Category Archives: #firstmovers

Four Ways Business Can Step Up To Industry 4.0

The challenges of Industry 4.0 are also its opportunities, writes John Pollaers, Chair of the Australian Advanced Manufacturing Council.

The ideas behind the Internet of Things (or “Cyber-Physical Systems”, “Machine-to-Machine Interoperability”, “Industry 4.0”, or several other names), are not particularly new. What is new is the convergence of existing technologies and corporate strategies.

The term Industrie 4.0 was first used in 2011 at the Hannover Fair. It is both a prediction of the ways things are headed, and an actuality. It was coined to describe a number of trends and technological developments that are causing a quantum leap in the way things will be made, and how products are being transformed by technology. The “leap” is the key concept at play here, as industrial revolutions 1 through 3 were all driven by a technological leap that changed the manufacturing landscape, and society along with it. To summarise:

  • The 1st industrial revolution was about mechanisation.
  • The 2nd revolution was driven by electrification.
  • The 3rd centered around automation and IT integration – this transformation is still going on in many countries.
  • The 4th industrial revolution is about the merging of the cyber and the physical worlds.

How will Industry 4.0 transform manufacturing?

The basic principle is that by connecting machines, work pieces and systems, businesses are creating intelligent networks along the entire value chain. This means greater flexibility – with information gathered in real time, and factories able to adapt more easily to changing requirements.

It enables customisation and servitisation of products; and a customer-specific production operation.

As factories, supply chains and products become networked, the lines between the physical and digital world will be increasingly blurred. Virtualisation enables the so-called Smart Factory by linking sensor data (from monitoring physical processes) with virtual plant models and simulation models.

There are many challenges ahead – and perhaps the most significant among them is developing global industry standards. The world’s two industrial powerhouses, Germany and the United States, recently came together to work collaboratively on aligning global standards and technologies. Australia’s own Prime Minister’s Industry 4.0 Taskforce is closely supporting that effort – aiming to ensure Australia is connected globally.

The flexibility tipping point 

The future for advanced manufacturing is high value, high margin products – but this will require constant innovation and flexibility. The good news is that technological developments are beginning to enable that flexibility on the factory floor and throughout the entire manufacturing system. Some examples of flexibility include:

  • Production becoming increasingly distributed.
  • A greater reliance on smaller-scale manufacturing plants and micro-factories.
  • The market becomes the world.

This flexibility will deliver two key advantages for Australia and other countries looking to scale up their manufacturing sectors:

  1. The first is a greater ability to co-locate research, design and manufacturing – accelerating the innovation process.
  1. The second is a bigger market – we are no longer constrained by the size of our domestic market.

Four ways businesses can step up to Industry 4.0

If industry is going to lead the way into the world of Industry 4.0, there are four key shifts in thinking that need to take place in leading organisations:

  1. Where once your organisation may have needed to reinvent itself every few decades, today, an onslaught of shocks – technological, cultural, economic, and regulatory – will force you to transform every few years.
  2. Five to ten years ago, your CEO might have become a business icon through a single transformation. The minimum requirement now is being able to execute multiple transformations.
  3. Success today means fostering a culture of continuous reinvention—reinvention in your business models, customer interactions, employee engagement, and the markets you serve.
  4. We need to fully appreciate the power of analytical systems, be able to establish employee familiarity and ensure organisations have the right talent to leverage technology opportunities.

The Australian Advanced Manufacturing Council is a CEO-led private sector initiative pursuing Australian success in advanced manufacturing. The AAMC brings together industry leadership to drive innovation success and resilience in the Australian economy.

 AAMC Chairman John Pollaers will deliver a keynote speech at PIVOT: The Faculty’s 10th Annual Asia Pacific CPO Forum.

Game-changer: Elon Musk intervenes in Australian energy crisis

Energy politics has reached fever pitch in South Australia, where an increasingly fraught situation has been disrupted by a single tweet from Elon Musk.

Take a moment to feel sorry for your procurement colleagues working in the Australian energy sector. Since former Prime Minister Tony Abbott’s now-famous “axe the tax” campaign against a national carbon trading scheme in 2011, Australia has been without a clear federal energy policy, leading to very little certainty about future direction for the sector.

This is a problem, as power companies plan three to four decades ahead. A lack of bipartisanship on this issue means that even if a policy is put in place, any future change of government (from Coalition to Labor) would mean a rollback of the hard-won legislation of their predecessors. Power companies know that at some stage in the near future, a carbon trading or emissions intensity scheme will need to be put in place, but they don’t know what form it will take, when it will happen and what the targets will be.

Compounding the issue, the Federal Coalition government is at odds with Labor-majority state governments around Australia on energy policy, culminating in this tense exchange last week between South Australian Premier and the federal energy minister, Josh Frydenberg. South Australia has drawn the lion’s share of criticism from the federal government on its energy situation. The state has an aggressive renewable energy target of 50% by 2025, with a high reliance on wind power.

South Australia’s energy crisis started in earnest on 28th September last year, when the state experienced a once-in-50-year storm event. Gale force and storm force winds, including tornadoes and 80,000 lightning strikes, damaged 23 pylons on electricity transmission lines. As a result of the initial damage and automatic safety features shutting down undamaged parts of the network, the entire state power grid cut out for at least three hours while emergency repairs were underway. 

Power gets political

Even before the power was switched back on, a number of politicians in the federal government commented on the crisis, linking the storm damage with the state’s renewable energy target. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said South Australia had paid “little or no attention to energy security”, while the Deputy Prime Minister, Barnaby Joyce, told the ABC that “Wind power wasn’t working too well last night, because they had a blackout”. One Nation senator Malcolm Roberts took the opportunity to urge all government to “exit all climate change policies.”

Much of the news cycle following the storm was dominated by a debate over renewables and energy security, and whether the storm damage or the state government’s policy was to blame. The situation was compounded by a series of further blackouts while calls increased for an urgent review of energy security at the state and national level. The debate spilled over into the international media, with South Australia rapidly becoming a much-cited example of a failure for renewable energy. Renowned Danish wind farm expert Soren Hermansen, who helped create the world’s first 100% renewable island, defended wind power by saying, “I’d have to go to Australia to deal with a blackout. We have a very powerful grid – we don’t experience any failure.”

Musk intervenes

Dropping unexpectedly into this politically-charged debate, billionaire co-founder of Tesla and SpaceX Elon Musk presented a game-changer with a single tweet earlier this month:

The offer was originally made by Lyndon Rive, Musk’s cousin and Tesla’s vice-president for energy products. Tesla has offered to install the 100 megawatt hours of battery storage that would be required to prevent further power shortages, price spikes and blackouts in South Australia. When pressed on Twitter by Mike Cannon-Brookes (Australian co-founder of Silicon Valley start-up Atlassian) on the seriousness of the offer, Musk himself doubled down with the pledge to “get the system installed and working 100 days from contract signature or it is free”.

Tesla’s confidence in its ability to deliver stems from the stepped-up battery production out of its new Gigafactory in Nevada, along with a recently-completed installation of an 80MWh grid-scale battery farm in southern California. The Californian project took 90 days to complete and cost US$100 million.

After a flurry of tweets and an hour-long phone call between Elon Musk and Prime Minister Turnbull, the debate around energy policy in Australia appears to have switched to an entirely new (renewable) direction. South Australia has announced a $550 million energy package, with:

  • $150 million for a 100MW grid-scale battery
  • $75 million in grants and another $75 million in loans to eligible projects which support private innovative companies and entrepreneurs
  • A $360 million state government-owned gas-fired 250MW power station to provide energy security when needed.

Meanwhile, Prime Minister Turnbull has unveiled $2bn expansion plans for the Snowy Mountains hydro-electric scheme, aimed to add 2,000MW to the scheme’s 4,100MW  capacity, or enough power for 500,000 homes. In a sign that the tension between federal and state energy policies continues to play out, Turnbull told reporters that the hydro-electric scheme will provide 20 times the capacity of the South Australian battery system.

Encouragingly, in the past month the national debate seems to have shifted away from the decades-long opposition between renewables and coal, to the state and federal governments trying to outdo each other on renewable projects. Cannon-Brookes wrote the following in a series of tweets that capture this shift:

“The national energy conversation seems to palpably have changed. We’re debating lithium ion vs flow vs pumped hydro storage solutions … whether 100MW is enough [or whether] 2GW is too much. $150m [investment in grid-scale batteries] in South Australia, $30m in Victoria, $2bn Federally. I’m confident there will be a series of good bids [for battery storage tech providers] in South Australia. Super funds, power operators, HNWs and many individuals wanting to invest. Most importantly, Australian people and the tech community and speaking up, loudly, that they want change.”

In other news:

Heavy construction equipment manufacturers waiting on Trump’s infrastructure plan

  • Executives in the construction industry are concerned that President Trump has not yet invested time to win congressional backing for his $1 trillion spending plan for large road, rail and bridge projects.
  • Equipment manufacturers have experienced low activity from farming, construction and mining clients in recent years, and are reportedly impatient for information about what form the investment will take.
  • The administration has indicated that an infrastructure plan would come after Congress deals with complex health care and tax reform.

Read more at The Wall Street Journal.

Kids @ Work: Children crash professor’s live interview with BBC

  • In a now-famous video interview, Professor Robert Kelly’s children burst into his room while he is discussing the impeachment of South Korean President Park Geun-hye with a BBC anchor.
  • The interview was interrupted first by his daughter, who dances into the room to join her father, then a baby in a bouncer and finally by his wife rushing in to herd the children out of the room.

Read more about incorporating your children into your work day on the Procurious blog.

Helen Mackenzie talks procurement reform in Scotland

Meet Helen Mackenzie: The self-confessed motorbike racing buff is pictured here sitting on Ian Hutchinson’s Supersport bike (incidentally the only rider to win 5 races at the Isle of Mann TT,’s). Helen dreams of buying some lovely race bikes from Yamaha or Honda for a racing team!

Helen hails from Stornoway in Scotland  and is the next in our #firstmovers series. Reach out to her – here, and say howdy!

Helen Mackenzie

Procurious asks: What is the procurement profession like in Scotland? How do you think procurement differs as opposed to elsewhere in the world?

Helen Mackenzie: Not sure about the Scottish private sector but public procurement in Scotland is really buzzing at the moment.  The Scottish Government’s just got the new Procurement Reform Act through the Parliament and so sustainable procurement is high up on our agenda.  

There’s never been a better time to be in public procurement.  At last many of us are getting to take up our seat right in the heart of corporate management and decision making.  Exciting times ahead.

Procurious: Should Scotland win independence in the forthcoming referendum, how do you see your business changing/will it be affected?

Helen: I don’t think there will be much difference for public procurement if Scotland votes yes.  We already have a different way of operating, different legislation etc.  

What might affect us is the whole question of whether Scotland stays in the EU and also whether we retain the pound.  To be honest I haven’t decided how I’ll vote yet.  I’ll have to get off the fence soon though! 

Procurious: Tell us a little bit more about your department/team (and do you envisage them getting on Procurious too?)

Helen: We’re a small council in the far North West of Scotland but we’re doing well in terms of procurement improvement and helping our colleagues to reduce costs and improve outcomes.  

I can see lots of public procurement people in Scotland using Procurious.  We’ve got a knowledge hub for Local Government but it’s a bit dry.  

I think the interaction that Procurious provides will be just what those of us who can’t get enough of procurement need to feed our passion and discuss ideas.

Procurious: Are you usually an early adopter? (Perhaps you’ve been a “first mover” with something else…) 

Helen: I must admit I have been a bit of a tail ender when it’s come to social media. I finally succumbed to doing a bit of Facebook and more recently LinkedIn but Twitter has been my main place for hanging out for a few years now.  

I love motorbike racing and so like a bit of Twitter banter with fellow fans.  I was a founding member of a network called Phinkit which operated for a bit last year.  It was like Procurious in structure but more general.  I think the general nature of it was its downfall in the end.

Why did you join Procurious?/How does it differ from other social networks currently out there?

Helen: I was desperate to find somewhere to hang out with other people who love procurement but wasn’t finding a lot of action on Twitter or LinkedIn.  Imagine my joy when I found Procurious!  At last a place just for buyers like me to talk about supply chains, contract management, invitations to tender and community benefit clauses.

You also get the feeling that people are actually listening to what’s being said.  What I’ve found with other networks like LinkedIn is that people post things, people answer but no-one is really engaging with each other.  Just a long long list of replies that no-one’s reading.  I haven’t come across that yet on Procurious. 

Procurious: What are you doing to help your peers to join the network? 

Helen: I’ve invited people I’m connected to on LinkedIn to join.  I’ll also be promoting Procurious through the Scottish Local Government Procurement Forum which I currently chair.  I’m mentioning it to anyone I know who’s into procurement.  Hopefully the word is spreading.

Meet our other #firstmovers:
Harold (Hal) Good
Farshad Bahmed
Sergio Giordano
Paul Smith
Richard Allen
Happymore Mambondiani
Jannine Wood

Here come the Millennials: Life as a junior category buyer

Today’s #firstmover is a true Millennial! Say hello to Jannine Wood – and go add her to your network while you’re at it. Read our article on Millennials – here.

Zoom Team/Shutterstock.com

Procurious asks: Procurement is a far cry from English Literature and Film Studies… When did you decide on procurement as a profession, and what attracted you to it?

Jannine: To be honest, procurement is something that initially I just fell in to. I had been floating around different admin jobs since university and couldn’t quiet decide what I wanted to do. I started working at Valueworks nearly two and half years ago and this is where I gain an interest in procurement.  

It was during my time at Valueworks that I realised that procurement was something that interested me and I had finally found my niche. I think the main attraction for me, is creating and building relationships with suppliers and clients.

Procurious: Could you explain your role within PfH?

Jannine: I’m the category buyer for finance and commercial category and there are five frameworks within the category. These include, debt management, bill payment services, decorating vouchers, vehicle lease and vehicle purchase.

I’m predominately responsible for vehicle lease and purchase.

Procurious: Some would argue that procurement suffers from an image problem; do you feel that there needs to be more education around the profession?

Jannine: I would agree that there needs to be more education around the profession, I think a lot of people are unsure of what procurement entails and often leaves them confused. However once you explain to what is it, the process and what the outcome is, I think it can be really appealing.

Procurious on social procurement: Do you feel that websites like Procurious help connect the procurement community/What have you used it for so far?

Jannine: I think websites like Procurious and LinkedIn are great for the procurement community and help build relationships with others (outside your inner circle). I have actually used Procurious to help build existing and new relationships.

Procurious: As a young female procurement professional – do you feel like there’s added pressure on you, or certain expectations?

Jannine: At times I feel there is certain expectation, especially within the vehicle industry (I worked predominately as a buyer for vehicle lease/purchase), which can be a male dominated industry at times. However I mostly feel pressure from myself, as I want to excel in what I do.

Procurious: We’ve recently written a piece on the millennial workforce [aka Generation Y – those born between 1980 and 2000], and discovered that young people often wrestle with career advancement. Do you have a different view; is there a clear path at PfH?

Jannine: I found career advancement difficult in the beginning, coming out of university and not having much work experience, I found it difficult to progress for the first few years.

However over the past two years I have found it easier to progress in my career and there is definitely a clear progress path at PfH.

Procurious: Is there a particular aspect of your role that provides you with job satisfaction? And can you recall your proudest moment?

Jannine: Seeing my relationships grown and develop over time is something that gives me great satisfaction, especially with the suppliers. Another aspect that is rewarding is helping a member resolve an issue/problem.

I think my proudest moment so far has been helping one of members conduct a mini competition in a very short space of time and working with the suppliers to ensure that the bids were completed quickly yet efficiently. The member was very grateful that the process had been completed so quickly.

Procurious: What’s your best advice for young people thinking of following in your footsteps?

Jannine: My best advice would be to any kind of work experience to begin with, although I didn’t get in to procurement for a while, the skills that I developed during my time in my other roles really benefitted me once I did move in to procurement and gave me great confidence when starting out in the industry.

We’d like to thank Jannine for taking the time to talk to us – and if you’d like to get involved too, send us a message.

What does procurement mean to developing countries?

For our next instalment of the #firstmovers series, we’re travelling to Zimbabwe and catching-up with Happymore Mambondiani.

Happymore Mambondiani

Happymore has spent his past three years in the mining sector (exploration drilling) where he works as a Store Manager for Ox Drilling of Zimbabwe. He also holds a CIPS diploma.

Join Happymore as he tells us of an altogether different procurement journey…

Procurious asks: How do you think procurement differs in your country, as opposed to elsewhere in the world?

I am from Zimbabwe (and being a developing country) it means procurement is still in its early stages  of being adopted as both a profession, and a function within organisations.

Procurious: What does this mean for procurement in developing countries? What are the main challenges it faces? 

Currently procurement is undertaken by unqualified personnel in the majority of organisations in the country be it in the public or private sector. In Zimbabwe (unlike other countries where procurement has grown as a profession), procurement has not yet developed into a function. Instead it has been lumped into a wing under the finance department – this is true except for all but the biggest firms like Tangaat Hullets (a sugar producing company) in the South East Low veld of Chiredzi/Triangel.

At a National level procurement is undertaken by the State Procurement Board which is under the Ministry of Finance. The State Procurement Board should be a ministry dedicated to the handling of government purchases of goods and services.

Does there need to be more education around the procurement profession?

There are initiatives by the government to enhance procurement as a profession through the availing of degrees at two of the states university i.e Bindura State University and Chinhoyi University of Technology. These initiatives will increase the number of procurement professionals in the country, as of now this figure stands slightly north of 15000.

Procurious: It’s heartening to learn there are professionals such as yourself who are fighting to speak-up for procurement. Is this why you joined Procurious? 

I joined so as to develop as a person and a professional in the Procurement arena. I also want to learn about the global language since we are now living in a global community where knowledge is shared through interaction, and Procurious is just that platform for me.

In a dynamic world where there is a drive towards globalization, being an early adopter keeps me afloat.

It is important that I develop both as a person and a professional, because it is this ability to change that helps define the future success of our organisations and ourselves.

Procurious: What are you hoping to get out of the network?

Getting connected for me, means knowledge sharing. It will provide me with the opportunity to interact with people who understand the Procurement language and landscape. There is also a likelihood I will discover other suppliers that weren’t on my radar before I joined Procurious.

I also relish the opportunity to learn and share knowledge, together we can hope to enhance the level of professionalism within Procurement practitioners in Zimbabwe (and the rest of of the world).

Procurious: What are you doing to spread the word?

I connected to Procurious using my LinkedIn account so this means I can invite my existing contacts, and share the experience with them too.

I can only invite 10 LinkedIn contacts per day, but I’ve got around this by using the email invitation. You should try it!

We thank Happymore for contributing and for his time. Go and say hello to him!

Meet our other #firstmovers:
Harold (Hal) Good
Farshad Bahmed
Sergio Giordano
Paul Smith
Richard Allen

Call on me? Procurious talks to Telstras Richard Allen

The next entry in our #firstmovers series features Telstra’s Chief Procurement Officer & Executive Director of Enterprise Services – Richard Allen.

He may have swapped beverages for telephones, but for Richard Allen the game has stayed the same.

Read more about Richard Allen here.

Richard Allen  (Telstra) on Procurious.com

Procurious asks: How do you think procurement differs in your country, as opposed to elsewhere in the world?

Richard: At Telstra I am lucky enough to be able to connect with procurement professionals from around the globe and I’m always struck by the common challenges facing a CPOs or Procurement teams. Often firms and teams are at different maturity levels but there are more similarities than differences.

Procurious: Do you know how many other procurement professionals are in your country? 

Richard: No but its growing. It’s becoming a profession of choice due to the commerciality of the roles and the cross business reach and impact.

Procurious: Are you usually an early adopter? (Perhaps you’ve been a “first mover” with something else…)

Richard: I am an early adopter –  technology and gadgets mainly. One of the great things about working for Telstra is the opportunity to look, feel, and touch the next generation of mobile devices.

Procurious: Why did you join the network?

Richard: I’m a believer in and supporter of the profession and Procurious enables connection to more people. It also facilitates more conversations about what procurement are thinking and working on.

How did you find out about Procurious?

Richard: I was part of the user/beta group

Procurious: What are you hoping to get out of the network?

Richard: Connection, ideas, inspiration.

Procurious: And finally… Are you going to invite your peers?

Richard: Yes – the strength of Procurious is in the depth and breadth of its user base. 

Meet our other #firstmovers:
Harold (Hal) Good
Farshad Bahmed
Sergio Giordano
Paul Smith

Is the UK more risk averse than the rest of Europe?

Paul Smith is trying to define where procurement ends and the rest of the business begins…

Paul Smith YPO

Paul Smith is the procurement and supply director of YPO (the largest public sector buying organisation in England). Previously, Paul has spent 21 years working in the private sector.

Read more about Paul here.

Our #firstmovers series profiles those members who we feel truly embody Procurious, and go to show just how “rich” and global our network is becoming.

Procurious asks: How do you think procurement differs in your country, as opposed to elsewhere in the world?

Paul: I don’t think the fundamentals of Procurement differ between countries, there is lots of overlap. I have worked in multiple industries and currently work in the public sector having worked the previous 21 years in the private sector, so I understand that there are plenty of differences from one organisation to the next and from one sector to the next.

Thinking about my most recent experience in the UK public sector, I get the impression that we are more risk averse than some of our European colleagues and that rules are more stringently applied. I don’t believe that this is a result of the attitude of the buyer rather it is the increasingly litigious nature of the supplier base who, emboldened by European remedies directive, are more willing to test that processes have been properly applied if they fail to win business.

Having said that, I don’t always think that this is a problem, we should ensure that public money is always spent in a fair and transparent way. I would just prefer a more commercial and flexible approach that achieved great outcomes whilst protecting public money.

Procurious: Do you know how many other procurement professionals are in your country?

Paul: No. There are many thousands (probably hundreds of thousands). It is becoming increasingly difficult to define where procurement ends and where the rest of the business begins. I know of many CIPS qualified people who do procurement work but are not in the procurement department and don’t have it in their job title.

Procurious: Are you usually an early adopter? (Perhaps you’ve been a “first mover” with something else…)

Paul: I guess so. I like technology and have always been interested in social networks. I think I ran one of the first e-auctions in the UK when the electricity market was being deregulated in the early 90s.

I am great believer in how technology will transform business and believe that we’ve hardly begun to see the impact on procurement.

Procurious: Why did you join our network?

Paul: As I said I am particularly interested in social networks and one aimed at my profession is of real interest to me.

How did you find out about Procurious?

Paul: I think I read about it in Supply Management. I guess you got a few new users via that article.

Procurious: What are you hoping to get out of the network?

Paul: There is real value in sharing knowledge and connecting with good people and I hope that the network will help me to do that. 

Procurious: Are you going to invite your peers?

Paul: I already have and a number have signed up.

Meet our other #firstmovers:
Harold (Hal) Good
Farshad Bahmed
Sergio Giordano

Sergio Giordano: How to successfully negotiate with an Italian? Play poker

Sergio Giordano reveals that the procurement profession in Italy is not your average Italian job…

Sergio has brought some much-needed Sicilian sunshine (not-to-mention a sense of infectious enthusiasm) to the Procurious network. With over 30 years of experience in industrial procurement, Sergio is now founder (and general manager) of ProcOut s.r.l.

You can read his full story here.

Our #firstmovers series profiles those members who we feel truly embody Procurious, and go to show just how “rich” and global our network is becoming.

Procurious asks: How do you think procurement differs in your country, as opposed to elsewhere in the world?

Sergio: Once Procurement in Italy was “emotional price negotiation” the Italian Procurement professional was one of the best negotiator in the world … but nothing else. Today in Italy things are partially changed, there are two distinctly separate worlds in procurement management

  1.  The large national and multinational companies in which the concept of Procurement has evolved (not just negotiating the price but the TCO, the knowledge of local and global market, management of the relationship with suppliers, the use of e-Procurement, Lean Procurement approach, etc…) they use the same “tools” and strategies of the most competitive and advanced European nations.
  2. SMEs (92% of the Italian companies …), in which almost nothing has changed in the way we manage procurement. In fact they follow two directions:
    1. Search for the Lowest price
    2. Trust to a single supplier without constant monitoring of market

Today, however, SMEs are realising that joining in network can help to become competitive to the market as large companies and things are changing also in the Procurement management.

However, in my opinion, one distinctive difference will always remain and it depends on our Latin nature, during the negotiations Italians tend to play “Poker” instead of “Bridge”…

Procurious: Do you know how many other procurement professionals are in your country?

Sergio: I have no idea.

Procurious: Are you usually an early adopter? (Perhaps you’ve been a “first mover” with something else…)

Sergio: Not usually, the choice depends heavily on the personal interest I have in the product or service and not just because it’s “new”, for example I think I was one of the first Italian Procurement Professionals to join Procurious! Right?

Procurious: Why did you join Procurious?

Sergio: Great place to exchange knowledge and experiences in particular between the old and the new generation of Procurement Professionals and, as Chantelle Genovezos said: “being in touch with the global Procurement community”!

Italian Sergio Giordano talks procurement and supply chains

Procurious: How did you find out about us?

Sergio: From an article on http://www.supplymanagement.com/
[
The now-infamous SupplyManagement article can be read here]

Procurious: What are you hoping to get out of the network?

Sergio: Expand my reputation but never stop to learn about Procurement from other people experiences

Procurious: Are you going to invite your peers?

Sergio: I’m doing my best to involve the entire Italian community of Procurement Professionals that I know…peers, LinkedIn contacts etc.

Many thanks to Sergio for taking time-out to answer our questions and for all his support so far.

If you would like to be considered for a future profile, please drop Matt Farrington Smith a line – he’d love to hear from you! (Bribes may or may not be encouraged…)

Meet our other #firstmovers:
Harold (Hal) Good
Farshad Bahmed

Hal Good fills us in on procurement in the United States

Meet Harold (Hal) Good, one of our #firstmovers

Lightspring/Shutterstock.com

Following on from our last infographic-filled blog post, this is the first entry in a new series that will profile selected members of the community. These are all members who we feel are truly embracing the site, and go to show just how “rich” and global Procurious is becoming.

Say hello to Harold (Hal) Good. Hal is a career procurement professional with over 30 years experience in venues including airport, convention center, city, county, emergency services, hospital, public safety, public works, state, utility and public-private partnerships.

Procurious asks: How do you think procurement differs in your country, as opposed to elsewhere in the world?

Hal: I think that procurement has developed a bit differently in the United States because procurement professionals had to choose among paths to receive credentials and professional recognition.

Private sector procurement professionals were most likely to be influenced by the credentialing systems and continuing education provided by National Association of Purchasing Managers, (NAPM), now ISM, which relied heavily on manufacturing and supply chain roots.  State and local government procurement professionals tended to be drawn into the educational programs sponsored by the National Institute of Governmental Purchasing, (NIGP), and its credentialing programs administered by the UPPCC.  

Contractors doing business with the US Federal Government, are committed to utilization of the FAR program which gave rise to the National Contract Association (NCMA) and its educational programs and credentials.  

This has spawned a difference in terminology and to some extent practices within the profession in the USA itself, as well as with the rest of the world.  That is probably due to the vast influence of CIPS in the international arena.

It should be noted that in the medical profession, procures are pretty much universally called the same thing.  In procurement however there is a wide variance in what is meant by something as elementary as tendering vs. bidding or tendering versus requesting proposals.  It is a situation ripe for someone to propose a universal standard that would be accepted by all. 

Procurious: Do you know how many other procurement professionals are in your country? 

Hal: No, I don’t.  It depends on the definition of a “professional”.  In 2008, according to the Department of Labor, there were 68,000 “purchasing mangers” employed in the US.  The latest Bureau of Labor statistics estimated 504,600 “jobs” for Purchasing managers, buyers and purchasing agents.

Procurious: Are you usually an early adopter? (Perhaps you’ve been a “first mover” with something else…)

Hal: I have always been an early adaptor! Example: I was head of the first city procurement department in the US to do online bidding.  I pride myself on being on the cutting edge of new technology and methodology.

Procurious: How did you find out about Procurious?

Hal: I found out about it from Stephen Ashcroft of Brian Farrington Ltd.

Procurious: What are you hoping to get out of the network?

Hal: An opportunity to improve the procurement profession globally. Proactively do what it takes to make it more strategic and less function based, more emphasis on overall value and contribution to the organizational mission, less cost driven.  Also become an influential global driver for the standardization of terminology, methodology and position descriptions.

Procurious: And finally, are you going to invite your peers?

Hal: Yes!

Procurious would like to thank Hal for his time, and for answering our questions.

If you would like to be considered for a future profile, please drop Matt Farrington Smith a line – he’d love to hear from you! (Bribes may or may not be encouraged…)