Category Archives: Procurement News

Will Procurement Have a Fight to Stay Relevant in the Future?

Is procurement facing an uphill struggle to stay relevant? Could strategy and technology hold the key to both destruction and survival?

fight for relevant

Procurious is at ProcureCon Europe this week. Stay up to date with what’s happening on Procurious, and by following us on Twitter.

It’s the end of Day 1 at ProcureCon Europe, and the Procurious team are looking forward to winding down with the best Berlin has to offer. First, though, we’re reflecting on what we heard from the speakers and delegates at the conference.

Procurement’s Burning Platforms

After fortifying ourselves with the great coffee on offer, Procurious stepped into the conference hall to listen to David Noble’s ‘State of the Profession‘ address. The CIPS CEO was positive about the situation procurement currently finds itself in, but had words of warning for the future.

One particular quote stuck in our minds as we considered the question of how procurement could remain relevant:

“If we don’t show our true value, our profession will cease to exist in its current form.”

Noble outlined what he termed as procurement’s “Burning Platforms” – those factors the global profession needs to be aware of now, and in the next few years.

First, the spectre of supply chain risk. Global risk is at its highest level (a peak of 80.8 in CIPS’ Risk Index in Q2 this year) since 2013.

Second was ethical supply. Linked heavily to supply chain risk, it appears that procurement is still struggling with transparency and ethics. Only 57 per cent of buyers have visibility of their Tier 1 and Tier 2 suppliers, and the percentage drops to single figures when it gets to Tier 3 and beyond.

The final burning platform was professional relevance, and how procurement could embed strategies to remain relevant. Noble touched on the ‘gig economy‘. This area is a double-edged sword, giving procurement the opportunity to train those not in the profession, but also challenges in maintaining the profession’s reputation.

Innovation & Frank Assessments

Automation and technology was a topic covered by a number of keynotes (more on that in the near future). However, it’s worth touching on a couple of areas of innovation, particularly in the area of stakeholder engagement.

JJ van der Meer, Partner at PA Consulting, outlined some of the activities that procurement can do to bring stakeholders on board. He and his team have coined a new word, “entreprocurement”, as a way of describing this innovation. While a bit unusual, it’s a term that’s likely to stick in the procurement world, we’re sure!

Innovation, and the drive to do better and better, was also the focus of Kristian Saksida’s keynote. Saksida, CPO at Solvay, offered a refreshingly honest assessment of his team’s transformation journey.

He was open to admitting the mistakes they had made while striving for more, but it was clear he wanted the room to have the benefit of this knowledge to avoid the same pitfalls.

Saksida’s background in Finance helped put an interesting spin on his material. However, he made some key points about the need for procurement to be speaking the same language as the business.

For two functions which have often had a troubled relationship, Saksida’s keynote gave a sense of positivity for the future at Solvay.

Sport and Procurement – A Creative Mix

Lastly we stopped in on Celia Sanchez San Juan’s interactive case study on optimising business partnering. Having seen Sanchez San Juan in a panel earlier, it offered a chance to dig deeper into Adidas’ fledgeling procurement team.

You may not see how sport is relevant to business partnering, but the link was far from tenuous. Adidas look at sport as having the power to change lives, and approach their procurement in the same way.

Sanchez San Juan offered Adidas’ maxim, “The Guiding Principle is Helping to Make a Difference, in the Game and in the World”, by way of explaining how the company puts its people at the heart of its change in procurement.

The journey to becoming a strategic business partner drew on the ideas of insights, impact, and innovation. Moving procurement from ‘Support’ to ‘Creator’ drives greater collaboration, and ultimately delivers greater value for the customer. In the world of sport and procurement, it was all about playing on the same team.

Isn’t that a good thought to finish the day with!

Don’t Discount the Outliers – Steal Knowledge From Them!

Outliers are frequently discounted in statistics. But in procurement, it’s worth being more open minded – they may have great knowledge to share.

outliers

The Faculty is excited to share its “Outliers” Best-Practice Case Studies paper here on Procurious.

Stealing from your peers may sound ethically questionable at best. However, in today’s fast-paced and increasingly frenetic business environment, individual CPOs simply do not have the time or resources to develop their own solutions to every challenge.

That’s why peer groups such as The Faculty Roundtable exist. They provide a forum for collaborative learning and knowledge sharing around best practice procurement.

Identifying the Outliers

How do we identify best practice? In statistics, an “outlier” is defined as a data point that is a considerable distance from the rest of the observation points. Depending on circumstances, statisticians often choose to exclude outliers from the data entirely so they do not skew the results one way or another.

At The Faculty, we take the opposite approach. We see outliers as an opportunity to celebrate success, set the standard for the industry and, most importantly, learn from best practice.

The Faculty Roundtable’s recent Benchmarking report measured performance across multiple procurement practice areas, including:

  • Corporate Sponsorship,
  • Strategy,
  • Team Structure,
  • Communications,
  • Environment,
  • Innovation,
  • SRM,
  • Systems, and
  • Training and capability.

Our latest research paper contains a series of case studies highlighting some of The Faculty Roundtable members’ approach to common challenges across many of these practice areas.

Case study participants were selected due to their “outlier” status in specific benchmarks, or because they have taken an innovative approach to problem solving, demonstrating excellence in one or more areas.

Learn from the Best

The six case studies cover best-practice solutions to the following shared challenges for CPOs and their teams:

  1. Influence is Everything: Executive Support in Action at Broadspectrum

Learn how Broadspectrum CPO Kevin McCafferty ensured that Procurement gained recognition at the highest levels of the organisation as a team that creates shareholder value.

  1. A Partnership of Equals: Procurement and Environment at Australia Post

Australia Post’s Head of Environmental Sustainability, Andrew Sellick, explains why a partnership with Procurement is the most impactful way for the Environment team to meet and beat the organisation’s carbon reduction targets. 

  1. Taking the Leap: Moving from Operational to Strategic SRM at Energex

It’s easy to get bogged down in the detail. Brett Mann, Group Manager Procurement & Supply at Energex, explains why you need to have the right people in the room to facilitate a strategic level of discussion with suppliers.

  1. Do CPOs Even Need a Communications Plan? Rethinking Stakeholder Communications at Santos

Santos CPO David Henchliffe argues that a communications plan is only required with stakeholders whom Procurement doesn’t have a working relationship with.

If Procurement is intimately involved in the business, then senior executives (and their teams by extension) will know all about your function’s value contribution, upcoming projects and challenges.

  1. Planning for Success: Executing Locally Crafted Strategies in a Globally Owned Enterprise at BP Asia-Pacific

Even in an internationally-owned business with global category strategies, local planning is more important than ever. This is the view of Lauren Feery, Asia-Pacific Strategy and Performance Manager for downstream procurement at BP. Find out how to connect parallel local and global planning processes. 

  1. Keeping Your Eye on the Prize: Working Towards a Unified P2P System Across 30 countries at Australia and New Zealand Banking Group (ANZ)

ANZ has taken on the challenge of unifying, streamlining and simplifying P2P systems in its offices across the entire Asia-Pacific region. From Melbourne to Auckland, Singapore to Manila, the rollout has required best-practice change-management to ensure every end-user is on board.

The purpose of these bite-sized case studies is to enable CPOs to learn from the region’s best-in-class procurement teams and take proven methodologies back to their own organisations.

  • The Outliers Best-Practice case studies are available to download now from Procurious > Groups > Benchmarking.
  • The Faculty Roundtable’s full Benchmarking report is also available here on Procurious > Groups > Benchmarking.

Web

About The Faculty Roundtable

The Faculty Roundtable is comprised of an influential group of procurement leaders in the Asia-Pacific region. These leaders gather to share their experiences and insights, to achieve greater commercial success for their organisations.

Through The Roundtable, members have access to leading-edge thought leadership and commentators, a ready supply of valuable expertise through exclusive market intelligence, as well as networking and professional development opportunities for themselves and their team members.

Meetings are held throughout the year in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Singapore.

For more information, please email [email protected] or call +61 3 9654 4900.

Business Backwards – Putting the Customer at the Heart of Procurement

Everyone knows that the customer is always right. And it’s time for procurement to put them at the heart of their work.

customer at the heart

Procurious is at ProcureCon Europe this week. Stay up to date with what’s happening on Procurious.

They say every day is a school day. And today is no different for the 250 procurement and supply chain professionals in the room.

Far from focusing on the supplier relationships (though there is plenty of that too), one panel discussion got the assembled masses considering a relationship that doesn’t always get the focus in procurement.

The internal customer interactions have not traditionally treated procurement well. Blamed for late deliveries, for complicating processes, and for being a “roadblock”, the profession takes its fair share of flak.

However, a change of thinking, to put the customer at the heart of the relationship, could change all this.

Don’t Stray too Far from the Customer

Titled ‘5 Changes to Make to Your Procurement Teams to Transform to a Higher-Performing Organisation’, the discussion showcased some great ideas about how procurement could change its focus.

The panel, chaired by Richard Beaumont, former CPO at Prudential Digital Services, consisted of:

  • Antonia Wanner – Director Global Commodities Procurement at Nestlé
  • Axel Horst – Operational & Commercial Excellence Manager at Shell Global Solutions
  • Celia Sanchez San Juan – Director Group Procurement at Adidas

The overwhelming message from all three procurement leaders was that there needed to be a greater focus on the customer. According to Sanchez San Juan, the right business plan should put customers at the centre. If procurement is too far from its customers, then it’s too far from the core of the business.

Antonia Wanner gave an example of the focus that Nestlé gives to its customers in procurement. In the past, the organisation had used 10 types of topping for its chocolate ice cream (competitors used 2).

However, procurement established that its customers were more interested in having natural vanilla in the ice cream, than the chocolate toppings. By reducing the number of chocolate toppings, it allowed Nestlé to procure the natural vanilla, ultimately meeting an important customer requirement.

Business Backwards

Axel Horst then shared the strategy that Shell are using the help drive a customer focus – “Business Backwards”. The strategy takes the traditional top-down process model, and turns it on its head, starting with the customer requirements.

Once these are known, strategies can be defined as to how to deliver this, and then finally, leaders know what they need to do to make the strategy a reality. And it’s not just in process that Shell are demonstrating the drive for serving the customer.

Each Shell employee, including the procurement function, is required to work one full day each quarter on the retail site. According to Horst, this helps each employee understand the customer more, and, for procurement, what they need to consider when buying for the retail side of the business.

Advice from the Future

Beaumont finished the panel by asking the three leaders what advice they would give to their past selves. Though they focused on the key to current success, all three showed that customers were still at the forefront of their thinking.

Wanner highlighted the constant innovation required to stay ahead of the game, with the key being to “try, fail, and learn fast”. Horst built on this by saying that if you were going to fail, fail fast, so that innovation wouldn’t be held up.

Finally Sanchez San Juan said that she would tell herself to push harder for what she really believed in, which was key to driving great innovation across the business.

Will customer-centric procurement really take hold? Or will we be looking back in three years at an opportunity lost? Sadly, without a crystal ball, only time will tell.

ProcureCon Europe, now in its 17th year, is Europe’s most strategic procurement conference for CPOs and senior procurement executives. See the full range of topic and speakers at the event here.

Raising the Curtain on the Future of IT Procurement

Few categories receive the same attention as IT procurement. So how can professionals demonstrate the value they deliver to organisations?

raising curtain it procurement

IT procurement is the most important spend category for most large businesses today. As a result, the category is under pressure to demonstrate its ability deliver cost savings against a backdrop of financial pressure and restricted budgets.

In just a few weeks, Procurement pros from all over Europe will gather in Amsterdam to discuss the future of their industry at ProcureCon IT Europe.

Progressive procurement leaders know that it’s not just about saving on the bottom line, it’s about adding value to the business too. It’s a subject which is bound to be top of the list of priorities in Amsterdam.

We asked 100 IT Procurement executives from some of the world’s largest organisations what they are doing to innovate, inspire and add value as part of our research for ProcureCon IT.

Creating a Best-in-Class IT Procurement Function

Procurement is becoming a more integrated part of many organisations, and IT Procurement increasingly has the skills required to deliver value to its stakeholders and make a significant impact on this important category of spend.

But what are the best-in-class procurement pros focussing on now to improve their effectiveness?

procurecon-it-blog

Our research highlights a focus on tightening up the relationship with suppliers. Nearly 60 per cent of our research participants named contract management as their number one focus. Procurement teams seek to optimise all contract-related costs, and provide both clarity and transparency for both parties.

Other priorities speak directly to the supplier relationship. More than half of respondents named vendor innovation as a key area of focus, and a similar amount highlighted supplier rationalisation.

Clearly, IT Procurement is on the hunt for the innovative solutions which will create a competitive advantage for their business. It’s not all about quantity though. It’s about slimming your roster down and making sure that every supplier is pulling its weight.

Thriving in the Future IT Procurement Landscape

What does some of this innovation look like? There is no doubt that the digital innovation which has turned the world upside down in the last ten years is also changing procurement too.

Cloud technology is an important area of growth for our respondents – more than half of our respondents are already heavily invested in these solutions. Some of the latest innovations in this area use app-based user interfaces and cloud-based analytical platforms to provide real-time access to information about who is spending what and when (and that’s just the beginning).

Even better, these systems generate an incredible amount of data with which to hone your operations further.

Data on this scale has the power to enhance planning, delivery and reporting on opportunities for cost savings, value creation, and a host of other things. Trend analysis can uncover patterns which will predict both future opportunities and future threats.

As a result, learning how to harness the information you already have inside your business is now of critical importance for those seeking to thrive in this new economic reality.

The Solutions Zone

ProcureCon IT is all about finding practical solutions to the challenges which IT procurement pros face on a daily basis. It’s the only truly peer-led conference of its kind in Europe!

Not only will you meet hundreds of people who are successfully taking their IT procurement operations successfully to the next level, but it’s also a superb opportunity to meet with some of the most innovative solution providers in the market place today.

To get industry-leading insight on the issues mentioned here, as well as lots more, join us on the 5th and 6th of December at the Mövenpick Hotel Amsterdam for ProcureCon IT.

Take a look at the full event agenda here.

Procurement Innovation Personas Revealed: Which Are You?

Are you an ‘innovation visionary’? Or one of the other innovation ‘personas’ in procurement? Well now you can find out!

procurement innovation personas

By Daniel Ball, Director, Wax Digital.

Recent research Wax Digital has conducted has revealed that 80 per cent of procurement professionals are seeking to challenge the status quo.

However, for many their use of innovation is evolving. Fewer than one in five are seen as ‘innovation visionaries’, and many others are taking different paths.

The research shows that procurement professionals value innovation, with most working towards becoming more innovative in their role in a bid to drive the business.

Procurement Innovation Personas

However, what it also shows is that there are four distinct ‘personas’ that define how procurement professionals are driven by innovation and change.

The four different personas defining procurement innovation are:

  • High-level Visionaries

18 per cent are committed to the use of technology and using data insights to influence business innovation.

Very much about the bigger picture, they use their procurement expertise to influence top level innovation and growth, rather than being personally and practically hands on in driving that change.

  • Enlightened Activists

At 36 per cent, the most common of the ‘personas’ and the most likely to be directly driving innovation.

This group is successfully driving change and delivering business value through high technology adoption. They are focused on solving real business issues rather than departmental processes. They don’t stand still and are always on the lookout for what’s next.

  • Early Strategists

30 per cent are still sowing the early seeds of procurement innovation but realise that they have many opportunities ahead of them. Innovation is a priority, but they have some way to go before they fully embrace it.

  • Pragmatic Professionals

This final 20 per cent are less innovation focused, but still open to using it practically, to improve procurement processes. Their primary focus is on savings to the bottom line and following clear business mandates.

Seeking Value in Innovation

It’s really positive that these findings show almost all procurement professionals seeing value in innovation and involvement in it. Whether this is through changing the way they do things, or, as is increasingly the case, influencing how the business as a whole should adapt too.

While early innovators tend to be dealing with more fundamental changes, such as implementing technology for the first time, they have the biggest ambitions for innovation in the near future.

At the more experienced end of the spectrum we see a mix of procurement working hands on to drive business innovation, and senior procurement advisors consulting on the business big questions around future change.

What’s interesting is that these findings ring true with what we see working with procurement teams on a day-to-day basis. The function is shedding its stuffy and administrative reputation. It is investing in technology that integrates the whole sourcing and purchasing process, delivering valuable insight, and enabling them to be bolder in showing the business what it’s capable of.

Procurement’s path to innovation is not perfect however. There are tell-tale signs that its innovativeness could be hampered and restricted by its inherent aversion to risk.

To become real innovators, procurement professionals must foster the right business relationships, nurture the correct set of new skills and seek to break ground in their approach to technology.

If you’d like to find out which persona you are and how you can best apply innovation in your role we have created a simple quiz – What type of procurement innovator are you?

The personas are based on research conducted by MORAR Consulting with 100 senior UK procurement executives commissioned by Wax Digital.

2016 – The Year of Procurement Transformation

Transformation – the word on procurement’s lips. But when will real strategic change be realised for the profession?

transformation

If you were to pick one word to describe 2016, you could probably settle on volatile. There has been major change afoot in global markets and politics, which has lead to unprecedented volatility and upheaval.

In the past few weeks, we have been talking to some of our Procurement partners about the topic of change and transformation within their organisations, and more broadly in the market for our ‘Autumn Market Insights‘.

It prompted us to think about what has actually changed? Clearly the spectrum of change is quite varied. However, a common theme coming out of these discussions was ultimately that Procurement was, is, and always will be, about getting cost out of the bottom line of the business.

Transformation on the Procurement Agenda

How aggressively this is approached will obviously vary from business to business depending on its agenda. But surely this is why Procurement is critical to any business?

What this has allowed over time is for Procurement to have a seat at the “top table”, rather than being part of a broader function that reports into Finance.

Increasingly we are seeing businesses turning to a more category aligned approach to Procurement, bringing in experts in their field to drive category strategies forward and having the gravitas to collaborate with stakeholder groups.

However, as of one of the CPO’s we spoke to pointed out there can be risks to this approach. There can be a risk that a Procurement team member becomes so immersed within their stakeholder group that they “go native”, and move away from the Procurement agenda.

And the Buzz Word Is…?

If the buzz word for Procurement in 2015 was “strategic”, we would say 2016 is all about Procurement transformation. We are working with four large and well respected organisations at the moment in the South, supporting their transformations.

But what does Transformation truly mean? Does this simply mean a change in process or ways of working or is it something much larger? We have to consider transformation as fundamental change across the business – the processes behind procurement, the remit it covers, and the tools used. This is true transformation.

Clearly 2016 is very much about driving this Procurement transformation agenda. These are exciting times for the profession. And, as we approach the end of 2016, it can only add to Procurement being at the forefront of an organisation’s DNA.

Procurement Heads is all about getting to know great Procurement people and recruiting Senior Procurement professionals.

Procurement Heads understands the value of working in partnership, both in helping people develop their careers and in supporting organisations to build world-class teams.

Stop Ignoring Twitter As A Supply Chain Tool

Using social media as a supply chain tool? Don’t dismiss Twitter – it can add real value for your organisation.

twitter supply chain

Many procurement teams and companies have realised the crucial role that social media plays in their marketing efforts. However, while Facebook and LinkedIn are often used effectively, Twitter is frequently relegated to an afterthought – and it shouldn’t be.

From brand awareness to customer engagement and trend monitoring, Twitter provides many opportunities for supply chain organisations to stand out from the crowd.

In addition, the microblogging platform can be an asset that extends beyond your marketing efforts and shapes your overall business strategy.

Below are just a few ways Twitter can be a game changer for your company:

Use Hashtags To Showcase Thought Leadership And Discover New Supply Chain Trends

Twitter’s hashtags are a great way to get a pulse on the supply chain industry. In fact, there are 228 tweets per hour that include the hashtag #supplychain. Some of the other most popular supply chain hashtags include #Procurement, #SCM, and #Logistics.

Use these hashtags in your posts to showcase thought leadership and uncover potential business development opportunities. You can also follow these hashtags – and others – to uncover new trends, technologies and best practices that you can use to implement in your organisation.

Tools like Hashtagify make it easy to find hashtags relevant to your company and industry.

Recruit The Right Talent

Recruiting and retaining top supply chain talent is becoming more competitive, so companies need to find new ways to recruit the best in the industry.

Showcasing your company’s corporate culture through Twitter can entice the right supply chain talent to apply for job openings at your organisation.  

Not only can Twitter help find the right talent, it can also help your organisation research and vet candidates. Your organisation will understand the candidate’s perspective on the supply chain industry, as well as get a better sense of whether or not the candidate would be a good fit in your organisation.

Discover Potential Demands And Risks in Real Time

Twitter acts like a real-time news ticker, which can help supply chain professionals prepare for unexpected demands and risk. Twitter is able to add rich, real-time insight to operational data that can help your organisation make timely and better-informed decisions.

According to IBM, Twitter is a valuable indicator of demand for certain sectors of manufacturing. For example, if a major influencer discusses one of your products on Twitter, the awareness of your brand may skyrocket, causing a large demand for your company’s product without any warning.

By monitoring your products and services on Twitter, you’ll be able to learn about the demand as soon as you can. Social listening on Twitter can also help your organisation prepare for low-probability, high-impact risks such as natural disasters that could disrupt your supply chain.

Showcasing your knowledge, connecting with top talent and keeping your finger on the pulse of the supply chain are powerful ways to gain a competitive advantage over the competition, and Twitter makes it simple. Be sure to integrate it into your social media strategy.

Ed Edwards is Audience Outreach Manager at THOMASNET.com. He leverages his extensive experiences in engineering, manufacturing and procurement, to educate procurement and engineering professionals on how to streamline and improve their work.

Ed provides customised training to organisations’ engineering and sourcing teams and helps buyers with their challenges and finds them new opportunities.

Unpicking The Kraljic Matrix for Procurement

In 1983, the world was introduced to The Kraljic Matrix. But is it still as relevant to procurement today?

kraljic matrix

September 1983: Peter Kraljic publishes an article that will deeply change both the working methodology and concept of many Procurement departments.

The article, published in the Harvard Business Review was titled “Purchasing must become Supply Management”. It introduced a concept that has been a key tool for procurement ever since: The Kraljic Matrix.

In this article, Kraljic advocated and argued for the need for profound transformation of the Purchasing Department into a much more strategic role. He included several examples of large organisations that had already done so, and achieved excellent results.

In order to support the required change to a more strategic role, Kraljic introduced a decision matrix. In this article, we will explain how the matrix works, and how organisations can apply it in their procurement department.

Defining The Kraljic Matrix

The Kraljic Matrix classifies the sourcing scope (also known as acquisition perimeter) from a company according to two factors.

1. Financial Impact

Measures the impact on both the manufacturing costs of the product and its impact on the profit margin.

Look at the example of manufacturing a Lego brick. Plastic would have a high financial impact, both because it accounts for most of the product cost, and because the current volatility of oil (the price of which impacts directly on plastic cost) greatly affects the profit margin.

2. Complexity of Supply

Sorts the market complexity to achieve a stable and uninterrupted supply. In this case, we must consider whether there are monopolies, logistic issues, volatility, or impact of technological changes.

An example of highly complex supply would be the chipset manufacturer for mobile phones Qualcomm. The company took over Intel and Nvidia, giving them a monopoly on the market, and the ability to refuse to supply certain organisations.

Whereas some organisations, like Samsung, chose to manufacture their own chipsets. However, not all companies can do the same.

The Kraljic Matrix

By combining both factors, we produce a chart with four perfectly differentiated groups:

  • Leverage Items

Standard commodities with an abundant source of suppliers. They are usually highly standardised, and easily available, products. Supply risk is low, though there is a high impact on costs and benefits. For example, plastic or raw material for Lego bricks.

  • Strategic Items

These are critical products for a company, and are the key focus for the Procurement team. There is high risk against supply, and a high impact on cost. For example, the Qualcomm chipsets for mobile phones.

  • Non-Critical Items

Those products that have a low impact on costs, and the supply of these is low in complexity. A good example would be, for example, standard screws in a computer factory.

  • Bottleneck Items

These are products with limited source of supply. Their supply risk is high, but do not have a major financial impact. For example, an integral part of technology hardware, the power pack for a laptop.

Analysis and Strategy

Once you have classified the products, you can define the strategies to be applied on each group in order to optimise supply. While each item will likely have it’s own specific strategy, the categorisation in The Kraljic Matrix points to a common direction and goal for each, and shows common pros and cons for each group.

kraljic-categories
Adapted from ‘Purchasing Must Become Supply Management’ – Peter Kraljic, Harvard Business Review, 1983
  • Leverage Items

We are in a so-called “buyer’s market”. Because of this, we need to negotiate to achieve the best supply conditions from a dominant position. Procurement can do this through the use of tenders, reverse auctions, setting specific target prices, or framework agreements.

  • Strategic Items

In this case, the need to mitigate risk is mutual between the supplier and the buyer. The goal here is to ensure long-term availability. Therefore, procurement needs to consider suppliers as an equal and look for a “win-win” negotiation that benefits both parties.

In these cases supplier development strategies, partnerships, and supplier innovation are recommended.

  • Non-Critical Items

There are products with low economic impact and low complexity of supply. This makes them usually the lowest priority in a sourcing strategy.

Habitually supply agreements are negotiated based on high volumes, or Kanban type solutions are implemented. A good example is the screws in the computer factory described above. These would be bought in bulk, but have a variety of suppliers available in the market.

  • Bottleneck Items

These are the opposite to Leveraged Items – we are in a “Supplier’s Market.”

In this case two parallel strategies must be followed. The first is to secure supply through framework agreements, providing for penalties for the supplier due to lack of supply while maintaining good relationships with existing suppliers.

The second, which should be done at the same time, is for procurement to work with R&D or Engineering departments to establish alternative products that can be used. This enables the organisation to reduce supply risk, turning bottleneck items back to non-critical items.

Some Advice to Heed

Although the information provided by The Kraljic Matrix may seem very generalised, it’s purpose is to help set up a basis of supply strategy.

By classifying sourcing activities using the Matrix, organisations can get a clearer picture of its available resources, priorities for negotiations, and objectives it wants to achieve.

The article wouldn’t be complete without some advice. The Kraljic Matrix is a dynamic tool – it changes, so it needs to be reviewed frequently. Markets have become more dynamic, and the supply situation can change significantly in short time periods.

Being able to adapt to these changes is a critical success factor for Procurement. Therefore the tools used to develop strategies must also be dynamic and flexible, which is why the Kraljic Matrix can provide great value for organisations.

How Big Data Insights are Revolutionising Global Procurement Strategy

More companies than ever are using Big Data insights to drive their decision making. But what key benefits are they realising by doing so?

big-data-insights

This article was originally published on My Purchasing Center.

Advances in technology are making it possible to generate more data than ever before. We can quantify, measure and track every interaction, transaction and engagement in excruciating detail.

And when we collect these “big data,” we can gain tremendous insights into business processes, including global procurement strategy.

Because global procurement is focused entirely around obtaining greater efficiencies and streamlining purchasing operations, global procurement is primed to be revolutionised by the insights that stem from big data.

Businesses that collect big data insights are finding that they can refine global procurement strategies and processes with greater precision than ever before. They also can intervene more effectively to resolve problems and challenges, and they can use concrete data instead of intuition and instinct to accomplish this work.

One study by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management, finds that among companies in the top third within their industry, the use of data-driven decision-making made a company 5 per cent more productive and 6 per cent more profitable than a company that didn’t use data-driven decision-making.

Let’s explore the specific ways that big data insights are revolutionising the global procurement industry:

Shorten order-to-delivery times

Traditionally, the procurement timeline has been based largely on individuals using their best judgment and insider knowledge to get the right products and resources to the right place at the right time.

No matter how talented people are, however, they’re often no match for a computer algorithm that is specifically designed to optimise timelines and manage all aspects of the ordering and delivery process.

Computer-based analytics also can adapt to changing conditions in real time, ensuring that no matter what happens, nothing will slip through the cracks, and order-to-delivery times will continue to be optimised.

Increase supply chain efficiency

As with managing a procurement timeline, individual people can only manage a supply chain as efficiently as the human brain will allow.

Analytics software goes past the limitations of the human brain, processing and interpreting more data points about a supply chain than anyone’s brain could possibly synthesise.

In the end, these big-data insights yield more precise predictions about how to optimise the supply chain – and better predictions yield better decisions.

Lower costs

The goal of global procurement is to achieve cost savings, so it makes perfect sense to use big data insights to optimise all opportunities to lower costs.

Analytics software can instantaneously and accurately compute more possible combinations of events and items and scenarios than any human brain could, and computers can also thus make the “sweet spot” recommendation that appropriately balances all of these competing factors.

Improve supplier-client relationships

Both the supplier and the procurement client benefit from big-data insights. The supplier gets access to invaluable information that helps the supplier more effectively allocate its resources, as well as make plans to deliver on time and on budget.

The client benefits by no longer being forced to actively manage every aspect of the procurement process. Rather, a computer-based management approach frees the client to focus on building and enhancing relationships with suppliers, and on developing creative, out-of-the-box solutions that further enhance procurement processes.

Eliminate arbitrary decision-making

As much as businesses like to think their managers are making sound decisions, some will inevitably make decisions based on emotion, gut instinct, and self-interest.

Big data insights dramatically reduce the chances of this by forcing managers to not only use data-driven analytics to make decisions, but also to be prepared to defend those decisions.

As more businesses turn to big data insights to drive global procurement strategy, it’s important to provide adequate resources to support this transition and to provide adequate time for this transition.

When big data insights are integrated effectively into procurement processes, businesses can count on shorter order-to-delivery times, increased supply chain efficiencies, lowered costs, improved supplier-client relationships, and less arbitrary decision-making.

With more than 30 years of experience working with and providing excellent customer service to companies of all sizes, Rick Bender now is the Sales Director at CenterPoint Group.

CenterPoint is a management consulting firm that specialises in reducing purchasing expenses of businesses in areas such as office supplies, janitorial supplies, and industrial supplies.  

5 Common Failures in Technology Implementation

Technology should provide huge benefits in procurement. So why do so many projects fail at the implementation phase?

failure at implementation

 

Join our webinar on the 7th of November and find out how to drive successful technology implementation.

If you’ve been a procurement professional for any length of time, this is probably a familiar situation.

Your company has decided to implement new technology in the procurement function. A date for go-live has been set, and some training has been arranged for current users. There are grumblings about yet another system to be used, but that doesn’t fit with current procurement processes.

When you ask around, very few, if any, of the department have been asked to input into this decision. The company certainly doesn’t seem to have spoken to people who are actually going to be using the system.

When the time comes, the technology is implemented, and training is rolled out. The procurement team accept the new system (perhaps grudgingly), and start to use it.

Within a few weeks, the (very short) honeymoon period is over, and the issues and bugs have appeared. Far from improving or simplifying the processes, the technology isn’t working out as planned. It’s begun to make even simple tasks more difficult.

Within months, the shiny, new, purpose-built technology is being used for the bare minimum that the procurement team can get away with, and they have begun to come up with novel ways to work around the system.

Difference Between Success and Failure

While situations like this may be decreasing in number, they still occur with uncomfortable regularity. When it comes to technology across organisations, not just in procurement, implementation is the stage in the process that is most associated with the success or failure of the project.

Ahead of the free webinar between Oracle and Procurious, Darryl Griffiths, Acting MD at Enrich, and implementation expert, shares his key reasons for why implementations fail.

  1. Alignment of Strategy and Technology

Ensuring that the business, procurement and operational strategy all aligns is the first step in this process. However, too often, strategies aren’t aligned, or have been created in isolation without proper discuss.

Without fully understanding the strategy, the objectives for the technology implementation can’t be fully understood. This can lead to the wrong technology for the project being selected, and not being fit for purpose against the objectives.

  1. Lack of Change Management Plan

The plan for how the technology is going to be implemented should be laid out clearly from the start. Frequently, organisations work towards their go-live date, but give little thought to the short, medium, and long-term plan following the launch.

Too few plans take into account training requirements, or how new users will receive this training when they start in the department. 

  1. Lack of Communication or Champions

Without good communication, it’s likely to be a fight to get buy-in. Without buy-in, the implementation is doomed to failure.

Organisations don’t take into account the end users of the technology. This leads to the ‘why’ of the project never being disseminated.

This leads to the perception of new technology being forced on them, and breeds resistance. This resistance undermines the project, creating a situation where users are expecting the technology to fail, rather than having an open mind on how it can help them.

  1. Poor or Out-of-Date Data

The old technology didn’t work properly because the data wasn’t right. But there’s no data clean-up been carried out before the new technology is implemented. Which means the new system won’t work any better.

There is a vast amount of data available to procurement, which technology is frequently implemented to help sift through. However, putting poor data into the system, as well as not keeping the data up to date, will inevitably result in bad data out.

  1. Built to Last vs. Built to Change

In years gone by, products were built to last. It was common for things to last 10 years or more. However, in a marketplace and environment where agility and flexibility are valued, a built-to-last system may not fit the bill.

If the system hasn’t been built to be changed easily, then it’s going to go out of date very quickly. And it’s unlikely that budget will be available for a new system after 1-2 years, when it was designed to last 10 years.

Secret of Success

It’s easy to pin-point where technology implementation fails, but far harder to ensure that it’s a success from the outset. However, if the right strategies are in place, and all the planning is carried out, procurement gives itself a greater chance of success.

If you want to find out more about how to manage your implementation, and hear more from Darryl on how you can set yourself up for success, join our free webinar on the 7th of November.

Darryl will join Oracle Business Development Direction, David Hobson, in a discussion chaired by Procurious Founder, Tania Seary. The webinar is aimed at helping Procurement Leaders come to terms with volatility, understand the role and benefits of technology, especially cloud, in procurement strategy, planning and decision making.

For more information, and to register, visit our dedicated page.