Category Archives: Procurious News

Procurious Big Idea #40 – Helping CPOs With Change

Jade Campbell, Senior Consultant with The Faculty says CPOs are working in a constantly changing environment and need to be able to lead their teams through it.

Jade believes all procurement professionals have a role to play in supporting the CPOs in dealing with these changes.

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Procurious Big Idea #39 – Creating Awareness At University Level

Huey Chan, Analyst at The Faculty, believes a lack of awareness at the university level is harming procurement’s ability to attract the right talent.

Huey says this talent drought can be combatted by CPOs spending time getting in front of students and talking about what a job in procurement entails.

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Attitude vs. Skill and Being 25 Again – Your Procurious Discussions

It’s been a while since we wrapped up some of the discussions on Procurious, but the questions and answers have still been coming in thick and fast.


This month, we’ve selected three of our most popular discussions, covering topics including attitudes and skills of procurement professionals, eSourcing and the chance to revisit our career choice.

What is more important, the right attitude or the right skill set?

This question really caught the eye of the community and has great resonance in procurement and supply chain given all the recent talk of talent gaps and recruitment struggles.

For many employers, finding the right person is more than the skills and experience that they possess, but ensuring that the candidate will be a good cultural fit. But which of these is more important?

The common consensus in the community was that, in a straight choice, it was attitude, rather than skill, that was more important. James Ferguson struck a chord with the belief that “new skills can be taught, attitude can’t”.

The right attitude allows the right skills to be learned more readily, with the individual willing to learn and helping with the overall development of the team too.

However, Darren Niblo and Monica Palacios had the opposite stance. Darren argued that attitudes could change over time, while Monica stated that it was dependent on the seniority of the individual, with executives needing the skills (i.e. understanding the environment) in order to succeed.

What’s the first thing that comes into your head when you hear the word ‘eSourcing’?

This is another hot topic, with procurement increasingly moving towards working electronically with new technology. However, a lack of clarity can sometimes inhibit the use of technology or systems, even when they seem very straightforward.

The most popular answer from the community was from Samantha Coombs, whose definition of eSourcing was “Procure-to-pay all in one platforms, with bolt on contract management blocks as and when required”, also stating that the process was “revolutionising procurement globally”.

Other key themes associated with the concept of eSourcing were:

  • Efficiency
  • Centralisation
  • Driving savings for the business
  • Repeatability
  • Collaborative and easy for both sides
  • Innovative

Two answers also highlighted the networking opportunities eSourcing presented, either speaking to an existing contact or inviting new/unknown suppliers into the RFx process.

And one thing we can all agree on is that it is a positive move away from endless printing, photocopying and envelope stuffing!

If you were 25 again, would you follow the same career path?

 

Posed by Procurious’ own Jordan Early, the question comes from the Procurious interview with ISM CEO Tom Derry.

Tom told Procurious, “If I was 25 again, I couldn’t think of a field that I would personally find more fascinating than a corporate career in procurement and supply chain.”

Perhaps unsurprisingly for a community of highly motivated, intelligent and progressive procurement and supply chain professionals, the verdict was unanimous – we would all make the same choice given our time again.

With more people actively seeking a career in procurement, the number of individuals ‘falling’ into the profession is decreasing. And with the opportunity to be an architect of change and drive business efficiency, mentor new entrants and push forward the boundaries of the profession, why wouldn’t you want to work in procurement!

Once again, we’d like to thank you for being part of our community and sharing your knowledge with your peers and colleagues.

If you have a burning question you would like answered, head over to the Discussion forum and pick the brains of your fellow professionals.

4 Recommendations for Achieving World-Class Procurement Performance

According to newly-published research from The Hackett Group, world-class procurement organisations are now delivering services at 17 per cent less cost than typical companies.

World class procurement findings from The Hackett Group

The research identified that procurement organisations are able to gain an upper hand thanks to their deep understanding of the needs of their business, and in-turn reacting quickly to changing requirements, driving higher overall value and greater stakeholder satisfaction.

To achieve world-class performance, The Hackett Group recommends that procurement organisations take a structured approach to improving the customer experience, focusing in four areas:

Identify stakeholders

First they should identify and understand key stakeholders, and segment their internal customers based on attributes such as importance and level of influence within the organisation. In addition to seniority, issues such as language, culture, and even personality should be taken into account.

On average procurement organisations who’ve improved stakeholder alignment report 28 per cent higher savings than those that don¹t.

Satisfaction surveys

Next, procurement organisations can develop formal customer satisfaction surveys tailored to key stakeholders, taking care to use a variety of ad-hoc and structured approaches to gain deeper insights.

The research indicated that procurement organisations viewed as a true business partner report 68 per cent higher savings than those viewed as gatekeepers, reflecting higher effectiveness at both cost reduction and cost avoidance.

Take feedback onboard

Procurement organisations should also analyse the results of customer satisfaction surveys, and ensure that stakeholders understand their feedback is being valued and utilised.

Self-service tools

Finally, procurement can improve their level of customer service by taking a holistic view, and by implementing self-service tools to answer common inquiries and provide real-time visibility into order status.

Chris Sawchuk – Global Procurement Advisory Leader, notes: “They have increased the scope of their spend influence, the savings they are able to capture, and the value delivered beyond hard-dollar savings, in part by emphasising on-demand analytics and market intelligence, and realigning their service portfolio.”

To view the research in full visit http://bit.ly/1BQOSeJ

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How To Start A Discussion Topic On Procurious

Today we’re going back to basics and revisiting one of the most popular areas on Procurious – namely, Discussions.

How to start a discussion topic on Procurious

At the time of writing over 400 discussion topics have been started on the site, with a colossal 1700+ answers from the Procurious community.

For those yet to dip their toes into the Discussion waters we present a few quick tips so you can start creating topics with ease.

Select a Topic

First thing’s first, begin by selecting a topic that best represents your chosen Discussion area. We’ve provided quite a broad selection to choose from, including: Technology, Sustainability, Supply Chain, Professional Development, Procurement, Industry Groups,  Indirect and Direct Categories, Big Ideas and Lifestyle.

Select a Subtopic

Depending on your topic of choice you’ll be presented with corresponding subtopic options here.

Now comes the important part…

Look to the ‘Ask a question or start a discussion’ field. We recommend beginning your question here, but limit it to a maximum of 20 words. Why? We display the very latest Discussions on the Procurious Community page – you can see an example here.

Procurious Discussion

Because of this, resist the urge to pop a URL in here. Instead pop it in the optional ‘Add more details’ section if you feel a URL is relevant to your Discussion.

Please note that this isn’t a place to post ‘sales-ey’ or promotional messages.Your job here is to encourage lively and thought provoking debate.

Then all that’s left to do is hit ‘Post’ and your Discussion will be live and appear on Procurious.

How to contribute to a Discussion

Once you’ve headed to the Discussions page and chosen a Discussion that takes your fancy, click ‘Answer’ to add your reply and don’t forget to hit ‘Add Answer’ when done.

How to upvote a reply

Whenever you reply to a Discussion, other Procurious members can choose to ‘upvote’ you. Answers/replies that are deemed the most worthy by your fellow community members will likely get the most votes and appear at the top of the Discussion. No pressure…

Obviously please refrain from openly abusing the platform or fellow members – we rely on you (the community) to report any inappropriate posts or sales pitches, which neatly takes us too…

Reporting a Discussion

You can choose to report a Discussion topic or individual reply by clicking the ‘Report’ prompt located next to the offending item.

Share a Discussion

Want to encourage more Procurious members to weigh in? Just click on ‘Share’ to promote the Discussion topic in your Community feed.