Category Archives: Procurement News

‘Weak’ UK supply chain is holding back investment

The British are coming! Controversial acceptance speeches, staunch warnings, and more – feature in our weekly news blast.

Twilight of supply chain
If quality doesn’t improve, could this be the twilight of the UK’s supply chain?

 

Business calls for measures to boost supply chain

  • Weaknesses in the UK’s supply chain are holding back industrial investment, according to British business. Industry is calling on the government to help boost competitiveness with measures to incentivise innovation, improve financing and resolve a crippling skills gap.
  • Close to 80 per cent of companies say improving the quality of Britain’s supply chain will be crucial to future growth, according to a study published on Monday by the Confederation of British Industry and consultants AT Kearney.
  • Industry’s call is made more urgent after the Bank of England’s chief economist Andy Haldane last week warned that productivity remained 15 per cent below pre-crisis levels despite unprecedented declines in wages.
  • Yet in a blow to the CBI’s findings, some global manufacturers said Britain’s relatively high costs would remain the biggest deterrent to investment. “It’s far more expensive . . . here,” said Neeraj Kanwar, managing director of India’s Apollo tyres. “The UK as far as manufacturing is concerned is not lucrative at all.”

Read more at FT.com

Top transport, logistics, supply chain operators in Malta honoured

  • Noel Ellul, an expert in transport and logistics in Malta with a career spanning over 40 years, was awarded the ‘Outstanding Achievement of the Year’ honour at the first TransLog Awards to be held.
  • Key transport, logistics and supply chain stakeholders operating in Malta were recognised with awards in 12 different categories at the TransLog Awards presentation ceremony held at the Intercontinental Hotel.
  • Organised by Support and Supply Management Group (SSM) and marketing communications agency BPC International, and supported by HSBC Bank Malta, the TransLog Awards attracted nominations from both Maltese and regional businesses operating in Malta.

Read more at Times of Malta

Osborne poaches Balfour Beatty supply chain manager for director role

  • Mr Robeson joins Osborne from Balfour Beatty Construction Services UK, where he worked in supply chain management until September 2014, according to his LinkedIn profile. He has also worked for Wates Construction and Berkeley Homes.
  • Osborne said Mr Robeson would bring experience and expertise in supply chain relationship development, procurement best practice and added value realisation.
  • Osborne Construction managing director Andy Steele said: “I am delighted to welcome John to the Osborne Construction Leadership Team. John will help us improve on stakeholder engagement and further us to increase our operational excellence agenda.”

Read more at Construction News

Stirling Prize winner hits out at UK procurement

  • Stirling Prize winner Steve Tompkins has criticised the UK’s procurement system for freezing out young practices.
  • The Haworth Tompkins director contrasted the “increasingly bureaucratic” British system unfavourably with that found overseas where greater weight is often placed on talent and ideas.
  • He said his own practice had struggled to break into new typologies because PQQs in this country so often demand prior experience. “The whole procurement structure in this country is increasingly bureaucratic,” he told BD after scooping the Stirling Prize on Thursday night for the Everyman Theatre in Liverpool. “The number of hurdles you have to pass through to get a commission is daunting and the amount of design work you have to do is daunting, demoralising and very wasteful.
  • He continued: “It’s increasingly hard for young practices to get in at all. I wish that was a debate we could have with the procurement process.”

Read more at bdonline.co.uk

Supply chain boost with new Discovery Sport

  • The first Land Rover Discovery Sport has rolled off the production line at Jaguar Land Rover’s (JLR) Halewood site, with the UK supply chain benefiting from £3.5bn in contracts from the new vehicle.
  • The latest model in the range has created 250 manufacturing jobs in Halewood as the result of a £200m investment.
  • Fifty-five suppliers have also secured a total of £3.5bn in contracts to support production, which has led to the safeguarding and creation of more than 1,000 UK jobs, JLR said.

Read more at Insider Media Limited

Germany wants cleaner, kinder textiles supply chain

  • Gerd Müller, Germany’s Minister for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), launched a new Textiles Alliance in Berlin late last week. Its goal is to help move the international textile supply chain toward better labor and environmental practices.
  • Müller’s ministry wants to see improvements at every link in the supply chain – from the cotton fields through the textile dyeing and clothing production process to distribution and retail.
  • Among other aims, the Textiles Alliance seeks decent wages, an end to forced labor and child labor, respect for safety standards, and a stop to the use of certain particularly environmentally toxic chemicals in the textiles supply chain.
  • Membership in the alliance is voluntary, however, and while the ministry reported that 29 textiles companies and associations had joined the Textiles Alliance in time for the launch, many key industry players and associations in Germany gave notice that they would not join.

Read more at Deutsche Welte

HGV driver shortage may affect UK supply chain

  • Members of the British International Freight Association – who tend to be truck hirers delivering container and trailer imports from ports to distribution centres – have reported significantly increased waiting times for an available vehicle, much higher costs from haulage companies and surcharges from some shipping lines.
  • The implementation of the new HGV driver regulations – the Driver Certificate of Professional Competence (CPC) – in September has already contributed to a lack of new drivers within the logistics and distribution sector, and the shortage of drivers has been compounded by the imports forecast, as well as the earlier-than-expected peak season.
  • BIFA director general, Robert Keen said: “New HGV drivers are urgently required in the UK logistics business to help alleviate the problems caused by the current shortage, which is leading to significant pressures on logistics costs.”

Read more at Supply Management

Are we in the Golden Age of Procurement?

Rio’s CEO says it’s time “to meddle in the middle”

Rio Tinto’s CEO Sam Walsh put a spotlight on the value that can be delivered by both the C-level and procurement shifting their focus from the top and bottom-line to the “middle line”, when he spoke at the CIPS conference in Sydney last week.

Sam Walsh - CEO Rio Tinto

He said most companies were not making the most of the possibilities of procurement. In fact, research showed that when it comes to procurement, 50% to 90% of companies recognise that they do not employ best practices. This is despite research also showing that companies who get their procurement operations to the standard of the best – can increase their profit margins by 15 per cent.

“Shift your perspective.  Instead of spending your whole time obsessing only about the top line, and the bottom line, focus on the middle line as well.”

Even though turnover and profit are critically important, you don’t hear many people talking about the cost of sales or improvement in their working capital. Have you ever turned on Bloomberg in the morning and heard them say, “Today, Unilever’s cost of sales went up by 3.5%?”

“The middle line is frequently where you can make most difference, securing your competitive advantage, proving your value, showing your mettle,” said Sam.

In encouraging the procurement profession to seize the opportunity, he said “And if the middle’s in a muddle? Meddle! You won’t regret it! You might just make a tonne more money.”

In his speech “The golden age of procurement“ Sam shared some of his thoughts about the importance of procurement from the perspective of a global chief executive. In opening, he mused that there has never been a more exciting or important time to work in procurement. Sam cemented the fact that a lot has changed since he first started out, and went on to praise today’s women and men that are pushing forward, making businesses more innovative, productive, and creating the partnerships that will see us into the future.

One of the areas highlighted for “meddling in the middle” was to focus on innovation.

“You need to collaborate to compete,” said Sam.

Rio Tinto has a whole raft of strategic partnerships that are incredibly beneficial. Strategic partnerships with academic bodies, research institutes, as well as suppliers.

Working closely with key partners, Rio Tinto has established a great record in innovation. Its ‘Mine of the Future’ programme has been developed working with companies like Hitachi, Atlas Copco, Komatsu, Bridgestone, and General Electric. All of which are producing stunning results.

“You might have read about driverless cars in the papers. Rio Tinto already has 53 driverless trucks operating in the Pilbara. Collectively they’ve driven 3.9 million kilometres, and are all operated remotely using GPS,” Sam said.

Another area recommended for “meddling in the middle” was sustainability.

“So the saying goes, we are what we eat. In business, we are what we buy,” he said.

Rio Tinto spent around US$26 billion dollars last year. The decisions it make about where and how it invests this spend can have a huge impact. An important part of its approach is to source locally, and it applies this same approach in other markets as well. For example, at Rio Tinto’s new mining lease area in South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal region, the company is investing time, money and skills as one of the major employers in the region to develop lasting community businesses that can supply the mine.

Sam reminds us however that all of this doesn’t come without effort; that it’s about getting the skills right too. He says that today’s procurement professionals require a much wider skills-set than was needed when he first started as a trainee buyer at General Motors Holden.

“Today’s procurement professionals need to work smarter, harder and faster.  Procurement used to be predominantly focused on achieving security of supply. Today, we’re operating in a business environment that is far more volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous than it was when I started out,” he said.

“We’re getting increasingly used to economic, political, and environmental shocks. As procurement professionals we need to be on top of these changes as and when they happen, we need to negotiate contracts that can withstand sudden and dramatic economic change.”

One of Australia’s top procurement job goes to…

Today marks a big day.

Procurious member, and reigning Asia-Pacific CPO of the Year, Visna Lampasi has been announced as Head of Group Procurement at Australia’s largest retailer, Woolworths Limited.

Visna Lampasi Woolworths

In what was no doubt a hotly contested role, Visna will lead the procurement of all goods not for resale across the Woolworths Limited brands including Woolworth Supermarkets and Petrol, Liquor Group, Big W, Masters Home Improvement, ALH Hotel Group, Woolworths Money, Everyday Rewards and Ezibuy.

For those unfamiliar with Woolworths Limited, the group of companies has approximately 200,000 staff Australia-wide with an annual revenue of $60 billion – one of Australia’s leading groups.

If anyone is up for the task of delivering commercial value in such a high profile role, Visna is having taken out the title of The Faculty’s CPO of the Year 2014 earlier this year.

Visna’s career background spans across a number of procurement roles, most recently operating as infrastructure company Leighton Contractors’ Chief Procurement Officer where she established an award winning social procurement program.

Procurement veteran and Procurious founder Tania Seary welcomed the announcement: “I haven’t had the opportunity to work closely with the Woolworths Procurement team, but I understand they have been through various transformations.

“Within the Australian procurement landscape, the team would be regarded as a mature procurement function,” said Seary.

“Having gotten to know Visna over the years, I know she’s a very talented and tenacious procurement professional who will undoubtedly identify a multitude of sources of untapped value within the organisation.”

Industry peer and Rio Tinto’s General Manager of Global Process Architecture, Cindy Dunham echoed Seary’s sentiments:

“I’ve had the pleasure of working with Visna on a number of procurement professional bodies and know that she’ll bring a great depth of knowledge and experience to the Woolworths Group.

“Visna’s large network is complemented by her industry leadership, influencing skills and dedication. I look forward to her continued commitment to raising the profile of procurement in Australia.”

The Faculty’s CPO of the Year judging panel chairman Dr. Karen Morley also congratulated Visna on the new role.

“Visna’s track record of achieving commercial outcomes, leading cultural change, and balancing social outcomes in tough project management environments sets her up well for further success.”

From the team here at Procurious we’d like to congratulate Visna!

For those wanting to know how she does it, stay tuned for some exclusive procurement advice from the woman of the hour coming soon.

Risk of business disruption has increased by a fifth – which countries are affected?

A new report reports that a fifth of the world’s countries are at risk from business disruption… this and more in our weekly news blast:

Supply chains at risk from civil unrest and war

Risk of business disruption has increased in a fifth of countries

  • The risk of business disruption due to civil unrest has increased in a fifth of countries over the past quarter, according to a report.
  • The ranking of 197 countries, which assesses the likelihood of strikes, protests and ethnic and sectarian conflict impacting business operations, includes 11 states that are considered to be “extreme risk”. These include Syria at number one, followed by the Central African Republic, Pakistan and Sudan.
  • Maplecroft’s Civil Unrest Index shows risk has increased most in Hong Kong over the past three months, due to the pro-democracy demonstrations. This was followed by Liberia where there has been mounting unrest as a result of the Ebola virus outbreak.
  • Maplecroft said firms operating in and sourcing from these countries “faced severe disruptions”. Factories in Vietnam were forced to suspend production during anti-Chinese protests in May 2014, and anti-government protests in Thailand, culminated in a coup and “shut down much of the country’s commercial centre”, halving projected GDP growth to 2.5 per cent.

Read more at Supply Management

World Bank to launch procurement app

  • The World Bank plans to release a mobile application that will give users access to comprehensive procurement data from 2004 to 2014.

  • The new app, which is being rolled out amid an ongoing controversial procurement reform process within the institution, aims to provide more transparency and accessibility to donors and recipients. Once downloaded, the app will be fully functional offline, allowing those in the most remote places full access, according to Joao Veiga Malta, practice manager at the bank’s Governance Global Practice. “What we wanted to do was to be able to provide you the procurement information that the bank had with an easy reach [so] that you did not necessarily need a masters in statistics in order to be able to do an analysis.”

  • The app, Veiga Malta explained, will show the distribution of awards by country and can be organized by civil works, goods, consulting services and nonconsulting services. Users can search by fiscal year, economic sector, donor country or recipient country, and will be able to see graphs, pie charts, ratios, trends and rankings.

Read more at Devex.com

New Spanish brand enters the hot fast fashion market

  • When most people think of European clothes, they immediately think of haute couture creations from Paris with astronomical price tags. If not that, there are the giant label’s prêt-à-porter incarnations which fetch similarly high prices. So the idea of clothes from sunny Spain with price tags on T-shirts at P299 can be a surprise.
  • Those T-shirts come from Sfera (pronounced es-fera), a fast fashion brand from the Spanish company Grupo El Corte Ingles. The company is the largest department store chain in Spain, and under its umbrella, it has travel agencies, convenience stores, and home and DIY stores.
  • Sfera opened its first Asian venture in SM Makati, right inside SM’s department store. “We believe that [the Philippines] is a very mature market, and [it] can give us feedback… [on] the behavior and the Asian taste of the customer,” said Guillermo Lopez Garcia, an international manager from Sfera, as he discussed why the brand decided to bring its fashions here. “We believe that if we can compete and succeed in the Philippines… we can succeed anywhere.”

Read more at Business World Online

Supply chains conservative about 4G handset development in China during 4Q14

  • Handset supply chain makers are continuing to see the effects of lagging 4G handset sales in China as vendors clear out reserves of 3G units.
  • Both vendors and retailers in China are still clearing reserves of 3G handsets as sales have been stagnating following decisions by major China-based telecom providers to end handset purchase subsidies.
  • The subsidies spurred a wave of handset purchasing throughout 2013 into 2014 and were expected to continue for 4G units. However, most telecom providers have limited or even stopped such moves and have yet to reissue new plans for helping to push 4G handsets in China.
  • Panel makers and touch panel makers have seen the brunt of the situation in 2014 and expect conservative orders to China during the fourth quarter of 2014 as a result.

Read more at Digitimes

Kaiser moves to remake its supply chain

  • Kaiser Permanente is trying to remake the hospital supply chain, Forbes reported.
  • The California-based integrated provider is using new software to try and make the ordering and use of supplies for its 38 hospitals, 9.5 million members, 17,000 physicians and 48,000 nurses more efficient and less costly, according to Forbes contributor Steve Banker.
  • That’s a change from Kaiser just five years ago, when nurses and other frontline healthcare workers were responsible for tracking down and ordering supplies, which were often siloed in multiple locations throughout the system. Recalled or expired supplies had to be discovered and returned in a virtually manual process. That form of supply chain management often meant that providers had time taken away from caring for patients.

Read more at Fierce Health Finance

Thyssen to manage Airbus Helicopters supply chain

  • German industrial group ThyssenKrupp  has agreed a deal with Airbus to manage the supply chain of metallic raw materials for Airbus Helicopters.
  • ThyssenKrupp said its Aerospace division would manage procurement, logistics, quality assurance and fine-tuning the management of blanks – unfinished metal that is stamped out of larger pieces of material – for Airbus Helicopters worldwide. It said the cooperation would take place for the “coming years”, without being more specific.
  • ThyssenKrupp Aerospace is part of the group’s Materials Services division, which distributes materials and provides technical services for the production and manufacturing sectors.

Read more at Reuters.com

Initiative to reduce fertilizer use for commodity grain crops launched in US

  • Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) has launched a new, collaborative initiative to eliminate fertilizer pollution as a major environmental concern in the United States. The effort will engage farmers and businesses throughout the supply chain to transform the way fertilizer-dependent grain crops are grown and sourced.
  • “If we’re going to meet food demands for a growing population, we’ve got to decouple production from pollution as soon as possible,” said David Festa, EDF vice president. “The most promising way to accomplish this essential task is by collaborating with decision makers at every point in the U.S. grain supply chain — from retailers and food companies to agribusiness and farmers.”
  • “Our long-term goal is to make the entire U.S. grain supply sustainable — good for farmers, good for the climate and good for our waterways,” said Suzy Friedman, director of EDF’s Sustainable Sourcing Initiative.

Read more at OCJ.com

UK public procurement organisations praised for insurance framework project

It’s a win for Procurious-favourites YPO (and partners)

A collaboration between the largest public procurement organisations in the UK to reduce duplication of effort and achieve savings has taken home the Best Public Procurement Project gong at the CIPS Supply Management Award 2014.

CIPS Supply Management Awards 2014

What was the idea?

The joint venture was headed by the Crown Commercial Service, and YPO, ESPO and NEPO. It provides the public sector with quick and easy access to a wide range of insurance services, including property, liability and motor cover. Since its launch in February 2013 it has already been used by over 260 customers from across the public sector, delivering savings of some £7.6m. It’s also worth noting that individual customers such as local authorities have saved over half a million pounds on their insurance costs.

Of the 29 suppliers on the agreement, a healthy percentage – over 25 per cent are SMEs. This goes some way to demonstrating how the Government’s commitment to improving public sector business opportunities for smaller businesses is working.

The CIPS judging panel said:

“The team demonstrated a creative approach to a category in which procurement can find difficulty gaining traction in.  There is evidence of not only real cash savings but a team that engaged widely with stakeholders and the wider market to deliver outstanding results”.

On the win Sally Collier, CEO of the Crown Commercial Service exclaimed: “I am absolutely thrilled. This is a tremendous accolade for our highly successful collaboration with YPO, ESPO and NEPO. It recognises our commitment to delivering savings for the taxpayer and improving efficiency by working closely with customers and constantly innovating to meet their needs.” 

Paul Smith, Procurement and Supply Chain Director of YPO offered: “The award is a fantastic recognition of the hard work and commitment of all collaborative partners. The aim was to deliver a single approach to insurance procurement across the public sector, streamlining processes and achieving efficiencies. I am delighted that this has been realised and many organisations are already reaping the financial benefits.”

Paul Smith and YPO previously featured in our ‘Is the UK more risk averse than the rest of Europe?’ article. Read it here.

Could Uber’s business model tackle procurement’s next challenges?

In a week that saw the CIPS Conference juggernaut roll into town, and Tesco (still) reeling from overstated first-half profits [more on that here] – you might have missed the following nuggets of news:

The Uber business model could transform supply chain

Copy Uber’s model to tackle procurement’s next big challenges

  • According to CIPS economist John Glen, speaking at the CIPS Annual Conference in London last week, Uber is not actually in the business of taxis.
  • “Uber is in the business of looking out into the world where there is excess capacity and resources that are not being fully utilised and matching the resource with customers who want to use it,” Glen told delegates.
  • “How do you look at capacity that exists within your own business that is not being currently fully utilised, that you could rent out to someone else or use in imaginative ways?”
  • He continued: “We now have to start to be very clever about how we form alliances with our supply chain, how we understand what it is our customer wants, how we use technologies that are out there cleverly with assets and customers in different geographies, and that is going to be our world in the next 12 months and beyond.”

Read more at Supply Management

Rating agencies’ demands pose threat to commodity supply chain

  • Commodity-price spikes could become more common if credit rating agencies drive up the cost of capital for leading trading houses, forcing them to hold less inventory, a leading consultancy has warned.
  • In a new report on the commodity trading industry, co-authored by Graham Sharp, one of the founders of Trafigura, the consultancy says that by including debts associated with trading in its calculation, the agencies could drive up the cost of traders’ capital. As a result, these companies would have “significantly less incentive” to hold high volumes of inventory and resolve potential supply disruptions.

  • The big commodity traders are drawing greater attention from investors as they issue more bonds and financial instruments to help finance the acquisition of assets that range from coal mines to storage terminals and petrol retailers.

Read more at the FT.com

California launches high-speed train procurement

  • The Californian high speed rail programme envisages provision of a ‘one seat ride’ between Los Angeles and San Francisco by 2028 within a budget of $68bn.
  • Expressions of interest are to be submitted to the California High Speed Rail Authority by October 22 from potential suppliers of high speed trainsets for the planned 836 km network that would link the San Francisco Bay Area with the Los Angeles basin by 2028.
  • ‘We are going to have the first true high-speed rail system in America and industry leaders from around the world are eager to talk to us about why their trains should be running on our tracks’, commented CHSRA Chief Executive Jeff Morales. ‘This is a big moment for our programme.’

Read more at the Railway Gazette

H&M’s environmental sustainability coordinator on sustainable materials

  • The Guardian spoke to Erik Karlsson, H&M’s environmental sustainability coordinator, about the environmental credentials of the new line and the H&M partnership with Jeanologia.
  • He revealed: H&M has been working with more sustainable materials for many years now. Currently, we are the largest user of organic cotton. Our ambition now is to be able to close the loop on textiles, ie produce new fibres from old clothes. In this collection we have two products with recycled cotton from our garment collecting program.
  • To create Conscious denim, washes have been scored red, yellow or green (where green indicates the toughest criteria) for water consumption and energy consumption. To meet Conscious denim standards at H&M, garments must be made with organic, recycled or climate smart cellulose materials and the washing process should score ‘green’.

Read more at The Guardian

Hermes on equality in the supply chain

  • Retail Week has published an article that highlights the success Hermes has had in bringing about equality across the business.
  • The writer – Carole Woodhead, is CEO of Hermes.
  • Women hold a third of the main board positions at Hermes UK. In addition, 25 per cent of all senior management positions are females, as are more than 60 per cent of our field team leaders. In terms of the supply chain sector, women are extremely well represented at Hermes and the company is above the industry norm.
  • We have also recently welcomed Clare Bottle to Hermes who has taken up the position of head of courier service. Clare brings more than 20 years of industry experience to the team, previously working as national logistics manager at Lafarge Tarmac. Clare is also vice-chair of Women in Logistics UK and a trustee of Transaid.

Read more at Retail Week

Coca-Cola green branding devalues the colour’s ethical heritage

  • The cola wars are back on again with the launches of Coke Life and Pepsi True but their use of green branding leaves a sour taste in the mouth, says Chris Arnold, creative director, Creative Orchestra and author of Ethical Marketing & The New Consumer.
  • It’s packaged in a green container which implies it’s some kind of natural, ethical, environmentally-friendly product. What’s more, Coke has spent over 100 years associating the brand with the colour red, so this seems a betrayal of the brand to suddenly go green.
  • With two brands, that aren’t exactly seen as ethical brands, their use of green just devalues the use of the colour green and it’s association with natural and environmental products. Coke claims the green is inspired by the green leaf of the Stevia plant. Seriously?

Read more at Marketing Magazine

Our takeaways from the CIPS 2014 Conference

Procurious headed to Kings Place to take in the sights, and hear from a wealth of insightful speakers at the biggest procurement event of the year – the 2014 CIPS Conference and Exhibition.

Having survived the global economic crisis, this year’s theme (unsurprisingly) focused on ‘standards, ethics and innovation’ within what CIPS calls ‘a new procurement future’. 

With Craig Lardner chairing proceedings, delegates were treated to a packed day full of talks, break-out sessions, and a distinguished guest from the world of broadcasting.

CIPS Conference 2014
Facebook.com, CIPS

Some of our highlights from the day included:

Dr John Glen’s opening session was an early highlight of the day. John is an economist for CIPS, and lectures at the Cranfield School of Management. If you’ve ever struggled to grasp economics, the good Dr offered a brilliantly accessible half hour. He also suggested that the next big challenge for supply chains would be to adopt the business model that’s made Uber into such a success story.

IKEA’s Environmental and Sustainable Development Manager – Charlie Browne, revealed how the business has reduced supplier count in a bid to maximize effectiveness. Sustainability is also in IKEA’s blood – with the retailer’s efforts dating back to 1990s.

Tesco’s Frances Goodwin offered her thoughts on the role of ethical trading in procurement. She left us with a surprising nugget around procuring a banana – in that the supply chain is (on average) 5 layers deep.

Rita Clifton – President of the Market Research Society and former Chair of Interbrand presented a light-hearted session on the power of branding. Rita distilled the ingredients that make a strong brand, and revealed some of the brands that she thinks have got it right. She also confirmed something we’ve been saying for a while: Procurement has an image problem. Do a Google Image search for procurement and see what we mean…

In what was possibly the biggest announcement of the day – Babs Omotowa, Managing Director and Chief Executive Officer of Nigeria LNG Limited was announced as the incoming CIPS President. Babs will take the mantle from Craig Lardner four weeks from now.

Our favourite break-out session was delivered courtesy of Clive Lewis – Founder and Managing Director of Illumine Training. Clive guided us through 5 different methods to help boost creativity, and approach problems differently.

Elsewhere, Bord Bia (the Irish Food Board) and Selex ES talked about building strong supplier relationships. The latter having previously been crowned the overall winner at CIPS Supply Management Awards 2014 for their work with Research Electro-Optics (REO).

To cap a busy day off, influential food writer (and occasional TV personality)  – Jay Rayner, provided a thought-provoking (and at times, hilarious) commentary on food supply chains. With insights like: full service supermarkets cannot compete with discounters – and in the end it’s the suppliers that suffer. We suspect he may have also snuck a few plugs for his book in there too…

Twitter also provided some key takeaways – here is what some of the other attendees were saying:

CIPS Conference 2014

CIPS Conference 2014

CIPS Conference 2014

CIPS Conference 2014

CIPS Conference 2014

Sears mimics Zara’s fast fashion approach

Fast fashion is a bit of a buzzword around these parts, so we’re somewhat surprised to find it hasn’t featured more heavily in our weekly news roundups. Of course now our lead-item has just gone and bucked that trend… Eyes-down for that and more:

falling_in_fashion_de_sears_8726_900x656

Sears mimics Zara’s fast fashion approach

  • Carlos Slim, following the lead of fellow billionaire Amancio Ortega, is freshening up his Sears outlets in Mexico with an of-the-moment sense of style in a bid to boost profits.
  • The retailer is joining the ranks of Ortega’s fashion empire Zara by introducing new brands that quickly convert the latest runway styles of clothes and accessories into cheaper, mass-distributed goods. It’s a change of pace for Sears, which opened its first store in Mexico City in 1947 and whose 82 Mexican locations are now owned by Slim’s Grupo Sanborns SAB.
  • Sanborns aims to benefit from the 30 percent growth in Mexican consumer spending that PricewaterhouseCoopers projects through 2017. Slim is betting that his “fast-fashion” strategy will help lure new, young consumers who favor retailers such as H&M and Forever 21, which opened its eighth store in Mexico last month.

Read more at Business of Fashion

Qatar Airways and IAG Cargo considering expanding capacity sharing agreement

  • Qatar Airways Cargo, and the cargo handling division of the International Airlines Group, IAG Cargo, are considering expanding a capacity sharing agreement signed in May to cover additional Asian destinations.
  • Under the agreement’s current terms, Qatar Airways operate five weekly B777-F flights between Hong Kong and London Stansted via Mumbai International, Chennai, Delhi International and Dhaka on various routings, on behalf of IAG Cargo.
  • IAG entered the agreement after British Airways (BA, London Heathrow) prematurely terminated a lease contract with Atlas Air for three B747-8Fs operated by Global Supply Systems (GSS, London Stansted). The two parties are now considering expanding the deal to include points in Pakistan. Dave Shepherd, Head of Commercial at IAG Cargo, has said that the decision to expand the agreement is a result of its ongoing success adding that it could be a model for other carriers to follow.

Via Supply Chain Digital

Procurement in the UK

Metropolitan Police uses P2P system to transform procurement

  • The Metropolitan Police has introduced a purchase-to-pay (P2P) system to transform the way it procures goods and services.
  • Vicky Morgan, director of procurement operations at the service, said the iBuy system has helped improve customer service, reduce processing costs, improve financial reporting and balance costs. Speaking at the eWorld Purchasing and Supply conference in London, Morgan explained that she thought introducing such a system would be the main part of the transformation project. But she soon found out business process and change management were bigger hurdles.
  • To further improve the system, Morgan launched iBuy Plus to introduce “a very different way of working”. Staff are now required to make every purchase order themselves, and Morgan has reduced the numerous levels of approvals. Before this system, an order would have to be approved by around three people.

Read more at Supply Management

Whitehall mandates supply chain cyber security standard for suppliers

  • The UK government wants to improve cyber security in its supply chain. From next week on 1st October, all suppliers must be compliant with new “Cyber Essentials” controls if they are bidding for government contracts which involve the handling of sensitive and personal information and the provision of certain technical products and services.
  • The UK government has developed Cyber Essentials in consultation with industry, and according to the government, it offers “a sound foundation of basic cyber hygiene measures which, when properly implemented, can significantly reduce a company’s vulnerability.” The scheme’s set of five critical controls is applicable to all types of organisations, of all sizes, giving protection from the most prevalent forms of threat coming from the internet.
  • Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude said: “It’s vital that we take steps to reduce the levels of cyber security risk in our supply chain. Cyber Essentials provides a cost-effective foundation of basic measures that can defend against the increasing threat of cyber attack. Businesses can demonstrate that they take this issue seriously and that they have met government requirements to respond to the threat. Gaining this kind of accreditation will also demonstrate to non-government customers a business’ clear stance on cyber security.

Read more at Government Computing

Taiwan losing its grip on iPhone supply chain

  • Production of the hot-selling iPhone 6 is bringing business to a number of Taiwanese technology firms and boosting factory orders on the mainland, although supplier competition and sourcing changes at Apple have taken a bite out of the region’s dependence on the popular handsets.
  • Apple has contracted Taiwanese tech giant Hon Hai Precision to make all its iPhone 6 Plus handsets and 70 per cent of basic iPhone 6 orders, analysts say. Pegatron, based in Taipei, will assemble the other 30 per cent, the Market Intelligence and Consulting Institute in Taiwan estimates.
  • “Most of the worldwide assembly for the iPhone 6 range will take place in China, because that is where the lowest costs and biggest factories are located,” said Neil Mawston, global wireless practice executive director at Strategy Analytics in Britain.
  • But as Apple changes specs from earlier iPhone models and has the pick from a bigger field of suppliers worldwide, mainland and Taiwanese companies are getting fewer orders compared to older iPhones. “The components for the iPhone 6 portfolio come from a very globalised supply chain,” Mawston said. Taiwan will pocket just US$25 to US$30 from the total US$245 to US$255 manufacturing bill of materials from each iPhone 6 handset, according to the Market Intelligence and Consulting Institute.

Read more at SCMP.com

Procurement profession “relieved” following Scotland no vote

The last seven days have played host to one of the biggest news stories of 2014 – suffice to say Procurious can’t ignore it! Hence we lead with Scotland, but things have been happening further afield too… Read on for all the details:

What does the Scottish referendum mean for procurement?

Supply chain “relieved” by referendum result

  • The people decided the country will remain united and Cameron ensures promises to Scotland will be honoured. Supply chain experts are “relieved”, say result “removes risk to employment” and that it’s “business as usual”.
  • Bernard Molloy, global industrial logistics director at Unipart Group, comments; “No doubt logistics and supply chains would have to be rebalanced if the Scottish Referendum was yes. Costs and return-on-investment on distribution are currently fairly reasonably spread nationally; this would have been a different story if the vote was yes.”
  • Chris Sturman, chief executive of the Food Storage & Distribution Federation, says; “I believe this a good decision for all the inhabitants of the UK. It maintains the economic and logistical whole, removes risk to employment, enables  stable costs and prices for all citizens and removes the instability of change, especially after the uncertainty of the recession.

Read more on SHD Logistics Magazine

Supply Management also carried this article – it includes quotes from John Milne, a procurement consultant at Hampco based in Aberdeen:

  • “There’s a sense of relief and a vindication because much of the media were supporting the hype of the nationalists who were giving an unfeasible argument. It’s a relief for the oil and gas sector too, we know which regime we have to negotiate with now.
  • “For procurement, it has taken the fear factor away – the changes would have cost a lot of money. So procurement will heave a sigh of relief that they won’t have to take on the changes.”

India’s artillery procurement saga

  • There is little doubt that the Indian Army’s artillery is in urgent need of modernization. But delays in procurement are hindering the process.
  • India hasn’t purchased a new system since the Bofors in 1980s. Senior Indian army officials have also raised concerns over shortages of modern artillery systems, which they believe would be a crucial drawback in any future conflict. The Army has been notably lackadaisical when it comes to acquiring these types of guns, with tenders cancelled in 2007, 2009 and 2010.
  • in 2012 the Ministry of Defence cleared a $647 million deal to acquire 145 M777 155-mm 38-caliber howitzers under Washington’s Foreign Military Sales program. In October 2013, however, it was reported that British multinational BAE Systems would be closing the U.S. factory that manufactures the gun, due the “absence of any order or commitment from New Delhi.” If New Delhi wants the guns, it will have to pay to reopen the line, raising the price to as much as $885 million. A recent strengthening of the U.S. dollar makes the deal even more expensive. Washington points out that if India had been able to move more quickly, it could have had the guns at the lower price.

Read more at The Diplomat

Top procurement groups deliver 7x return on investment

  • In a combined initiative to bring common value management visibility and practices to the procurement profession, three organizations – A.T. Kearney, the Institute for Supply Management, and the Chartered Institute of Purchasing & Supply – released the results of the inaugural ROSMASM Performance Check Report “Building the Brand of Procurement and Supply.”
  • The report found that leading procurement teams are delivering significant value to their organizations, but without a credible standard allowing companies to consistently track and score procurement performance, many CFOs question the performance of and benefits delivered by their procurement teams.
  • In an independent survey of CFOs and financial function leaders the study found that only 10 per cent of procurement functions have established recognition with their CFOs regarding how procurement contributes value and that the benefits are real and measureable. The report is distilled from more than 400 completed, qualified, and accepted cumulative benchmarks along with more than 170 submissions focused on 2013 results.

Read more at EBN Online

At McDonald’s, sustainability is job 1, 2 and 3…

  • McDonald’s sustainability efforts focus on verifiable sustainable coffee, fish, fiber, palm oil and beef with “beef being Priority Number One, Two and Three.”
  • Bob Langert, McDonald’s Global Sustainability VP, said their sustainability efforts are based on collaborations within their respective industries.
  • “We want to do this right and to do it right we have to collaborate and get the right measures in place. We are determined to let science lead the way, but we are also determined to start purchasing (beef) in 2016.”

Read more and watch the video interview at The Pig Site

Snapdeal to spend over $100 million on its supply chain in 2014

  • Online marketplace Snapdeal has become one of the largest clients for ecommerce logistics companies in India. The Delhi-based company, unlike rivals Flipkart and Amazon, outsources its entire logistics.
  • Snapdeal’s co-founder and chief operating officer, Rohit Bansal said: “We had earlier mentioned that we would end up spending Rs 450 crore in supply chain this year. But, with the kind of sales happening, we may well end up spending somewhere between $100-125 million (Rs 600-760 crore) in supply chain.”

Read more in The Economic Times

Procurement and supply chain apprenticeship launches in Scotland

Out of the loop? Join us as we reveal what’s been happening in the world of procurement during the last seven days.

L’Oreal completes five year supply chain transformation

  • The world’s largest manufacturer of beauty products, French company L’Oréal, has been on a five-year plan to completely overhaul its supply chain to cope with new trends in consumer behaviour and new purchasing technologies.
  • The group’s global supply chain employs around 7,000 people serving 130 markets, fulfilling about 16m orders annually. It operates 150 distribution centres globally serving some 40 factories, with around half operated in-house and half by third-party logistics providers.
  • Key to the efficiency improvements was the closer involvement in supply chain executives in the sales forecasting activities that are normally the preserve of sales and marketing teams.

Read more at The Load Star

Procurement and supply chain apprenticeship launches in Scotland 

University

  • A new apprenticeship to encourage young people into a career in purchasing and supply chain has been launched in Scotland.
  • City of Glasgow College has opened its first “industry academy” for procurement and supply chain, a teaching model that makes sure students’ experiences replicate working environments. The curriculum has been developed, and is updated regularly, with help from procurement professionals, and has the support of CIPS.
  • The college’s new industry academy and the modern apprenticeship in procurement and supply chain will attract young people into an industry that benefits Scotland’s economy and businesses while providing good long-term career prospects.

Read more at Supply Management

IT Sourcing not just an isolated procurement activity

  • While many people talk about IT sourcing as just buying hardware or software, leading commercial companies know that IT sourcing is far more complex than just “buying stuff.”
  • The IT Supply Management process has four closely interconnected dimensions. They are IT Supply Strategy, IT Category Management, IT Relationship Management,  and IT Sourcing Strategy,
  • The commercial sector’s experience in IT sourcing offers a number of lessons learned that the DoD can adapt as it builds an IT sourcing strategy.

Read more at C4ISRNET

Bank Branch Shake-Up To Test Procurement

  • Growing demand among the global population for online and mobile banking means that the traditional bank branch is changing.
  • Bank branches of the future will move away from simple transactional tasks and will act as a platform for upselling to customers. There will be an increase in the use of self-service machines to cut labour costs and time spent on lower-value transactions.
  • Ensuring contracts for fixed-term agreements with suppliers are detailed is vital as additional work will rack up expenditure significantly in an already cost-sensitive project.

Read more at Procurement Leaders

Improving the value procurement delivers can generate €7.6m in revenue

  • A well-managed supplier relationship management programme can save top performing businesses €22.8m in spending and generate €7.6m in revenue per €1bn of annual spend, according to research by The Hackett Group.
  • Established procurement specialist Xoomworks claim to have built an innovative framework called Complete Procurement which helps high turnover organisations in finance, insurance and retail make significant savings through improving returns on current investments in people and technology.
  • The balance between solid mechanics and positive behaviours allow organisations to break through the frustrations often experienced when only the mechanics are in focus, thereby allowing the procurement function to acquire new levels of added value for their organisations.

Read more at Retail Times