Category Archives: Procurement News

Here’s Why IT Procurement Leaders Are CPOs of the Future

The fourth industrial revolution is here. Change-resistant CPOs who see it as a threat will inevitably see themselves consigned to the scrap-heap.

The CPO of the Future, on the other hand, will seize every opportunity Industry 4.0 presents. And the profession is looking to IT procurement experts for leadership.

CPOs of the future

The procurement function is at a digital tipping point. To quote James Gregson’s analysis of Deloitte’s 2016 Global CPO Survey, “digital disruption will either reinvigorate or replace procurement’s value proposition”. In other words, if you’re not disrupting, you’re being disrupted.

Industry 4.0 marks the convergence of physical and digital manufacturing capabilities, where increasing automation and computerisation allow us to create smart workplaces.

From office printers that automatically order their own ink cartridges, to fully-robotised factories, the scale of change has been compared to the industrial revolutions of the 18th and 19th centuries.

Procurement, far from allowing itself to be left behind, must ride the wave of technological advancement to stay ahead. We’ve even seen the emergence of a new term – Procurement 4.0 – to encapsulate the changes that Industry 4.0 is making in the supply chain.

The vocabulary of CPOs is changing, too. The usual chatter around traditional practices such as sourcing, contracts and requisition-to-pay is fading away to make room for cutting-edge concepts like cognitive analytics, crowd sourcing, digital reporting, artificial intelligence and machine learning.

If you’re already in IT Procurement, then let me be the first to congratulate you! IT Buyers are going to be the CPOs of the future. Here are five reasons why.

  1. You already control an important chunk of the strategic spend

Global IT spending, according to Gartner, is expected to reach $3.5 trillion in 2017. As the future of business lies in the Cloud and with digital technology, it’s easy to predict that those professionals who are buying this future are best-positioned to lead the profession.

Arguably, no category of spend touches all areas of the business as much as IT. It’s a highly-specialised, big-ticket category where the buyer regularly deals with tier-one vendors.

Salary ranges, according to The Source General Manager Tony Megally, reflect the high-level impact of IT buying roles. “Generally, IT procurement managers’ salaries are 15 per cent higher than other specialisations. They are, without doubt, one of the best-paid categories in the profession.”

  1. Soon everything we buy will include an element of technology

Direct or indirect, goods or services, in the new world of Industry 4.0 just about everything we buy will have some element of technology. IT Buyers have the opportunity to add some runs to their career scorecard by seeking out innovative technology that solves previously “unsolvable” problems.

Take for example the decades-old safety concern around the fatigue levels of operators of heavy machinery. Mining truck drivers now have wearable technology (essentially baseball caps) that regularly conduct electroencephalogram (EEG) tests on the wearer.

The SmartCap knows when you’re approaching a micro-sleep even before you do. It then sounds an alarm in the truck cabin that alerts the wearer. The alarm can be routed to a remote monitor, who will stop the truck and remove fatigued driver from duty.

For the IT procurement manager, it’s important to understand the technology to manage it commercially. Which companies currently produce these caps? The earliest adopters are in the mining sector – what other sectors could benefit from this product?

What will it mean for safety standards across every industry where operator fatigue is a concern? Could your organisation be accused of negligence if you’re slow to implement this technology?

  1. You know how to drive change

Introducing new technology to an organisation is a major change process. More than anyone, IT procurement buyers are very aware of this fact, many having fought and overcome end-user resistance to new processes or systems.

Here at the threshold of Industry 4.0, the experience gained by battle-scarred IT change-management veterans will be invaluable as the pace of transformational change continues to accelerate.

  1. You’re an innovation scout

IT Procurement professionals have witnessed a huge amount of change in their search for the ultimate technology solutions over the past 20 years.

Take, for example, the evolution of the laptop. These have developed from bulky, suitcase-like machines in the 1980s, to sleek thin-screened notebooks in the early 2000s. However, the devices were effectively (and dramatically) made obsolete in 2010 when Apple released its first-generation iPad.

As technology increasingly becomes the product, we must keep options open to take advantage of the frenetic pace of change. This means shorter contracts, built-in optionality, and smaller, more agile suppliers who will drive innovation.

CPOs of the future will essentially be “innovation scouts”, with a major focus on finding, and profiting from, the next big thing in IT.

Organisations are also increasingly looking to supplier innovation to boost top-line revenue. This means the skill-set required to source from technology providers is fast becoming invaluable.

  1. You understand cyber security

88 per cent of U.S. CEOs are somewhat or extremely concerned about cyber threats. These CEOs are looking for technology savvy leaders across their business to protect them from cyber breaches.

Again, IT Procurement managers are ideally positioned to become experts in the cybersecurity challenges associated with the coming IoT wave, which will bring a rapid expansion of potential entry points for malicious software.

Whether you’re a problem-solver, change-management veteran, innovation scout, cyber-security expert, or all of the above, IT Buyers are already in possession of the ideal skill-set that will be needed by Procurement 4.0’s CPOs of the Future.

Procurious is at ProcureCon IT in Amsterdam this week. Stay up to date with what’s happening on Procurious, and by following us on Twitter.

Could Direct Bookings Help Drive Value for Procurement?

Travel procurement tends to get people hot under the collar. But should procurement be more open to direct bookings to drive greater value?

Hotels direct booking

This article is based on a study conducted by Software Advice, available to read here.

In the hotel room booking wars, online travel agencies (OTAs) seem to be giving up a little ground. This represents a great opportunity for small, boutique and independent hotels.

Hotels that sell rooms through OTAs must pay a commission, so direct bookings mean higher profit margins. For many years, hotels gave up that extra profit in order to reach a wider audience.

However, new data shows that many rates are now cheaper when booking directly through the hotel website.

What Is Causing Cheaper Direct Bookings?

The true cause of this shift is hard to nail down, though some experts think a combination of a couple key factors may be leading to cheaper direct bookings:

  • Effective regulation against rate parity clauses. Regulations against rate parity clauses – contract language that forces hotels to maintain the same rates on all distribution channels – may be having an effect. This means some hotels could offer lower rates on their own website.
  • OTAs are willingly easing up on commissions. OTAs often charge hotels an average of 15 to 25 per cent per booking, so it’s easy to see why hotels would want travellers to book direct. It’s possible the OTAs believe reducing commission rates won’t matter, since their volume of business is so high.

This shift is an opportunity for small and independent hotels to educate potential guests, and market these cheaper direct booking rates to them.

Taylor Short, Hotel Market Researcher for the hotel information systems reviews companySoftware Advice, believes that incentives could be the key to attracting customers.

“Hotels and resorts want to attract organisations and groups for the revenue and sales potential when the group is on property. Because of this, hotels will often use software to manage incentives offered to guests, such as free wifi or rate discounts, for those who book in groups,” says Short.

“To compel group over individual bookings, hotels will try to tailor packages to the groups they see most often. For a business networking group, for example, they may offer free transportation from the airport, discount on drinks, or a round of golf. There are things to offer that can help deliver a better, more personalised experience.”

Driving Direct Bookings

Shifting consumer habits to looking at a wider range of options presents an opportunity for small hotels to educate travellers that booking directly can be cheaper and more valuable.

There are a number of tactics smaller hotels can use to help drive customers to websites, and boost brand loyalty. These include:

  1. Compel website visitors to book direct with pop-ups or calls-to-action (CTAs).
  2. Offer incentives on the website.
  3. Arrange OTA widgets so that rates capture visitor attention.
  4. Focus on what they can offer vs. bigger brands.
  5. Prepare for the long game.

Changing Habits and Procurement

So if consumer habits are changing, it’s probably fair to say business travellers are looking for similar options. But where does this leave procurement?

Travel procurement is one of the ‘hot buttons’ for organisations. Procurement need to find the right balance between value for money, and ensuring that their staff are getting a good experience.

Every year, millions of pounds are spent outside of travel management systems. This maverick spend, which can be up to 20 per cent more expensive than through authorised sources, further hinders procurement’s position. Maverick spend comes in all shapes and sizes, and organisations need to be aware of why it is happening so they can combat it.

However, as travel options, in particular accommodation, open up with businesses such as Airbnb, procurement needs to stay in step with changes. This doesn’t mean allowing staff to book directly themselves, but not staying with preferred suppliers because they happen to be on a list.

The difficulty for procurement lies in how organisational travel is booked. Large organisations tend to use a travel management system, or agency, to collate bookings.  Smaller organisations might be more flexible. However, if processes are in place, then it’s likely to be more difficult to justify a change.

However, it doesn’t stop procurement looking at smaller hotels who may offer added extras that employees will enjoy. If direct bookings could offer greater value, then it’s worth considering working with these suppliers in the future.

How to Change the Game with Sole Suppliers

Sole suppliers – you might think you’re stuck with them in procurement. But once you know the why, you can plan a change for the better.

sole suppliers change game

This article was first published on Future Proofitable. 

In the first part of this series, I discussed how sole supplier situations can occur. From monopolies, to high exit barriers and business attitudes, there are a number of reasons procurement might find itself in this situation.

But now we know how these occur, the question to ask is how we can do something about them.

Sole Suppliers – Can you do anything about it?

Definitely – yes. What you can do depends on what you are dealing with, and which stage in the process you are in.

1. Product Selection

If you can avoid buying the product in question, you should. You can also head off the sole sourcing situation by being involved in a process as early as possible. Making products in house is an option too.

You may also be able to find a provider who offers similar services or products, and convince them to adjust their offering to your requirements. Integrate vertically by buying your supplier and making them your internal provider.

2. Tender or Category Strategy Review

Assess the full lifecycle of the product or service. Analyse what, if any, additional costs are related to object you are purchasing.

Study alternative sources of supply, or look at the make vs. buy decision again. Even if you choose to buy, when the time comes to create negotiation leverage, you will have done half your homework already.

Choose the right way of buying. If it is possible, could you buy machines and servicing or maintenance separately? Or, on the other hand, could you bundle the products and service together?

Prepare a good contract in advance, and communicate it upfront. Build in price review mechanisms and no-penalty exit clauses. Alternatively, invest time in developing a full SLA, and ensuring this lasts for the whole relationship.

Share the information (technical, legal, commercial) early in the process with all suppliers. Cross-validate information and responses with specialists or 3rd party service providers. Finally, analyse proposals with the purpose of identifying “unique” solutions.

3. Analyse Sole Suppliers Business Needs and Decision Drivers

What time of the year is it and when does their financial year finish? Is there a reason to believe that tendering on a specific time frame might give you better or worse conditions?

  • Like buying grain just after new harvest data is clear and not based on assumptions
  • Or negotiating with software companies closer to their financial year end, when they are likely to be more aggressive with pricing.

Consider geographical aspects. If you are negotiating with a large multi-national, perform a market test of their pricing policy in different countries. You might be surprised that a branch, located somewhere further away from the central function would get a better group deal purely because of the location.

What sales strategy are they using? Are they more aggressive with the pricing of new solutions or new technology? Are they interested in growth? Market entry? Stopping their competitor entry? Can you invite someone new, who is not yet in the market? Does the size of the contract matter?

Do not forget to negotiate small value adding add-ons and other benefits to the contract. You can ‘sell’ positive references, feedback and referrals. You can help to reduce the supplier’s risks and become a better customer (implementing electronic ordering and invoicing tools, consolidating POs).

Or you could threaten them with moving to an alternative supplier, or bring one in.

4. Business Strategy

One thing to think about might be a change to your business strategy. Could you move the location of your HQ (for a critical product), or give up certain markets or products?

You could invest in in-house R&D, work with laboratories and universities. While doing this, educate business users. Challenge old ways of working, and help to eliminate all pseudo-sole suppliers.

Re-evaluate short term switching costs and compare them against long term business losses, if you decide (once again) not to change anything.

Should you do anything at all?

That is the question, too. The saying goes “nothing personal, just business”. Procurement should also be business oriented and invest its resources where they matter.

Should you start any project? Well, that depends. If this is something that you must do routinely (review a category or contract), you might consider how much time and effort to invest. And similarly, if the prize you are after is big enough, it’s probably worth spending time on it.

Based on the situation your business is in, you should perform opportunity analysis and evaluate your expectations. It’s not only about the size of the spend.

With sole suppliers, there is another level of complexity to be evaluated – the nature of the business situation. You can do this for single supplier situations, too.

For the categories mentioned above, approximate ratio of effort to success are shown in the graph below. Required effort is a relative number and can vary in units of measurement (days, weeks, months, people involved).

roe

It’s only one part of the equation in that it performs a sense check from Procurement’s perspective.

Weighing Dissatisfaction vs. Change

Another key part in projects like this is implementation. In many cases, it can (and will) end up in a change project. If you don’t want Procurement’s credibility to suffer, you must make sure that savings promised and savings achieved are as close as possible.

If the dissatisfaction with the sole supplier situation outweighs resistance to change, and if you have a plan on how to act, you increase the chances of success.

At the same time, it suggests what you can do if any side of the equation is not favourable. You can increase internal dissatisfaction among key stakeholders (clearly communicate risks and losses of the situation to finance people), or reduce resistance to the project (get the buy-in from engineering, technology, sales and other departments).

Is Your Technology Serving Up Greater Procurement Performance?

To what extent is your organisation using technology to improve the performance of procurement?

serving up procurement technology

Procurement’s adoption of technology has been surging in recent years, and it’s showing no signs of slowing down.

But what is the best way to transform the processes and performance of your Procurement organisation, while facing up to the need to restrict budgets and generally tighten up on spending?

Next week, Procurement professionals from all over Europe will gather in Amsterdam at ProcureCon IT Europe to discuss exactly that, as well as a host of other transformational topics.

In advance of the event, we asked 100 IT Procurement executives from some of the world’s largest organisations what they are doing to drive performance using technology. Here’s a preview of the results.

Procurement on Cloud 9

ProcureCon IT technology improvement

Technology is serving up Procurement teams with a wealth of tools with which to enhance their ability to add value to their business.  From social media to the cloud, automation and the Internet of Things, the list is growing ever longer.

Our research identified the cloud as one of the biggest areas of adoption today. Almost half of surveyed procurement organisations are already heavily invested, and a further 30 per cent are currently experimenting.

However, Procurement organisations will have to learn on their feet to get the most out of this new technology. Poorly implemented systems can end up being little more than expensive white elephants.

In addition, procurement professionals need to evaluate how to best implement transformational systems and processes, while reducing costs. One solution is to avoid hiring permanent new staff with the requisite skills, but instead to find strategic external technology partners who can manage the supply chain cloud on their behalf.

Adapting to these kinds of tectonic shifts in the procurement landscape is done best by the nimble. And to the victor will go the spoils.

The Future’s Bright, The Future’s Digital

Cloud technology is just one element of the digital transformation of procurement. Another important area of investment and focus for procurement teams is harnessing the power of big data.

More than 35 per cent of respondents to our survey are already heavily invested in big data, and more than half are currently experimenting. Going hand-in-hand with big data is spend analytics, another huge investment area for procurement organisations according to our research.

However, big data means different things to different people. Procurement’s approach needs to be moderated by a focus on desired outcomes.

Without a set of clear objectives, the insights offered by analytics will be limited and difficult to put into action. Once you have decided your goal, you’ll be better placed to select the ranges of data which are most appropriate.

Join Us at ProcureCon IT

ProcureCon IT is all about finding practical solutions to the challenges which IT procurement pros face on a daily basis. It’s the only truly peer-led conference of its kind in Europe.

Not only will you meet hundreds of people who are successfully taking their IT procurement technology strategy to the next level, but it’s also a superb opportunity to meet with some of the most innovative solution providers in the market place today.

To get industry-leading insight on the issues mentioned here, as well as lots more, join us on the 5th and 6th of December at the Mövenpick Hotel Amsterdam for ProcureCon IT.

Take a look at the full event agenda and download the research on procurement technology here.

Top 10 Trends for Spend Control & Procurement Automation

With the final months of 2016 fast approaching, it can only mean one thing – planning for 2017 is fiercely underway. In this article, we look into next year and share insights into how Spend Control and eProcurement Automation will evolve.

trends in spend control

These are not the macroeconomic trends you’ll hear from the large consulting companies. Nor are they the ‘who’s going to buy who’ predictions from the technology analysts. These are the trends that PROACTIS is seeing and hearing in our customer base, and in the companies we’re talking with every day.

We are participating in some of these trends, and we are even leading the charge on a couple. Some are not really even trends yet – some are just growing topics of discussion.

But these are all things real procurement professionals and real finance managers are thinking about, and doing today, as they move forward in their quest for world class Spend Control. Below is a summary of the top 10 trends for 2017.

  1. The Rise of Procurement 2.0

Procurement is rapidly moving away from what was once a personality-centric function where senior procurement professionals did a lot of the work themselves, did a lot of the work manually, and did a lot of the work using mainly the knowledge they had amassed from years in the profession.

  1. End-to-End eProcurement – Plugging the Gaps

Driven by the changing expectations of Procurement, there is now a growing vision of what ‘end-to-end’ procurement looks like and a conscious effort to move toward that vision. More organisations are moving to ‘source-to-settle’ solution suites to achieve maximum Spend Under Management.

  1. A Growing Focus on Supplier Collaboration

Few organisations really have the breadth, depth and quality of supplier information needed to do all the things they need to do.

As procurement organisations move through the Spend Control journey, they are recognising that one of the fundamental requirements for success is to have a solid, sustained handle on their supplier base. They are realising that supplier information is the lifeblood of Procurement.

  1. A Stronger Requirement for Buyers to be ‘Easy to do Business With’

Organisations that have put in place a solid Supplier Management cloud framework (which typically includes a supplier portal) are seeing that they can leverage this new capability to improve supplier interaction and commerce. This makes it easier for buyers and suppliers to do business.

  1. Cloud-Based Procurement will Remain – and for Good Reason

After looking at the options, the more organisations are opting for cloud-based options to solution licensing, deployment and management. Traditional software licensing, on-premise installation, and in-house technical management just don’t make sense anymore.

  1. Blurring the Line Between Software and Services

We have started to see more organisations combine software-as-a-service and associated people services into a broader solution to meet particular needs. For example, cleaning supplier records, sourcing specific categories of spend, and turning paper invoices into eInvoices.

  1. A CPO Mantra: Think Strategically, Act Tactically

Even procurement leaders with a clear end-to-end Spend Control vision are recognising that the war against excess cost and risk is generally won one battle at a time. Nothing big is ever accomplished in ‘one fell swoop’ and world-class Spend Control is a big thing.

  1. A Growing Recognition of the True Cost of ‘Shelfware’

Many larger organisations have made the move to one of the mega Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) or Financial Management systems. However, often the procurement modules aren’t fit for purpose and become ‘shelfware’ – software that’s just sitting on the shelf unused to any meaningful extent.

Organisations are recognising that if they are going to be successful, they must insist upon getting the right tools. And if they have to branch out from the ERP mother ship to do so, they will.

As a result, more companies are taking action and adopting integrated best-in-class applications.

  1. A Better Understanding of the Limitations of “Simple Self-Service Shopping”

Everyone agrees that employee adoption is a key factor in the success of a purchase-to-pay roll-out. The faster and more intuitive the experience, the more spend that’s likely to go through the system.

The problem is that it doesn’t do a lot of good to put spend through a P2P system if that system does not lead employees to purchase from approved suppliers using negotiated pricing and service agreements.

More organisations are now looking closely at how their solutions are going to help with all aspects of increasing Spend Under Management.

  1. The Importance and Value of Integration

No eProcurement system should exist in a vacuum. And no existing information systems environment is a blank sheet of paper.

More organisations are integrating their eProcurement solutions with a wider range of systems in order to create a single Spend Control umbrella over all aspects of enterprise-wide spend.

To find out more, download the full paper ‘Procurement Automation 2017: Key Trends & Hot Topics’.

Procurement Isn’t Done Innovating

Changing the close-minded nature of a stakeholder to the value of procurement is a big challenge. But procurement isn’t beaten yet.

stakeholder management

Have you just started following this series of posts? Don’t miss the first two! I’ve been sharing my perspective on procurement productivity and efficiency from over four decades worth of experience in the field. Catch up here on Part 1 and Part 2.

If you’ve ever met me, you’ll know it is in my nature to look forward. I’m always trying to figure out what is likely to come next for a profession that has already seen so much change.

Although most of the time we consider savings as the primary procurement performance metric, our core focus should actually be on spend and what it can accomplish.

In my first post, I suggested that the total number of annual procurement hours is a fixed resource that must be maximised if we are going to approach our full potential. The same is true of spend.

A company’s total annual (or budgeted) spend is fixed. Simply shrinking it is a limited view of procurement’s impact, and one that has gotten us in trouble in the past for being overly cost-conscious.

Expanding View of Spend Management

In order to really influence spend under management, we need to back up or expand our view of the spend management process. Starting with eSourcing and moving forward is too late. By then, a significant opportunity to impact the category has already been passed.

The supplier discovery process – as reimagined by the team at tealbook, for instance – contains all of the value potential uncovered in downstream processes. While it might seem like more work to broaden the pool of prospective suppliers, it’s actually procurement’s best change to affect results by more than a shade or two at a time.

All measurements (savings, spend under management, etc.) need to drive meaningful improvements in results. They can’t just capture activity, and no measurement exists for its own sake. Because of the seemingly contradictory nature of the metrics in play, procurement is sometimes in the position of having to reconcile long term strategic value creation with short term business requirements.

In the face of this challenge, we have to make working the ‘right way’ so easy and intuitive that people don’t have an incentive to fall back on their old habits.

Importance of the Right Price

Procurement has successfully overcome a savings-driven mindset. It is time for us to help our internal stakeholders overcome a status-quo mindset. I have been in situations when an internal stakeholder tells me something along the lines of, “This is an area where we aren’t really concerned about what we pay.”

And while we need to be careful not to alienate someone by beating the ‘savings drums,’ this is a prime opportunity to educate, and to explain why it is important to get the right price regardless of what is being bought.

Each dollar spent has the potential to create varying levels of value. Not being worried about what you spend in a particular category or on a specific product is one thing. But what if you could accomplish more with that same dollar? Maybe there is a more innovative supplier or a next generation product available?

If a company’s doesn’t open their mind to what is possible, and investigate qualified alternatives, they condemn their potential to the bounds of the past.

tealbook allows companies to pursue inquiries like these without holding up the project timeline. In fact, an internal stakeholder can search the suppliers themselves if they like. They may even uncover new potential sources of supply that match their definition of desired value.

Shifting the Stakeholder Mindset

This mindset-shift is a challenge that the procurement community as a whole can stand up and address together.

Procurement pros are notoriously conservative in their sharing habits. While this makes a lot of sense in specific cases, any opportunity to contribute to, or benefit from, aggregate industry intelligence may be just the cure we need to closed-minded stakeholders and the frustration they create.

I have been around a lot of different procurement and purchasing groups, and they get all worn down. I’ve seen unbridled energy and excitement degrade to the point of becoming a lack of professional engagement.

When we don’t set up the true mission of procurement right – maximising the value of every dollar spent – it’s not a fun place to work. But hope is not lost. Procurement is not done innovating.

Catering to business clients is a big role for procurement. We need to draw those clients into the process and make it easy for them to understand the real meaning behind differentials in cost. Not just in terms of savings, but also in terms of what the spend can accomplish for the company. Ultimately, this will carry procurement forward to the next phase of our development.

And that is something I can hardly wait to see play out.

Gregg Brandyberry is a recognised pioneer in procurement and sourcing technology. He has over 40 years experience in industries such as automotive, textile, manufactured goods, electronics and healthcare.

He is the former Vice President of Procurement – Global Systems and Operations for GlaxoSmithKline, and a Senior Advisor for A.T. Kearney’s Procurement and Analytic Solutions organisation.

Why Procurement Needs to Open the Door to Supplier Diversity

Procurement is under pressure to engage more in supplier diversity. But help is at hand from organisations who can help make connections.

open door supplier diversity

In May 2015, the Australian Government set out Indigenous company contract targets for federal departments and agencies. Starting from 0.5 per cent, the targets were set to rise to 3 per cent by 2019-20.

The joint message from the Minister for Indigenous Affairs and Minister for Finance claims, “the policy will ensure that Indigenous businesses have the chance to compete and showcase the products they have to offer.”

Supply Nation is the Australian leader in Indigenous supplier diversity. The organisation exists to connect Indigenous-owned businesses with the procurement teams of government and corporate organisations.

Supply Nation has worked closely with government to collaborate and influence the evolution of procurement policy that is now represented by the Indigenous Procurement Policy.

We sat down with Supply Nation’s CEO, Laura Berry, to talk more about the importance of this benchmark, and how organisations across Australia can strive to meet it. 

Why is engaging with Indigenous-owned businesses and suppliers so important for organisations across Australia?

Supply Nation strives to increase opportunities for Indigenous-owned businesses to supply their goods and services to large organisations. Supplier diversity puts under-represented businesses on a level playing field with other qualified suppliers when it comes to competing for the supply of quality goods and services.

One of the major benefits of opening the door to additional markets and engaging in supplier diversity, is that it facilitates the growth of Indigenous businesses. This results in increased economic activity and employment, and channels greater social value back to Indigenous communities.

In addition, data clearly shows that supplier diversity drives significant and measurable long-term business benefits, aside from the goods and services, which can ultimately provide a unique experience to customers. The addition of Indigenous-owned businesses can bring increased competitiveness, innovation and savings to the supply chain.

What qualities and capabilities have you built that supported you in achieving better procurement outcomes?

Creating an environment where our members and suppliers can connect, develop relationships and identify future procurement opportunities is integral to the work of Supply Nation.

Supply Nation assists our government and corporate members with tools and strategies to embed supplier diversity within their supply chain through a tailored account management model.

We also provide support for business matching, opportunity briefings, supplier promotions, external training opportunities and networking events.

What are the biggest challenges Supply Nation faces in procurement at the moment?

As a not-for-profit organisation, the procurement challenges facing Supply Nation itself are not significant. However, for our Indigenous suppliers, the challenges are the same as those faced by small businesses across Australia.

These include the difficulty in breaking into established supply chains and conventional procurement processes, or in developing relationships with buyers.

With the Federal Government’s Indigenous Procurement Policy, there’s more pressure for government buyers to find and engage with Indigenous-owned businesses. We see a real challenge – and a real opportunity – in facilitating the connection between the businesses and procurement professionals.

What’s the first step for organisations looking to alter their processes to meet new supplier diversity requirements around Indigenous suppliers?

Step 1 would be to become a member of Supply Nation (if you’re not already)!

Take the opportunity to search for goods or services through our directory, Indigenous Business Direct. You can engage with a Supply Nation Relationship Manager who can help you navigate the process.

We can help with changing internal policies and procedures, connecting with businesses that meet your requirements, and setting up established and sustainable supplier diversity practices that are modelled on world best practice.

How can attendees benefit from attending GovProcure 2016 (where Laura is speaking)?

We have some amazing, successful and diverse Indigenous-owned businesses that are growing fast and delivering incredible products and services. I’d recommend everyone comes along to understand how they can engage not only to hit their targets, but also to get some insight into the benefits these businesses can bring to your supply chain.

Among other Australian procurement leaders, the event will also feature Ian Rudgley, CPO for the City of Sydney, a council that despite not being subject to the federal targets, has award-winning engagement and mentorship of Indigenous suppliers.

For more details on the agenda please download the brochure.

Does Insurance Against Failure Really Keep You Covered?

Is it really worth taking out insurance against system failure? Is the true value in a system that works first time, all the time?

space launch insurance

Download ‘Parting the Clouds‘, Smart by GEP’s latest whitepaper, to understand the difference between Cloud Solutions and SaaS Software.

There was a debate in the office that ran for a while when we were putting together the white paper that’s associated with this post.

“Yes,” said one camp, “we understand that there are technical, operational and architectural differences between Cloud and SaaS, but so what?”

In other words, why should Procurement care how their software “solution” is delivered to them, as long as it works?

“Fair point” said the others, “but if we believe the cloud model is inherently more secure, robust and future-proofed than the other, should we not call out that distinction?”

“Again,” came the response “if a SaaS implementation is backed by the necessary service level agreements from the supplier, what’s the difference?”

And that is when the subject of insuring space launches came up.

Bear with me.

Can Insurance Really Cover Everything?

Insurance is what we’re talking about, of course. Ensuring your Procurement operation can carry out the business at hand without interruption or disruption is a primary goal of selecting the right software system. The SLAs in the contract with the vendor are what comprise that insurance policy.

As is the case with everything in the insurance world, the greater the degree of protection you want, the higher the premiums.  But there is also a matter of the risk.

Seven per cent of satellites and spacecraft fail at launch. Recently some fairly dramatic launch failures have made the news. The ones that really make the headlines are those that involve the destruction of a payload that teams of scientists have been working on for years.

You can almost feel the despair and horror of watching a decade’s hard work destroyed in mere seconds.

Usually, but not always, these payloads are insured against multiple possible eventualities. Launch failure, failure on deployment, failure on landing – as in the case of the recent ESA Mars mission. Naturally the premiums are immense to insure an interplanetary mission. Often the insurance by no means covers the ultimate cost of the failure.

The many millions paid out after a launch failure may cover some of the financial stake invested by the agencies funding the project. However, there is essentially nothing that can recover the loss of the science that was to be delivered. The physical and material can be replaced, but the loss of the results is absolute.

Don’t Insure Against Failure – Do It Right First Time!

A far better form of insurance for space launches is a system that doesn’t go wrong. This is in fact the calculated risk taken in many projects. Catastrophic failure cannot be mitigated with cash, so better to spend the insurance premiums on building something that won’t explode.

And this is why it seemed an appropriate metaphor for the kind of SLA insurance under discussion. It’s all very well having the on-paper insurance for failure coverage, but that’s of little consequence if the financial value of the pay-out can do nothing to mitigate the real cost.

This is why, then, we feel there is a clear distinction between different interpretations of what “cloud” actually means. The fundamental underlying scalability, security, robustness and other forms of risk really should be considered when making a genuinely informed decision.

Comparing vendor contracts like for like you may see the same SLAs – system availability, uptime and access. But without a doubt the benefit of an SLA is in never having to rely on it.

If your procurement technology fails, are you really covered against all the potential losses? What risks should you be considering when adopting new Cloud technology?

Download Smart by GEP‘s latest whitepaper, ‘Parting the Clouds to find out all you need to know.

Could Brexit Cloud have a Silver Lining?

The Brexit result upset the apple cart. It also left many people searching for a silver lining to the clouds on the horizon.

silver lining

This article was written by Daniel Ball, Director, Wax Digital.

Marmite – you either love it or hate it as they say. Well, Tesco for one was probably agreeing with the second of those sentiments recently when its rocky relationship with the brand’s owner Unilever hit the press.

As you’ll remember the food giants’ spat was triggered when Unilever stated it would need to raise its UK prices. This was in order to offset the impact of the pound’s post-Brexit weakness against the Euro in its supply chain.

Tesco retorted by removing Unilever products from its shelves. A bold move considering the food manufacturer owns many leading consumer brands.

Weakening Sterling

To recap, in mid-October the pound fell to a value below €1.10 for the first time since March 2010. The pound had generally been on the slide ever since the UK’s EU referendum back in June. It was also performing weakly against other major currencies including the US dollar and those in most emerging markets.

In many ways this is bad news for UK consumer and business to business purchasing. Both as individuals and organisations we’re pretty heavily reliant on global supply chains, meaning that it will cost domestically-based organisations heavily.

UK manufacturers sourcing parts and materials from overseas to make products locally, will pay more due to poor exchange rates.

Equally retailers and wholesalers buying end products from other countries will pay more to put them on their shelves or fill their warehouses. These cost increases will inevitably be passed on to UK business customers and consumers alike.

Returning to Domestic Focus?

However the situation may not be all bad and there could be a silver lining in this post-Brexit cloud. One potential positive outcome from this situation could be some British supply chains choosing to return to a more domestic focus.

Weighing up the options in a less than favourable global financial position, it may make sense for some UK businesses to explore the cost benefits of buying locally. This will help to remove exchange rate risk, even if local supply is not the cheapest price book option.

After years of decline, UK manufacturing may actually receive a boost and resurgence of ‘Buy British’ standards of the past. However this will be fuelled by necessity, rather than a Brexit campaign.

Admittedly it’s an ambitious scenario. Imagine the impact of Tesco commissioning UK food producers to come up with viable, locally made alternatives to replace Unilever’s full range. Especially considering its brands comprise around half of the worldwide grocery market share.

Secondly, consider how a weak pound may also drive overseas buyers to look to British suppliers for pound-based pricing. This will allow them to realise the benefit when the Sterling costs are converted back into their own stronger currencies. UK suppliers could see new market openings and opportunities to trade overseas that once didn’t exist.

British supply may suddenly become in vogue.

Silver Lining in Currency Battles

For procurement teams choosing to buy domestically, a move such as this will mean significant focus on supplier sourcing and close inspection of supplier relationships. Necessary checks and due diligence would have to be built in, in order to ensure any changes in supply didn’t leave the business at risk.

Equally procurement professionals working supply side in the UK should seek to advise the business on how to make the most of new opportunities and negotiate effectively in supply relationships.

Brexit is rather like Marmite in that it divided the nation. But while there are fears about the UK’s future after Brexit, recent currencies-related battles have highlighted a potential silver lining.

Now could actually be the time where we see both onshore and offshore buyers eyeing up UK supply options over going overseas or opting for their foreign domestic choices.

Procurement would need to ensure necessary checks, due diligence and information management in new sourcing activities. There would be a need to ensure swift and effective onboarding. New contracts and relationships would have to carefully managed to minimise ongoing trading risk with new partners.

But if procurement can pull this off, who’s to say this cloud couldn’t have a silver lining?

What Can Procurement Learn From 2016?

From politics to procurement – 2016 has changed our outlooks. But what can the profession learn as we head towards the new year?

politics of change

I’m not a political person, never have been, but maybe 2016 has put paid to that. It could be my advancing years or the direct relevance the events of 2016 have created, but politics has now piqued my interest.

Furthermore, as a business owner, parent and amateur investor, it’s beholden on me to be well informed and to put in place risk mitigating strategies should the worst happen.

Different Outlook

To anyone who knows me, I think I’d fairly describe myself as a cautious optimist. Someone who believes in the enduring power of ‘doing the right thing’. I must say this outlook has been tested to its limits these last three months.

And with the result of last Wednesday’s US election now a reality, I find myself having to re-evaluate this mantra.

I think it’s fair to say that few people in business expected the UK to vote for Brexit. Even fewer expected the US to elect Donald Trump as President. To say that the pollsters who predicted strong contrary outcomes have been wrong-footed is an understatement.

As BBC correspondent Mark Mardell wrote on Wednesday, “it is perhaps ironic that our two countries, with a reputation for stable political systems, have declared political revolutions of such importance”.

Ironic or inevitable, if find myself asking. As Trump put it, his path to victory was ‘not a campaign, but a great movement’.

Undoubtedly from these 2 cataclysmic events there is the notion that globalisation has given folk a raw deal. There is a belief that the gap between rich and poor has widened. This is clearly nothing new.

But the events of 2016 are now showing us that people are willing to express their desire for change in a manifest way, and that the UK’s referendum and US elections have facilitated this expression. Clearly the belief that ‘we need people who change the world, rather than describe it’ has never been more true.

Politics & Procurement

So aside from emotive connotations of such seismic change, what can the Procurement profession learn about these events?

I’ve always read with interest the term ‘Force Majeure’ in contracts, essentially the common clause that frees parties from legal obligation when an extraordinary event occurs. Is 2016 now the year of Force Majeure?

As organisations have historically rushed to globalise their supply chains, are we now going to see a reversal of this and a more localised, protectionist approach to markets? The challenge for Procurement Leaders will be how to predict these events and to mitigate the risks associated with global change.

Without doubt we are entering an era that favours a less politically correct approach of yesteryear, one that rewards forthright opinions and direct action. The new breed of procurement practitioner will need to build this thinking into category plans, sourcing strategies and contracts.

I, for one, will be watching with interest.