you only get out what you put in. As a mentee you need to be organised and be clear on your objectives at all times.’ 

What kind of experience have you had with mentors? What qualities do you look for in a mentor? Let us know in the comments below.

My Number One Procurement Career Tip – Be Connected

As you move forward with your career, remember it is not just about the number of connections you have – it is about the quality of your connections. As the old adage goes “ it is about who you know, rather than what you know”.


As the majority of us spend more time working from home in the “new normal” way of working, being connected is more important than ever.

Be connected with your peers from a cross section of industries

Being connected to your peers, not from just your industry but across sectors, is a great way to learn both current and future best practice. You can discuss key topics of the day and benchmark your procurement and supply chain maturity, both as an individual and as an organisation.

I have learnt so much from being a member of The Faculty Roundtable (whilst I lived in Australia) and the Procurious Roundtable (now that I am back in the UK). Not only through the top drawer guest speakers that come and share their knowledge, but through the connections I have made from being a member.

Making the time to attend these events is always a stretch, but the benefits massively outweigh the time required to catch up at work.

Investing the time to listen to the challenges and opportunities that others face, and discussing these in an open forum with your peers, can be truly enlightening. When you have had the fortune to share ideas with the likes of Paul Menzies, Len Blackmore, Naomi Lloyd, Andrew Ordish and Matthew Kay in Sydney or Matt Beddoe, Phil English, Bruce Morrison, Lauren Ferry, Chris Eccleston and Ross Mandiwall in London (or virtually), you know the power of a strong peer network. Learning from professionals with extensive experience in a vast array of industries provides a diversity of thought that helps you improve as a person and enhances your strategic thinking and knowledge.

Be connected and highly engaged with your own team

With an ever-increasing myriad of stakeholders to manage, it is imperative that you create enough time to manage your own team. Whether face to face, by Teams, Skype or Zoom, I try and create enough time for team meetings, one to ones and other connection opportunities.

Building great relationships with your team helps you to build a great team ethos, with everyone pulling in the same direction with no room for mavericks or terrorists. I always remember someone telling me that you need to spend 30% of your time with your people, listening, encouraging and developing them. And they were right.

Also remember it is important to connect with not only your direct reports. Over the last couple of years we have introduced a Procurement Development Group at Murphy. It enables the up-and-coming procurement team members to work on some key topics set by the procurement leadership team. The Procurement Development Group presents their recommendations to the senior team, giving them exposure to people they don’t often come into contact with. This opportunity has been really appreciated by our future leaders and can lead to accelerated career progression. Their work has produced some fantastic results for our organisation – so it has been a win–win for everyone involved.

Be a Mentor and Be Mentored

Mentoring, or being mentored, is another great way of keeping connected. I am big believer that having the right mentor can help with your career progression. Each of the key members of my team are either mentored by a Senior Director at Murphy or by a leading CPO, arranged by Procurious, from an external organisation – and the feedback I receive on this is so positive!

I enjoy mentoring people. I get as much out of the sessions as the mentees. It is great to get different views, hear other’s perspectives and see their careers flourish.

Never be too intimidated to ask someone to mentor you. After all, what is the worst they can say? “No”? And if they say yes, remember that it is you – the mentee – who needs to drive the relationship. As with everything, you only get out what you put in. 

Be connected – inside work and out

With the COVID-imposed increased isolation, we are all faced with the challenge of ensuring we are both physically and mentally healthy. A great way of taking your mind off the job is by doing something outside work that you really enjoy and involves interaction with others.

We all need to give something back to society. It provides such fulfilment. So whether it is charitable work or sport, get connected externally and make a difference.

My great passion, in addition to my family, is rugby. It has given me so many amazing experiences and memories over the years.  When I was asked to become Chairman at the Club I played at for 20 years, there was only one answer!

I am now in my second season. This opportunity has given me a host of new challenges and learning experiences, which I am thoroughly enjoying. It has also afforded me the chance to meet and work with some more amazing people, keeping me ever more connected.     

And finally…

As you move forward with your career, remember it is not just about the number of connections you have: it is about the quality of your connections. As the old adage goes “it is about who you know, rather than what you know”.

It is much more important to maximise the value you get from a few, quality connections and making sure you deliver value to your connections.

Join the Roundtable in the UK by contacting Helen Mackenzie at [email protected] or in Australia by contacting Sally Lansbury at [email protected]

Attention Generation Next: Your Clock Starts Now. Are You Ready?

COVID-19 has created a significant opportunity for generation next to lead, grow and advance. Here are five steps to break through.


Are you satisfied with your current position, or are you eager to break out and change the game?

Do same-old, status quo procurement and supply chain strategies work for you, or are you ready to rewrite the playbook for the modern era?

Procurement’s impressive performance during COVID-19, and the critical role the function plays in the ongoing recovery, has created significant opportunity for generation next. 

Are you going to take advantage?

The doors are wide open. And the rewards are substantial. Think promotions, increased comp, resources, access to emerging tech, leadership opportunities, validation and trust from the c-suite, and much more.  

But the doors won’t stay open forever. Now is the time to hustle and own your opportunity. If you’re not entirely sure where to begin, consider these five key steps to break through in today’s market.

1. Want more attention? Make your mark where it matters.

The fastest way to get noticed: push forward the strategic, board-level objectives of your organisation. 

What tops your CEO’s agenda right now? If you don’t know, request an immediate alignment meeting with your CPO or team lead. Our research found that the c-suite’s top three focus areas today are mitigating supply chain risk, containing costs, and driving business continuity. 

These three areas are your golden ticket. Get creative and be bold with your recommendations. Leadership is looking for fresh and modern ideas, not a repeat of yesterday’s strategy. Don’t hesitate to share, even if your recommendations represent a new approach for your team.

Start by thinking outside the box: Is there a use case for AI, blockchain or predictive analytics? What about partnering with a peer or competitor to solve the problem? If you can drive the results the company needs faster and more effectively than in the past, the recognition will follow.

2. Market your success like crazy.

It’s always a team game, but if you don’t advocate for yourself, who will?

Keep track of your wins and benchmark performance over time to demonstrate improvement. And report with data, not anecdotes. 

Be sure to communicate like an executive when sharing your success up the ladder. The TL;DR (too long, didn’t read) phenomenon is a very real trap. Lead with the headline, back it up with data and close with how you plan to take it up to another level. 

Remember, you, and you alone, are responsible for your career growth.

3. Champion digitisation and emerging tech.

COVID-19 rapidly accelerated the enterprise digitisation journey and eliminated all the old excuses associated with delayed tech transformation projects.

Every executive is looking to increase resilience, productivity and performance. Digitisation and emerging tech – like AI and machine learning – delivers on all fronts. Those who proactively adapt and modernise are best positioned to lead today and in the future. 

If your department is not equipped with the right technology, take a stand and champion the digitisation effort. Executives will take notice. Our research shows that 93% of organisations are investing to enable procurement’s success. There are three primary areas that companies are focusing on to propel procurement forward:

  • Data and analytics
  • Development of existing talent
  • Technology

Two of the three are directly tied to digital transformation. For many companies, September marks the start of the 2021 budgeting season. If you see an opportunity, the time to make a move is now. Make the business case abundantly clear by connecting your requests to what matters most for the organisation right now: cash, resiliency, and business continuity.

4. Learn, develop and then learn some more

Fifty-seven percent of organisations are investing in talent development to propel procurement forward, according to our survey research. That number needs to be higher… and you need to make sure you get your fair share of the investment.

COVID-19 fundamentally changed supply chain and procurement management as we know it. According to our Supply Chain Confidence Index, 97% of organisations experienced a COVID-19 disruption, and 73% are planning seismic supply chain strategy shifts post-pandemic. The status quo simply won’t cut it. You need to grow your skills, expertise and network.

Your job: Put forward your personal business case for investment. Identify the skills that you and your team need to survive and thrive tomorrow. And take ownership of your own development.

There are ample opportunities to improve and develop. Our recent survey uncovered five primary talent gaps facing the function today.

  1. Analytics
  2. Market intelligence
  3. Technology knowledge
  4. Relationships building
  5. Emotional intelligence

Mastering these five areas will push you forward in a big way. Breaking them down, there are three key themes. The first is analytics –  leaders that can analyze data, uncover trends and use insights to make fast and informed decisions will remain in high-demand. This should be area number one for professional development and training. The second centers around tech digitisation and modernisation, which we touched on earlier. The last bucket represents the soft skills necessary to be a great leader – emotional intelligence, relationships, and human connection.

Be the leader you want to follow 

As you grow, get promoted and gain more influence, prioritize being a great leader. Make it one of the most important things you do every day.

Your leadership approach can either crack the foundation of your team or launch everyone forward. In fact, Gallup says managers account for at least 70% of the variance in team engagement.

But remember, future success requires practice today. According to research from HBR, there are six key areas every aspiring leader should practice right now:

  • Creating an exciting and challenging vision
  • Translating the vision into a clear strategy and roadmap 
  • Team management: recruiting, developing and rewarding great people to execute on your strategy 
  • Focusing on measurable results
  • Fostering an environment of team innovation and learning 
  • Leading yourself — “know yourself, improve yourself, and manage the appropriate balance in your own life.”

If you wait to start practicing these skills until after you get the promotion, it may be too late. As HBR’s Ron Ashkenas and Brook Manville write: “No matter where you are in your career, you can find opportunities to practice these six skills. You’ll have varying degrees of success, which is normal. But by reflecting on your successes and failures at every step, and getting feedback from colleagues and mentors, you’ll keep making positive adjustments and find more opportunities to learn.”

The Clock is Ticking: It’s your time to lead.

For current and aspiring procurement leaders, there’s never been a better opportunity. More than 60% of procurement professionals have seen executive trust increase in the past three months. Similarly, more procurement leaders report having a seat at the executive table today than they did in May.

You have everything we need to step up, lead and earn more recognition and trust. The doors are open: are you going to walk or run through?Interested in learning more about procurement leadership? Get more insights, advice and best practices from our latest report: Procurement’s Time to Lead.

Is Now The Right Time To Ask For A Pay Rise?

Should you ask for a raise during a pandemic? It depends on how well you perform, and how your company is doing.


You consistently deliver, you always exceed your targets, and your boss is thrilled. 

Does that mean now the right time to ask for a raise – despite everything going on in the world? 

Actually, now could be the perfect time. 

It might seem counterintuitive, but economic downturns often mean steady wages, says Dr Michael Gravier, Professor of Marketing and Global Supply Chain Management at Bryant University.

“Layoffs and workforce reductions are done partly to preserve the salaries of remaining workers, and companies know that they must keep up the morale of remaining workers,” Professor Gravier says. 

Since recessions don’t last forever, businesses have an incentive to make sure their best employees stick around to ride out the economic storm.

“Companies that are most well prepared tend to come out of economic downturns stronger than competitors,” adds Gravier. 

“This means that workers who haven’t been furloughed are, on average, well-positioned to request reasonable pay raises, especially if they’ve shown a talent for doing more with less or improving operations or succeeding despite the odds during these difficult times.”

Where to start

Are you a high performer? Then it sounds like you’re ideally placed to ask for a raise.

Start by understanding how well your company is doing, and its priorities for the next several months.

And don’t be put off by reports that overall wage growth is weaker now. Professor Gravier points out that supply chain industry wages have remained fairly robust. 

Bottom line: go get that raise.

Build your case

Start by assembling proof that you deserve a raise. Remember, the topic of your paycheck might be deeply personal and sensitive to you, but it isn’t to your boss. All they want are hard facts that prove you meet and exceed expectations.

For that reason, it’s smart to get in the habit of jotting down this evidence regularly. For example, Professor Gravier set aside time every Friday to write about what had happened during the week, and how key performance metrics were going. 

‘“You must first know thyself,” as the old saying goes,” Gravier says. “If workers cannot justify their performance, clearly there is not much need to entertain their request [for a raise].”

So what sort of accomplishments should you record? Anything that proves how valuable you are, says Scott Dance, Director of Hays Procurement & Supply Chain.

“[W]rite down all the things that you’ve achieved individually or contributed to significantly as part of a team, [and] back up these achievements with real, measurable evidence,” Dance says.

“Your fundamental objective is to prove that you’re an asset to the business and that you have made a significant contribution during what has been a particularly challenging time for many organisations.”

Know your market value

The next piece of evidence you need is your market value, says Jacqui Paterson, Director of Supply Chain and Procurement at UK recruitment agency Drummond Bridge.

“I would advise [employees] to look at all of the factors associated with their current role, [like] ease of location, job satisfaction, working conditions and then research what the current market rate would equate to for the role they deliver,” Paterson says.

A good way to benchmark your salary is using a guide, like the one recently published by the Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply. That way, you can see averages for your experience level and geographical region.

Paterson also recommends asking yourself questions like:

  • How long ago was my last pay rise given?
  • Can my company accommodate a rise right now? 
  • Are my skills in high demand?

It’s all about doing your homework first so you’re prepared, professional, and ready to make a strong case.

Choose your timing

People often ask for a raise during a performance review. But that’s a mistake because many other employees are asking for a raise then too, Paterson says.

When is a better time, then? Paterson advises to “time the conversation strategically – perhaps after a series of successful, valuable contributions have been delivered.”

And don’t forget to approach your discussion diplomatically. “A confrontational or “expectant” pay rise conversation doesn’t usually end positively,” Paterson warns.

What if they say no?

Even if you make a convincing case, you might still get rejected. 

What should you do next? Find out why you were turned down, says Paterson. “No to a pay rise just now does not mean never.”

“If the [employee] is generally happy where they are, this can be the trigger to initiate conversations in writing that if certain savings, KPIs etc are met that the raise will be reviewed after a three-month period.” 

After all, “[n]ot all businesses can afford to consider a salary rise in the current market conditions, or they may want to review how business is moving when the economy shows signs of improving before committing to any salary rises,” Paterson adds.

Another possibility is your boss can’t give you a raise, but they can sweeten the deal by giving you other benefits. 

These could include a job title change, extra time off, or the ability to work from home permanently.

So before your conversation, you should consider if you’ll only accept more money, or if you could be satisfied with recognition in other ways.

Is it time to leave?

Only you can decide if you’re happy sticking around without a pay raise. If your top priority is a bigger salary, leaving may be your only route.

“If your current employer can’t meet your requirements in terms of salary or otherwise, it’s certainly worth testing the waters and seeing what you could be getting elsewhere,” says Scott Dance from Hays.

“Despite ongoing uncertainty, there’s no reason why you should hold off looking to the future and considering how you can make your professional ambitions a reality.” 

Dance advises updating your CV/ resume with any new skills or expertise you might have learned over the last few months of lockdown.

“Refreshing your CV might open up new avenues which you thought weren’t possible before,” Dance says. That’s why you should be open to trying something new.

“The long-term reality of the Covid-19 crisis may mean that we see surges in demand, industry shifts and emerging trends that impact the jobs market,” Dance adds.

“Being flexible and open-minded about your career may help you secure that pay rise you’re after and take your career in an exciting new direction.”

Do you have any tried-and-true advice? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

Virtually Connected: How To Network Your Face Off

Online networking can be intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. Approach it with generosity, and watch your network grow.


Picture yourself at a business networking event – the room buzzing with people. Where would we find you?

Are you working the room, having interesting conversations? Or maybe you’re lurking in the corner, hoping people will come to you.

In any case, there won’t be in-person events for a while – which means it’s time to step up your virtual networking.

You’ve probably heard the phrase: “Your network determines your net worth.” The right people can have a huge influence on your future.

But a great network won’t just come to you. So if you’re a digital wallflower, it’s time to leave the corner and join the party. 

Build your personal brand

The best way to build a strong network is being helpful.

If you post useful, interesting information, you can positively influence the way you’re perceived.

To put it another way, it allows you to build your personal brand. 

But what does that actually mean? Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon, is credited with saying: “Personal branding is the story people tell about you when you’re not in the room.”

Why is it important to build your personal brand? In short, future opportunities, says Andy Moore, Digital Marketing Manager at Procurious.

“Social media has become a staple in society,” Moore says. “And in the world of getting hired, having an online profile has become essential in the last few years.  

“So it’s important for professionals to first understand the ‘why’ of building their personal brand – it can help with future connections and can generate better leads.”

Get involved

But where do you start, especially if you haven’t done much networking online?

It’s as easy as posting an article you find interesting. Or sharing your opinion on an industry hot topic. Or asking your network’s opinions.

The important thing is to show up consistently and make a contribution, Moore adds.

“People want to hang out with the ‘life of the party,’” says Moore. “This is the same for social media. People want to be connected with those who have a voice and get involved.”

That includes liking, sharing, and commenting on other people’s posts. Everyone loves a bit of validation, and your network will appreciate your support.

Keep in mind that a strong digital network won’t happen overnight, especially if you don’t have much of an online presence right now.

Like any other relationship, networks require consistency over time.

But it’s worth the effort, says Mark Holyoake, Managing Director of supply chain recruitment firm Holyoake Search.

“I’ve long been a proponent of personal branding,” Holyoake says. “Technology has made this easier than ever, and with conferences and networking opportunities still all virtual for the time being, it has never been more important.”

You get what you put in

Your success at building your online network will largely depend on your attitude.

After all, few things kill a relationship quicker than self-centredness. So don’t view your network as a group of people who only exist to get you a job.

Instead, approach them as a worthwhile group of your colleagues and peers. What would they like to know from you? What is interesting to them? What can you share that will make their lives better or easier?

Likewise, think of people in your network that you could introduce to each other, knowing that both will benefit from the connection.

There are lots of ways to add value to your network.

Where to network

There are plenty of social platforms to choose from. Where should you invest your time? The simple answer is where your professional associations hang out. 

And you don’t need to be on every platform. Why put time into building an Instagram profile when your network spends all their time on LinkedIn?

You should also join and contribute to online groups that are specific to your professional interests.

Procurious is a great example of this, where you can find groups dedicated to any aspect of procurement.

CPOs in Scotland, supply chain sustainability, and Indian procurement professionals – you name it. And don’t worry if you can’t find your tribe. Just start your own group! 

There are 40,000 procurement professionals from all over the world on Procurious, and they want to build their networks too.

So get involved in the groups and the discussion boards. You’ve got answers and experience that people are looking for right now.

For example, can you help out this Procurious member? They want advice on getting internal stakeholders to bring procurement in earlier during the IT purchasing process.

Who knows where your connections could lead? If you come ready to give, you’ll be surprised how much you receive over time.

You can do this

It doesn’t matter if you usually lurk in the corner at networking events. Or if the word ‘networking’ makes you break out in hives.

You were built to network.

That’s because you’re already a natural at creating partnerships across supply chains and stakeholders, says Tania Seary, Founder of Procurious.

“Procurement professionals are united by the need to be agile, to be savvy, to be bold,” Seary says. “We can do that alone, but we can do it even better by reaching out to colleagues and contacts to fill the gaps.”

Networking is about watering the seeds of possibility, nurturing existing relationships, and growing the best you can from each encounter, Seary adds.

Need more encouragement? Check out Tania Seary’s two-minute pep talk on networking in procurement

How To Be A Supernormal Leader

Collaboration is imperative for your organisation to progress! And it can be achieved through “silo busting” (encouraging inter-departmental sharing of knowledge), building and valuing trust, attenuating body language to communicate openness, promoting diversity, cultivating self-awareness and fostering empathy, and creating a safe environment for sharing ideas and practices.


Collaboration is more important than ever before. In fact, an organisation’s survival may depend on how well it can combine the potential of its people as well as its suppliers. By connecting the external market with their own organisation and its customers, Procurement has the opportunity to facilitate and deliver significant shared value. Collaboration matters like never before.

I’ve read many surveys on leadership and collaboration, particularly of recency. Deloitte’s Future of Work research found that 65% of the C-Level executives surveyed have a strategic objective to transform their organisation’s culture, with a focus on connectivity, communication and collaboration.

When one gets underneath the surface of these surveys, six crucial leadership behavioural themes leap out. I’m referring to leadership at all levels, call it strategic leadership if you so choose. Whether you’re the Chief Procurement Officer, the Head of Category Management or the Buyer, when you think about building and embracing a collaborative culture, you already realise that your job has changed. I really don’t think and hope you’ll ever look back. So, this is absolutely not about old-school leadership and hierarchical thinking. This is also not a new leadership philosophy. This is about embracing the fact that we are better together. A single, collaborative eco-system. To make the impact required and to inspire others, requires collaborative leadership. It’s about self-awareness and its about emotional intelligence too.

Here are the six leadership behaviours:

1. Silo ‘busting’

I really struggle with the word ‘silo’. It is why wastebaskets were created. Silo’s are sizeable organisational blockers, built to last by those whom create them. The collaborative environment we seek is kept from forming. The creativity, innovation and growth potential is essentially being silo distanced. ‘Silo’ is a term that has been passed around and discussed in boardrooms for at least 30 years. They remain a growing pain in the organisational backside.

Silo mentality describes the mindset present when departments don’t share information. Wherever it’s spotted, silo mentality becomes synonymous with power struggles and fear of exposure or failure. Silo mentality cause organisations to waste time, resources and money. They wreck collaboration.

Silos get busted by leaders, not by technology or processes. Procurement has privileged access to typically all parts of an organisation and its supplier base too. Get on the front foot and create unifying goals and objectives. Build ‘silo-busting’ into your balance scorecard and set the pace for collaboration, both internally and externally.

2. Trust matters

A collaborative team isn’t a group of people working together. It’s a group of people working together who trust each other. They also understand their own and each others’ strengths and weaknesses. Trust is the key binding agent for collaboration. It is where procurement and the supplier base can also unite, like never before.

As a leader, you need people to trust you. But how do you show that you trust them? The way sharing of information is communicated determines whether it becomes an obstacle to or an enabler of collaboration. Perhaps a cynical view, though some leaders I have observed who profess to value collaboration, undermine their effectiveness by withholding information or sharing it on a ‘needs to know’ basis. This makes them feel important.

Leaders build trust through honest, consistent and transparent communication – easy to say, often trickier in reality than it sounds. Procurement leaders take note. Put the ego to one side and build trust with your colleagues, customers and suppliers. It’s hard work and unanswerably essential to achieve true collaboration leadership. What one finds is that when you take the time to get to know your colleagues and suppliers, trust builds faster. Embrace all feedback, not just positive, and always have your learning and listening chips switched on. Build joint goals. Create the time to celebrate successes. Adapt, learn and grow, together.

3. Body language tells its own story

Negotiators are taught how to assess body language. Not just negotiators I hasten to add. In its most simplistic form, there are two sets of body language. One set that projects sincerity, authenticity and warmth. The other send signals of status and influence. For collaboration to flourish, focus your energy on the former. Authenticity is key. Be yourself.

4. Promoting diversity

Diverse thinking is an essential ingredient for collaborative leadership. It reinforces my point about leadership at al levels. Team members at the same level, and with a similar background, are found to perform worse than those with varying skills and knowledge. There’s a tendency for similarly minded individuals at the same level in an organisation to seek affirmation from one another i.e. they tend to reinforce each others predisposition. Innovation is triggered by cross-functional working. Creative breakthroughs occur most often when ideas collide and then combine. Collaboration enables innovation.

5. Self-awareness

Development Dimensions International (DDI) has studied leadership for almost fifty years. In their latest research, with over 15,000 leaders from more than 300 organisations, DDI looked at leaders’ conversational skills that had the highest impact on overall performance. At the very top of the list was empathy – specifically, the ability to listen and respond empathetically. Learn to understand before be understood. So, for great collaborative leadership, if you recognise this as a development need, then work hard on developing it.

6. Primal instincts

Human beings have two primitive instincts that guide a willingness to collaborate — or not — and they are triggered under very different circumstance. The first instinct is to hoard and has been traced back to early humans hoarding vital supplies, like food, out of fear of not having enough. The more they put away, the safer they felt. We’ve all observed this instinct and many experienced it of recency. In the workplace, when people feel ignored or threatened, they retreat and hold on to knowledge. The second instinct, on the other hand, is that humans are also a learning, teaching, knowledge-sharing species. According to evolutional psychologists, this trait is also hard-wired, linking back to when humans first started gathering in clans. Leaders trigger the ‘sharing instinct’ when they create psychologically safe workplace environments in which people feel secure, valued and trusted.

In a world of arguably unprecedented uncertainty and disruption, collaborative leadership behaviours are so important to organisation survival, recovery and growth. Collaboration as a skill set is no longer a ‘nice to have’. There are tools and techniques to help develop your collaborative skill set further, whether you are a buyer or seller. Successful supplier and procurement collaboration will make a transformational difference.

This article was originally published by Procurement Potential on July 12 2020 and is republished here with permission.