Category Archives: Procurious News

Working From Home Is Resilient, But Is It Sustainable In Procurement?

The coronavirus pandemic disrupted Procurement in unimaginable ways. Running Procurement from home is possible, but is it sustainable?


The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted the workforce in ways we have never experienced, affecting also Procurement departments and Procurement Outsourcing (PO) providers. Shared service center locations first across Asia and then the rest of the world became hot spots, leading to a rush of company initiatives to enable procurement professionals to productively work from home. IBM was successful in moving 99% of its Procurement Outsourcing teams from 60 centers across 40 countries into a home office environment in only 10 days without service degradation (1), proving that running a Procurement business working from homeis possible and productivity can be maintained when a business can react quickly, but is it sustainable? Have critical activities just been postponed or is this is the new business as usual? Three considerations for sustained resiliency.

#1. Make regularly working from home part of your team’s DNA

While many of us are used to working from home in some capacity, over 80% of our procurement professionals have never done so on a regular basis.  And just because our workforce can work from home does not mean they are able and willing to do so long-term.

But returning to the office means finding the balance between safety and productivity for our teams, and deciding whether to aim for a quick return to the office or a more comprehensive re-modeling toward “borderless workplaces” where staff works from a combination of office, client site and/or home. Returning to the office is based on smart, quick and simple fixes: social distancing, mask wearing, and setting up sanitation protocols, such as rethinking where and when we eat and gather, how we open and close doors and use elevators. Re-modeling more fundamentally looks at how we work and defining what the worker’s purpose and intent is inside the office. Buildings become much more purpose-driven; deliberately sought out for team meetings, new employee onboarding, and collaboration sessions, with more hot desks and larger shared spaces, instead of being the default place to go for work.

But no matter in what capacity we return to the office, working from home regularly or even primarily will have to become part of our DNA going forward, as future infection waves are likely to force us out of offices again multiple times over the next few years.

Achieving this will require us to focus more than ever on internal communication. We have already seen a personalization of written communication over the past few months, with people expressing genuine care for each other, but we need to also listen to our employees and keep an eagle-eyed focus on engagement. By taking time for one-on-one discussions, acknowledging everyone’s individual challenges, ramping up appreciation and recognition, and ensuring we create virtual spaces for socializing we can maintain a sense of belonging and feeling of pride. On a collective scale, short pulse surveys can be a simple way to gauge the team about how they feel and adapt measures for greater engagement and productivity.

Ultimately our teams and their willingness to be flexible will be the first line of defense for sustained productivity in the new world.

#2: Bootstrap adjustments in operating models to accelerate your digitalization journey

Just a few months of working from home on a large scale have successfully increased the sense of urgency for digitalization and more intelligent end-to-end workflows. IBM and our clients have already seen an explosion of home-grown dashboards and trackers, aimed at gaining more visibility into procurement operations, allowing for more granular insights and daily views of the business. In the spirit of agility, we should initially allow for the creation of these “quick and dirty” data collection and visualization tools, even if it is manual and there is duplication. As we learn more about what our post-COVID-19 world will look like and the effort required to maintain a plethora of semi-manual tools becomes a burden, we can start distilling down to only a handful of tools and a new operating standard, creating the enablers for a broader roll-out of “no touch” procurement solutions, including traditional tools like catalogs, as well as newer solutions like marketplaces, chatbots, guided buying assistants, robotic process automation, and analytics to accelerate speed to insights and decision making.

Even more delicate and trust-based processes like Category Management and Strategic Sourcing can benefit from digitalization, for example by running “Virtual Sourcing Bootcamps” with business stakeholders using a series of video calls to map out purchasing plans, identify additional addressable spend and define more robust category wave plans for the year.

Additional incentives can be created for those internal clients or BPO customers who are resistant to a more permanent work from home delivery environment by redistributing real estate charges and differentiating expected employee productivity to create a price differential between home- and office-based setups.

#3: Learn to build trust virtually as a buyer and a seller

Until recently, meeting face-to-face was a non-negotiable prerequisite for the signing of large contracts, which we at IBM have experienced both as a supplier of Procurement Outsourcing, but also a buyer agent with our own and our customer’s suppliers. Finding a way to make customers comfortable pulling the trigger on multi-million-dollar contracts with little to no human contact is going to be a key success factor for our new future.

In the outsourcing world, visiting one or more delivery centers is a staple in every sales pursuit, but with increasingly distributed teams and a desire to reduce non-essential business travel, we are now showcasing our teams and their capabilities virtually. Using a mixture of live and pre-recorded videos, online whiteboarding tools and virtual roundtables with practitioners we have been able to create an authentic virtual delivery experience to aid in the sales process.

Experiment with virtual collaboration tools not just internally, but get comfortable using them with clients and suppliers to co-create, or hear from experts and practitioners that wouldn’t otherwise have been flown in. Focus your travel dollars and effort on one key meeting or workshop and augment it with a few virtual “visits” to round out the picture.

Summary

Leading a borderless workplace Procurement team is possible and can even deliver superior results if employees are engaged, but ensuring sustainability requires active shaping of your team’s DNA, a more digitalized operating model and the confidence to build trust in a virtual environment. Sometimes creativity requires constraints to really flourish, and let’s use the existing restrictions as an opportunity to emerge from this crisis stronger than when we entered it.

By Matthew Bounds & Martin Esser. For more information about operational resiliency, read:

·       Business Process Outsourcing (BPO) Services for business continuity and resiliency ibm.com/bpo

·       Building operational resiliency for anytime, anywhere and any situation

Footnote: (1) IBM Services blog, “Building operational resiliency for anytime, anywhere and any situation”, May 4, 2020, https://www.ibm.com/blogs/services/2020/05/04/building-operational-resiliency-for-anytime-anywhere-and-any-situation/

C’mon Procurement Pros – Pucker Up And Get Your Tech Dollars Now

NOW is the time to start a robust process to select, fund and implement a new technology system. 


Your CFO needs some love right now – supply chain isn’t something they’ve had to worry about much before…because you had it all covered!!  For the first time in their careers they’ve had to get into the details of how you keep it all going.  Your poor pandemic-battle-scarred CFO is now looking for some new ways to mitigate future business continuity risks.

Procurement and supply chain leaders around the world have the answers to future potential business disruption woes – what’s needed is some serious investment in technology!

COVID-19 has placed the risk of future global supply chain disruptions at the top of the C-suite’s agenda. Not wanting to be caught out again, company leaders are desperate for a better, faster way to recover the next time a crisis strikes.

Their eyes are firmly fixed on supply chain.

So, it’s time to wipe the dust of all those technology business cases – and get on Zoom, pucker up to the c-level and ask for the cash.

It’s the right time

The pandemic caught us out. It stripped away the luxury of time, revealing the real supply chain risks that we knew had been lurking just below the water line for years.

The tide went out and our weaknesses were exposed – a lack of visibility into our multi-layered supply chains, an overdependence on single geographies and single supply source and a lack of agility to pivot and close the supply gaps.

As we move forward, supplier risk, supplier collaboration, value analysis, cost reduction, quality, and compliance will be more important than ever. 

NOW is the time to start a robust process to select, fund and implement a new technology system. 

How to pucker up

But how can you make sure you select the right system and construct a convincing business case, especially when budgets are being slashed across the board?

Here’s your guide to technology selection and adoption, pulled together from years of experience.

Step One – make sure you meet the business needs

It starts with understanding needs. As procurement and supply chain pros, we all know how to run a solid needs analysis….so I don’t need to labour this point.

To decide what works for your company and suppliers, remember the 80/20 rule.  For example, if 80% of your spend is on contingent labour, you are better off looking at a system that specialises in that functionality. 

What system is best?

Once you know your company needs, it’s time to narrow down the provider playing field.

This can get confusing, because you might pick your top three and accidentally end up comparing apples to oranges. One system could be a full end-to-end suite, and you’re comparing it to a contract management point solution and a sourcing tool!

It’s easy to get overwhelmed; there are literally hundreds of e-procurement technology suppliers in the marketplace right now.

About 10 years ago we saw a big push towards ‘best of breed’ solutions. There were very few fully-integrated suites that were intuitive and easy to use. Plus, a lot of companies had budget limitations, so they looked to point solutions for contracts, P2P, sourcing, supplier management, analytics, etc. 

That worked for a while, but then it became a nightmare to maintain all those integrations and the systems lacked true interoperability.  

Then came the race for fully integrated suites, which led to the likes of SAP Ariba, Coupa, Ivalua and Jaggaer who emerged to lead the pack today.

Will the strong preference for the fully integrated suites continue? That remains to be seen. One thing is for sure, we will see a thinning out of the market as some of the best of breed start-ups struggle for cash.

But only you will know what’s right for your company.

Finding the love…and the cash

Once you’ve chosen your tech system, it’s time to get senior-level buy-in. How can you make your case convincing?

It comes down to giving a clear, compelling ‘why’. Why now? Why this system? What will it mean for the company?

Some great messaging that would resonate with the c-suite right now would be:

  • Systems give transparency
  • Systems give control
  • Systems give confidence

As well as these overarching messages, you should tailor specific business case messaging and justification for investment in your system for different members of the c-suite.  For example:

Chief Executive Officer – mitigate business continuity risk and future profitability

Chief Financial Officer – cost control and visibility

Chief Marketing Officer – reputation risk, protecting brands and fostering innovation

Head of Operations – efficiency and continuity

Financial Controller – well, it’s obviously about control!

Another tip for developing your business case messaging is to reach out to your online peer community and look through social media, to find stories that support your reasons for investing in tech.

There’s nothing the c-level likes more than to do better (or avoid the same mistakes) than the competition. Your stories and examples on how peers are handling problems will be a powerful tool for motivating your senior leadership team to invest in your recommended technology. 

Keep a c-suite huddle

It’s critical to ensure you have a wide base of support across the senior leadership team so that your project has strong foundations.

Stay close to the c-suite throughout the project.  Don’t ever assume the support you secure today will endure. Keep them regularly updated to ensure your technology project stays top of mind (and the corporate strategic priority list!).

Also, beware the trophy-seeking sponsor who could be using your supply chain technology project as a pawn in their political power play. It is always difficult to pick these people, but the wrong choice could threaten your project’s success. You don’t want everything to go down the drain when your board sponsor’s career bets don’t pay off. 

Ensure change management isn’t funded out of small change

Business cases for tech have always focussed on headcount reductions (hard numbers based on FTEs taken out of Accounts Payable, administration etc) and efficiencies (more of a soft number) on the value side, and licensing and implementation on the cost side for investment in technology. Don’t forget to also factor in the total cost of ownership. Customisation costs, implementation, and productivity losses and gains are all important financial considerations.

All of these cost and other benefits are important, but you must ensure you include a significant budget for change management, training, user implementation.

As a profession, we have not had enough focus on how to implement technology; that’s our weak point. It’s difficult to ensure the organisation is gaining the full benefit of the system they have invested in – and for the most part, we do a pretty lousy job of it.

That’s because these are change management projects, not technology projects. It’s so little about systems and so much about the people who use them.

Too often, the implementation budget is the first thing to go when CFOs want a quick financial win. Don’t fall prey to their argument that people will work it out, or that it’s all straightforward. That logic is precisely how and why many technology projects fail.

Fiercely guard your change management budget, and make sure you have a dedicated project team to make it a success.

You can do this

This is your chance to step up and lead, showing your potential for a more senior role.

Given the high failure rate of these systems right now, it may be a high-risk strategy to take on the leadership of a procurement or supply chain technology implementation. But with risk comes reward; your successful project will be a great asset to your career progression and increase your visibility.

More importantly, it will prove that you understand the business and know how to solve complex issues.

As we work our way through this latest supply chain disruption, we are (sadly) capturing the real costs of this pandemic and will have much stronger financial proof points for investment in technology.

If this kind of disruption happens again, we know the magnitude of what it is going to cost. So we must put systems in place that will respond much faster to mitigate these potential losses.

Now is the time to step up and put forward your argument for investment. We may never have such a fertile and receptive audience as we do right now.

Act now, while the spotlight is on supply chain.  Don’t waste a crisis.

This blog is an excerpt from a talk given by Procurious founder Tania Seary, as part of the SIG Procurement Technology Summit. Want even more expert advice on choosing and implementing a new procurement technology system? Register for Matt Stewart’s podcast series

RFP Beware – It’s Not Just About Ticking The Boxes

Don’t get caught out by using a template without thinking! The result can give you nightmares!


I was recently asked to describe the worst procurement project that I had been involved in. While not the worst, this story certainly highlights the importance of engaging procurement teams early and not blindly following templates!

The scenario

I was in the role of a buyer supporting an internal customer and I took over a project at evaluation stage. The evaluation team had individually assessed the bid responses and the team had convened to discuss their findings. A weighted attribute model had been selected to help identify what criterion was valued over others.

The template bites back

The ranking of the bidders evaluation scores were revealed and the project lead was shocked. “This isn’t what we expected? These aren’t the best proposals that meet our needs, these are the weaker ones?!”

The problem became obvious. The boilerplate RFP template had been used without tailoring it to the business problem they were trying to solve.  Most critically, the evaluation criteria percentage hadn’t been adjusted at all. Innovation was set to a default of 10% whe,n in fact, it was the most critical factor the project!

What is a weighted attribute evaluation model?

A weighted attribute model is one of the most common evaluation models used in procurement. It helps to identify the proposals that best meet the most important buyer needs. This could be requirements like: methodology, project management, resources or capability and capacity.

A typical weighted attribute model looks like:

Track record10%
Technical skills25%
Project team and key personnel20%
Methodology35%
Price10%

There are many different ways to approach the weighted attribute model. (Top tip, don’t put the percentages too close together otherwise there will be nothing distinguishing one bid from the other!)

Project resuscitation

What would you do if you inherited a project at evaluation stage and the RFP didn’t actually ask the market for the complete picture that you wanted? And worse, that the evaluation criteria didn’t match the most critical elements of the project?

These were my options:

  1. Cancel and start again – this wouldn’t be fair to the bidders who had already put in the time and effort to respond.
  2. Reissue parts of the tender questions – the submission deadline had already passed but we could seek further clarification responses. This would risk our reputation in the market.
  3. Create a second stage and interview each bidder to better understand their proposal and see if they have the capacity and ability to scale up to our desired needs.

We selected option number 3 and ran a second stage process. The presentations enabled us to drill down into each proposal and meet with each company face to face. They were able to better understand the objectives we were seeking and we were able to better understand the solution they were putting forward.

3 lessons that changed the way I approach evaluation

  1. One size doesn’t fit all

A template with a generic model can’t be assumed to meet the needs of every project in every situation. It’s important that the needs are thought about carefully and that the right model is chosen for the project.

  • Clunky RFP processes aren’t always right – especially where innovation is required

Consider what parts of the process must be executed e.g. notice to market, instead of paper based responses – ask the bidders to complete a simple two pager, then hold a dialogue to flush out the rest of the solution.

  • Think carefully about what is important to the success of the project

The commercial team could have determined what was most important to the project. Pairwise analysis is a great tool to help with this!

The traditional RFP model’s days are numbered and will hopefully soon become a thing of the past. It does not suit all processes and yet it’s still frequently used. If the entire process can’t evolve to be more efficient, then we have to change the way we approach evaluation to ensure we’re selecting the best company for the job, rather than the company that can write the best response.

Join Procurious to connect with 40,000 other ambitious procurement professionals and get free access to networking, industry news, training and much more. 

How The COVID-19 Crisis Will Permanently Change Expectations From Procurement Organisations

COVID-19 is permanently redefining the role of procurement organisations…


Transformational procurement trends that were already underway are now rapidly accelerating due to new working realities. Procurement organisations will be expected to play new roles as companies respond to and recover from this pandemic and its fallout. Organisations will need to actively identify and contain various sources of risks while strengthening their competitive advantage as economies and supply chains recover. Those who learn from the COVID-19 crisis and quickly meet these challenges will forge a competitive advantage.

As corporate leaders’ expectations from Procurement significantly increase—both for the new normal and future challenges—Procurement leaders should deploy six tenets in order to successfully position their organisations:

  1. Become leaders of scenario and contingency planning
  2. Improve real-time visibility into supply chain risk
  3. Develop ability to rapidly deploy cash controls
  4. Increase P&L contribution beyond historical norms
  5. Accelerate digitalisation efforts
  6. Invest in talent

1.     Become leaders of scenario and contingency planning

COVID-19 has highlighted that most companies were not prepared to address a catastrophic event and the ensuing economic uncertainty. Going forward, organisations need to assess supply chain vulnerabilities, develop scenario models, and update associated corporate protocols and risk mitigation strategies. Externally, this means developing macroeconomic and supplier-specific assessments of event likelihood and impact and detailed reaction plans to mitigate potential fallout. Internally, it means identifying how policies affecting employees (e.g., travel, remote working model, supplier engagement) need to evolve to promote safety and productivity.

Procurement organisations will be expected to continue playing a key planning and coordination role, ensuring close engagement with other functions to increase the speed and effectiveness of required actions. Leaders should direct their teams to codify the learnings of this crisis, develop scenarios and contingencies, and establish dedicated Centers of Excellence.

 2.     Improve real-time visibility into supply chain risk

Having real-time visibility into evolving sources of risk is critical for initiating mitigation plans on time. Procurement should deploy permanent control towers to monitor specific risks (e.g., financial, operational, geopolitical) to identify early warning signals and deploy the appropriate responses. This includes re-examining the company’s risk of supply across suppliers, geographies and facilities, and proactively identifying supply alternatives, strategic alliances, and hedging strategies should a catastrophic event impair access to critical inputs. 

Additionally, organisations must develop the necessary processes to monitor key suppliers at a detailed level – tracking financial viability, operational capacity, talent management, transportation networks, etc. These metrics can be used to establish a supplier risk score to assist in response prioritisation and supplier segmentation. 

 3.     Develop ability to rapidly deploy cash controls

Having free cash flow is vital in times of crisis. Procurement will need solutions to rapidly slow cash outflow while minimising operational and cultural disruption. 

Having hypervisibility into spend allows companies to quickly distinguish between essential and discretionary spend in times of systemic shock. This allows Procurement to deploy the right processes—with senior leadership support—to control all substantial discretionary spending, establishing criteria to allow, deny, or delay expenses. Further, organisations should take a more nuanced approach to payables, adopting different terms based on suppliers’ financial position and criticality.

In parallel, companies should optimise inventory, increasing cross-functional demand planning, portfolio simplification, and material substitution plans. Doing so will allow for better use of current inventory and free cash for other uses while minimising production disruption.

 4.     Increase P&L contribution beyond historical norms

Delivering savings is the core mandate of procurement teams, and many are feeling increased pressure to further deliver to alleviate financial hardships.

Externally, this requires prioritising actions and suppliers based on a keen understanding of market changes (e.g., commodity and labor rates, supply base changes). Procurement also needs to create new sources of leverage using a holistic set of tools, including e-auctions, product teardowns, should cost models, and stronger collaboration with strategic suppliers.

Internally, Procurement is well-positioned to play a critical role in aligning leaders to reset company behaviours, including identifying places where historical consumption patterns have been wasteful. Such moves require organisational trade-offs, so Procurement must identify the least disruptive actions and lay out the costs to enable informed decision making. For most organisations, this requires an unprecedented level of transparency and an ability to influence internal clients and leaders beyond what has been required. 

Those that exercise these capabilities—while working closely with leadership, the business, and other functions—will see step changes in savings. By doing so, they will help their companies better absorb shocks and reinvest in corporate priorities.

 5.     Accelerate digitalisation efforts

Diligent use of technology has supported procurement functions navigating COVID-19. Going forward, many companies will need to accelerate on-going digitalisation efforts and adopt well-established technologies like P2P automation. It also means accelerating the use of more advanced technologies to monitor risk, analyse spend, surface savings opportunities, onboard and manage suppliers, and conduct market events electronically. Having these capabilities in place will ensure procurement teams remain effective and agile in times of crisis – working remotely from peers, clients, and suppliers.    

6.     Invest in talent

As Procurement takes on more responsibility, roles and required capabilities will evolve. Procurement will be at the forefront of strategic thinking, cross-functional management, and external alliance management. New skills will be required – including management of AI, automation, and data science. Procurement leaders need to rethink their talent management strategies, create new roles, increase training, and ensure adequate talent pools.

Path forward: COVID-19 has redefined the role procurement organizations need to play in times of crisis and recovery. Given the severity of COVID-19, the long recovery ahead, and the potential of other such events reoccurring, the expectations of procurement organizations will remain higher on a permanent basis. Procurement functions face a key decision point in where they go post COVID-19—those that rapidly learn from the experience and pursue a “new normal” will be well-positioned in the long term, achieving outsized returns.

This article was originally published on LinkedIn on 24 April 2020 by Daniel WeiseIt has been republished here with permission.

Want to keep up with the latest coronavirus and supply chain news? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news in a content series via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. We’re stronger together. Join us now.

Spend Analysis Is A Secret Weapon

Spend Analysis can help build a roadmap on category sourcing and capture savings.


I firmly believe that spend analysis is probably the simplest yet smartest exercise a procurement department can conduct. And I’m not talking about leveraging a spend cube technology and running a GL file to get some rapid classification, albeit, that is the first step many of us take. But how about those of us who don’t have a robust spend technology deployed yet? Well, good news is that the value of analyzing spend is not in the complexity of the tool, or the visualizations that it produces, or even how quick they are produced; but it lies in the power of understanding spend patterns and asking the right questions behind those visuals and tables.

For many years my team and myself have conducted spend analysis exercises in MS Excel or Access and things have worked out very well, and we’ve learned a fair share of valuable lessons in terms of both effective spend classification, as well as result interpretation. This last one critical in operationalizing and mobilizing procurement teams. Unquestionably, these lessons when applied together can become a secret weapon to an organization, and even if every company applies them, the “secret” part of it remains true as every spend profile is different to each company as well as the strategies employed to develop a competitive edge. Here are some of the things, I’ve learned from analysis dozens of spend profiles over the years:

Spend Analysis can help build a roadmap on category sourcing and capture savings. This is no secret, as it is the primary reason why anyone would run a spend analysis. The mechanisms by which spend is classified and categorized help organizations understand where money is going, to which vendors, in which regions, on which categories and how diluted or dispersed spend might be across these areas. Accurately classifying spend is the first step in identifying levers across spend categories, where aggregated volumes might drive value or how “quick-and-easy” it might be for the organization to identify and drive savings to the organization.

Spend Analysis is key to identifying tail spend, even more so, in defining it. Which seems to be almost a bi-product of the spend analysis exercise itself. Because Spend Analysis relies in tying suppliers to categories, irrespective of the taxonomy used, thresholds are typically set based on spend levels, which ultimately will put all the “unclassified” spend in one large bucket conventionally (but not conveniently) addressed as “tail”. Let me tell you a secret, Tail Spend is a big problem for a lot of organizations because that’s where a lot of unmanaged, unsupervised spend goes, this is where procurement policies and procedures die and all controls are lost, but inherently, where a lot opportunity resides. Controlling tail spend is a major priority for organization, especially those who have already executed on a sourcing roadmap and deployed (some) category management.

Spend Analysis helps – very accurately – identify procurement behaviors. Remember that tail spend conversation we just had? Well, analyzing tail spend can help us determine when buyers across the organization are buying from suppliers who are part of managed categories but who are not part of the negotiated deals the organization has in place, repeatability of this pattern with the same “unmanaged” vendor may mean the buyer has a preference towards that vendor, for whichever reason (e.g. buying from Lowes where a contract with Grainger exists); conversely, finding many “unmanaged” suppliers under the same category may mean the buyer isn’t aware of the deals that might be in place with a preferred vendor (i.e. buying from Fastenal, Lowes, Amazon, and McMaster Carr instead of simply Grainger), doesn’t know how to follow a process to purchase from that vendor, or more interestingly, the buyer may have a preferred payment mechanism or process to use, which by the way, it typically defaults to the one that’s easiest. A good rule to follow is that the easiest procurement process should also be the right process, needless to say organically decreasing rogue spend.

Spend Analysis enables compliance by driving visibility into all the things above, and helps us start asking ourselves questions about why we see purchasing patterns that should not exist, define how prevalent they are, what regions or departments are reoccurring offenders or even understand how some of those vendors are being paid. I’ve seen a lot of customers who prefer one payment method over others, some like the P-Card approach as they benefit from the rebates, some others prefer limiting their P-Card spend as much as possible in order to drive technology efficiencies into the payment process – think of dynamic discounting and supply chain financing methods, as some of these benefits.

Last but not least, spend analysis is a tool to mitigate risk across supply base and enhance supplier relationship management best practices. Think about it, knowing how much you spend with a certain supplier can tell you how much leverage you really have to negotiate pricing, but it can also tell you how much you rely on a given supplier to enable the continuous operations of your organization. If a stationery supplier goes bankrupt overnight, your business may be able to stomach that. But what happens when a supplier in a more critical category is badly exposed to risk, perhaps a supplier who produces a patented part to your broader supply chain process across the world? Knowing how much the business relies on its extended supplier network, with a high confidence level, is critical in managing inherent risk and adapt quickly when needed.

The value of ongoing and disciplined spend analysis can offer many insights into how the organisation operates. It provides windows into efficiencies and opportunities that may be captured by the business.  Moreover, spend analysis is not a “one-and-done” thing, the more frequently it is done, the clearer the trends and patterns become. If you are able to integrate spend analysis into other valuable source-to-pay tools and technologies, the company can really benefit from quick improvements and a sustainable procurement function. Spend analysis can enable a competitive advantage, you may even want to see it as the most exclusive secret weapon at your disposal.

Here’s How To Hire Better People

The coronavirus crisis has created a number of challenges for hiring. Here’s how to hire the best people during this difficult time.


It’s a fact that most business leaders already know, but one that this crisis has highlighted more than ever, and that is: your people are your everything. In volatile and stressful situations like the present, the best talent shines through more than ever, and can literally be the difference between companies that make it and those that don’t. This begs the inevitable question: How do I attract and hire great talent? 

Back in March when the world was a rather different place, I took part in Procurious’  Big Ideas Summit where I advised procurement leaders how to stay ahead of their competition by hiring better people.

Since that time, the situation has, obviously, completely changed and companies now have additional obstacles to overcome to attract the best talent. Here,  I’ll share how my clients are staying ahead of the game right now and in doing so what they have learnt about how to make their recruitment process far more agile, even when we return to ‘normality’.

Here’s how you can follow in their footsteps and hire the best talent right now: 

Hiring via video conferencing

Would you hire someone without meeting them?

At the beginning of this crisis I posed this question to a number of our key clients and the answer in 95% of cases was an emphatic ‘no’. However, as the realisation has grown that this situation is not changing any time soon, I have experienced a shift in mindset. 

Hiring managers are being forced to reconsider their stance and we are seeing a new approach to hiring, the result of which may have positive long term effects and change our attitude to remote recruitment forever.

One of our financial services clients started a proactive recruitment drive across their Global Procurement function at the beginning of the year. Far from slowing down they have continued to recruit, engage and on-board using video conference technology, taking advantage of the fact there is a pool of highly talented furloughed or disengaged talent in the marketplace.

Being a global player it’s a given that their procurement team needs to be able to engage remotely with stakeholders on a daily basis. Their belief is that by embracing the video conferencing interview process, they are able to clearly assess if a candidate will be able to drive stakeholder engagement using exactly those tools and technology. If a candidate can’t perform remotely at an interview, how then can they influence and engage with key stakeholders around the world remotely? 

In addition, their expectation is that we will see an increase in home working practice once we exit lockdown, compared to before COVID19, therefore peer to peer relationships will need to be built through remote interaction.

 Speeding up the recruitment process

If one thing is for sure about great talent, it’s that they always have other options. For this reason, you’re likely to lose talent in long and drawn out recruitment processes as someone else will simply beat you to it. In addition to this, your recruitment process says a lot about your company, and if it takes too long, this will make candidates question how efficient and effective the rest of your business is. 

When it comes to recruitment processes, the current crisis has presented an interesting opportunity. Usually, senior appointments are drawn out as they often require international travel and the coordination of different people all around the world. Given travel is currently not possible, companies have a unique opportunity to simplify. 

One of our manufacturing clients has worked closely with their HR team to redesign their interview process to a single stage panel interview, attended by all stakeholders. Where previously the process may have been drawn out over 3 or 4 stages and weeks and weeks, now the decision for critical hires is made in days as opposed to months. 

Whilst the change to process for this client is being driven by exceptional times, they believe that if they can continue to foster this ethos there is no doubt that they will put themselves ahead of their competition when it comes to engaging the best talent in the future.

Should your interview questions change because the process is remote? 

On the surface, the crisis has not really changed the fundamental scope of most roles, beyond a heightened need to be able to use technology and communicate digitally. But has it changed how we should assess people? In many ways, it has. 

One area remote interviewing has made more complex to assess is the notion of ‘cultural fit.’  It is far more difficult to ascertain natural cultural fit based on chemistry when not meeting someone face to face, therefore we need to be more scientific about what constitutes that ‘fit’. This means going back to basics and assessing key competencies rather than relying on gut feeling

In order to ascertain this, one of our clients, a food retailer,now incorporates a far greater element of questioning around self-awareness and development as part of their remote interviewing process.. For example, ‘What do you like and dislike about procurement’ helps to identify why they are in the profession and the ‘3 key areas for development’ demonstrates their depth of self- awareness.

Hiring better people

Finding talent in non-pandemic times is already a challenge. Add the changes required due to the virus, and things become even more challenging. Yet companies also have so much to learn from this crisis – and those who adapt may learn important lessons that they’ll be able to use to continue to engage top talent well into the future.

Check out Sally Davis’ presentation at Big Ideas Summit London from a few months ago here.

The Age of Influence – Are you a Player?

Could the age of influence be drawing to a close? Or does it now reflect the changing attitudes to advertising and promotion in the social media environment?

Cristiano Ronaldo (186 million followers), Ariana Grande (165 million) and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson (159 million) have gathered some of the largest audiences on Instagram. But a celebrity status and a huge following doesn’t necessarily lead to great influence. The Digital Marketing Institute has shown that there is a greater level of trust placed in an influencer versus a celebrity.  

But as an “experiencer”, you may have the most engagement of all! 

In the first article of this series I established the context for how the nature of influence is changing the digital age. As people’s consumption of media and social media changes, so does how we perceive people to be ‘influential’ in our lives. Individuals from all walks of life now have a platform to share their thoughts, experiences and daily lives. 

However, the paradox in some ways of this situation is that the younger generation have been able to build larger followings, and greater influence, despite having theoretically less to offer and share. While this is not at the expense of the older generations doing the same, Gen X and Baby Boomers are certainly lagging behind in the circles of “must know” social media influencers. 

There is still an opportunity for these generations to build their own influence on social media, but potentially against a backdrop of the waning powers of influencers as a whole. Cynicism, controversy, commercialisation and over-saturation have all played a part in the erosion of influencers’ status. Far from being an end, however, this may represent the next evolution of the digital age. 

To understand this further, we need to revisit the categorisation of influencers and view this through the lens of a shifting balance of power. 

Waning Influence and Diminishing Returns? 

Micro influencers (those with an audience of 10,000 people or fewer) are likely to be able to command an audience in their niche, irrespective of the changing environment. Many of this group are seen as ‘Experiencers’, the go-to group for recommendations about products, services and experiences.  

It’s in the grouping of the macro influencers, commanding audiences of over 250,000 people and generally found in the world of celebrity, where changes in influence may be felt most keenly. These influencers have traditionally had their seat of power on sites such as Instagram, rather than YouTube or Snapchat. 

As I mentioned in my introduction, Cristiano Ronaldo, Ariana Grande and Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson have gathered the three largest audiences on Instagram. There isn’t an out-and-out digital celebrity in the site’s top 10 accounts and certainly no politicians or other, more traditional, influencers. 

Research has shown that the influence of social media posts differs depending on whether they were posted by an influencer or a celebrity. This is largely down to the question of engagement versus impact. Celebrities may have huge audiences, but products they promote may only be applicable to a small percentage of them (engagement). And while they can reach this audience, they are unlikely to be able to change consumer behaviours (impact). 

Celebrities frequently have their own brands and products to promote, as well as those offered by marketers. All these posts may also be treated with a level of cynicism from the wider audience, part of which can be attributed to the truly eye-watering sums of money being earned for sponsored posts. 

Money = Influence? Or Influence = Money? 

Sponsored posts, adverts, product promotions. If you have a big enough audience on social media and a big enough personal profile, then you might be approached by a brand to help market their products. This can be quite a lucrative opportunity – even if you aren’t as high profile as Kim Kardashian, who reportedly charges over $250,000 for an Instagram photo.  

The greater the audience, the higher the payment (on average): 

  • Instagram: $1,000 per 100,000 followers 
  • Snapchat: starts at $500 per campaign in 24 hours 
  • YouTube: Roughly $2,000 per 100,000 followers (this could go as high as an average of nearly $4,000 with 500k+ followers) 

And these sums are still rising – and at a rate of approximately 50 per cent per year since 2017 according to the Wall Street Journal. Which somewhat flies in the face of the question of declining influence and impact. It may also go some way to explain why 75 per cent of children dream of becoming YouTubers and why many people are aiming for a hyphenated job title including the word ‘influencer’, rather than a more traditional career as experienced by previous generations.  

This is where we can loop back to our original point of why social media influencers are largely from Gen X. They are the ones who appear on reality TV, who are the new generation of footballers who already have a social media following, who understand how best to leverage their own brand and use social media to their advantage. 

Real World Influence 

A brief interlude to discuss influence in the real world. This is not to say that Dwayne Johnson and Ariana Grande don’t operate in the real world, but their influence largely comes through on social media. However, as influence doesn’t necessarily need to be linked to selling of products or promotion of brands. It can be linked to real-world events and the increasing stature of an individual. 

One such recent example can be seen in New York Democratic Governor, Andrew Cuomo. Before March 2020, Cuomo was little known outside of his state and certainly didn’t have a strong influence outside of the USA. However, Cuomo’s leadership in response to the coronavirus outbreak and how hard New York had been hit by it.  

Between January and March 2020, Cuomo’s Twitter following went up by 31 per cent, his Instagram followers by 64 per cent. Not only has his audience increased, but his reception and perception to his message, which has been described as “frank” and “honest”, with his briefings drawing praise from all corners of the political and media spectrum.  

Positive comparisons have been made with the response of other world leaders, including President Trump. Not only has this exponentially increased Cuomo’s influence across the real and digital worlds, but it has raised his profile to an extent that he is being talked about as a future Presidential candidate.  

It just goes to show how digital influence could potentially have a huge real-world impact.  

Ads and Controversy 

It could be argued that many influencers are not sufficiently attuned to the risks associated with their influence, as recent controversies have shown. Fake news, advertising poor or harmful products, not marking posts as ads and marketing goods or services to vulnerable or impressionable audiences (i.e. children) are just some of these. 

There are site-specific guidelines or requirements to do with the posting of sponsored content, but even with this content can be misleading. Any sponsored content on Instagram, for example, is required to have ‘#Ad’ at the top of the post, but it is frequently either buried in a flood of hashtags on the post or missing entirely. 

There are reports that companies actively dissuade influencers from mentioning that a post is an ad, while many also fail to disclose their paid partnerships with influencers. On the other side, the UK’s Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) has pushed a number of celebrities, including Ellie Goulding, Rita Ora and Alexa Chung, to commit to disclosing payments for sponsored posts on social media. 

This is not to tar all influencers with the same brush. Many follow the regulations as they cannot afford the reputational damage, or to pay back monies earned, when being an influencer is their sole source of income. However, from the outside, these influencers would seem to be the exception rather than the norm which further undermines their credibility and impact. 

Changing the Game 

Could greater regulation assist in this? And could many influencers who already follow the existing regulations benefit from stricter rules? There is always going to be a minority at the very least who seek to circumvent regulations, but these influencers could find themselves squeezed out through a loss of audience and influence for failing to play by the rule. 

This could be the next, much needed, evolution in the social media age. It could arrest any decline in influence and potentially remove the idea that being an influencer is not a “real career”. And by doing so, this would open the opportunity for others to become influencers and bridge the generational gap that appears to exist in the current environment. 

For procurement, it could mean having a market and audience to increase influence, both as individuals and as a profession. How procurement could leverage this changing environment will be the subject of the third and final article in this series, coming soon on Procurious. 

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Procurement Technology – What It Can And Can’t Replace In A Manufacturer’s Journey Towards Supply Chain Resilience And Agility

A review of the key elements in supplier management for manufacturers and how Source-to-Pay procurement technology can support the journey towards supply chain resilience and agility in times of crisis.


As the COVID-19 pandemic disrupts global supply chains, procurement organizations around the world are scrambling to react. There are many supply chain management lessons to learn from the Covid-19 crisis.  However, some organizations are better prepared to weather this storm than others. Many of these organizations are already using Source-to-Pay technology and are now realizing more than ever that technology is a “must have” to ensure their supply chain remains resilient and agile throughout a crisis. In this article we’ll review how supplier management capabilities in Source-to-Pay technology can free-up and enable a manufacturer’s direct material procurement team to do what they do best to ensure the supply chain remains resilient and agile: be creative and strategic.

Supplier Data Quality & Management in Decision Making

It may be the most basic level, but data management may also be the most daunting for some organizations. Supplier Data is at the core of every procurement activity, and it is critical for those dealing with direct materials in manufacturing. Often, what procurement teams end up with are multiple collections of data stored in tiny, disconnected data silos, such as: spreadsheets, MS Access databases, email and even the dreaded manila file folder and sticky note.

Obviously, these methods of capturing and recording data have limitations, and these limitations can hamper decision making in several ways, and ultimately impact the management and resilience of the organizations supply chain. Some of these challenges include limited:

  • Ability to collaborate, identify opportunities or issues and act
  • Transparency, or ability to scale data, across an organization
  • Ability to enrich data sets with other, related data sets.

These challenges in the direct material supply chain pose a real threat, especially in a time of crisis and let’s face it, there is no shortage of events that could jeopardise and/or disrupt a business, potentially impacting their profitability, business continuity, image, and reputation. Often, organizations try to band-aid the data problem, which can cause long term problems and inefficiencies long into the future. This is where Source-to-Pay systems can help – by providing procurement teams with a system that centralizes information and ensures data quality meets a high standard. This in turn enables procurement teams to better evaluate a situation, make decisions and act.

Managing a complex network of direct material suppliers

Manufacturing supply chains are notoriously complex, and this fact has been a common topic of the news media throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s a manufacturing organizations’ procurement team that is on the front lines fighting for the supply chain’s survival. However, procurement teams often lack consistent visibility beyond their tier 1 strategic suppliers for each product line, and this limits a company’s ability to ensure the materials and processes required to produce a product are consistently available.

It’s not uncommon for direct materials procurement teams to capture information on sub-tier 1 suppliers. However, organizing and making sense of this data is so challenging that it is uncommon for all but the most critical product elements in the most mature procurement organizations. This is where Source-to-Pay (S2P) technology can help, by enabling procurement teams to capture important information across the entire supply chain so they can identify potential issues early, initiate collaboration with the necessary parties and take action to support suppliers and mitigate potential issues.

Risk & Performance Management

The evaluation of direct material suppliers is often nuanced and complex depending on the final product, regulatory concerns, and other requirements. However, it is up to the procurement team to find a way to ensure that suppliers:

  • Are not risky;
  • Perform well over time;
  • Meet quality & regulatory requirements;
  • Maintains the right certifications, and more; and
  • Meet Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) expectations.

Empowered with all this information, procurement teams can ensure supply chain continuity and resiliency, and that value is maximized for the company. But it just isn’t possible to achieve the levels of organization and collaboration necessary to collect all the data from suppliers, 3rd party data providers and internal business processes to give buyers a complete picture of each supplier across the supply chain without a serious database and supporting processes. To get started and keep the process more manageable, many companies focus on a smaller subset of key suppliers.

Source-to-Pay technology can help procurement teams establish and organize campaigns to collect & update supplier information and receive real-time supplier risk management updates on important risk factors (e.g. Financial, etc.). Furthermore, these solutions can help procurement collect feedback from stakeholders, track and maintain certifications and more. With this information, procurement can rapidly identify and classify issues and then collaboratively work with suppliers on improvement plans.

Developing Suppliers: Establishing & Implementing Supplier Strategies

One of the benefits that effective supplier development programs have in common is they establish mutually beneficial partnerships between the supplier and buying company. These programs enable bilateral feedback, opportunities for product and service innovation, access to new markets and investment. The key to the success of these strategies begins with communication and transparency, both of which are also essential in times of crisis. Additionally, manufacturers with mature supplier development strategies in place tend to have:

  • Access to reliable data,
  • The ability to identify critical suppliers across all tiers of the supply chain,
  • Capabilities to monitor and manage supplier risk and performance,
  • The ability to closely collaborate with the supplier, often including commercial, operational and technical strategies and plans.

Accomplishing and maintaining each of these elements over time is often a challenge for all but the most mature procurement organizations, but it is never too soon to lay the foundation. Source-to-Pay technology can help procurement lay the foundation, by fostering communication, collaboration and better visibility across the global supply chain. 

Supply Chain Resilience and Agility

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the world is now painfully aware that even the best run supply chains can encounter significant challenges. However, some supply chains will recover faster than others because of their resilience and agility. What the best performing supply chains most likely have in common is a procurement organization with a strong data foundation to support effective decision making, the ability to collaborate and communicate with and support all tiers of their supply chain, monitor and track risk and performance and effective supplier management and development strategies that has produced close partnerships.

Throughout each of the elements described in this article, Source-to-Pay technology replaces much of the manual, non-strategic effort necessary to support and manage supplier relationships. The result is a foundation that empowers procurement teams to add more value to the organization and be better prepared to manage their supply chain through times of crisis.

What It Feels Like To Be Furloughed

Have you been furloughed during the coronavirus crisis? Many people have. Here’s a searingly honest account of what it feels like.


Matt* was suddenly and unexpectedly furloughed from his job as a sourcing consulting director at one of the US’s most recognisable businesses. He has shared his story here on the condition of anonymity. 

Life has a funny way of throwing us curveballs, hey? Just last weekend, I found a list of goals I’d made, sometime after the new year when the enthusiasm of resolutions had yet to wane. I’d included the good old standard goals, something like ‘get fitter,’ ‘scroll less!’ ‘don’t get hung up on things you can’t change!’ but there was also a solid few career ones in there. None of them, I might add, included being sent home from work, suddenly and unexpectedly, with no return date and no certainty there would even be a job to return to. But then again, was a pandemic really in anyone’s plan? I’ve since heard that some people believed it possible, but to be honest I never really gave the idea much thought. 

I’m a sourcing consulting director by trade, and I love – or, I loved – everything about my job. Helping clients transition and transform their businesses was my bread and butter, and I enjoyed the variety and challenges it afforded me. On a daily basis, I’d be confronted with new and different projects; no two clients were the same. As a natural people-person, I found the client contact invigorating and the problem solving even more so. I was often jet-setting around the country and seeing different cities while living out of a suitcase and it suited me just fine. It enabled me to get properly embedded in my work and give it my all. 

Around January, I remember seeing eerie photos of Wuhan and thinking how strange it looked and seemed. I think I saw a photo of a door welded shut on an apartment block and I reflected on how grateful I was for American freedoms, and how I never thought something even resembling a lockdown could ever happen here. Boy, was I wrong. Our doors might not be welded shut but we sure are trapped in another way. 

Have you seen the movie the Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe? If you haven’t, it’s where four English children go through their wardrobe into a land completely unrecognisable to them, called Narnia. ‘Virus life,’ to me, felt like Narnia, but not in a good sense. When the Covid-19 pandemic hit, it felt like we were safely in the wardrobe one day and then a place we truly didn’t want to be the next. 

From a work perspective, when the pandemic did hit hard, I was immediately concerned about the travel side of my job, but not my actual job, interestingly. But as a business, we were shocked at how quickly things exploded and started having an impact. Somehow, stil, I wasn’t worried. But then. 

When they told me, I didn’t really react much. I was shocked, I think, maybe a little numb. I’ve always been a risk-averse person, always doing the right thing, always trying to get a stable job and succeed at it. So when I heard I was being furloughed, I kind of got this sense of, but I’ve always done the right thing? I certainly wished it wasn’t me. In a rational sense, I got it, of course I did. I understood the dynamics, I knew that things were unstable now and changing fast. But still. 

Since being stood down from my role, time has taken on a strangely elastic sense. Sometimes days go fast, especially when I get really engaged in playing games with my family or staying up late watching a movie. I know some people’s children have driven them crazy, but I’ve honestly enjoyed my family dynamics and our closeness so much. But when I do find a minute to myself, I can’t say my mind is completely clear. My business has told me, ‘as far as they know’ that I’ll be back, but I can’t help but wonder. A few of my colleagues have been laid off and I now see the fear and dread in their eyes as they confront America’s most challenging job market. Sure, in procurement we’re weathering the storm well but nothing is for sure. I try not to think about being fired. Now I’m not ‘present’ at work, I do feel genuinely worried. 

Being furloughed has been a great time for personal reflection. Fortunately, I was in a relatively secure financial position prior to this and so far, money hasn’t been a real issue – but I know for so many people, that simply isn’t true. I’ve also paused and reflected on what is an ‘essential versus a ‘non-essential’ business – something I’d never really thought about before. All things being equal, if I was ever offered a job again, I’d definitely preference an ‘essential’ business as having a stable job is critical to me. Despite my relative financial stability, I’ll also be more conservative with cash. You truly never know what is around the corner. That’s what this pandemic has taught me. 

In life, I’ve always been used to knowing what’s coming next. It’s such a strange feeling to wake up and not have to plan anything past my morning coffee. But at the same time, it’s nice to take a breath. The future is unclear, but I feel, in procurement at least, that there’s hope.

Editor’s note: As of 20 May 2020, Matt has been officially ‘stood up’ and will be imminently returning to his role. If you enjoyed this article then read the wildly popular article You’ve been fired or made redundant. What to say to your next boss?

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Are Procurement Professionals Inherently Narcissistic?

Are you the office Narcissist? This article seeks to demystify an unloved aspect of the human psyche.


If working from home for 6 weeks has taught me anything it’s that I get a lot out of human connection. I realised that I analyse my own behaviour through interacting with others. They act as a mirror. Now all I see is my own face day in day out on yet another Zoom meeting.

Aside from noticing how bad my under eye circles have become, the Zoom meetings have forced me into a new way of conversing. I try to cut in to get heard over the cacophony of voices all talking and competing at once. This is extrovert torture, where’s my stage?

But I’m special!

But I have a unique view point!

But I’ve tackled this before!

Hmmm is this narcissism? Am I the office narcissist?

The answer is yes, partly.

How we interact with the term narcissism

Narcissism is flung about as an adjective to describe behaviours of people that we encounter in our every day lives. Whether it is hearing about the latest dating flop from your bestie or hearing the latest office drama from colleagues, the pop culture definition would label a narcissist as someone who is self-centered to an unhealthy degree.

Defining narcissism

Narcissism is commonly defined in the context of Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) which is at the extreme end of the spectrum. Psychology Today defines NPD as someone who displays “…grandiosity, a lack of empathy for other people, and a need for admiration. People with this condition are frequently described as arrogant, self-centered, manipulative, and demanding. They may also have grandiose fantasies and may be convinced that they deserve special treatment.[1]

At the heart of it they lack self-love

While we often view a narcissist as someone that loves themselves too much, talks about themselves a lot and is very self-obsessed. It runs a little bit deeper than that. Robert Greene is one of the most well-known proponents that believes narcissism comes from a lack of self-love that leads to insecurity and a lack of empathy for others.

Without this inner worth the narcissist will seek attention and validation from others to feed the beast.

Newsflash! We’re all narcissists!

What’s often missed in the pop culture definition and understanding of narcissism is that we all have it within us. Narcissism is a normal and healthy part of being human it’s just a matter of where you lie on the spectrum.

Take a light hearted test, go on

In 1979 the Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) was developed by Raskin and Hall.[2]

While this test is not a diagnostic tool, it can be used to see where you rate on the narcissism scale in very general terms. I got 12 out of 40 and rated most highly in exploitativeness, self-sufficiency and authority. I can see how these traits would complement being a leader in a commercial sector!

Are procurement professionals inherently narcissistic?

The most recent edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders lists nine criteria for NPD, it specifies that someone only needs to meet five of them to clinically qualify as a narcissist. Read on to see if you can relate to the telltale signs of a procurement narcissist.

Note: it is not a diagnostic tool, instead it measures normal expressions of narcissism. So, even someone who gets the highest possible score on the NPI does not necessarily have Narcissistic Personality Disorder.

9 signs of NPDTelltale signs of procurement narcissists
1. Grandiose sense of self-importanceThe procurement person who must talk at every meeting about themselves and won’t listen to anyone else – even if it’s information from their client that they need to hear.
2. Preoccupation with fantasies of unlimited success, power, brilliance, beauty, or ideal loveThe procurement person who won’t roll their sleeves up or get their hands dirty unless the project comes with a highly visible profile.
3. Belief they’re special and unique and can only be understood by, or should associate with, other special or high-status people or institutionsThe procurement person who corners your boss any chance they can get and deliberately cuts you out of emails and meetings involving anyone higher up the food chain.
4. Need for excessive admirationThe procurement person who copies the whole team in on an email reply back to a customer where the customer has just thanked them for completing a task.
5. Sense of entitlementThe procurement newbie who demands to be the project lead on a $10m account their first day!
6. Interpersonally exploitative behaviourThe procurement person who proclaims they have written the best category strategy in the history of all time but actually they made others do it for them.
7. Lack of empathyThe procurement person who steals air time in a team meeting to talk about how amazing they are when a colleague has just lost a large account.
8. Envy of others or a belief that others are envious of themThe procurement person who sits in on your project meeting only to then try and take it over (when they were never invited in the first place).
9. Demonstration of arrogant and haughty behaviours or attitudesThe procurement person who refuses to use plain english and will only communicate in unnecessary inflated industry jargon to make it known that they are better than anyone else.

Conclusion

While not all procurement professionals have NPD, we all display narcissistic behaviours from time to time. I would argue that a healthy amount of narcissism is required to be successful in this industry! If narcissism is an inherent trait in everyone that can be harnessed for good, then perhaps we need to reassess the characterisation of the behaviour trait as being only bad.

Is healthy narcissism your untapped office superpower?

If you enjoyed this article then read the wildly popular article ‘Are you the office psychopath’

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