Category Archives: #firstmovers

Call on me? Procurious talks to Telstras Richard Allen

The next entry in our #firstmovers series features Telstra’s Chief Procurement Officer & Executive Director of Enterprise Services – Richard Allen.

He may have swapped beverages for telephones, but for Richard Allen the game has stayed the same.

Read more about Richard Allen here.

Richard Allen  (Telstra) on Procurious.com

Procurious asks: How do you think procurement differs in your country, as opposed to elsewhere in the world?

Richard: At Telstra I am lucky enough to be able to connect with procurement professionals from around the globe and I’m always struck by the common challenges facing a CPOs or Procurement teams. Often firms and teams are at different maturity levels but there are more similarities than differences.

Procurious: Do you know how many other procurement professionals are in your country? 

Richard: No but its growing. It’s becoming a profession of choice due to the commerciality of the roles and the cross business reach and impact.

Procurious: Are you usually an early adopter? (Perhaps you’ve been a “first mover” with something else…)

Richard: I am an early adopter –  technology and gadgets mainly. One of the great things about working for Telstra is the opportunity to look, feel, and touch the next generation of mobile devices.

Procurious: Why did you join the network?

Richard: I’m a believer in and supporter of the profession and Procurious enables connection to more people. It also facilitates more conversations about what procurement are thinking and working on.

How did you find out about Procurious?

Richard: I was part of the user/beta group

Procurious: What are you hoping to get out of the network?

Richard: Connection, ideas, inspiration.

Procurious: And finally… Are you going to invite your peers?

Richard: Yes – the strength of Procurious is in the depth and breadth of its user base. 

Meet our other #firstmovers:
Harold (Hal) Good
Farshad Bahmed
Sergio Giordano
Paul Smith

Is the UK more risk averse than the rest of Europe?

Paul Smith is trying to define where procurement ends and the rest of the business begins…

Paul Smith YPO

Paul Smith is the procurement and supply director of YPO (the largest public sector buying organisation in England). Previously, Paul has spent 21 years working in the private sector.

Read more about Paul here.

Our #firstmovers series profiles those members who we feel truly embody Procurious, and go to show just how “rich” and global our network is becoming.

Procurious asks: How do you think procurement differs in your country, as opposed to elsewhere in the world?

Paul: I don’t think the fundamentals of Procurement differ between countries, there is lots of overlap. I have worked in multiple industries and currently work in the public sector having worked the previous 21 years in the private sector, so I understand that there are plenty of differences from one organisation to the next and from one sector to the next.

Thinking about my most recent experience in the UK public sector, I get the impression that we are more risk averse than some of our European colleagues and that rules are more stringently applied. I don’t believe that this is a result of the attitude of the buyer rather it is the increasingly litigious nature of the supplier base who, emboldened by European remedies directive, are more willing to test that processes have been properly applied if they fail to win business.

Having said that, I don’t always think that this is a problem, we should ensure that public money is always spent in a fair and transparent way. I would just prefer a more commercial and flexible approach that achieved great outcomes whilst protecting public money.

Procurious: Do you know how many other procurement professionals are in your country?

Paul: No. There are many thousands (probably hundreds of thousands). It is becoming increasingly difficult to define where procurement ends and where the rest of the business begins. I know of many CIPS qualified people who do procurement work but are not in the procurement department and don’t have it in their job title.

Procurious: Are you usually an early adopter? (Perhaps you’ve been a “first mover” with something else…)

Paul: I guess so. I like technology and have always been interested in social networks. I think I ran one of the first e-auctions in the UK when the electricity market was being deregulated in the early 90s.

I am great believer in how technology will transform business and believe that we’ve hardly begun to see the impact on procurement.

Procurious: Why did you join our network?

Paul: As I said I am particularly interested in social networks and one aimed at my profession is of real interest to me.

How did you find out about Procurious?

Paul: I think I read about it in Supply Management. I guess you got a few new users via that article.

Procurious: What are you hoping to get out of the network?

Paul: There is real value in sharing knowledge and connecting with good people and I hope that the network will help me to do that. 

Procurious: Are you going to invite your peers?

Paul: I already have and a number have signed up.

Meet our other #firstmovers:
Harold (Hal) Good
Farshad Bahmed
Sergio Giordano

Sergio Giordano: How to successfully negotiate with an Italian? Play poker

Sergio Giordano reveals that the procurement profession in Italy is not your average Italian job…

Sergio has brought some much-needed Sicilian sunshine (not-to-mention a sense of infectious enthusiasm) to the Procurious network. With over 30 years of experience in industrial procurement, Sergio is now founder (and general manager) of ProcOut s.r.l.

You can read his full story here.

Our #firstmovers series profiles those members who we feel truly embody Procurious, and go to show just how “rich” and global our network is becoming.

Procurious asks: How do you think procurement differs in your country, as opposed to elsewhere in the world?

Sergio: Once Procurement in Italy was “emotional price negotiation” the Italian Procurement professional was one of the best negotiator in the world … but nothing else. Today in Italy things are partially changed, there are two distinctly separate worlds in procurement management

  1.  The large national and multinational companies in which the concept of Procurement has evolved (not just negotiating the price but the TCO, the knowledge of local and global market, management of the relationship with suppliers, the use of e-Procurement, Lean Procurement approach, etc…) they use the same “tools” and strategies of the most competitive and advanced European nations.
  2. SMEs (92% of the Italian companies …), in which almost nothing has changed in the way we manage procurement. In fact they follow two directions:
    1. Search for the Lowest price
    2. Trust to a single supplier without constant monitoring of market

Today, however, SMEs are realising that joining in network can help to become competitive to the market as large companies and things are changing also in the Procurement management.

However, in my opinion, one distinctive difference will always remain and it depends on our Latin nature, during the negotiations Italians tend to play “Poker” instead of “Bridge”…

Procurious: Do you know how many other procurement professionals are in your country?

Sergio: I have no idea.

Procurious: Are you usually an early adopter? (Perhaps you’ve been a “first mover” with something else…)

Sergio: Not usually, the choice depends heavily on the personal interest I have in the product or service and not just because it’s “new”, for example I think I was one of the first Italian Procurement Professionals to join Procurious! Right?

Procurious: Why did you join Procurious?

Sergio: Great place to exchange knowledge and experiences in particular between the old and the new generation of Procurement Professionals and, as Chantelle Genovezos said: “being in touch with the global Procurement community”!

Italian Sergio Giordano talks procurement and supply chains

Procurious: How did you find out about us?

Sergio: From an article on http://www.supplymanagement.com/
[
The now-infamous SupplyManagement article can be read here]

Procurious: What are you hoping to get out of the network?

Sergio: Expand my reputation but never stop to learn about Procurement from other people experiences

Procurious: Are you going to invite your peers?

Sergio: I’m doing my best to involve the entire Italian community of Procurement Professionals that I know…peers, LinkedIn contacts etc.

Many thanks to Sergio for taking time-out to answer our questions and for all his support so far.

If you would like to be considered for a future profile, please drop Matt Farrington Smith a line – he’d love to hear from you! (Bribes may or may not be encouraged…)

Meet our other #firstmovers:
Harold (Hal) Good
Farshad Bahmed

Hal Good fills us in on procurement in the United States

Meet Harold (Hal) Good, one of our #firstmovers

Following on from our last infographic-filled blog post, this is the first entry in a new series that will profile selected members of the community. These are all members who we feel are truly embracing the site, and go to show just how “rich” and global Procurious is becoming.

Say hello to Harold (Hal) Good. Hal is a career procurement professional with over 30 years experience in venues including airport, convention center, city, county, emergency services, hospital, public safety, public works, state, utility and public-private partnerships.

Procurious asks: How do you think procurement differs in your country, as opposed to elsewhere in the world?

Hal at All Military Academies Ball held at Union League Hotel PhilaHal: I think that procurement has developed a bit differently in the United States because procurement professionals had to choose among paths to receive credentials and professional recognition.

Private sector procurement professionals were most likely to be influenced by the credentialing systems and continuing education provided by National Association of Purchasing Managers, (NAPM), now ISM, which relied heavily on manufacturing and supply chain roots.  State and local government procurement professionals tended to be drawn into the educational programs sponsored by the National Institute of Governmental Purchasing, (NIGP), and its credentialing programs administered by the UPPCC.  

Contractors doing business with the US Federal Government, are committed to utilization of the FAR program which gave rise to the National Contract Association (NCMA) and its educational programs and credentials.  

This has spawned a difference in terminology and to some extent practices within the profession in the USA itself, as well as with the rest of the world.  That is probably due to the vast influence of CIPS in the international arena.

It should be noted that in the medical profession, procures are pretty much universally called the same thing.  In procurement however there is a wide variance in what is meant by something as elementary as tendering vs. bidding or tendering versus requesting proposals.  It is a situation ripe for someone to propose a universal standard that would be accepted by all. 

Procurious: Do you know how many other procurement professionals are in your country? 

Hal: No, I don’t.  It depends on the definition of a “professional”.  In 2008, according to the Department of Labor, there were 68,000 “purchasing mangers” employed in the US.  The latest Bureau of Labor statistics estimated 504,600 “jobs” for Purchasing managers, buyers and purchasing agents.

Procurious: Are you usually an early adopter? (Perhaps you’ve been a “first mover” with something else…)

Hal: I have always been an early adaptor! Example: I was head of the first city procurement department in the US to do online bidding.  I pride myself on being on the cutting edge of new technology and methodology.

Procurious: How did you find out about Procurious?

Hal: I found out about it from Stephen Ashcroft of Brian Farrington Ltd.

Procurious: What are you hoping to get out of the network?

Hal: An opportunity to improve the procurement profession globally. Proactively do what it takes to make it more strategic and less function based, more emphasis on overall value and contribution to the organizational mission, less cost driven.  Also become an influential global driver for the standardization of terminology, methodology and position descriptions.

Procurious: And finally, are you going to invite your peers?

Hal: Yes!

Procurious would like to thank Hal for his time, and for answering our questions.

If you would like to be considered for a future profile, please drop Matt Farrington Smith a line – he’d love to hear from you! (Bribes may or may not be encouraged…)