Category Archives: Procurious News

Human Rights Falter In Grey Areas Of Procurement Policy

Workers are often the victims when there are gaps in legal procurement and ethical procurement, but businesses nowadays have a lot to lose as the lines between profit and social conscience are no longer so easily defined… 

Back in 2010, rotten Apple stories started flashing up on smartphones everywhere. Forget tales of environmental unsustainability, these concerned social injustice: poor pay, unhealthy conditions and worryingly low levels of worker welfare. Then came the shocking news of staff suicides.

Attention focused on a prime link in the Apple supply chain: a vast 1.4-square-mile megafactory complex owned and run by Foxconn Technology Group, a Taiwanese multinational contract-manufacturing company, specialising in electronics.

Dubbed ‘Foxconn City’, the mini metropolis housed almost half a million workers on a giant industrial park in Shenzhen, China.

Fast forward to 2019 and Apple is still sourcing from Foxconn, across various sites. The roll-call of Foxconn manufacturing, present and past, still reads like a who’s who of the tech world, and includes other monster brands such as Google, Huawei, Microsoft and Sony, to name but a few.

So, given that Apple was soon to become the first public company on the planet worth $1 trillion, how did it get embroiled in such a dubious ethical sourcing saga in the first place, plus seemingly fail to crisis-manage its public relations effectively when the story broke?

The simple, grim fact is that Apple and the tech community are by no means alone in this. The recent history of procurement by global consumer brands is littered with the reputational detritus of bad ethics and selective legality.

Fast fashion, in particular, has struggled to keep its name out of incriminating headlines, with ethical procurement issues ranging from ongoing stories around ‘dirty’ cotton, through ‘cry for help’ labels sewn into high street clothes, to the tragic Rana Plaza factory collapse in 2013, where 1,134 lost their lives.

Sourcing scandals also continue to flood out of food and agriculture. Ethical issues served up for public consumption range from TV exposés of supermarket chicken suppliers tampering with ‘kill dates’, to the abuse of water rights by industrial-scale avocado farmers in Chile.

Across all sectors and societies, employment remains the most mapped, but least navigable, legal and ethical intersection.

Figures from the International Labour Organization (ILO), released most recently in 2017, revealed that more than 40 million people worldwide were in modern slavery in 2016, including around 25 million in forced labour. Of those in forced labour, some 16 million were being exploited in the private sector. Furthermore, there were more than 152 million estimated victims of child labour, almost half of whom were aged between 5 and 11.

Ethical procurement is essentially a people business, affecting lives and livelihoods, for good or ill, says group director at the Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply (CIPS), Cath Hill.

“Applying rigorous ethical standards to your supply chain is not just about compliance or completing necessary paperwork, but implementing good governance and preventing exploitation of human beings across the globe for the sake of profit,” she says.

In international waters, though, standardisation is a slippery fish.

If not a definitive and demonstrable difference, often at least, there exists a commercial and cultural tension between the norms of legal and ethical procurement. Discrepancies abound in a grey area between the two disciplines and, if unchecked and unpoliced, carve out a policy gap where human rights fall down.

Legal standards can lag behind best practice, especially in relation to global companies with complex supply chains, explains Martin Buttle, strategic lead for general merchandise at the Ethical Trading Initiative (ETI).

“A company that meets local labour laws in one country could still breach international minimum standards. The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights make it clear that businesses have a responsibility to respect human rights even in countries where national law is weak, or poorly enforced,” he says.

Based on ILO conventions, the internationally recognised ETI Base Code of labour standards has been designed to tackle exactly this kind of cross-border inconsistency and jumble of jurisdictions, representing a commitment to ensure all workers are free from exploitation and discrimination, paid a living wage and enjoy conditions of safety, security and equity.

Stepping out of the moral maze for a moment, there are also many bottom-line business-case benefits to be gained by adopting such an ethical approach, suggests Mr Buttle: “It can maintain the supply of goods, increase productivity and quality, and enhance a company’s reputation with its customer base, which is increasingly expected by consumers.”

However, it is often the pressure of competitive marketplaces and overly aggressive procurement practices or pricing policies that result in damaging knock-on effects, he says.

“Brands should understand how their actions impact on their suppliers’ ability to uphold labour rights. For example, a company with poor purchasing practices, such as unrealistic deadlines or unit prices, can cause challenges for its suppliers, leading to increased risk of poor wages and excessive working hours. This is particularly the case if a supplier feels forced to accept orders below the cost of production to win contracts.”

All too often, there is little communication and accountability, says Alex Saric, smart procurement expert at Ivalua: “Cost is the only discussion point and data isn’t shared effectively, while risk and CSR assessments can be a ‘tick-box’ exercise, meaning transparency initiatives end up half-baked.”

Weaknesses notwithstanding, big brands can still set a positive agenda for supplier behaviour, beyond compliance. “If suppliers see that being responsible is more likely to win them a contract, ethical practices change from a minimum requirement to a valuable key differentiator. They must operate sustainably, or face losing out to more ethical competitors,” Mr Saric says.

While any ethical shift is relatively slow and undoubtedly late, legislative momentum is only pushing in one direction and businesses would do well to watch this space closely, suggests Lee Rubin, counsel and global sourcing expert at international law firm Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman.

“When it comes to lawmaking, legal and ethical considerations are merging, typified by the Modern Slavery Act. While not all sections of the Act are directly applicable to business, the provision around ‘transparency in supply chains’ impacts the largest brands and companies.”

Serious money is also flowing more towards the good and the green, adds Mr Buttle: “Many investors understand that poor human rights practices in the supply chain can put their investment at risk. With a growing interest in social impact, we are starting to see the investment community influencing business decisions.”

All in all, this collective chorus calling for ethical procurement is simply becoming too important to ignore, says Ms Hill: “It is not only the right thing to do, but also the lines between profit and social conscience are no longer so easily defined. News travels fast and bad news travels at lightning speed.”

The heat is most definitely on, says Shaun McCarthy, director at leaders in sustainable procurement Action Sustainability: “These days the court of public opinion is an unforgiving place and brands need to be aware they are playing with fire when it comes to ethical procurement.”

Ultimately, therefore, brands that muddy transparency, frustrate traceability and neglect communications get burned, concludes retail expert and consumer champion Martin Newman: “Consumers will shop with their feet and their mouse. If you pay this lip service or they think you’re being disingenuous, they will not only not buy now, they’ll never come back; and they’ll tell all their friends and family about it.”

This article, edited by Jim McClelland, was taken from the Raconteur Future of Procurement report, as featured in The Times. 

How Public Sector Procurement Can Have Social Value

With public sector organisations becoming increasingly aware that their procurement decisions have an impact on local communities, some are rethinking how they award contracts.

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Both private and public sector entities are becoming more interested in how their organisations impact society. Whether it’s in contributing to the community or managing the impact on the environment, organisations recognise they can change their local communities through who they pick to deliver goods or services.

Traditionally, it had been assumed that choosing a supplier that added social value may mean compromising for a sub-standard quality product or service, but views are slowly starting to change.

“They recognise the benefits of working with social enterprises, but are ruled by the need to mitigate risk and deliver efficient and economic services,” says Beth Pilgrim, co-founder of Supply Change.

“Often companies will just go to suppliers they know. What we are trying to explain to the public sector is that adding social value into your supply chain doesn’t have to be difficult or require extra work.”

Ms Pilgrim established Supply Change in 2018 with colleagues Aoise Keogan-Nooshabadi and Verena Wimmer after the trio conducted a series of research studies on the public sector procurement process. They found that while public sector bodies were keen to award contracts to social enterprises, they struggled to do so.

“One of the key themes that came out of our research was that social enterprises struggle to navigate public sector procurement processes,” Ms Pilgrim says. “The existing portals are not really tailored towards them, so they don’t get good visibility.”

In 2013, the UK government’s Social Value Act came into force, obligating public sector bodies to look at the social and environmental benefits of awarding a contract to a supplier, as well as the economic ones.

Heralded as a game-changer by the then-government, the Act has nudged public bodies to look more closely at the attributes of companies bidding to win work.

Despite this, some experts say that the legislation doesn’t go far enough, with a company’s social and environmental points score only accounting for a very small percentage of the overall total, and the outcome weighted towards other factors such as quality and cost.

“A number of leading authorities have recognised this and increased the social value element of their contracts,” says Ed Cross, executive director at procurement advisory group Odesma.

Mr Cross says that upping consideration of social value attributes could be good news for smaller businesses competing for contracts, but adds that the public sector still has some way to go.

“There seems to be a lack of trust in smaller enterprises, particularly social enterprises, from the public sector,” he explains.

“Part of this is down to the false assumption that social enterprises working with volunteers or part-time employees aren’t as reliable as larger organisations with full-time, paid employees.”

Mr Cross’s sentiments are shared by many, who feel that smaller enterprises can often face a real battle just to get an initial foot in the door.

“One of the biggest challenges smaller businesses face when it comes to gaining access to contracts that offer social benefits is the tick-box process of tenders for contracts, as well as how public sector guidelines are inflexible,” says Craig Knowles, marketing manager at procurement software group Market Dojo.

“The tick-box approach often means small businesses that might not fit specific criteria are left at the door before they’ve even been given the chance to prove themselves.

“There needs to be a change in attitude on taking “risks” on small business as many, often wrongly, believe they don’t have resources to work through big tenders when in reality this couldn’t be further from the truth.”

Despite widespread concerns that social enterprises and small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are still missing out on contacts from the public sector, there is evidence of innovation.

Supply Change’s Ms Pilgrim says initiatives at some local authorities show how awarding contracts to smaller, local businesses can be transformative for the local community. She cites Preston in Lancashire as an example.

In 2013, the council brought in external consultants to evaluate whether it would be possible to redirect some of its annual contract-award budget to local businesses which had clear social impact objectives. Since doing so it has stimulated the local economy, putting money into local firms and increasing employment.

“We have seen how that can be a real success story,” says Ms Pilgrim. “Preston has a strategy of spending money within their local economy to build up SMEs, social enterprises and the voluntary sector as much as possible. It has resulted in a turnaround in the local economy.”

Similar projects are now underway across the UK, with Manchester City Council and Birmingham City Council among the larger authorities to consider how they can alter their approaches.

For SMEs and social enterprises looking to get a piece of the action, Malcolm Harrison, group chief executive of the Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply, says small firms should play to their strengths.

“SMEs and social enterprises need to work hard to showcase the flexibility, innovation and financial rigour they can provide,” he says.

“To help SMEs, government should do more. Simpler language, less jargon and the chance for an open dialogue all help SMEs to compete with large companies. SMEs can themselves take charge and become more visible to potential contractors, and websites such as Contracts Finder and Compete For can be a great way of finding opportunities.”

One of the biggest challenges smaller businesses face is the tick-box process of tenders for contracts, as well as how public sector guidelines are inflexible.

This article, edited by Peter Archer, was taken from the Raconteur Future of Procurement report, as featured in The Times. 

7 Ways To Influence Your Internal Stakeholders?

For most, influencing externally comes easily. But when you have to influence internally, there is a mountain of factors and intricacies to navigate…

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This article was based on research conducted by Conti Advanced Business Learning (www.cabl.ch), a Swiss training company that specializes in Negotiation & Influencing training.

Seven procurement experts share their advice on how they creatively influence their internal stakeholders to come to agreements and a consensus for any different challenges they or the company faces.

1. Matching their requirements

Carefully! The ability to influence internal stakeholders is about knowing what is important to them and finding a solution that matches their requirements. If you do not know their goals,objectives or challenges, how can you know whether your idea will help or hinder them? Spend time with the key internal stakeholders, determine what their priorities are, look at your needs and understand how you can help your stakeholder.

Susannah Gooch, Vice President, Direct & Operations Purchasing & Supplier Management, AbbVie

2. Be proactive: point out the things most important to them

We influence stakeholders by tailoring the message to them and pointing out the things that are most important for that individual stakeholder. While preparing for a large negotiation we had to have senior executive’s approval of our strategy. The decks we prepared for these meetings were all different, but all came to the same conclusion (i.e. our strategy). This approach worked beautifully as we were able to show each senior executive that our strategy would match exactly with his goals.

Lukas Wyder, Director, Rogers Communication

3. Pinpoint you ‘must-wins’

By knowing what’s their purpose and what is a must win. R&D departments are not truly impressed or motivated by good economic deals! However, a company’s reputation and innovation are definitely buzz words for them. To keep them on your side of the table and prevent them shaking hands with suppliers before procurement does, it’s important to anchor them on their principles and gain their trust to act freely and move ahead with suppliers.

Alessandra Silvano, Category Director CAPEX and MRO, Carlsberg Group

4. Create opportunities to emphasise your decision-making powers

This is different to “asking what they want” or “receiving instructions” from the business. The greatest success I had was the formation of a “Procurement Steering Committee” where I, as CPO, was the secretary and ran the agenda. It was chaired by the CEO, with the COO and CFO in attendance. These were contracted signatories to deals so it was my opportunity to put forward the deals and proposals I would place with the market, to test their risk appetite and proposed BATNAs in exchange for commercial (and price) advantages. The meeting encouraged healthy debates and discussions and it got the senior leadership team involved in the contracts themselves, aligning with their expectations. It also had the advantage of delegating myself certain decision-making powers in order to secure deals on what was agreed. The process was sped up and it circumvented multitudes of stakeholders with differing views. It helped focus on the “important”, and not the “nice haves”. 

Alan Hustwick, Senior Executive Global Supply Chain, SCCR Pty Ltd

5. Find common interests

It is always tempting to try to convince internal stakeholders about the strategic importance of procurement, as we are so convinced about it. We like to convey our passion and vision. Also, and more often than don’t, the naïve belief that the internal stakeholder will share the same passion. Seldom do they!

The best way to convince internal stakeholders is to identify common interests. Certainly, this means that we need to know what their challenges and issues are, and how we can help them best. If they are convinced that there is something for them in the story, then and only then, will they start to listen to your ideas, and getting their support becomes much easier.

Bérénice Bessière, Director, Procurement and Travel Division Private and Public Organizations, WIPO

6. Confirm your reasoning with 3rd party information

Typically with objective facts. More often than not, 3rd party confirmation of your analysis is needed, for example, these may come in the form of outside analysts or consultancy organizations. Strangely, internal stakeholders often give more weight to outside opinions than colleagues, especially from other functions. They assume there are inter-departmental politics instead of seeing the cross-functional benefits and expertise of the whole company. I frequently refer to or copy and paste graphics or statistics from outside analysts when influencing others. 

Michael Hauck, Director Global Procurement, Tetra Pak

7. Speak their language and incorporate their needs into your communication

A good starting point is to look at the deal from their perspective and understand how I could get them to choose in their own interest what I want. Talking their own language also helps and this applies to all Procurement communications. I remember a mistake I made over ten years ago. We had just completed a Temporary Labour project and proudly presented the results, mentioning that we had delivered 2.4 million of cost savings, streamlined the process and improved the service levels. It would have been much better to put the focus on the process and service levels improvements and then mention that we also saved 2.4 million. 

Giuseppe Conti, Founder and Managing Partner, Conti Advanced Business Learning

Do you have ways to influence your internal stakeholders? If so, share in the comments below!

These answers were collected by Giuseppe Conti, Founder and Managing Partner of Conti Advanced Business Learning (www.cabl.ch), a consulting firm that specialises in negotiation & influencing. This article is part of a series aimed at collecting real-life negotiation experiences from Procurement executives.

Supplier-Enabled Innovation Is An Opportunity To Add Value

Businesses are tapping into the expertise of their supplier network to bring new products to market faster and streamline their processes.

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Where do new ideas come from? For many organisations, the answer is research and development. But imagine if the R&D department included not only your own people, but those from hundreds or even thousands of your suppliers too.

This is the promise of supplier-enabled innovation (SEI), which enables companies to tap into the expertise of their supplier network to develop new products and services or refine existing ones.

It’s not exactly a new idea, but according to David Rae, head of the Supplier-Enabled Innovation Center, it is an underutilised one. “If you have thousands of suppliers and a portion of them have R&D divisions focused on your sector, then you’d be mad not to tap into that resource,” he says.

Companies that combine their innovation efforts with those of their suppliers typically bring products to market faster, giving them a competitive advantage. The inevitable risks and costs of developing new products or services are also spread among a wide network of stakeholders. And due to their specific expertise, suppliers are often able to suggest product improvements that are unlikely to occur to internal teams.

It makes sense to partner with companies specialising in a particular area, says Omer Abdullah, co-founder and managing director of The Smart Cube, which provides procurement, analytics and research expertise. He uses the example of a packaging supplier to illustrate the point. “They’re the ones who have a vested interest in knowing what the latest packaging types are, what the latest packaging sizes are and what are consumers demanding,” he explains.

That’s certainly true in the case of Bayer, which works closely with suppliers such as Schott to find the best packaging for specific drugs. By collaborating early in the ampoule or vial selection process, with Schott contributing its expertise in how certain active ingredients interact with different types of containers, new medication can be brought to market in a quick and safe manner.

The procurement team are ideally placed to drive the innovation partnerships behind SEI, acting as the link between internal R&D, sales and marketing teams, and suppliers. Johnson & Johnson, for example, has focused on turning procurement into a team of “innovation scouts”, seeking out suppliers who understand emerging trends and plan their business accordingly.

This is one of the vital elements of SEI: if you can’t find innovative suppliers to work with, then the whole concept quickly falls apart. If you’re interested in using SEI to improve your R&D function, for example, “you need to take into account things like what percentage of their [the supplier’s] revenue they are putting towards R&D, their strategic goals and where they’re actually headed as a company”, says Mr Rae.

It can be tempting to focus on the current supply chain when selecting SEI partners, but this may not offer the kind of cutting-edge innovation that will really expand internal capabilities, says Simon McGuire, health systems leader for Philips UK and Ireland. “I believe a good procurement team will ensure any supplier activity is initiated with clear alignment and agreement on capability gaps and unmet customer needs, together with an ability to secure the required technology and skillsets from the marketplace,” he says.

An awareness of market trends and shifts, competitor moves and the company’s own patent pipeline is also a key part of an informed view of what suppliers might be able to offer. “For me the most essential element of a good supplier partnership that will deliver is the strong alignment of goals and visions, with clear definitions, responsibilities and objectives from the start,” says Mr McGuire.

Online platforms are a relatively common way of communicating innovation challenges to supplier networks. Philips, for example, has an open innovation portal called SPICE, which allows suppliers, companies and individual inventors to collaborate to both view Philips innovation challenges and suggest ideas of their own. But the success of these platforms depends upon suppliers receiving relevant, timely feedback on their ideas and transparency around the development of any proposals.

Indeed, the trust at the heart of any good partnership flows both ways. “Surprisingly, suppliers do not always take their innovation first to their largest or even their most profitable, highest-margin customers,” says Clive R. Heal, a procurement innovation expert who leads Voicinn, a group of global innovation keynote speakers, and founded and led the Roche Innovation Center of Excellence. “They target customers with whom they have the closest relationships and see the best longer-term growth opportunities.”

Both companies should also be clear about who will own the intellectual property (IP) for any new products or services before embarking on a partnership. For instance, would a licensing approach, with the company granted exclusive rights to use a particular technology or service for an agreed period, work best? Or is a joint IP model the better option? Many innovation partnerships fail to clear this hurdle due to competing interests, Mr Heal points out.

Regardless of which ownership approach is agreed, successful SEI initiatives nearly always follow a long-term approach to innovation, focusing on mutual benefits for both customer and supplier. In other words, a true partnership that runs counter to the “not invented here” syndrome still found in many businesses.

“Overcoming this is difficult,” says Mr Rae. “But with the disruption now happening – the platform business models cropping up, the growth in startups, the fact that innovation is taking place everywhere and not just in R&D labs – companies will have to change, otherwise they’re going to get disrupted too.”

This article, edited by Peter Archer, was taken from the Raconteur Future of Procurement report, as featured in The Times.  

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What Makes A High Performing Team?

How do you build and nurture high performing teams?

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Recently I realised that my management brand is being built whilst I’m busy planning how I want to be a better manager. In other words, it’s the small daily interactions of how I show up in the world that count, not the long term plans yet to be actioned.

Big gestures show your leadership style, sure, but where people really form an opinion of the type of leader you are is how you greet them in the morning, how you handle stress, how you help them when they are stressed, how you organise yourself and the team in the small ways. How you back them when it counts, or if you back them at all.

I realised I am working in the opposite way to how I have been generally managed in the past and the management styles I have seen around me. If building high performing teams is seen as a strength of mine then what is that I do?

Getting back to basics

  1. Present, informative leadership

Heads of departments or general managers will be exposed to lots of high level information, often well above the relevancy and pay grade of most general team members. When managers share the information down the line it helps to build a common vision and brings all levels along for the collective ride. It also helps contextualise what being busy really means. It helps each person prioritise according to the organisation’s higher goals or hot topics of the day and helps build meaning.

2. Flexibility (true flexibility)

Flexible working arrangements are often talked about but rarely effectively executed by management. It requires someone to let go of the need to control every aspect of how they feel the work environment should run. It requires shifting to an outputs frame of working rather than presentism and hourly bum-in-seat time. Showing decency and respect to team members will render more tangible outputs then say, denying annual leave requests and privately rescinding public approvals for people to work from home. All this does is build a culture of hierarchy, need for control and lack of trust.

Respect and trust breeds loyalty and which produces higher output, care and pride for one’s own work.

3. Developing through empowerment

Development is an eye roll producing topic for most managers and even employees – but it is really important and it doesn’t have to be a tick box exercise, it can be genuine and effective with little effort.

Hacks for a procurement development plan, review in detail the follow areas:

  • Technical experience related to their job
  • Cross agency and cross team learning
  • Focus on commercial and supplier management (or other specific area in the sector)
  • Formal training, courses or workshops
  • In-house learning
  • The procurement lifecycle for gaps in their knowledge
  • Build their strengths
  • Look at procurement trends, what can they research or learn and become the team expert in

But here’s the thing, you actually have to complete the tasks and have the meetings! If these two things are executed it will evolve naturally, it can be this simple.

4. Building people’s strengths

The concept of playing to your strengths is not a new one but because of the human tendency to want to be good in all areas of our work, it’s pervasive and needs to be called out frequently.

5. Hiring a blended team

Part of making a high performing team is understanding the types of roles, personalities and levels of technical expertise that you will need for long term success. What isn’t required or even possible, is having all of the types of roles, personalities and levels of expertise. This is a utopia view that is probably rarely going to happen. Instead try to balance out the management style first e.g. a creative, fire type needs more structured staff to offset this nature. Then expand from there matching the roles in the team with what they will need to be successful, pair them off.

You’re dreaming mate

I can already hear my hairdresser in my ear saying… “this is all very well but it relies on people not taking the p*ss and having a good team to begin with. It relies on people wanting to do good work in the first place and not just focusing on getting out of the office fast enough to make Friday happy hour (on a Tuesday).”

Yes it does.

I have only worked in one place in 10 years that had such a degree of toxicity that none of these tactics would have worked. Maybe it’s because I do my homework first before applying for jobs and I research culture, leadership styles and team dynamics. But I would like to think that in the profession of procurement, most people are highly intelligent, capable people that just need a bit of trust and support to flourish and meet their highest potential.

My final tip: tell your team and your staff they are doing a good job – you’d be amazed at how this makes people feel.

Shifting The Dial In Procurement

Procurement has an opportunity, indeed an imperative, to transform from an enabler of cost reduction to a creator of sustainable competitive advantage.

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Traditionally procurement has been the efficient workhorse for organisations, driving cost savings percentage point by percentage point, contract by contract. Yet despite the tremendous impact that strong spend management can have in value creation, the reality is that in many sectors, procurement is still primarily a transactional function with a limited scope of influence. Minimal deference is currently given to a function that, in light of the unprecedented rate of change in the world today, could in fact unlock distinctive competitive advantages for their organisation.

There are major shifts taking place globally today to which procurement must respond: value chains are becoming more complex and volatile, with increased risks and opportunities that accompany that complexity; developments in digitization, automation, and analytics that can unlock previously untapped potential; and acceleration of technological advancements and innovations are now more difficult than ever to keep pace with without external partnerships. This rapidly changing setting brings an imperative to change how procurement operates as a business function, as well as an opportunity to extend the scope of procurement’s influence in an organization.

Winning in this more complex and digital future will require a complete transformation of procurement as a function: having a broader mandate, way beyond just cost reduction; investment in digitization, automation and analytics; and rethinking the procurement organization.

So, exactly where should procurement leaders start to transform their functions? As a starting point, let’s take a closer look at the most important global shifts, and the corresponding implications.

Volatility brings risks—and opportunities

Since 1980, global inter-regional trade has increased eightfold, making supply chains more global and interconnected. However, with rapid growth across emerging markets, ever-increasing talks of trade wars, and intensifying concerns about sustainability, global supply chains are becoming more complex, more volatile, and more risky. Procurement functions need to be more adaptable as ever to respond.

Recent changes in trade policies are forcing large multinationals to rethink their supply strategies. By some projections, for example, Brexit could cost automakers in the UK billions of dollars in additional tariffs, and potentially force some to shift production elsewhere. Many other industries are also experiencing significant upheavals due to the changing nature of trade relationships between the United States and other countries.

At the same time, by 2025, emerging regions are expected to be home to almost 230 companies in the Fortune Global 500, up from 85 in 2010 (Exhibit 1). In a rebalancing global economy, procurement teams need to look beyond traditional low-cost locations in China and Latin America and explore new emerging markets in Africa or Southeast Asia, which have become attractive for new global sourcing opportunities.

Increasing corporate attention to socially responsible practices adds another challenge in managing complex global supply chains. Greater transparency—and greater expectation to be transparent—means unethical behavior in even a tier-2 or -3 supplier has reputational impacts on the purchasing organization. While ethical sourcing isn’t a new trend, the extent to which consumers are now making purchasing decisions based on this is. And companies are responding: in the 2017 McKinsey Global Survey on Sustainability, respondents across all regions reported significant increases in the adoption of sustainability-related technologies.

Take, for example, the use of blockchain for the mining of cobalt, a critical mineral for the automotive and mobile-device industries. Reports of labor abuses in cobalt mines have led producers and customers to deploy blockchain technologies: each bag of cobalt is sealed with a digital tag that ensures full traceability to compliance-accredited mining locations, creating a new source of competitive differentiation.

This article is an extract and has been reproduced with permission from McKinsey & Company. It is co-authored by Tarandeep Singh Ahuja, a partner in McKinsey’s Melbourne office, and Yen Ngai, an expert in its Sydney office.  Full article is available here.

New Zealand Government Procurement – A Temperature Check

A lot has been going on in New Zealand Government procurement, compounding one after the other. Where to start?

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When you’re in the thick of something it’s harder to take the moment to carve out enough perspective to say something meaningful. A lot has been going on in New Zealand Government procurement, compounding one after the other. Where to start?

The Ardern effect

The Ardern effect started long before our Prime Minister was elected, it was coined during her election campaign as a way to explain (or criticise, depending on what side of the fence you are on) the undeniable, charismatic ability she has to lead and relate to people. Jacinda Ardern has gained a lot of notoriety for all of her firsts: youngest Prime Minister, first woman to be pregnant during her elected term, her partner is the primary carer – shock horror, they are unmarried to, although recently announced their engagement.

The Ardern effect has continued to follow her and is not just isolated to her election campaign as they are values that are inherent to her as a person, she does not switch them on and off. She is a leader that feels, this is perhaps the rarest thing about her. Perhaps this is the real “first”.

A leader with feels headlining at the UN

Ardern took these values and headlined them in her statement to the United Nations in September 2018 where she called out politicians and governments to respond to the “… growing sense of isolation, dislocation and a sense of insecurity and the erosion of hope.” New Zealand is a country where the Prime Minister’s response to this was to publically declare that we as a county are pursuing kindness.

The Ardern effect is a bow wave waiting to hit

I had never really seen values, emotions or concepts of a collective “betterness” be voiced in this way by a leader of our country in the theatre of politics, let alone on an international stage. I have watched with active interest how this would play out and trickle down into my day job – this vehement passion is bound to impact.

Positive warning shots

  1. Broader Outcomes

The New Zealand Government Procurement website states that government procurement can and should be used to support wider social, economic and environmental outcomes that go beyond the immediate purchase of goods and services. The Government agreed on 23 October 2018 to a set of priority outcomes for agencies to leverage from their procurement activities and identified specific contracts or sectors for initial focus.

Although the broader outcomes initiative is targeted to four priority areas, it sets the tone and the expectation that this the lens in which all government spending should be filtered through.

2. Wellbeing budget hype

The much anticipated, much talked about Wellbeing budget did not under deliver on its promise. New Zealand is the first western country to design its entire budget based on wellbeing priorities and instruct its ministries to design policies to improve wellbeing.

It’s not like Social Procurement hasn’t been done before, it’s happening in many areas, many businesses and many government agencies but what is different is the government which is leading, the context of what has happened in New Zealand recently and how you cannot move without being hit by social responsibility.

Added context

New Zealand has had a big year, here are some snippets that add to the contextual tapestry of our country:

  • The “I am hope” grass roots campaign by Mike King, New Zealander of the Year ignited the fight against mental health issues in NZ. Mental health continues to be a hot topic in our country and politics.
  • The Rainbow flag that symbolises diversity and inclusion was painted at the Airport of our capital city, welcoming people for the International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association (ILGA) showing that we accept and support everyone.
  • The horrific terror attacks and our response as a country to love more.
  • The first country in the world to bring in a Domestic Violence – Victims’ Protection Act that brings in new rights for employees affected by domestic violence. It gives them the right to take paid leave and to have flexible working arrangements to support them during this time.
  • NZ Government Procurement ranks number one in the world! Following research conducted by Oxford University

Poised

With our strong values based leader that is internationally recognised, our standing within the international procurement sector, the focus on broader outcomes and wellbeing for our citizens in NZ. It’s no wonder the trickle down effects are starting to make themselves known. It’s an exciting time for those of us that are passionate about social values.

Nine years of a government focused on infrastructure has been reflected in the hotness of infrastructure as a cool kid procurement job. It’s not too far off for the social warriors to get their turn to roar, conscious buying within the framework of government seems like an exciting challenge to me.

Who is ready to step up to the challenge?


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Where Does Your Supply Chain Begin and End?

Supply chain professionals are no doubt an important link in any supply chain but it is but one link in the end-to-end process.

By releon8211/ Shutterstock

Working in any supply chain management role can be all-consuming as well as challenging -but we can’t work in a vacuum. Supply chain professionals are no doubt an important link in any supply chain but it is but one link in the end-to-end process.

In the simplest type of supply chains, items and services are sourced from suppliers and converted into products and delivered to the customer or end-user.  During this process, both products and information move forward through the chain.   In the same way, products and related information move back up the chain.   

If only it were that easy. 

Any supply chain involves interactions between people, entities, information, and physical resources that combine, hopefully harmoniously, to sustain a company’s competitiveness.  It also has an objective to reduce overall costs and speed up the production and distribution cycle. As supply chain professionals know very well, if a supplier is unable to supply on time, and within the stipulated budget, business is bound to suffer losses and gain a negative reputation.

Q.  What is the main goal of an efficient supply chain?

A.  To get the customers what they want, when they want it, at least cost.  

If a company fails to focus fully on the consumer or end-user its ability to surviveis severely at risk. 

How to improve your supply chain

Sourcing is an early activity in the supply chain but demand planning comes first. By sharing projected requirements with your suppliers you can assist them to manage their own sourcing process and their inventory. Any forecasts that you supply them may not be cast in stone but they help to take the guesswork out of your order process.    Your Tier 2 suppliers, i.e. your supplier’s suppliers, are the ones that provide the items and services needed to fulfil your orders.  What products do they supply, what are their costs and what are their lead times?   

 The automotive industry is particularly good at this.  Modern vehicles are made up of more than 30 000 component parts.  Most leading vehicle manufacturers have a close grip on their Tier 2 suppliers: the parts suppliers for engines and equipment and computer software and hardware needed to make them run.

Technology in the supply chain 

The use, speed, and capabilities of technology are defining the trends in modern supply chains.  The cost of these technologies is starting to decrease making automation more affordable for mid-size companies. 

Demanding and techno-savvy customers are effectively re-shaping supply chains in the e-commerce world.  Customers expect to receive their order within a day or two whether it’s food, fashion or new bed linen.  They can choose not only what to buy, but who to buy it from and how to buy it.  E-commerce is creating new challenges throughout the supply chain from demand planning through procurement to warehousing, distribution and logistics.  Whether a customer is shopping in-store, on their laptop or mobile device, they expect their experience to remain the same, wherever they are in the world.  Retail companies that can adapt their supply chain operations to the new era of e-commerce will have the best chance of success.  

Global supply chains

Global supply chains are becoming very fragmented and dispersed and so require lots of resources and technologies to function well. Complex supply chains such as those in aerospace, hi-tech, chemicals and pharmaceuticals are becoming more difficult to design and manage.   According to Gartner, some of the most efficient global supply chains are in fast-moving-consumer-goods (FMCG) companies such as Unilever, Nestle, Nike and Inditex (Zara).  These companies have close relationships with their suppliers, even owning some of them, which is contributing to their successes. 

Johnson & Johnson is a confirmed leader in the healthcare industry due to its on-going focus on its supply chain capabilities such as end-to-end visibility.  The company prides itself on being a customer-centric organization.  It is an early adopter of new technologies such as 3D printing which it is using to enhance its manufacturing and distributions operations and unlock new opportunities.  Its global team has played a large part in streamlining the sourcing processes for both ingredients and packaging.    They realized that their supply chain was not as nimble and agile as it could be, and they weren’t leveraging their global scale in sourcing enough.

The professional association for supply chain management and the leading provider of research and education (APICS) provides a supply chain operations reference model (SCOR) on which you can assess your current abilities. It identifies steps in four measures:  process, performance, practices and people.    

The SCOR Model

APICS proposes that to improve your supply chain you need to:

  • Analyse your supply chain business processes and their dependencies with the SCOR framework in mind
  • Document and design your supply chain strategy, processes, and architectures to increase the speed of system implementations
  • Design internal business processes while taking organizational learning goals into consideration
  • Simulate the process to identify bottlenecks, gaps and process enhancements to improve supply chain performance

Underlying any successful supply chain is a strong organizational structure, up-to-date technology and strong leadership. An organisation’s supply chain is a significant source of competitive advantage and business leaders are embracing it as a strategic capability. 

If you’d like to read additional related content or get involved with thought provoking discussions check out the Supply Chain Pros group – a one stop shop for all your supply chain needs.

What Can Yoda Teach Us About The Kraljic Matrix?

The Kraljic Matrix revolutionised Procurement in 1983. Now the world looks very different. Is it time for an upgrade?

By Yuri Turkov/ Shutterstock

The year was 1983. This was the year that the Internet was created. Bill Gates unleashed Microsoft World on the market. Star Wars Return of the Jedi was playing in the cinema. I was nine. And a director at McKinsey in Dusseldorf wrote an article that would change Procurement forever. The author was Dr. Peter Kraljic. The article, published in the Harvard Business Review, stated: “Purchasing Must Become Supply Management“.

A Procurement Transformation

Kraljic recognized that the world was changing fast. He saw that if Procurement continued business as usual, it would expose itself to competitive pressure. If it was to survive, it would have to move into strategic supply management. This was the dawn of the Kraljic matrix. It would have a transformative effect on Procurement. The philosophy (that remains valid today) is that not all spend, all suppliers, all customers & are the same. So, Procurement needs to build tailored and differentiated strategies, notably taking into account profit impact and supply risk.

Fast forward to 2019. A lot has changed. The Cold War is history, and the Internet dominates the globe. The iPhone in my pocket has way more computing power than my first computer, a Commodore 64, also from 1983. Since Kraljic published his famous article, world trade has quadrupled and globalization has exploded. Procurement is operating in a much faster, bolder world than it was in 1983. It faces new challenges like Corporate Social Responsibility and ethical supply chains. In short, our current environment today is more “VUCA” (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous) than it ever was.

The Next Evolution Of The Kraljic Matrix

“Since the early 1980s, pioneering individuals and companies such as Peter Kraljic, Michael Porter, and A.T. Kearney have pushed procurement professionals to think more strategically about the art and science of strategic sourcing. […] But times have changed. Today’s environment is more dynamic and is filled with greater uncertainty. The tried and true tools and tactics adopted over the last 30 years as the “gold standard” are not as effective as they once were.” Strategic Sourcing in the New Economy: Harnessing the Potential of Sourcing Business Models for Modern Procurement by Bonnie Keith, Kate Vitasek, Karl Manrodt, and Jeanne Kling

In some ways, the Kraljic matrix still works well. The segmentation at the heart of it remains valid. But the world is so complicated now, the matrix becomes more like a Kraljic Rubik’s cube. There are many more dimensions and parameters to take into account than there were back then.

Procurement now needs to win the Holy Grail of strategic supply management: value. Take Total Value of Ownership (TVO), for instance. Before, sustainability and risk were considered as nice-to-have, but not necessary. The TVO model places non-price information firmly within calculation of cost. This is a concept of sourcing in which the buyer has all the cards in their hand. But more than that, TVO enables the buyer to create bonus-penalty systems. In effect, it is a calculation of value that enables Procurement to identify how they can increase value after the award has been made.

Evolve Or Stay In The 80s

“My colleagues developed [the matrix] further and experimented with a nine-box version that allowed more flexibility. But always it must be adapted to the characteristics of the company where it is being used.” Dr. Peter Kraljic

The evolution of strategic supply management is challenging. Seeing the Kraljic Matrix as a Rubik’s cube is one thing. Solving the cube is something else entirely. Collecting the enormous amount of information and data that you need for this is almost impossible on your own. However, the change that makes the world so complicated also gives us the tools we need to keep pace: technology. Procurement must have a digital transformation strategy.

Also, and beyond tools like Purchasing Portfolio Analysis matrixes (that needs to evolve to be subtler), it is critical for Procurement organizations to look beyond the technical aspects of the profession. Procurement activities encompass more “soft” activities that require interpersonal skills. It is all about relationships and, even if tools help in defining the right type of relationship to build in a specific context, they fall short in delivering the “human” dimension. Also, that same dimension should be integrated in the tools and models we use.

The “experience” of working with procurement (for suppliers and for stakeholders) is as essential. Procurement delivers a service in a human-to-human context and becoming the supplier/customer of choice requires more than just tools. Digital transformation is not just about tools!

Therefore, just like Yoda “burns” the Jedi Books in “The Last Jedi” to teach Luke a last lesson by symbolizing the need to be able to move forward while being mindful and even respectful of the past, it may be the time for Procurement professional to “burn” the matrix.


Like what you’re reading? As a procurement or supply chain professional, we truly value your opinion. And that’s why we want you to tell us what you want (what you really, really want) to see on Procurious. Click here to take our ten-minute survey and help us, help you!

Minding The Procurement Gap: Where You Are Vs Where You Think You Are

To meet the ever growing list of procurement objectives, procurement leaders must effectively transform their organisations. While most organisations have begun this journey, many hit roadblocks along the way, which could easily have been avoided. During our latest CPO roundtable in London, sponsored by Ivalua, Arnaud Malardé, Senior Product Marketing Manager – Ivalua discussed how to map a path that enables you to rapidly progress to best-in-class procurement, and beyond, to establish a true competitive advantage for your company.

The keys to effective procurement Transformation

To meet the ever growing list of procurement objectives digital transformation is critical to success. But less than 30 per cent of procurement organisations have digitised more than 50 per cent of their processes. And a great deal of technology initiatives that are implemented fail to deliver.

According to a survey commissioned with Forrester, who surveyed over 400 procurement practitioners, those that have switched eProcurement technology, list the following three reasons for failure:

  • Supplier onboarding 30 per cent
  • Poor user adoption 27 per cent
  • Implementation issues 25 per cent

Of course, the obstacles to your digital transformation success differ depending on how far along you are on your journey. Beginners are more likely to suffer with insufficient budget or lack of executive support whereas teams in the advanced stages might find integration of S2P tools or procurement’s change resistance the most challenging areas.

Arnaud believes there is a gap between where procurement think they are and where they actually are. True digital transformation is a long way off for most.

His advice to plotting your path to successful transformation:

  • Don’t overestimate your maturity
  • Successful leaders focus beyond procurement
  • Evaluate technology carefully: avoid the key obstacles, assess based on today’s and tomorrow’s requirements

Delivering a story with style

As we grow older we increasingly feel as though we’ve lost our ability to trade freely in stories the way children do. But that’s not entirely true. Story telling expert, author, actor and inspirational speaker David Gillespie believes that we don’t ever lose our story-telling skills, just the confidence to use them. But it’s so important to see storytelling as king and queen because it is at the heart of everything we do in our personal and professional lives.

David revealed the seven basic plots of storytelling, one or more of which can be applied to any story. Try it for yourself!

  1. Overcoming the monster
  2. The quest
  3. Voyage and return
  4. Comedy
  5. Tragedy
  6. Rebirth
  7. Rags to riches

David also shared his advice for delivering a story with style

  1. Structure is essential – We can’t all be like Charles Dickens or Stephen King who don’t know how their stories will end when they start writing. A good place to start is the end. Decide where you want to take your audience to and work backwards to find the middle and the beginning – the set up, confrontation and resolution. Get your framework right to hang the narrative on
  2. Take your audience on a journey – You’ve got to take the audience on a trip. If you don’t there’s not sense of movement and no change affected. The point of stories is to effect change by taking your audience from point A to point B
  3. Fluidity of the journey – best stories are fluid and easy to follow – you shouldn’t be asking readers to connect from one point to the next
  4. Edit, edit and edit again – When in doubt chuck it out. that’s what the mantra of storytelling should be. As humans, we tend to hang on to things even if it’s not serving the plot. Take it out!
  5. Bring the story to life – All the best stories deserve to be told with the same passion and enthusiasm as how we conceive them

Cyber Security – are you prepared?

There are more reasons every day for organisations to consider the implications of a robust Cyber strategy but many are not sure where to start. There are more reasons every day for organisations to consider the implications of a robust Cyber strategy but many are not sure where to start. Mark Raeburn, CEO – Context discussed how we can manage cyber risk, avoid potential breaches and deter, detect and respond to the most sophisticated cyber-attacks.

Mark talked through the threat spectrum, which plots the desire of certain groups or nations to commit cyber attacks versus their capability to execute these attacks. Russia are by far the most capable foreign power and they have intent. In general, people are fearful of terrorism and, of course, they are massively keen to exploit cyber security but at the moment they are not capable. A big concern would be if ‘hackers for hire’ start working for terrorists.

Key motivations for targeting

  • Prepositioning and disruption
  • Intellectual Property Theft
  • Espionage
  • Stepping Stone Access

If you’d like to find out more about sponsoring or attending our CPO roundtables please contact [email protected]