Category Archives: Career Management

Blockchain: The Technology, the Myth, the… Legend?

We’re told Blockchain is a huge game changer, that it’s the biggest innovation since the internet. But we’re also told it’s overhyped, it’s no big deal and that it has some serious limitations. So…what’s the truth? “Depending on who you ask, blockchains are either the most important technological innovation since the internet or a solution looking for a problem.” These are the opening words to a recent Wired article, entitled: The Guide to Blockchain.

And they certainly resonate with procurement professionals across the globe.

We’re told Blockchain is a huge game changer, that it’s the biggest innovation since the internet; it’s unhackable, it’s pervasive, it’s unparalleled and ultimately…it’s coming to the mainstream imminently.

But on the other hand, we’re told that Blockchain is overhyped, it’s no big deal, it has some serious limitations and, whilst it might be a pretty cool piece of technology, it’s certainly not the procurement disruptor that it’s hailed to be…

It’s no surprise that when it comes to Blockchain procurement pros don’t know who to believe when to expect its takeover or how to prepare.

So we’ve enlisted the help of some blockchain experts to give you the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

On 7th August,  Procurious presents: Blockchain: The Technology, the Myth, the… Legend?

Blockchain: The Technology, the Myth, the… Legend?

We’ll be discussing: 

  • How will Blockchain impact procurement?
  • What are some of the most common misconceptions about Blockchain?
  • How is Blockchain commonly being used in businesses today?
  • How can blockchain help procurement pros to manage their organisation’s contingent labour force?
  • What are the flaws at the heart of blockchain? Is it over-hyped?

Webinar Speakers

Vishnu P Tadepalli, Global Program Manager – Procurement Blockchain Lead – IBM Procurement Services
Vishnu is a highly motivated design thinker and is a digital procurement / supply chain enthusiast. In his current role Vishnu Tadepalli is the Global Program Manager / Lead for procurement blockchain solutions at IBM Procurement Services (IPS) , program managing the blockchain procurement transformation for both IBM global procurement and its procurement services clients. In his earlier role at IBM , Vishnu product managed Procurement Cognitive solutions and earlier worked as a sourcing consultant for multiple Fortune 200 companies. In addition to IBM, Vishnu worked with Unilever , AGCO and Suzuki Motor corporation in supply chain transformation and category manager roles.  His experience spans end to end global supply chain, including both direct and indirect procurement.
Vishnu has an MBA in Strategy & Supply chain from Uni of Wisconsin, Madison and is currently pursuing second Master’s in  Artificial Intelligence. He is a member of Government Blockchain Association(GBA) and Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP).  An active Linkedlner, Vishnu likes to spend his free time social volunteering and mentoring.
Linkedln : linkedin.com/in/vishnutadepalli
Twitter Handle : @vishnu65886588 

Paul Sidhu, Blockchain Practice Lead – IBM

Paul is a senior leader with over 25 years experience delivering business transformation in large and complex business environments. A natural strategy and innovation practitioner, Paul works with business leaders to articulate the benefits of process optimisation, digital transformation and new operating models that impact upon their business and to present them with options and strategic recommendations in a way they both understand and feel passionately about.

Paul leads the IBM Global Business Services Blockchain Practice in Australia. His cross-industry background and working with clients in multi-discipline business functions enables a deep understanding for the needs of diverse stakeholders and the ability to solve business challenges by incorporating new solution offerings built with Blockchain.

Jack Shaw,  Co-Founder and Executive Director of the American Blockchain Council

Jack  is a leading expert on the strategic business implications of Blockchain technology who has spoken and consulted on Blockchain around the world.

He is a world renowned Keynote Speaker. He was recently voted one of the World’s Top 25 Professional Speakers by over 27,000 meetings planners, executives and conference attendees – the only Technology speaker to be accorded this recognition.

Jack has been a Technology Futurist for over 30 years – helping others to understand the impact of emerging technologies. In addition to Blockchain, he is widely recognised for his expertise in such breakthrough business technologies as:

  •   Artificial Intelligence,
  •   Internet of Things, and
  •   3D PrintingHe has advised such Fortune 500 Companies GE, Coca Cola, Johnson & Johnson, IBM, Oracle, and SAP as well as hundreds of small to mid-sized businesses.A charismatic speaker, he’s delivered more than 1000 keynote speeches and executive presentations in 23 countries and every U.S. state. Jack graduated from Yale with a degree in Business Administration and has an MBA from Kellogg in Finance and Marketing.

AmericanBlockchainCouncil.org 

How do I register for the webinar?

Registering for our webinar couldn’t be easier (and, of course, it’s FREE!)

Click here to enter your details and confirm your attendance. We’ll send you a confirmation email with a link to the webinar platform and a handy reminder one hour before we go live!

I’m already a member of Procurious, do I still need to register?

Yes! If you are already a member of Procurious you must still register to access the webinar via this platform. We’ll send you a confirmation email with a link to the webinar platform and a handy reminder one hour before we go live!

When is it taking place?

The webinar will take place at 9am EDT/ 2PM BST on 7th August 2018

Help! I can’t make it to the live-stream

No problem! If you can’t make the live-stream you can catch up whenever it suits you. We’ll be making it available on Procurious soon after the event (and will be sure to send you a link) so you can listen at your leisure!

Can I ask a question?

If you’re listening live, our speakers would love to hear your questions and we’d love for you to pick their brains . Questions can be submitted throughout the live stream via the webinar platform.

If you think of a brilliant question after the event, feel free to submit your question via the Discussion Board on Procurious and we’ll do our very best to ensure it gets answered for you.

Blockchain: The Technology, the Myth, the… Legend? goes live on 7th August at 9am EDT/ 2pm BST. Sign up here.  

How To Answer The “Tell Me About Yourself” Interview Question

Five tips from the experts on how to answer a commonly-used and deceptively simple interview question.

Image: Photographee.eu/Shutterstock.com

Remember the “Bridge of Death” scene from Monty Python and the Quest for the Holy Grail? King Arthur and his brave knights must answer three questions posed by the keeper of the bridge in order to pass safely. If they get them wrong, they’re cast into the Gorge of Eternal Peril.

Sir Galahad answers the first two questions with ease, but is tripped up by the simplicity of the third:

KEEPER: Stop! What is your name?

GALAHAD: Sir Galahad of Camelot.

KEEPER: What is your quest?

GALAHAD: I seek the Grail.

KEEPER: What is your favourite colour?

GALAHAD: Blue. No, yellow! — Auuuuuuuugh! [Galahad falls to his death].

‘Tell me about yourself’ is a question posed by nearly every interviewer, yet data from Google reveals it is a question that a vast amount of people struggle with: on average over 33,000 people in the UK search online each month for answers or guidance on answering the question.

With this in mind, sales recruitment agency, Aaron Wallis, has collated a series of hints and tips for getting the most out of the common interview question and performing to your best ability.

1. Be prepared

As ‘tell me about yourself’ is such a common interview question, there’s nothing silly about writing down your answer and saying it in front of the mirror, or practicing your answer with someone you know. Whilst it can be good to have a rehearsed answer, it’s also worth bearing in mind that you don’t want to sound like you’re reciting it from memory. Be prepared to appear confident but natural.

2. Structure your answer

The best answers to the question give a brief overview to you and your experience, without taking too much away from the later stages of the interview.

Begin by outlining your current or most recent role and describing the skills or attributes that you bring or brought to the position, ensuring these will be relevant to the job you’re going for.

Finish up by saying while you’ve enjoyed your work, you’re excited for the fresh challenge this new opportunity brings, and why.

3. Consider what you want to get across

A common pitfall is mentioning too much about yourself that may either cause you to waste time during your interview or lose the natural flow of the conversation. Chances are that your interviewer has already studied your CV, so does not need to be told about every job you’ve ever had, or what your exam results were – even if they were straight As.

4. Avoid the irrelevant or controversial

Similarly, although you might be a cycling fanatic, or a keen cook, this can be totally irrelevant at the start of the opening stage of the interview. In the majority of job interviews, avoid talk of family, pets and politics.

5. Get ready for the following questions

If you’ve introduced yourself well, your interviewer is going to be impressed and keen to delve deeper. He or she will want to explore your experience, strengths and weaknesses further, but will do so under the impression you’re a good fit for the role. Make sure you can back up your initial answer with examples or anecdotes.

So, if you said: “In my current role I have increased sales by broadening our customer base,” just make sure you’re ready to answer follow-up questions later in the interview like: “How much did you increase sales by?”, or “How many extra customers did you bring on board, and how did you find them?”

Often the simple questions can be the ones which are the most unnerving if you haven’t considered what you might say. Generally it can be a good idea to plan out the interview in your head from the very start to the very finish. It’s never a bad thing to be over-prepared!


For a more detailed guide on answering the “tell me about yourself” interview question, please visit: https://www.aaronwallis.co.uk/candidates/advice/answering-tell-me-about-yourself

Understanding The Shape And Cut Of Procurement Organisations

Elaine Porteous clears up some common misconceptions about the ways  procurement  organisations can be structured, and demystifies some of the jargon…

Sergiy Bykhunenko/ Shutterstock

 Starting a new job can be both stressful and exhilarating. The people are different, the location is strange and the way they work is peculiar to that enterprise. There may be a seven-level procurement organisation chart or a loose, undocumented reporting structure to be navigated.  What is also daunting is the “in-speak”, the specific terminology which may be like a foreign language to you.

Let’s clear up some misconceptions about ways that procurement can be organised, and try and demystify some of the jargon.

An operating model is just the way the procurement function is set up to work.  Most companies start up being decentralised, unstructured and even disorganised until the workload grows.  As the functions expand and mature, there needs to be some form of formalising and centralising of the activities to consolidate the spend. Only then can we expect to make savings and reduce our risk exposure.

Centralised or centre-led?

Centralised procurement does have its benefits. It means more control over suppliers and contracts and it helps drive supplier diversity and corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives.  The risk is mitigated and skills development is made easier, expanding capabilities.  However, it can become a very bureaucratic and expensive cost centre. Too much data and not enough information can cause loss of focus and poor service to stakeholders.  People at the centre do not always understand regional and local supply markets and consumption patterns.  If “central” means the US and the region is Papua New Guinea, there may be cultural challenges too.   As procurement organizations move on and mature, over time, many of them become centre-led, taking some time to decentralise personnel and day-to-day operations.

Figure 1: The procurement journey

Image:  www.zycus.com

Wherever your organisation is on this curve, it is helpful to know what it means to be where.  There is no one best structure. The way your organisation works is influenced by the external supply market, the end-users needs and the overall company strategy. You just have to ride the wave.

Centre-led procurement organisations concentrate on defining strategy and policy for both their direct and indirect procurement.  Corporate spend can be fully leveraged on strategic commodities and services which are well-suited for centralized sourcing.  Non-strategic categories not suited to centralized sourcing can be handled by the individual business units or regions.

Centre-led procurement uses a category management structure which supports the rollout of sourcing and contracting plans to business unit and regional level.  The type of set-up is often called a hybrid model.

Category management means the bundling of third-party spend into buckets to extract more value.  The main aim behind category management is to aggregate the internal demand and achieve economies of scale by contracting the best suppliers at the lowest price.  In its best form, it involves an active category manager to roll out category plans, strategic sourcing and supplier management initiatives.

In a centre-led organisation, a global category manager would set the strategy for the category group, e.g. transport logistics, and for the sub-categories (also sometimes called commodities) within that group:  road, rail and air transport, freight forwarding, port activities and courier services.  At regional or divisional level, the category plans are followed and executed locally to achieve the best results for the organization.  This is the ideal but it is rarely implemented in full. Some categories are really challenging. Marketing services, technology and professional fees come to mind.

Cross-functional teams (CFTs)

To be effective, a category needs to be managed using one or more cross-functional teams.  A cross-functional team comprises representatives of key divisions and business units that work together, with procurement, to achieve the best results for the organization in that category or commodity. Although extensively used in strategic sourcing, CFTs are being used increasingly and successfully across process improvement, product development, quality assurance and the assessment of suppliers.    

The benefits are well-documented:  a more robust outcome, transfer of skills and learnings, improved internal cooperation and sustainable relationships.

Global organisations that run virtual CFTs have special challenges.  With the application of innovative methods and up-to-date online technology, it is now easier and more effective.

Whatever the operating model or the make-up of the CFT, the satisfaction of stakeholders and end users is paramount.  A stakeholder is anyone that has a vested interest in the outcome of your project or action.  He or she could be any one of these:

  • An internal departmental executives, manager or end-user
  • Another procurement team member
  • A co-opted subject matter expert
  • A supplier or a subcontractor
  • A member of the media or a regulatory body

Stakeholders are capable of influencing the success or failure of a project.

The model is not cast in stone

As a procurement organisation matures, it is likely that executives will revise and adjust a hybrid or centre-led structure so that it stays aligned to corporate objectives and continues to deliver value.  The best model is always the one that delivers results through open lines of two-way communication and uses processes that are flexible enough to take into account regional and cultural differences.

4 Ways To Reduce Maverick Spend

The Hackett Group estimates that maverick spending can cost companies up to 2 per cent of all indirect spending, due to lost savings opportunities and inefficiencies. That amounts to millions of dollars wasted every year.

Dean Drobot/ Shutterstock

Maverick spending, also known more formally as unmanaged spending, is a big problem for most companies. Maverick spending is when employees “buck the system” by going outside of contracts negotiated with preferred suppliers to purchase goods and services on their own, normally paying much higher rates. It occurs most often in areas of indirect spending, which includes large, diverse categories like MRO (maintenance, repairs, and operation), office supplies, professional services, and contract labor, to name a few. This diversity makes maverick spending behavior hard to spot and control. It’s not hard to spot the damage to the bottom line, though.

The ironic thing is that most negotiated supplier contracts are in place for the express purpose of governing tricky indirect spending categories. Yet studies have shown that a large percentage of indirect spending is still non-compliant.

What gives? Why do some employees still go off contract? Here are three eye-opening reasons:

  • Because they can – If there are no controls in place to enforce supplier contracts and negotiated rates, and no penalties for purchasing off-contract, it’s easier for employees to justify bypassing agreements when it suits them.
  • Because they don’t know any better – Especially in large companies, poor visibility is often blamed for maverick spending. If everyone in the buying chain is not aware of the contracts, or worse yet, contracts and catalogs are out-of-date, off-contract spending becomes more likely.
  • Because existing processes take too long – Slow ordering and approval processes are one of the leading causes of maverick spending. If approving a purchase and placing an order takes weeks, employees are going to go right around that process, especially in the case of time sensitive needs.

So how do you stop it? Put plain and simple, maverick spending will not stop until an organization does something about it. There’s a saying that goes, “Make the right way easy, and the wrong way hard.”

Here’s how to reduce maverick spending, so you can get better compliance, and realize some savings from your supplier contracts:

1.Put a system in place for better control

If you haven’t thought about this already, you should strongly consider implementing a purchasing system that automates all of your purchasing, regardless of commodity, approval process, or supplier. Purchasing systems make your entire purchasing process more efficient by governing requisition, approvals, buying, receipt, reconciliation, and reporting. They also serve as a “corral” for maverick spenders, by running all spend through a single platform, and providing only one way to do all purchasing.

2. Provide an intuitive and easy user interface

When putting a system in place, look for a best-in-class solution, known for being easy to use, and place where users can actually find goods or services they most commonly need. Usability and an intuitive shopping experience like consumer e-commerce sites will provide an inviting atmosphere that attracts off-contract purchasers back into the fold.

3. Simplify workflow procedures

World-class purchasing systems can streamline even the most complicated workflow procedures, making it much easier for employees to comply. Cumbersome purchasing processes that used to take weeks can be reduced to days or even hours. Even in cases where complicated ERP or accounting systems are gumming up the works, integration with cloud-based solutions are available to reduce traditional time, cost and resource hurdles and help simplify workflow for employees.

4. Take it seriously

It’s hard to believe, but maverick spenders still sometimes dodge even the easiest and most intuitive systems. The good news is, the spend analytics available in purchase-to-pay systems can tell you exactly where that rogue spend is coming from. Once it’s identified, it becomes much easier for management to enforce spending policies in those areas.

I Have Measured Out My Digital Transformation In Coffee Spoons…

Eager to lead your procurement team through a digital transformation?  We’ve got some advice from someone who knows the score… Grab a coffee and let illycaffè’s Procurement director talk you through the process… 

nazar_photo/ Shutterstock

Digital Transformation.

We assume that everyone is at it behind closed doors.

But how are they doing it? What’s the process? Are they doing a better job than us? Or is everyone simply floundering in the dark? Sometimes, you need the inside scoop from someone who knows the score!

Last month, at Jaggaer’s REVInternational 2018 event in Munich, Diego Pedroli, Procurement and Logistics Director – illycaffè gave us an overview of the organisation’s ongoing digital transformation and how he made it happen.

“What I’ve learnt over these two days” he began, “is that we are actually at the beginning of our [digital transformation] journey, and it’s one that will never end.  But at least we’ve started.”

illycaffè: A Brief History

illycaffè remains a family owned company with 1000+ employees,  100,000+ clients and B2B business in 140 countries.

Founded in Trieste, Italy, illycaffè prides itself on a century of innovation from launching the first high pressure espresso machine in 1935 to introducing the first single portion coffee pod in 1974.

Diego’s mission, as he sees it, is to uphold procurement excellence: continually advancing the procurement processes and supplier cycle management and managing the execution of the multi-year procurement programs.

The organisation’s digital transformation began back in December 2013 and has been evolving ever since.

Digital Transformation: The Beginning

Diego’s ultimate aim with leading illycaffè through this transformation was to streamline their processes organisation-wide, thus transitioning the procurement team from saving-hunters to value-hunters. “We wanted to try to digitalise the processes to add value and bring time for employees to actually look after the business.”

“At first it was all about developing and defining guidelines and procedures, changing the mindset of our people and the people working closely to us. We wanted to give procurement the responsibility to do procurement, not shopping!”

Between 2016 and 2017 Diego worked with illycaffè’s CEO and the board to approve the introduction of an SRM platform. After going through the bidding process and selecting Jaggaer they immediately kick-started the implementation.

Digital Transformation: The End Game

The hardest part of embarking on a digital transformation is often convincing key stakeholders, namely the CEO or CFO, of its necessity and potential value-add. Having a strong case to present and key objectives  is crucial. As Diego explained, “we were able to convince our CEO to implement the SRM system because of these factors:”

  1. Governance and Compliance
  • Allows for traceability of processes
  • Gives procurement professionals complete management of all suppliers, which greatly limits risk
  • Makes it easier to monitor suppliers and improve performance

2. Method

  • Implementation of a culture of shared method
  • Standardisation of procedures makes the business more streamlined
  • Increases the speed of response to internal and external stakeholders
  • Allows for continuous improvement, partly through sharing best practices

3. Transparency

  • Gives procurement greater accessibility and makes information easier to interpret
  • Having data in one place makes it simpler for everyone in the business to work and guarantees ethical practices and ethical processes

4. Economic Return

  • There are obvious economic benefits due to the workflow automation
  • Allows for a reduction of TCO in different purchasing categories

Diego’s parting words of advice? When it comes to digital transformation, “it is not enough to have the sponsorship of your CEO. And it is not enough to have a good tech partner. It’s important to have each and every person in your team on board.”

Learn more about Jaggaer and  REVInternational 2018 

Making the Case for ‘Libertarian’ Procurement

Can we start taking an approach to spend management and compliance that nods to the free will of buyers?  Kelly Barner discusses Libertarian procurement. 

Public sector procurement has always gotten a unique kind of attention. Not only is it the sector of our field most likely to get general media coverage, when it does, it is almost always spectacularly bad news. Trying to regulate procurement may be well-intentioned, but things have a way of going awry when buyer free will is denied.

Here’s a perfect example:

In 2013, the Massachusetts State Lottery Commission awarded a $5 Million contract for advertising services. They required that a portion of the work be sub-contracted out to a minority or woman-owned supplier. All proposals were evaluated on cost and presentation as well as the diversity requirement.

The contract was awarded to a firm that did not earn the highest score for cost or presentation but did commit to sub-contract $12,000 (0.24%) of the work to a woman-owned supplier. As a result, another firm involved in the bid, sued the lottery commission. Not only had they earned the highest score for cost and presentation, they were a certified woman-owned business. Had they been awarded the contract, 100% of the $5 Million would have been awarded to a diversity supplier and the state would have gotten better results for less money. They did not receive the award because they did not submit a plan to subcontract the work, believing their own status covered the intent (if not the letter) of the requirement.

Talk about missing the forest for the trees.

Public sector procurement may take the majority of the heat, but private sector procurement is just as guilty of using rules rather than sound judgement to drive desired results. Onerous governance and harsh mandates can have the opposite effect of what we intend with ‘strategic’ processes such as sourcing and supplier performance management.

Technology and consumer expectations have advanced to the point where we can consider the possibilities of ‘Libertarian’ procurement, an approach to spend management and compliance that nods to the free will of buyers whenever possible, even if it means giving up some of the ‘control’ traditionally associated with spend management. Libertarian procurement might include:

  • Allowing distributed buyers with strategic experience and category expertise to run their own sourcing projects.
  • Evaluating the suitability of a full sourcing project on a case by case basis (I.e. sometimes when a buyer requests to contract with a specific supplier, they have already done their homework and procurement should just support them).
  • Balancing supplier performance metrics with qualitative approaches to recognizing their total value contribution.

Sometimes internal colleagues want to work around procurement’s processes because they find them too slow or frustrating and just plan to push on principle. Other times, they really know what the right path forward is and can’t get started a minute too soon. The challenge is for procurement to tell the difference between the two. Understanding the motivations of stakeholders who want to exercise their free will is what separates spending mischief from spending vision. Procurement should be willing to take a chance when the conditions seem right, allowing vision to thrive even if the occasional mischief slips through.

Combining responsible spending principles with an increased level of trust for internal buyers will create challenges for procurement teams, but it will also create new opportunities and increased ownership on the part of internal stakeholders. Not being open to such change may actually be a risky move for procurement. After all, the more rigid and codified our role is, the more likely we are to be the target of automation initiatives. Any procurement team with their own healthy dose of free will should want to prevent that.

Where Are All The Great Procurement Jobs? Broaden Your Vision

Looking for a new procurement job? The good news is that there are a whole load available that are yours for the taking… you just need to broaden your vision!

Do you have your eye on an exciting opportunity in international category management, predictive data analytics, or do you have a passion to make sourcing more sustainable?  The good news is that new job roles like these are emerging in procurement and they are waiting for you.  Conventional manual processes are disappearing as we automate routine tasks, even contract management is deemed at risk: artificial intelligence and algorithms are already being used to draw up “smart” contracts.

Where are all the great jobs?

Corporate companies

Traditionally the most desirable careers were to be found in the big multinationals that have mature procurement organizations; this still holds quite true.  Some of the companies in the fast-moving-consumer-goods (FMCG) sector are leading the way in strategic procurement.  Unilever, P&G, Amazon and Coca-Cola are listed in Gartner’s Top 25 companies in supply chain.  Any one of these companies may be a good place to get a foot in the door and gain solid early experience.

Procurement solutions providers and consultancies

With the development of software solutions for procurement functions such as strategic sourcing, contracting and supplier management, many companies are outsourcing some functions to technically proficient service providers.  These problem solvers service a range of industries, locations and functions. Spend Matters publishes a list of the top 50 solutions providers To Know and another top 50 to Watch.   This list includes some consulting firms, both big and small.  Phil Ideson of the Art of Procurement says that this type of experience can be valuable if you want to go back into a corporate leadership role.  He says “I am a believer that procurement is a service provider to our stakeholders and not a function. Being with a solutions provider really helps you experience the need for customer centricity.”

Not-for-profit and Public Procurement 

Public sector procurement is a real job option.  Don’t disregard the experience that you can get from working on big-ticket items and major projects that positively affect your region or your city. It may not seem as cool as working for Apple Inc. but it may be more rewarding.  There is some perception that working for a non-profit organization means a drop in pay, not so.  Love to travel?  Opportunities to work abroad abound in the many divisions of the United Nations, the World Bank and the Red Cross, at market-related salaries.

Should you get certified or get a degree?

Unlike in finance and legal, there isn’t a license to practice in procurement. However, most employers prefer candidates with a least a bachelor’s degree in business or a professional certification in supply chain or procurement. Which one depends on whether your targeted employer has a preference for certification over a formal degree and what your desired end-game is.

1. Getting certified

Many of my colleagues without a professional certification have never felt that that impeded their career growth or work opportunities.  However, in the early stages of a career, it may be useful especially in locations where professional certifications are held in high esteem. CIPS, CAPM, IACCM and ISM are examples of certifications and affiliations that you could follow. In the UK and in Australia the push for certification and affiliation is stronger than in some other parts of the world.

2. Educational qualifications

Formal degrees in procurement are actually quite rare but there are lots of possibilities in supply chain management (SCM), of which procurement is a key element.  Leading employers source their talent from the best-ranked colleges internationally that offer supply chain advanced education and from the top UK universities with registered supply chain degrees.  If you are thinking it is too late to start, it really isn’t.  Many of these degrees are available online. Always take advantage of an offer of financial or other educational assistance from your employer.

Sometimes it’s all about the piece of paper, sometimes it’s about the affiliation.

“If I knew then what I know now”

I asked some mature and experienced colleagues what they would tell their 21-year old self and this is what they said:

  1. Be curious

Soak up everything. Read widely to stay on top of new trends, changes in regulations and advances in technology.   Don’t always accept commonly held positions, beliefs or strategies as absolute truths.  Question what you see and what you hear. You can look at everything with a fresh pair of eyes.

  1. Get wide exposure

Take advantage of any job rotation that you are offered,  opportunities to get exposure to many industries and many categories don’t come along every day.  Be open to change and chances to diversify your skills. Transitioning between functions helps you build your knowledge and helps you to better understand your stakeholders.

  1. Find a mentor

It may be useful to get guidance from someone who has been through a similar experience.  A well-chosen mentor provides advice and helps navigate you through the trials and tribulations of your career.  Gordon Donovan (FCIPS), of Epworth Healthcare, says a mentor can come from anywhere, even another industry.

  1. Ask for feedback (and act on it!)

Actively seek feedback on the things that you do well and things that need improvement. Sometimes it’s hard to take criticism but it can help develop both your technical and behavioural skills.

  1. Network

Networking does not come naturally to everyone but it is worth developing some skills in this area.  Meeting new people is so important because you never know when it’ll be someone who can help you to open doors or change your direction. Tanya Seary is a champion of networking, you can follow her example here. 

6. Job descriptions are not cast in stone

Many advertised jobs that you come across may be cut-and-pasted from descriptions used in previous recruitment activities.  Too many times employers and recruiters look for what they looked for last time, not what they need now.  If you think you would fit their needs, go for it, there’s nothing lost.

What the under 30’s say

Most under 30’s surveyed agreed with the boomers talking to their 21-year-old selves.  They suggested working hard to keep learning and gaining new qualifications and ask lots of questions.  As Christina Gill, one of the “30 under 30” stars with over a decade of experience in supply chain, said, “This is an exciting time in your career. Be open, be adventurous, be a sponge, listen, learn, and take risks in your career.”

A final thought: organisations that focus on supplier collaboration, unlocking innovation and making the best use of their precious data make attractive employers.

Hold The Phone! Procurement Pay Increase Smashing The Average Salary

Both ISM and CIPS have released their annual salary surveys. Read on for a short summary of the similarities and differences in salaries across the Atlantic.

Salary surveys make for interesting reading. They reveal much about the perceived value of procurement and supply management, and provide a very helpful data set to have at your disposal the next time you ask for a raise.

If you haven’t seen them already, the two most comprehensive salary surveys for 2018 are available here:

Let’s look at 5 of the most interesting findings across the two surveys:

  1. Average salaries for the profession

  • ISM has announced that the average overall compensation for participating supply management professionals was US$117,425, while CPOs earnt an average of US$263,578.
  • CIPS reported an average salary of £46,422 for procurement and supply professionals, with CPOs earning an average salary of £124,000.
  1. Salary increase smashing the national average

  • In the U.S., ISM reported that supply management salaries rose an average of 4.1% over 2016 salaries, versus 3% for U.S. professionals generally.
  • CIPS found that 68% of procurement professionals received an average 5.1% increase in salary, versus a 2.2% increase for the UK national average.

Paul Lee, Director of ISM Research & Publications, offered the following explanation:

“In today’s global economy, excellence in supply management improves both top- and bottom-line performance, and advances companies’ leadership on the worldwide stage. Supply management professionals’ higher-than-average wage growth reflects the significant value they add every day”.

  1. Certifications DO boost salaries:

  • ISM: Those with the ISM Certified Professional in Supply Management (CPSM) certification averaged 14.7% higher salaries than those without any certification.
  • CIPS: The data reveals that MCIPS and FCIPS professionals have increased earning power, with an average 12% salary disparity between MCIPS and non-MCIPS, and an average of 11% disparity between FCIPS and non-FCIPS across all job levels.
  1. Most important factors when considering a new job

We’re a mercenary bunch. “Salary” has once again come out at the top of both ISM and CIPS’ research into what people consider when evaluating job opportunities. Beyond the money, however, are some other factors that employers should note:

ISM top 6 factors:

  • Salary: 85%
  • Job satisfaction: 81%
  • Improved work/life balance: 80%
  • Benefits package (medical/dental/vision): 79%
  • Pension/retirement plan/401(k) or similar: 78%
  • Organisational culture/work environment: 75% percent

CIPS top 6 factors:

  • Salary: 74%
  • Location: 71%
  • Content of the work: 65%
  • Career progression opportunities: 62%
  • Company reputation: 59%
  • Company commitment to training and development: 58%
  1. Gender gap disappointment

  • ISM’s data reveals women are paid less than men across every level in U.S. supply management, with male CPOs earning 26% more than female counterparts, male VPs earning 52% more than women, and male Emerging Professionals earning 13% more than women.

CIPS reports that the most striking pay disparity exists at the Advanced Professional level, where men earned 33% more than women, a pay gap that has widened since the previous year’s (25%). Pay disparity at the Professional and Managerial levels is also considerable, at 14% and 11% respectively

How To Tell You’re Working For A Psychopath

Psychopaths are present in every workplace. And the higher you go in the organisation, the more likely you are to encounter one.

Working for a psychopath is no holiday. Here’s how to tell if your boss is one, or just a garden variety bully.

A human resources manager is more likely to know them as sociopaths, micromanagers or workplace bullies. I call them psychopaths, not to insult them or even to suggest that they might be chopping people up for fun, but because they share a common set of character traits with all those personality types and also with criminal psychopaths.

1. They are two-faced

A workplace psychopath has a two-faced nature. One face oozes charm and charisma, while the other is viciously mean. They work very hard at flattering those that have power over them, but present a very different face to the people that work for them. To most of their team they are manipulative and controlling. People who work for a psychopath see this face most of the time.

2. They have a pawn

Psychopaths will also recruit a pawn or two. These are people who the psychopath won’t attack, so long as they do their bidding. Frequently it is the pawn delivering the latest piece of manipulation rather than the psychopath themselves. This allows them to put distance between them and their victims and build in automatic plausible deniability if it goes pear-shaped. “No, Terry-The-Pawn was acting on his own initiative, it was nothing to do with me.”

3. They are excellent liars

They are convincing liars and they lie compulsively, often for no apparent reason. The truth to them is whatever needs to be said at that moment. It is whatever they judge their audience wants to hear. And they will have no compunction aggressively assuring you something happened which you know didn’t, often to the point where you will doubt your own memory.

4. They treat employees as dispensable livestock

They treat most people who work for them as dispensable livestock. And this usually causes the cattle (that would be you) unprecedented levels of stress, frustration and fear. When one victim burns out or leaves, they just move on to the next. They damage the health of individuals and the reputation of the organisation without any regret or shame. The workplace under a psychopath is in constant turmoil. Factions are rife, sick leave sky-rockets, staff turnover becomes endemic and productivity drops like a stone.

5. They can’t take criticism

They react to any criticism with aggressive denial or retaliation. If those aren’t options, usually because the critic has more power than them, they will feign victimhood or blame the victims of their actions. Punishment and threats have absolutely no effect on them. They will keep doing things their way, regardless.

In short, they are the classic malevolent workplace bully. This is not to say that all bullying in the workplace is done by psychopaths. Bosses can be mean but it is the frequency of bullying-type behavior that sets psychopaths apart from an everyday horrible boss.
In 2008, UK researcher Clive Boddy from Middlesex University set out to determine exactly how much workplace bullying was caused by psychopaths.

Boddy took a psychopathic checklist and embedded it in a management survey of Australian middle and senior managers. Almost six per cent of the respondents were working with a corporate psychopath as their current manager and thirty-two percent had worked for a psychopath at some time.

A further eleven per cent of respondents were working with managers who showed some psychopathic traits but were not rated at maximum in all categories.

The respondents also revealed how many times they had experienced bullying. Under normal managers, employees encountered bullying less than once a month (nine times a year), but the moderately psychopathic managers bullied employees more than twice a month (on average twenty-nine times a year), accounting for a twenty-one percent of all bullying. If that manager was a psychopath, the employee experienced bullying more than five times a month on average (64.4 times a year) and this accounted for twenty-six percent of all reported cases of bullying.

This means that, as an employee, you can, and probably will, be bullied in the workplace. If your boss is normal, bullying will happen once every six weeks or so. If you are working for a psychopath it will happen once or twice a week, or more. If the behavior described above is happening all the time then your boss is a psychopath. The bad news is that there are not many good options for solving it.

The exit beckons, but while you wait for the right opportunity, there are a number of things you can do to protect yourself and improve your position. Those strategies are the subject of the next part of this series.

David Gillespie is a guest speaker at the Big Ideas Summit in Sydney on Tuesday 30th October 2018, where he’ll help delegates understand how to deal with toxic people in the workplace. Interested in attending? Register here: http://www.bigideassummit.com/big-ideas-sydney

3 Ways To Increase Your Procurement Salary

Another day in your procurement job, another day moaning about your unsatisfactory salary… If you want things to change here’s how you take control!

I’ve always said that I’m extremely happy working in Procurement, and there’s no question that it’s great to be doing a job that I’m passionate about.

But no matter how much enjoyment we get from our work – money is always important and a key contributor to our chosen career path.

Of course, you and I would both be happy to double our monthly income; so I thought I’d outline three pieces of advice to help you get there!

  1. Get paid for your value, not your time

Do you have a clear understanding of how your current salary was calculated? Is your employer buying your time or buying your skills?

Many procurement professionals make the mistake of thinking they are paid per working hour. But the main consideration for your employer shouldn’t be  “how hard is this person working?” but rather  “how much value is the person generating for the company?”

So my first piece of advice to you is this: Start thinking about what value you are creating for the company – start measuring it! If you measure your results and your ambitions you have a much stronger argument when it comes to salary negotiations.

Take a look at these two scenarios. If you were to approach your manager to discuss a pay increase, which one sounds more authoritative?

A) I have worked overtime and several weekends during the past six months. I don’t give enough attention to my partner and family. So I think I deserve a salary increase of +20 per cent.

B) I have finalised three major RFQ’s within our category during the past 6 months and  I have reduced prices by 12 per cent per year for our company! I think this performance justifies a salary increase of 20 per cent.

Try to use the employer’s language as in scenario B. Find the arguments and KPI’s which you know they will value the most and think about how you can add influence in these areas. Then all you have to do is impress them with your results!

2. Take more responsibility

Do you enjoy responsibility  or do you avoid it at all costs – letting others make key business decisions for you?

Both behaviors are quite natural. After all, people are different. But ask yourself, what is the main difference between you and your manager at work? Why do they earn a significantly higher salary than you? Many managers have less knowledge and skills than their co-workers and employees, but they are still respected more by the top-executives. How does that always happen?!

The simple answer is that your manager has the responsibility for a much bigger area of the work.

The rule:  greater responsibility = greater salary.

So don’t allow yourself to hesitate when it comes to taking on responsibility. Don’t just wait to be asked, be proactive.

“I heard that our Procurement department plans to run the value stream mapping for Category XYZ. Can I lead this project as I know the processes and steps for VSM?”

“Can I take the responsibility for mapping new suppliers in South Asia, as I already have many business connections there?”

This approach to your work will stand you in good stead to get a significant salary increase when the time comes to negotiate.

Generate profit  for the company

In my experience most organisations consider their procurement department to be the cost centre of the business. Others regard it as a support or service function and,  in the worst cases, they dismiss procurement pros simply as buyers.

But you and I both know that procurement  has an enormous impact on an organisation’s profit.

Whatever your savings are – they contribute to the gross profits of the company. As we say at Future Procurement organisations: “one dollar saved is one dollar earned!”

So how can this knowledge help your salary?

Senior management in your organisation may not understand the value procurement brings to the business and they certainly won’t be familiar with your individual responsibilities and deliverables. They even may not understand the role of Procurement organisation…

But top management of any company cares about profit, this is the language they understand.  So modify your messaging and communicate the extra business profits that are connected to your procurement role.

To sum up; if you want your salary to increase you need to add value to the company, take more responsibility and concentrate on proving the profit you contribute to the company.

Remember; your employer will never care about you more than you care about yourself – it’s sad but it’s true!  Throughout my corporate career, the  biggest salary increases were never initiated by my boss.

Your salary is your own responsibility and if you don’t like it – it’s your problem to fix.

So get out there and fix it!