Category Archives: Generation Procurement

Let’s Get Internet of Things (IoT) Ready for Procurement!

What can the the Internet of Things (IoT) do for you and your procurement team? 

IoT is a big buzzword these days. From industry experts to academia to specialised thought leaders, everyone is talking about how IoT as a technology has the potential to disrupt not only the day-to-day workings of our companies, but also the lives of the individual.

The Internet of Things: A History

Let’s go back a bit and see how it all began. In 1999, Kevin Ashton, a British technology pioneer and cofounder of the Auto-ID Center at MIT, proposed the Internet of Things (IoT). It refers to gadgets and applications with built-in wireless connectivity that can harness great amounts of data from their surroundings and help monitor, control and organise things better. From home appliances to fitness gadgets to technology helping industries automate their processes, IoT can do it all!

And two decades later, IoT is the live wire. Smart homes, smart gadgets and smart cars- IoT has already given us a glimpse how is future going to be. But what does it hold for procurement?

Procurement and the Internet of Things

For Procurement particularly, IoT works as an enabler, empowering companies to gain visibility into their spend analysis and keep a vigilant eye on their consumers consumption pattern. The supply chain data generated is monitored continuously and analysed for behavioral sets to make better-informed decisions. Having a proactive overview helps companies to estimate the demand and supply statistics, as they are aware of the needs and usage pattern of their consumers. This empowers them to negotiate with supplier side in a more streamlined manner as they know in advance what material and what quality and quantity is required. All these factors combined contributes to cost savings and brings value for the procurement function.

Another area where Procurement can benefit significantly is in the tracking and monitoring of the movement of goods within supply chains. Deploying the right set of sensors, which are tracked remotely with an IoT-enabled device can identify equipment faults, stoppages and leakages in real time allowing service and maintenance teams to respond to issues more promptly and accurately. This also ensures diagnostic data is obtained in order to deploy the right set of technicians.

These factors directly impact the maintenance costs incurred by a company, contributing positively to the overall cost savings.

There is more that IoT can bring to the table for Procurement function. But to realise the utmost advantages, companies must ensure that they are investing in the right kind of technology, processes and people. They need to invest in setting up the infrastructure that will unleash the possibilities IoT has to offer. In short they need to be ‘IoT ready’.

If you are curious to learn more about how IoT will impact procurement, do join our upcoming webinar where our expert group of panelists will examine the practical impact of IoT on how our supply chains will work and what you will need to do to become IoT ready.

Webinar Speakers

  • Jon Hansen – Editor and Lead writer at Procurement Insights
  • Robert Handfield – Executive Director of the Supply Chain Resource Cooperative
  • Mark Hubbard – Managing Director at Smart Brown Dog Ltd

Webinar on ‘Getting Internet of Things (IoT) Ready for Procurement’ is on January 18, 2018 | Thursday. Register here for free to reserve your seat.

2017 Rewind – IBM CPO: You’re Finished If You Think You’ve Finished

As part of our 2017 Procurious rewind, we’re taking a look at the top blogs of the year. This article features our interview with IBM’s CPO Bob Murphy, who believes there is nothing so important as professional development and human relationships.

The numbers are eye-watering. IBM CPO Bob Murphy looks after a $70 billion spend – $25 billion internally and $45 billion 3rd-party. The company has around 150,000 contracts across 17,000 suppliers, with its flagship cognitive technology, Watson, reading 900 million pages in multiple languages per second.

As we prepared for our interview with Murphy, it’s understandable, then, that we expected to find him entirely focused on data analytics, automation, AI and the other tech that’s rapidly impacting so many professions. We were wrong – what comes across loud and clear is that this is a charismatic, engaging leader where people and relationships matter.

Think 40 and other professional development

Talking to Bob, it becomes immediately clear that his personal commitment to professional development is enormous. “If you want to be a leader, you have to stay current and replenish your IQ through learning and new knowledge. Ultimately, talent development is about making sure you have excellent people to replace outgoing leadership – it’s also vital for driving innovation.”

IBM’s Think 40 program mandates a minimum of 40 hours per year of self-initiated professional development. For the procurement team, this means having the option to select from a range of internal and external courses (often online), including offerings from Six Sigma, Procurement Leaders and ISM. For Bob, it comes down to inquisitiveness and a love of continual learning.

“We look for logical, friendly, humble, smart and inquisitive people. Anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of supply management can be trained to become outstanding procurement leaders. Making people aware of what is possible is absolutely critical – most successful people around the world put aside time to regularly read and educate themselves. They’re inquisitive; they enquire after things.”

Two critical skills for future leaders in procurement

  1. Digital literacy

“Data”, says Murphy, “is omnipresent and omnipotent.” He stresses that leaders who want to thrive in the procurement profession need to develop an understanding of:

  • Data analytics – we can gather data but how do you use that data to gain insights?
  • Robotic processes – how can you automate tactical processes so human capital is used to the greatest effect?
  • Cognitive computing – understanding how to digitise a process end-to-end so it is interconnected and insightful.
  1. Relationship building

Murphy tells Procurious that while leaders need to be able to use technology to get the insights and knowledge they need, their main focus should be on developing their emotional intelligence (EQ) rather than their IQ. “You need to have the ability to talk to clients in a consultative manner. We have one mouth and two ears, and that’s how we ought to apportion our time in any discussion. When we’re talking, we’re not learning.”

How can you train someone to be adept at building relationships? “It’s about attitude, not aptitude”, says Murphy. Whether leadership is innate or taught, the results are the same. You need to be able to work collaboratively with your suppliers, show them what’s important to you and understand what’s important to them. “Your relationship-building skills will ultimately enable your suppliers to drive innovation. For example, we have 17,000 suppliers at IBM. I want each one to wake up every morning and think: ‘How can I make IBM better’?”

Have you got a cognitive journey map?

Where is your organisation headed with cognitive procurement technology? Where do you want to be? How will you use people, processes and technology to get there? What can we automate?

Murphy recommends that every procurement team should have a roadmap that lays out the strategy for its data, analytics and cognitive journey. “All CEOs need a vision for their cognitive journey, and every function needs one too.”

According to The Hackett Group’s 2017 Procurement Key Issues research, only 32 percent of procurement organisations currently have a formal digital strategy in place, and only 25 percent have the needed resources and competencies in place today.

In reality, we can’t all be first-movers. But even if your company isn’t yet ready to act on cognitive technology, CPOs will be rewarded for raising the question, thinking through the issues and putting the challenge on the Board’s agenda. Most importantly, there needs to be milestones and deliverables, as Murphy warns: “Strategy without execution is a daydream”.

To end on a gem of a quote from Murphy, he spoke about how the constantly evolving nature of technology means a never-ending journey. “’Journey’ is a good description, because it is never finished. Anyone who thinks it is finished, is finished.”

2017 Rewind – Do You Have The Right Skills To Deliver On Tomorrow’s Procurement Strategy

As part of our 2017 Procurious rewind, we’re taking a look at the top blogs of the year. This piece looks at why are our procurement teams are falling so short when it comes to delivering on strategy? 

Shockingly, 60 per cent of CPOs believe their teams do not have the skills to deliver their procurement strategy, according to Deloitte’s “Global Chief Procurement Officer Survey 2017.”

Why are procurement teams falling so short?

Originally, procurement was heavily based on process management, negotiation and basic spend analysis. But the procurement function is evolving, and professionals have to adapt to a new environment . There are new and growing expectations that require alternate skills for a more advanced job profile.

Procurement professionals are expected to be much more analytical, with the ability to perform data mining. They also must learn to manipulate and understand financial data and indicators, such as P&L and balance sheets. That’s not to mention that they should be proficient with the latest technologies.

Yet, one of the most important skills to develop is customer centricity. In today’s customer-centric world, this becomes crucial.

In my opinion, understanding internal customers,  being able to communicate in their language, knowing what they want or helping them to understand what they need, is the most difficult skill to learn and develop because it often goes against the conventional and traditional training that many procurement professionals have received.

It’s time to stop hiding behind the processes and get to know the internal customers! Given the back-office environment we are coming from, there is still a lot to do to change the mind-set and the behaviour of those involved. Procurement professionals need to develop their consultative skills and become less process focused, since excessive process significantly impedes speed and agility.

Keeping It Fresh

Another challenge for procurement involves attracting and retaining fresh talent in our industry. This situation needs to be addressed now to prevent a significant skills gap within the next couple of years. While we still have to continue to build traditional procurement skills. We also need to recognise that these skills must evolve as analytic and cognitive solutions provide more refined data and insight. The challenge is less about finding someone who is an expert negotiator and more about recruiting someone who understands data and logic.

At IBM, we are currently hiring maths and statistics majors because they can understand trends and probabilities. Although many procurement skills can be taught,  it’s hard to train someone to find trends in complex data.

Taking IBM’s example, our strategy to recruit and retain talent is reflected in how we communicate our procurement roles. “Our Procurement strategy is about collaborating with customers to ensure they have best in-class solutions, with access to the most advanced technology available on mobile devices. We partner with our suppliers to be as innovative and creative as possible.”

Presented like this, a job in procurement sounds pretty exciting!

The party ain’t over yet!

And the party isn’t over once we’ve found the right skills and talent, we also need to keep that skilled staff within the procurement function! If we help employees build on their competencies as well as add new ones, and if they can see that their contribution to the company’s mission clearly makes a difference, it will help us to keep those employees in procurement.

Ultimately, modernising the procurement profession and making procurement a “cool” place to work will help retain a talented, skilled and motivated workforce.

Guess The Impact: Can You Handle The Pressure?

How can you prepare when you know the worst is coming, but you can’t be sure when, where or how it will come? The Guess The Impact quiz will help!

What would be the impact on your global supply chain if a volcano exploded in the Pacific? How would your supply chain be affected? Would your business continue running as usual or would the devastation prevent access to suppliers, parts, staff?

What about a diesel shortage in France? Do you have contingency strategies in place just in case? Can you source materials or labour you need elsewhere?

Maybe you think you understand the financial implications of a tsunami wiping out a global manufacturer or what happens when a major distributor goes bankrupt.

In an increasingly volatile world, pre-empting catastrophes and assessing the bearing they might have on your business is vital. Major events and even seemingly unrelated business decisions can have a serious impact on your bottom line.

But whilst 87 per cent of supply chain leaders consider proactive risk management important, a mere 36 per cent feel equipped to manage it!

Disruptors: A Case Study

 IBM Watson Supply Chain created the “Guess The Impact” quiz to test just how well you would manage a major supply chain disruption.

Meghan Jones, Content Marketing Manager, IBM Watson Supply Chain, created the quiz to demonstrate the magnitude of disruption that these events can have in a ripple effect on people and businesses everywhere. “I wanted people who took the quiz to rethink their preparedness for disruption scenarios as they were reading about how far reaching disruptions can spread.

“As an example, most people are aware of the devastating havoc that a tsunami will wreak on a country where it happens; though people don’t generally stop to think about the worldwide implications of a disruption-taking place beyond just the physical location of where it happened.”

One of the case studies in the quiz highlights the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku, which triggered a powerful Tsunami travelling 6 miles inland. 130,000 buildings collapsed, 1 million buildings were damaged, and heavy damage was inflicted on roads, railways and dams. The Bank of Japan offered 15 trillion Yen, or $183 billion USD to the banking system in March in effort to normalise market conditions.

The World Bank later estimated the full economic cost at $235 billion USD making it the costliest natural disaster in history.

Is your supply chain equipped with the visibility you need to mobilise quickly and source from another supplier to avoid the ripple effects of a natural disaster like this?

Almost anything from a weather incident to an unexpected spike in demand can disrupt a company’s supply chain, impacting cost, productivity and the customer experience. IBM Supply Chain Insights can elevate your existing systems to provide greater visibility, transparency and insight into supply chain data and processes—so you can better predict and mitigate the disruptions and risks that threaten your competitive advantage.

To survive and thrive, supply chains must become thinking supply chains.

IBM Supply Chain Insights

Joanne Wright, Chief Supply Chain Officer, IBM, created IBM Supply Chain Insights to help procurement professionals quickly mitigate these disruptions; enabling them to build a transparent, intelligent and predictive supply chain.

IBM Supply Chain Insights leverages Watson cognitive technology trained in supply chain to provide comprehensive visibility and insights across the entire supply chain. It enables organisations to predict, assess and mitigate disruptions and risks allowing you to improve supply chain operations to deliver greater value to the business.

Take the “Guess The Impact” quiz, developed by the gurus at Watson Supply Chain, to test your ability to handle a major disruption in your supply chain.

Don’t be Fooled and Underestimate Blockchain

Do you find it comforting to dismiss blockchain as “flash in the pan”? Simona Pop believes you’d be a fool to do so and explains why it will live up to the hype.

There is a pattern emerging where new technologies are treated with a certain degree of skepticism. After the initial wave of excitement and expectation, many of the game changing advances are suddenly approached with a “flash in the pan” dismissal.

Is it meant to reassure comfortable people and businesses that carrying on as they are is the better option? Why risk innovation when you can draw out a tradition type stance?

But this isn’t the technology’s fault. Many of these advances are – when divorced from the Gartner hype cycle and the hashtags and actively placed in their proper context – exactly as exciting and game changing as they seem, if not more so.

Blockchain is a high-profile victim of this phenomenon: as a distributed ledger technology that promises faster, more secure payments, many industries have been exploring its possibilities and many more have been writing and talking about it.

Purchasing is no exception. And while blockchain technology may have limited application in other professions, in this one, it will live up to the hype. As a means of reducing costs, improving efficiency, controlling fraud, and boosting transparency, it has tangible, real-world benefits for procurement functions – whatever the market or business they work within.

In a recent article, Paul Clayton, Head of New Service Development for Basware, states:

”In 2017, blockchain is word of the year, it’s absolutely everywhere. But it’s not earth shattering, it’s not the third generation of the Internet it’s just an interesting concept with some obvious benefits and flaws.”

Let’s go through some of the reasons why Basware feel blockchain is not all it promises to be for finance and purchasing:

  1. “Whilst a blockchain itself is safe, an application using it remains hackable” – This is also true of your bank software, or Apple Pay or pretty much any software we are currently using for payments. It should not stop us using it or leveraging its deep transformational effects in how businesses operate.
  2. “It can be too transparent” – Technically true, but in reality the references to user wallets are encrypted key strings which, whilst easy to relate to the originating source and other related transactions, is not as easy to relate to an actual physical person. In much the same way as a credit card number isn’t easy to relate to a person without extra information.
  3. “It’s not the most elegant solution” –  Here’s where we strongly disagree. The elegance is in the simplicity. Banks have been trying to come up with distributed ledger technology since the 70s but they were hindered because they refused to be outside the transaction. By using TLS style encryption and cutting out the transaction verification at financial institution level, the whole transaction becomes significantly simpler.
  4. “You can still lose things!“ – Of course you can. You can lose your wallet too.

The argument that there isn’t really that much value in blockchain when the benefits of smart contracts and removing the invoice are tangible possibilities is nonsensical. Removing  the need for invoice processing is huge and any platform truly helping businesses handle their invoices and payments should know this. Invoice processing, and invoice fraud by proxy, are the biggest threats to company money out there today. Just look at Facebook and Google who were victims of $100M payment scam this year.

Blockchain automates trust

Trust is the cornerstone of every business relationship. On a fundamental level, you need to believe that the other person is who they say they are – and they need to believe the same of you.

In this age of phishing, malware, and general cyber security attacks, this seemingly simple principle becomes complicated. Login details are stolen and turned to criminal ends; high-level executives are being impersonated by hackers, who then persuade other parties to release vital funds; the sheer scale and variety of cybercrime is growing.

Blockchain provides a means of automating trust. By using permanently retained historical data to authenticate everyone involved in a deal, each side can be assured of the other parties’ trustworthiness: the seller and buyer alike are always who they say they are, and the product is the right product. What’s more, because prices cannot be modified, invoices will effectively be rendered obsolete.

This greatly simplifies the complicated, multi-faceted transactions that make up modern supply chains – maximising security and reducing the risk of fraud.

Blockchain is fast

Procurement functions will also benefit from the speed and efficiency of blockchain technology. For one thing, it’s fully digital: by taking the more time-consuming elements of a conventional transaction out of the equation, you immediately save time and resources that would have been spent on these tasks.

Shared access databases mean that it’s no longer necessary to manually scan invoices – dramatically accelerating the reconciliation process as all parties are allowed to view the same transaction.

Blockchain effectively cuts out the middlemen. By removing all intermediaries, it makes the processing of payments and transactions much faster: purchase order data can be exchanged on the blockchain at a far speedier pace than current levels will allow. This technology can also identify the nearest and most cost-effective vendors: decreasing lead and work time, and improving your operational efficiency.

Blockchain creates strong audit trails

Blockchain technology stores every detail of every transaction at every level of the supply chain. This will – as mentioned above – facilitate greater fraud control, and it will also offer transparency into issues of legality such as money laundering and the use of child labour.

And though it’s a digital technology, blockchain will also assist with the tracking and recording of physical items. As they are transported across local and international borders, they can be identified at each location – creating a strong and fully documented audit trail.

This kind of end-to-end visibility ensures that delays are rare and that missing items are found and allocated to supply routes more easily. This allows you to manage and optimize these supply routes with maximum efficiency – ensuring that no space is wasted and no customer disappointed.

It’s clear blockchain will have a significant influence on procurement and finance. The advantages of being able to streamline business processes, secure payments, and automate workloads shouldn’t be understated. Do the research, ensure you’re positioning your business correctly and you’ll be in the camp that benefits – today, and in the future.

See InstaSupply’s co-founders chat about blockchain and its vital role on our roadmap.

Strategic Sourcing Tech Investment Is The Key To Transformation

Are you running a little late to the digital transformation party? They do say better late than never!

As we’ve explored previously, digital transformation is changing in the world of supplier sourcing.

According to The Hackett Group’s Sourcing Cycle Time and Cost Measurement study, firms are spending around $275,000 a year on software that streamlines sourcing — from supplier discovery, to e-sourcing, to contract lifecycle management (CLM).

So while it’s a sector still driven largely by traditional methods — with their corresponding disadvantages and inefficiencies — companies are starting to see the benefits of a software-driven approach to sourcing.

A little late to the digital transformation party? Perhaps. But better late than never!

Insights into increased efficiency

Respondents report that using supplier-discovery software they can reduce the time it takes to find and qualify a new supplier by 31%. The average time spent doing this the old-fashioned way is in the region of 40 hours. That’s an entire week’s work — and even then the process isn’t fool proof. Around 14% of projects fail to meet expectations, meaning the bidding has to begin again.

Powered by the right software, many time-consuming processes are eliminated. With access to system-recommended suppliers based on predefined criteria, sourcing staff can instantly improve their productivity and speed supplier discovery. On the e-sourcing front, the right tech can reduce total sourcing time by 30%. While CLM software can improve compliance by increasing the use of standard terms and conditions by 38%.

Adapt to succeed

It’s obvious that businesses are seeing benefits. Although that’s not to say new technology adoption isn’t without its own challenges. Processes need to be assessed and adapted, and staff have to learn new ways of working. Cultural change isn’t easy, but it’s one of the hurdles that all firms must clear in pursuit of digital transformation.

In a highly competitive business landscape, it’s vital that your processes enable you to get results quickly and cost-effectively. And this is the bottom line of why organisations need to revisit their approach to strategic sourcing.

A little adjustment today opens the door to far greater efficiency tomorrow.

To discover how your organisation can embrace digital transformation and reduce strategic sourcing costs and cycle times, read The Hackett Group report now.

Sourcing, But Not As We Know It!

How many procurement pros do you need to manage $1 billion of spend? We examine the stats revealing the state of today’s sourcing landscape…

How many staff does it take to make a success of strategic sourcing?

We might not have a definitive answer to that question, but we do have access to some figures that tell us a lot about the state of the sourcing landscape today.

For instance, we know that companies dedicate 16 full-time employees (FTEs) to the sourcing process for every $1 billion in spend. It’s one of those stats that makes you think. At first glance this might sound ok, right? 16 full-time staff can achieve a lot. But $1 billion represents an incredible amount of procurement.

The fact is, most organisations aren’t maximising the value of their purchasing. Efficiency is being compromised, and in this there are a number of factors at play.

Periodic category reviews, while being the best way to ensure effective sourcing, are just not possible for most organisations with the resources available to them. This means companies aren’t adjusting their sourcing to account for changing market conditions.

Compounding the problem, the bulk of sourcing teams’ time – 50 per cent – is swallowed up by the supplier evaluation and negotiation stages, which in some cases can involve highly complex financial and regulatory work. With so much time spent on this phase, more strategic and potentially value-adding phases such as planning – which are still mostly conducted by category managers – don’t get the attention they deserve.

Looking at the landscape as a whole it’s no surprise that most sourcing projects are long and costly, and ultimately don’t deliver the results that stakeholders expect.

Strategic sourcing, it’s a-changing

And automation is the key…

More and more firms are convinced that digital transformation is the answer to increased efficiency in strategic sourcing, and they’re not afraid to invest in software that gives them a procurement advantage. In fact, they spend more than a quarter of a million dollars a year on these solutions. What’s more, they’ve found that this investment is paying off. According to these companies, supplier discovery, e-sourcing and contract lifecycle management software is helping them streamline the entire sourcing process – from discovery to contract signing. As a result, their total sourcing times are being reduced by 30 per cent as are their costs.

This is just the beginning of a trend that holds significant opportunities for organisations. But firms need to be bold in their thinking to achieve these results. Increasing FTEs isn’t the route to increased efficiency. Companies need to look to technology to help them transform their procurement processes and deliver faster, more cost-effective sourcing than ever before.

To discover how your organisation can embrace digital transformation and reduce costs and cycle times by 30 per cent, read The Hackett Group report now.

Meet the James Bond of Procurement

Looking for some holiday reading? We review Christopher Hepworth’s “The Last Oracle”, a fast-paced thriller starring Sam Jardine, the world’s greatest negotiator – and a procurement professional!

As a series of bizarre climate-related events occur across our planet, it seems the world is edging towards a catastrophic tipping point.

Rex Daingerfield is the owner of a giant fracking company that seeks to exploit a rich seam of gas in the environmentally sensitive Greenland ice shelf. But Daingerfield has a nemesis – his daughter. Born to an Egyptian mother, she is inducted as the Oracle of the Temple of Sekhmet. Her role is to protect the earth from the likes of her father.

The Oracle recruits the world’s greatest negotiator, Sam Jardine, to convince her father to change his destructive business model. But a secret society of the rich and powerful stands to profit from the chaos that has gripped the world. Led by an errant priest from the Temple of Sekhmet, they will do anything to stop Jardine.

As the planet edges closer to disaster, Jardine is confronted by politicians, lobbyists, vested interests – even his own radicalised half-brother – all of whom stand to gain from the mayhem about to be unleashed.

Sounds exciting, doesn’t it? Here’s what we enjoyed about this book.

A procurement hero

Sam Jardine is a procurement professional who is sent all over the world on special projects when his incredible powers of negotiation are required.

He is described in some of the advertising around The Last Oracle as “the new James Bond”. There are certainly some similarities – he keeps his cool in the novel’s many action scenes, he loves fast (solar-powered) cars, and he wins the heart of at least two female characters. But in many ways, his character has more depth than Bond. Jardine isn’t always sure of himself, and one of the strongest themes running through the book is his internal conflict between loyalty (and fear of) his oil-industry employer, his own conscience and his knowledge of impending climate catastrophe. He’s also very fallible – he makes mistakes, he gets severely injured on more than one occasion, and he doesn’t always “get the girl” despite his good looks and charm.

Jardine is also described as the world’s greatest negotiator – and this holds true, with arguably the best scenes in the novel being negotiations. Jardine leverages his cultural intelligence when negotiating with an African tribal chief, thinks fast to save his job in an interview with his furious CEO, negotiates for his life before a vengeful Egyptian goddess, locks horns with Washington lobbyists and politicians, and even extracts a multi-million dollar family secret from a drunken uncle in an English pub for the price of two pints of ale and a packet of crisps. The back-and-forth dialogue in these scenes is spot-on, and Jardine frequently wins the day by taking a risk that his opponents (and the reader) doesn’t expect.

The characters

Although there are some characters in the novel who have more scope for development, such as the ruthless fracking tycoon Rex Daingerfield, the bullish oilman Chuck Crawford, and even some radicalised Islamic terrorists, there are a handful of characters that are gratifyingly complex. We’ve already mentioned the hero Jardine’s internal struggles. Daingerfield’s mysterious daughter, Sienna, is one of three strong, intelligent female characters that Jardine interacts with, and faces a schizophrenic struggle between her identity as a holy oracle of an ancient Egyptian goddess, her filial duty to her father, and her mission to prevent an environmental holocaust. This conflict eventually lands her in psychiatric care. The theme of mental health is also present in Jardine’s younger brother Jack, whose internal demons and severe lack of judgement makes him an easy recruit for the aforementioned terrorists. 

The author is a CPO!

To let you in on a secret, “Christopher Hepworth” is actually a pseudonym. The author is head of procurement in their country for one of the world’s leading insurers, and therefore knows a thing or two about negotiation.

The world needs more procurement heroes, including fictional ones, to help raise the profile of the profession. Five stars!

The Last Oracle is the third Sam Jardine Thriller from author Christopher Hepworth. Read more reviews and purchase your copy on Amazon.

Are You Ready For The Procurement Rebels And Revolutionaries In Your Team?

We know Gen Z don’t fit into the traditional workplace – but how can procurement organisations embrace these revolutionaries to benefit from their rebellious nature and leverage their innovative approaches? 

As a procurement manager with very rigid, process driven procurement software in place, how do you plan to manage the potential chaos that will come from the millennials in your current workforce and the Generation Z’s about to enter it?

Firstly, let’s address three ways of dealing with this issue. Do you ignore them, do you suppress them, or do you take time to investigate what these natural rebels and revolutionaries can offer?

Both groups are born entrepreneurs; they mesh work and play together, they’re smart beyond their years and they have a clear picture of what they want from a career.

Technology has been a major influencer in the develop of a new type of professional. It has provided access to vast amounts of information and has become the great equalizer, playing a major role in their disruptive nature at home and at work.

In my experience, I’ve found that both millennials and Z’s are self-starters – they work smarter and harder than you may think and have disproved time and again the “lazy” stereotype. They’re not averse to working outside normal business hours and use their daily commutes or downtime to get work done because they want to complete it promptly.

The tech catalyst

So, we know that millennials and Z’s don’t fit traditional workplace rules, so how can organisations benefit from their rebellious nature?

Technology is the catalyst of this rebellion. It meshes the world of work and play into a single environment; one where users expect the ‘Amazon’ type experience they get at home on Sunday to be mirrored in how they use technology at work on Monday. ­­

What do you say to the team member that walks into your office to tell you that your existing procurement software is drowning the team? They then show you an app they downloaded over weekend that allowed them to create RFQs, connect and chat with suppliers, make decisions and save a ton of their time and your money.

Revolutionaries are born from discontent. They’re frustrated at the status quo, and those who lead them are searching for a better way. It can be a challenging process, but these young rebels – or, to use a modern term: these entrepreneurs – are simply seeking more effective and flexible ways to work.

A new approach

So how would you react to the above scenario? It starts by changing how you approach the thinking behind the solution. This means recognising that innovation is no longer a top-down exercise that remains in the exclusive domain of senior management teams or corporate retreats.

Real innovation today is being driven from the ground up by those rebels within our teams that simply want a better work experience and are not afraid to try new technology or methods to get better outcomes.

It wasn’t that long ago when ‘agile’ was a term used only in software and development teams. I now see sales teams working with scrums and management teams having daily stand ups – it’s just one example of the new way of thinking and doing that is helping business work faster in today’s instant world.

Does this mean that it’s time to let the revolution rise and allow the rebels to take over the organization? Well, not entirely – it’s about getting the balance right.

It’s time for procurement leaders to stop lamenting about being seen as the roadblocks within their organisations and to look to your millennials and Z’s as a talent pool rich with ideas, innovation and passion.

They will challenge, they will make mistakes, but it is time to move beyond the current boundaries you’ve set, and remember – you were a rebel once, too!

About the author

Alan Paul is a thought leader and CEO of sourceit, a technology company that has led the market in the development of simple and easy-to-use sourcing applications for indirect categories.

Sourceit offers three different products for buyers:

  • RFQ – time saving request for quote software for all indirect categories,
  • Market – a specialized procurement and job management application for marketing services, and
  • Catalog – an inventory management and on-demand product/services ordering application.

Visit the website: sourceithq.com

Deal Or No Deal? The Brexit Effect

What are the implications of Brexit on Procurement? And how should the function be preparing for the various possible outcomes? 

Zycus’ webinar The Brexit Effect Understanding Brexit and Its Impact On Procurement takes place on Tuesday, 21st November 2017. Register for free here.

On June 23 2016, the world woke up to some very unexpected news.

This was the day around 17.4 million people in UK, by a sizeable margin of 52 per cent to 48 per cent, voted to become the first country to leave the European Union.

As the world looked on in shock, the then prime minister David Cameron immediately resigned, leaving his successor Theresa May to handle proceedings. She soon confirmed that Article 50 of the Lisbon treaty would be triggered and did so in March 2017.

From the time the UK submitted its Article 50 letter to the European Commission, a two year formal process of leaving the EU began.  A number of events were set in motion that cannot now be halted without significant agreement between the two governments.

What will happen in these two years?

Within these two years, the UK and the European Commission will either agree upon an interim agreement or trade will be governed under a pre-agreed set of tariffs. The impact of Brexit on the UK economy will be determined largely by whatever relationship the UK manages to forge with the EU, and this may not become clear for number of years.

In these uncertain and unpredictable times, how can procurement professionals prepare and what risks does the function face? In the EU, the public purchase of goods and services has been estimated to be worth 16 per cent of GDP and it is nearly 20 per cent of UK’s GDP.

Regardless of whether you work in the public or private sector, there is no doubt that Brexit’s impact extends across the entire breadth of the procurement industry. It’s really hard to understand how significantly regulations are going to change for procurement.

The worst case scenario for procurement

  • Cost: The costs to import goods within supply chains are likely to rise, whether it’s due to commodity prices or labour cost. In terms of commodity prices, we cannot know for sure of the impact; there could be a major change depending on the value of the pound or we might see no change at all. Labour cost will be dependent on the new immigration regulations, which could make it more expensive to hire EU nationals in the UK and vice versa.
  • Freedom of movement and supply chain delays: There is a chance that there will be a loss in freedom of movement both in goods and services for UK and European businesses with supply chains operating across borders. There is also a possibility that there will be some disruption in existing supply chains because of time-consuming border checks and paperwork at UK ports, which could increase custom processing time.
  • Procurement recruiting and talent management may suffer: Not only the flow of goods and services will be impacted but procurement talent will also be considerably affected. If the “leave” campaign succeeds in stopping migrants from the EU, there is a chance that the procurement talent pool in UK will be considerably reduced. Many of the EU procurement professionals might not want to be a part of UK given the current instability.

Procurement’s Pre-emptive Action

CIPS recently conducted a survey with 2100+ supply chain managers, which delivered some very interesting results:

  • Around 32 per cent of UK businesses using EU suppliers are currently looking for British replacements
  • More than one third of UK businesses plan to respond to Brexit by beating down suppliers’ process
  • 46 per cent of European businesses expect to reduce their use of UK suppliers

As supply chain complexity increases, many British companies are considering the possibility of shifting supplier base from continental EU to the UK. In the meantime, European companies that have operations in the UK are looking at moving their operations outside of the UK to ease business. This is because UK will become a separate market for EU and therefore like we discussed earlier, the movement of goods across borders with the UK will be deemed as imports and exports, attracting new customs controls. This will become more time consuming and attract paperwork, taxes, tariffs, excise duties and VAT which will have direct implications for revenue and cash flow of businesses.

If trade negotiations fail throughout the Brexit process, businesses inside and outside the UK should be ready to explore new options. Procurement must plan ahead to find alternative suppliers or start work with existing suppliers to put deals in place, soon!

If you are curious to know more about how Brexit will impact procurement, do join our upcoming webinar on Brexit featuring industry experts Mark Webb and Jon Hansen. They will be discussing:

  • The impact of Brexit on supplier risk assessment and management
  • The influence of trade tariffs on cost
  • Increasing demand for procurement talent
  • What is the procurement technology answer to Brexit? 

Speakers:

Jon Hansen – Editor and Lead writer at Procurement Insights

Mark Webb – Managing Director at Future Purchasing, UK

Kanishka Ghosh – Director of Product Management at Zycus Inc.

The Brexit Effect Understanding Brexit and Its Impact On Procurement takes place on Tuesday, 21st November 2017. Register for free here.