Category Archives: In The Press

El Niño is coming: How it will impact your organisation

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology has called it; we’re set for an El Niño year.

El Nino could wreak havoc

When I was younger I used to love the words El Niño. Although I knew nothing about this weather event, what I did know was that when we had El Niño conditions, we had great waves to surf.

Living in Australia, as time passed, I began to see El Niño through a different lens. The weather pattern tended to be reported in the news for causing droughts and bush fires, particularly on the country’s east coast.

I never understood El Niño; I didn’t even know what the name meant. It seemed to be used as a scapegoat in Australia for when things went wrong. “Geez, it’s hot today”… “Yeah its that El Niño mate” people would joke.

The fact of the matter is that El Niño has a distinct impact on global climatic conditions and these, in turn, have an impact on our ability to produce certain raw materials. Below I have tried to explain some of these impacts*.

So what exactly is El Niño?

Let’s start with the name. Peruvian fisherman named the weather pattern that we now know as El Niño. These fishermen noticed that in certain years, normally when water temperatures were higher, the anchovies they fished for were far less prevalent.

The fish shortage was normally noticed around Christmas time, hence the name El Niño (which directly translates from Spanish to ‘the boy’ but colloquially refers to Jesus Christ and explains the Christmas link).

Incidentally, the anchovies the fishermen were seeking weren’t in fact gone, they’d merely moved into deeper, colder, more nutrient rich water.

How does it form?

While definitive proof is yet to be established, an El Niño cycle is thought to begin in the tropical waters of the Pacific Ocean. Cyclical weather changes cause prevailing westerly trade winds to dwindle and this allows warm water to amass around the equator.

This warm water then begins to move eastward towards the Americas, and in its wake, leaves a trail of climatic changes that ripple out around the globe. Broadly speaking, El Niño climate cycles tend to result in drier, hotter conditions across the Asia Pacific region and cooler, wetter and stormier conditions in the Americas.

What’s all this got to do with the price of a coffee?

Changing weather conditions are, generally speaking, not a good thing for primary producers. As I mentioned earlier, the name El Niño comes from South American fishermen who saw their yields drop as a result of the changing water temperatures.

Pastoralists too, whether in Australia or the Americas, suffer from El Niño conditions, but for different reasons. While Aussie farmers may suffer through a drought, their counterparts in Brazil and Argentina will likely face issues due to too much rainfall, which can destroy grazing lands and reduce productivity.

Weather susceptible crops like coffee and cocoa also feel the effect of El Niño conditions. Similar to pastoralists, coffee growers in Colombia (where rainfall will increase) are likely to face different issues to those in Vietnam (where rainfall is expected to decrease). The similarity these producers share is that neither face ideal growing conditions for coffee production and harvests will decrease. With lower harvests comes higher prices and this means your morning cup of Jo may get a little more expensive should the predicted El Niño pattern eventuate.

It’s not all bad

It’s easy to get gloomy about these predictions, but it’s important to remember that El Niño conditions are not always bad for farmers. California’s drought and water restrictions have been well documented over recent years; I’m sure there are Californian farmers who would be more than keen to see a year of above average rainfall. Past El Niño years have proven fruitful for dairy and wine producers in the US, as well as wheat farmers in Australia. Whilst some will lose out, others will likely gain.

It’s not only food that’s impacted

Mines too are impacted by adverse weather. Increases in rainfall brought on from past El Niño cycles have wreaked havoc with mining operations in Southern America, causing landslides and halting work. Similarly, parts of Asia that rely on hydroelectric power will likely take a hit as rainfall levels decrease across the region.

What are your thoughts on El Niño? Will it impact your organisation’s operations?

* It must be noted that this description is a broad simplification of an incredibly complex meteorologic occurrence.

Why Cyber Security Needs To Be On Your Board’s Agenda

The Confederation of British Industry has offered-up some tips to help keep your company safe.

Cyber security tips to keep your business safe

Like any other large-scale threat to a company, cyber security must be dealt with at board level, the CBI said at its inaugural Cyber Security Conference in London.

Cyber security is nothing new, but (as Procurious was told at a recent CIPS workshop) it’s a risk that’s risen to the top of many a government’s agenda.

Matthew Fell, CBI Competitive Markets Director, offers the following says this of the threat:

“Getting cyber security right is critical for modern businesses, whatever their sector or size… With our IP, finances and our customer relationships all inextricably linked to technology, we must take steps to protect our online assets.

“Awareness of this critical business risk has risen in recent years, especially as the number of prominent cyber hacks hitting the headlines has sharply increased. Unfortunately, even as awareness in the business community has increased, with a small uptick in action, there is still a disconnect between awareness and action – especially for our high growth small and medium sized businesses, who are at just as much at risk as global brands.”

There’s no silver bullet

Matthew echoes the words of other experts in his field and reasserts the importance of businesses needing to act now in order to mitigate the scale of the impact.

“Nearly all businesses suffer cyber-attacks – 81 per cent of large businesses suffered a security breach last year alone, with the figure for small businesses at 60 per cent.

“Whilst the number of these attacks is going down, as hackers have become more sophisticated and targeted, the cost of these attacks almost doubled last year. That puts the average cost for large businesses between £600,000 and 1.15mn and for small businesses between £65,000 and 115,000.

“Like any other large scale threat to your company, the issue of effective cyber security should be firmly on the agenda of the board.

“Yet only about half of large businesses and a third of small businesses have adequate insurance cover for their online assets in the event of a breach. As the nature of liability changes in the digital age, businesses will need to rethink the assurances they have in place to mitigate financial loss.”

What you can do now

The UK government has issued ‘Cyber Essentials’ – an industry supported scheme to help organisations to protect themselves against common cyber security threats and identify risks.

The full scheme is open to UK organisations and allows them to gain 1 of 2 new ‘Cyber Essentials’ badges to show they are taking steps to protect themselves. If you’re not in the UK that’s OK, as the guidance and recommendations laid out in the ‘Cyber Essentials’ pack will help you on the right path.

What do we mean by risks?

Simply put, a risk is determined as anything that will have an impact on something we value. Don’t overly confuse yourself with lingo, instead take cyber security at face value and ask what losses would be acceptable to you?

In our case, at Procurious we want to ensure that your data is safe (membership details consisting of email addresses, password etc.), all of our content (videos, articles), social networking and online accounts, and making sure that our domain remains online. As an online business network these are all core elements to what we’re trying to achieve. We’d recommend you assess your own security needs, and in doing so tailor your approach to identify where you really need the protection.

For more information on the sources cited in this article please visit:
CBI
Cyber Essentials 

What Really Happened At The Tesco Shareholders Meeting

‘The Rolls Royce of grocery retail has become Ryanair… The difference is people still want to fly with Ryanair.’

What happened at the Tesco Shareholder meeting

As I reported here last week, UK supermarket chain Tesco, held its first shareholder meeting since the supplier rebate accounting scandal and subsequent profit drop, last Friday. Despite reporting better than expected share values, the mood in the room was certainly not a jovial one.

Shareholder concerns focused primarily on executive pay. Of particular interest were the huge sums made out to former bosses that many hold responsible for both the financial and moral demise of the firm.

Rewarding Failure

It was pointed out that Philip Clarke, the Supermarket’s former CEO, was given a £1.2 million early termination fee and will access a pension of nearly £14 million (or £658,000 a year), from a firm that is clearly in worse shape than it was when he joined it.

Clarke was at the helm during a meteoric fall from grace that culminated in Tesco reporting a £6.4B loss in April of this year. As well as plummeting profits, the firm became embroiled in a fraudulent accounting scandal around the way the firm booked £263m in supplier rebates on Clarke’s watch. The latter has resulted in an investigation by the Serious Fraud Office.

Criticism was not reserved for former executives

The firm’s new boss, Dave Lewis, also came under fire as 18 per cent of shareholders failed to back a remuneration report that showed Lewis had received £4.13M for his first six months in the new role.

While both men are contractually entitled to funds they have (and will continue to receive), the sentiment of the crowd certainly echoed a discomfort with the corporate greed that is attached to executive level salaries.

Shareholders directly juxtaposed these executive salaries to those earned by in-store staff members, which have been described as being below the ‘living wage’. One particularly stinging shareholder comment summed up this sentiment:

“We do not pay the living wage but we do make our executives millionaires for failure.”

Other shareholder quotes made on the day included:

“When we bought Tesco shares it was the Rolls-Royce of grocery retail but last year it became the Ryanair of grocery retail. The difference is that people want to fly with Ryanair.” 

“Our country can no longer accept the greed of executives.”

The challenge ahead for Lewis and his leadership seems a daunting one. The eyes of his shareholders, and indeed the media, will be fixed on the firm’s performance in the coming months. The leadership team must not only turn around poor profit figures, but also navigate a sea of litigation that will be attached to the firms handling of the supplier rebate scandal.

At the shareholders meeting, Lewis stipulated that “We are managing the business in the right way and, at a fundamental level, the business is stepping in the right direction.” The recent share price improvements and company performances appear to be positive, but there is a long road ahead for the new boss.

The cost of maintaining a supply of ethically sourced coffee

Starbucks contributes $30M to supplier development fund

Starbucks contributes $30M to supplier development fund

Global coffee chain Starbucks has announced it will contribute a further $30M USD to its Global Farmers Fund, more than doubling the company’s investment in this initiative. The fund, established back in 2008, is designed to provide support for farmers in the company’s supply chain.

In the announcement Starbucks claimed that its investment aligned directly with the firm’s global sourcing strategy. Starbucks purchases coffee from more than 30 countries across the globe. Many of these suppliers are located in the developing world and do not have access to the infrastructure and financial support to secure the longevity of their operations.

“By providing access to capital, farmers have the ability to make strategic investments in their infrastructure, offering the stability they need to manage ongoing complexities so that there is a future for them and the industry.” Said Craig Russell, executive vice president of global coffee for Starbucks.

Recent years have seen the coffee industry undergo a series of supply shocks due in large to adverse weather conditions. This year’s prediction of an el Niño weather pattern could potentially impact the output of coffee producers. Starbucks investment should better prepare farmers for these sorts of events.

It is thought that by investing its supply base, Starbucks will not only improve its security of supply, but also the quality of its product, its environmental impact and ultimately its profitability.

Richard Rhinehart, Executive Director SCAA Specialty Coffee Association of America made this statement following Starbucks announcement; “Traditionally smallholder coffee farmers depend on a single payment at the end of the harvest season to cover their expenses for an entire year. They are most often viewed as too high risk or lack access to any conventional loan facilities, and are captive to a cycle of sustained poverty. In order to break this cycle, these producers need to be able to make investments in their farms, households and communities that will deliver long-term benefits. Such investments require credit, and buyers who are willing to extend credit and share risk with farmers are not only stabilizing their own supply chains but contributing to the resiliency of coffee production globally.

2014 Best Year for Supply Chain and Logistics since Great Recession

The revelation comes from the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) 26th Annual “State of Logistics Report.

This year's State of Logistics Report

This year’s State of Logistics Report revealed that the supply chain industry experienced its best year since the Great Recession. The report examined the economic vitality and associated challenges facing each segment of the logistics industry. It also tracked and measured all costs associated with moving freight through the U.S. supply chain since 1988.

According to the research the transportation sector grew by 3.6 per cent in 2014 due to stronger shipment volumes rather than higher rates. The U.S. economy was on solid ground. New job creation was consistent, real net income and household net worth inched up, inflation was low-to-moderate and gas prices tumbled, providing consumers with additional buying power.

The report revealed total U.S. business logistics costs rose to $1.45 trillion in 2014, a 3.1 per cent increase from the previous year. However, the growth rate for logistics costs was lower than the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP), resulting in a slight decline in logistics as a percent of GDP from 8.4 per cent to 8.3 per cent.

Costs for the water sector rose 8.9 per cent, the second highest growth sector in 2014. Inland waterway traffic rebounded due to successful agricultural harvests, higher demand for coal and an expansion of petroleum transportation by barge. Shipments through the nation’s ports increased, with East Coast ports seeing the largest percentage of gains due to congestion and delays at West Coast ports caused by protracted labour issues.

And in 2014 air cargo sector costs declined 1.2 per cent as competition from other modes kept rates down; however, in 2014, a record $968 billion of high value merchandise was moved by air—$443.8 billion in exports and $543.3 in imports.

“Today’s market-leading companies use their supply chains to drive innovation and competitive advantage,” stated Marc Althen, president of Penske Logistics. “This in-turn drives demand for logistics providers. While demand for logistics is increasing, the industry faces a talent shortage and needs more logistics engineers, technology professionals, warehouse workers, and truck drivers to meet the needs of current and evolving freight fulfillment models businesses and consumers rely on for their goods and services.”

Intrigue, money laundering and arrests at the Alhambra

World’s collide as procurement fraud comes to my hometown of Granada.

Alhambra_-_Patio_de_los_Leones_in_the_morning_sun_-_July_2011

This morning, the Director of the Alhambra, an ancient Moorish palace that is now Spain’s most visited tourist attraction, along with some senior staff members were arrested and accused of money laundering.

The allegations centre on the dubious circumstances surrounding the award of a contract to service the Palace’s audio guides.

In 2007 the Alhambra held a tender for the provision of audio guide services, the contract was awarded and then renewed in 2011. The issues that have arisen are related to discrepancies between the bid that was submitted by the winning supplier Stendal and the actual contract terms.

Stendal’s 2007 bid stipulated that the company would contribute an annual fee of 77,000 Euros as well as 47 per cent of the revenues it raised to the Alhambra for the privilege of supplying the guides.

However, the final contract stipulates that Stendal would only contribute 30,000 Euros a year and 15 per cent of its revenues back to the Alhambra. Clearly the terms used to win the business were not implemented in the contractual agreement and this has raised concerns of bribery and kickbacks with the Spanish authorities.

While the flat fee of either 70,000 or 30,000 Euros does not seem a vast sum of money. When you consider that the Alhambra receives 2.4 million visitors a year and each audio guide rents for 4 Euros, you start to see there is serious money in the revenue sharing side of the agreement.

After facing questioning at Granada’s police headquarters, those arrested were released with charges and will face further hearings in the coming days.

If you can read Spanish or know how to work Google Translate, you can read more here.

We need data to combat slavery in supply chains

Thai fishing scandal

International news agency Reuters has announced that recent investigations into the Thai fishing industry suggest that fish caught by boats utilising slave labour could be finding their way into the global retail supply chain.

It is alleged that operators in the Thai fishing industry (the world’s third largest seafood exporter) are staffing boats with migrant workers under appalling conditions that have been likened to slavery.

There are concerns that due to a lack of transparent supply chain data, global retailers and fish buyers are not able to track if the fish they are buying were caught on these suspect vessels.

Lisa Rende Taylor, director of Project Issara, a program run by Anti-Slavery International highlighted as much when she claimed “One big problem in the Thai fishing industry is the lack of certification of good slavery-free shrimp versus bad-shrimp.”

Speaking at a the Trust Forum Asia conference, Nick Grono, the head of Freedom Fund, said his organisation would spend $5 million dollars on an initiative to increase awareness and transparency across these supply chains.

The issues present in the Thai fishing industry are replicated across a plethora of industries in the developing world. In attempts to access cheaper products and produce, global buying teams are now extensively leveraging the developing world’s low cost base. More often than not, this means creating relationships with third party suppliers.

These relationships are notoriously opaque, meaning that procurement teams often lose sight of what is happening in their supply chain. Only through improving supply chain data and encouraging procurement teams to take direct responsibility for the actions of suppliers (and indeed their supplier’s suppliers) can we hope to put an end to these worrying practices.

More than 3,000 mid-sized Thai vessels will have to stop fishing on July 1 under government measures designed to curb illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing, the Bangkok Post reported.

Uncovering The Truths Behind Supplying The Supermarket Giants

Supplier Rebates to be Discussed at Tesco Shareholders Meeting

Tesco supplier rebates under scrutiny

This Friday, Dave Lewis has the unenviable task of addressing the Tesco shareholders at the firm’s annual meeting. As the firm’s new CEO, the responsibility for explaining the company’s fall from grace over the past 12 months falls at his feet.

There is a lot to talk about. But it’s likely that the majority of the shareholder’s concerns will revolve around the £6.4 billion in pre-tax losses that were reported for the year ending February.

Who audits the auditor?

Serious concerns have been raised around Tesco’s relationship with its previous auditor, PwC. This relationship (which was terminated last month) appeared to have turned septic and has been used to explain some of the accounting discrepancies that contributed to company’s recent woes.

While it is easy to focus on the firm’s recent poor performance, perhaps the greatest challenge for Lewis will be explaining that the worst is potentially still to come.

The UK’s Serious Fraud Office has opened an inquiry into the supermarket chain over an accounting scandal that saw the retailer inflate its reported profits by £263m through incorrectly logging supplier rebates. Not only has this scandal cast doubts over Tesco’s reporting standards, it has brought the company’s ethics and supplier relationships into question.

Dodgy accounting brings dodgy supplier relationships into focus

Supplier rebates are nothing new in the supermarket space. In fact, it’s believed that this behaviour has existed since the 1970’s. However, in recent years the practice has been stepped up significantly. Suggestions have been made that UK supermarkets make as much money from supplier rebates as they do from operating profits.

Supplier rebates, which see suppliers making compulsory contributions to supermarkets in return for prime shelf space (or the allocation of marketing effort), have faced scrutiny for the way they are reported. These payments have traditionally not been well defined and recognised through financial reporting systems. In the wake of the Tesco rebate fiasco, the Financial Reporting Council has announced it will look more closely at the way rebates are managed from an accounting point of view.

The supplier rebate scandal not only carries implications for the firm’s reporting credibility; it has been a public relations nightmare. The mass media has jumped on the issue of supplier rebates and customers are now fully aware that supermarkets insist on large payments from suppliers, not only to market their products but also to secure in-store shelf space (this stuff fills column inches). In an era of increased supermarket competition (firms like Aldi are stealing significant market share from Tesco) these PR scandals are crippling.

Lewis’s moment of truth will come this Friday. Tune into Procurious on Monday, as we’ll be providing a review of the shareholder meeting, including an analysis of the way Lewis responded to the supplier rebate scandal.

Celebrating National Women in Engineering Day

National Women In Engineering Day is hoping to change perceptions and inspire more women engineers.

Supporting National Women in Engineering Day

What is it?

National Women in Engineering Day (NWED) was launched in 2014 by the Women’s Engineering Society (WES), as an inaugural event to celebrate the achievements of women in engineering and encourage more girls to consider engineering as a career. 

Who’s involved?

Approximately 400 schools and colleges across the UK are expected to take part in NWED celebrations this year with over 100 events listed on the NWED website www.nwed.org.uk. The organisations hosting the events include universities, schools, engineering societies, and multinational organisations, such as Ford Motor Company, Amec Foster Wheeler, Qinetiq, Atkins, DECC, BT, Pepsi, Selex ES, Dyson, Arup, DuPont, BP, Siemens, BAE Systems, TFL, Crossrail, and many more.

Is it just a UK initiative then?

Nope.

This year NWED has also gained interest on an international level with events happening all over the world to celebrate achievements of women engineers on a global level. For example, the Institution of Engineering and Technology in Kuwait are hosting a conference on NWED with talks from guest speakers, networking activities and awards.

How did it come about?

The Women’s Engineering Society (WES) is a not for profit organisation which was established in 1919 after the First World War to inspire and support women in engineering. For more information visit www.wes.org.uk.

Dawn Bonfield, Founder of National Women in Engineering Day and President of the Women’s Engineering Society said ‘We were absolutely amazed by the enthusiasm for National Women in Engineering Day last year, but this year the day has grown even more and we have seen an enormous number of organisations getting involved with the celebrations. This really is testament to the change in perception of women in engineering, and we need to do all we can now to maintain this activity throughout the year to ensure that girls see engineering as a real career choice for them.’

How many female engineers does it take to set a world record?

Among the events, a Guinness World Record has also been planned to coincide with NWED with the aim to have the largest gathering of women engineers on NWED 23 June at Horse Guards Parade.

Worrying Number of UK Organisations Lack Supply Chain ‘Plan B’

Nearly two and a half years since the oft reported ‘horsemeat scandal’ and many organisations are still lacking a Plan B for a supply chain crisis, according to a survey by CIPS.

Most organisations don't have a plan B

CIPS quizzed senior supply chain managers from across the globe on a number of topics, with the research throwing up a number of surprising statistics, all of which show that many organisations are just not learning the lessons of past failures in the industry.

No Risk Mitigation

At the most basic level when considering a subject like a supply chain scandal is the concept of risk mitigation strategies. These can be for ensuring continuity of supply in the event of a natural disaster or alternative suppliers if sourcing has to be changed due to ethical issues.

CIPS found that two-thirds of the respondents didn’t have, or weren’t aware of, a mitigation strategy covering all tiers of their supply chains. Compounding this is a lack of close relationships with suppliers (only 11 per cent) and the majority (65 per cent) of the managers only having relationships with Tier 1 suppliers or not at all.

Not Managing Relationships

With procurement often focused on reducing cost, reducing supplier lists and eliminating tail spend, relationships can often be overlooked with larger, more critical suppliers. These relationships can help to build trust, maintain ethical standards and can also help to reduce cost in the long-term.

And the statistics back this up too, with the survey results showing a big difference in organisations suffering a supply chain crisis in the past year.

  • 67 per cent with relationships with Tier 3 suppliers and beyond highlighted zero supply chain crises
  • Only 45 per cent with Tier 1 supplier relationships could say the same

Supply Chain Fog – Low Visibility

When considering supply chain transparency (reported recently on Procurious here and here), these relationships can also be a key pillar for buyers in avoiding disruptions. According to the survey:

  • 56 per cent with relationships with Tier 3 suppliers and beyond had complete visibility of their supply chain
  • A worrying 13 per cent with only Tier 1 supplier relationships were able to say the same

A similar difference is seen with malpractice and ethical violations in the supply chain too.

  • 49 per cent with Tier 3 supplier relationships could be certain of no supply chain malpractice, compared to just 16 per cent with Tier 1 supplier relationships
  • Of these, 62 per cent with Tier 3 relationships would take responsibility for malpractice, versus 32 per cent with Tier 1 relationships

Taking Responsibility

In light of these results, David Noble, Group CEO of CIPS, stated that it was time for UK organisations to take responsibility for the conditions in which their goods were being produced.

“As UK companies are increasingly using suppliers in emerging markets to maintain their price competitiveness, they are becoming more exposed to reputational risks such as poor health and safety standards for workers or even enforced slavery, bribery and corruption, as well as environmental degradation.

Having visibility and strong supplier relationships at the first tier of the supply chain is clearly no longer enough, as these risks do not always exist in the first tier, but often further down supply chains.”

Procurious wants to make it easier for companies to do this, and has proposed the idea of a ‘Supply Chain Wiki’, which would enable organisations to have access to the full picture in their supply chains. It’s only by working together that the profession can create something like this and allow us to get to the stage where transparency is a given, rather than an option.

Do you want to get involved with helping build a Supply Chain Wiki? What examples of the practices above have you seen? Get in touch with Procurious and let us know.

Meanwhile, some light reading for you all with your weekly procurement and supply chain headlines.

Supply chain wary as Airbus and Boeing push output envelope

  • Suppliers to Airbus and Boeing are worried they might lose out if they invest to meet higher commercial jet production targets that ultimately prove unsustainable
  • The manufacturing giants plan to raise production rates of best-selling single-aisle planes by 25 percent to 50-52 a month in 2017-18, with the possibility of output going up to 60 or more
  • This prompted public pushback from major suppliers such as GE and partner Safran, who said they needed to secure the start of a steep rise in output before committing to even higher targets
  • Concerns were also raised over how long any higher production rates may last, although Airbus CEO Fabrice Bregier dismissed talk of a bubble

Read more at Business Insider

Made in Britain: Booming UK automotive industry must re-shore IT to future proof supply chain

  • The UK automotive industry is back on track after years of decline, with many pointing to the important role it plays in improving the economy
  • According to the Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) UK car plants last year produced more than 1.5 million vehicles, the highest number since 2007
  • One of the factors underpinning the increase has been the decision by car makers to re-shore many of the processes, including production, that have been systematically transferred overseas over the past couple of decades
  • The survey found that cost was but one driving factor, and was in fact eclipsed by the desire to improve quality, create shorter, more responsive supply chains and streamline communication with customers

Read more at IT Pro Portal

Mattel looks to overcome supply chain talent shortage

  • Mattel Inc. is revamping its supply chain operations but says there is a limited pool of people with the right skills
  • Companies are looking inward to find people to manage increasingly complex supply chains, amid a shortage of skilled labor
  • Peter Gibbons, the company’s chief supply chain officer, said in an interview, “Finding really good people who’ve been there and done it before is a challenge.”
  • The company is now hiring college grads directly from supply chain or business programs in hopes of moulding them into supply chain leaders down the line. It has also changed the metrics it uses to evaluate its supply chain managers to take a more “holistic” view of the job function

Read more at Wall St Journal

US to import egg products from Netherlands to ease shortage

  • With an increasing egg shortage due to the widespread bird flu outbreak, the United States will soon allow imported egg products from the Netherlands to be used for commercial baking and in processed foods.
  • It’s the first time in more than a decade the U.S. has bought eggs from a European nation, and comes as consumers are seeing a surge in shell egg prices and a Texas-based supermarket began limiting purchases.
  • The H5N2 virus — which began to spread widely through Midwest farms in the early spring, including in Iowa, the nation’s largest egg producer — has left nearly 47 million birds dead or dying
  • “Our members are not able to get their hands on enough eggs to continue their production. It’s very much a crisis for us right now,” said Cory Martin, director of government relations for the American Bakers Association, a trade group representing wholesale bakeries including cookie and cracker maker Pepperidge Farm, Krispy Kreme Doughnut Corp., and White Plains, New York-based Linden’s Cookies.
  • Prices for egg products used by food manufacturers and bakeries jumped more than 200 percent in the past month, and even large bakeries have been forced to buy eggs by the carton and crack them individually to continue production, Martin said.

Read more at US News and World Report

Industry body launched to support timber supply chain

  • The ethical, social and environmental risks in the timber supply chain are to be addressed by a newly-formed umbrella organisation which aims to provide a unified voice for the timber industry and ultimately grow the UK’s low-carbon economy.
  • The Confederation of Timber Industries (CTI) will represent the timber supply chain from forest to end-of-life recycling and energy recovery; consolidating and enhancing the various links in the timber supply chain and building more relationships with new industry partners.
  • Dr Peter Bonfield, chief executive of BRE, launched the CTI. He said: “This Industry has needed a stronger joined up voice for a very long time. This is a great moment for the Timber Industries to demonstrate their combined strength and showcase the Industry.
  • The timber supply chain contributes substantially to the UK’s construction and manufacturing industries; providing jobs across the skills spectrum and adding value of around £20bn to the UK economy. It is among of the most complex in the world with a huge diversity of operations worldwide and a downstream process that involves many steps from harvesting through to sawmill, wood processing and distribution.

Read more at edie.net