Category Archives: Procurious News

Big Ideas 2015: How to be a Digital Delegate and get involved

Big Ideas Summit 2015 - how do I get involved?

Chances are if you’ve visited Procurious in the last few weeks you’ll have seen mention of something we‘re calling the Big Ideas Summit 2015 that‘s due to kick-off in London on 30 April. Good for you, but why should I care?‘ you might ask…

You’ve read all about our Influencers, the issues affecting procurement and supply chains in 2015, maybe even come-up with a question or two – but now you want to be a part of it.

It just so happens we’re billing the Big Ideas Summit 2015 as a ‘digitally-led’ conference. So it doesn’t matter where you are in the world, you can still get involved as a Digital Delegate and catch the day’s discussions as they happen. Interactivity is key!

How can I participate?

If you haven’t already make sure you’ve joined our Big Ideas Summit 2015 Group on Procurious. Click on the link or find it by visiting the ‘Groups’ area.

Beforehand make sure to submit your questions for the various sessions (and Influencers) on the Big Ideas Group page. You can get all of the schedule details here so there’s still plenty of time to come up with a question.

In the run-up to 30 April we’re posting articles that shed light on our key topics of risk, talent, technology and cost. As well as interviews with our Influencers, group discussions, and guest blog posts.

On the day: Keep your eyes peeled – the Group will be THE place for getting the updates from London as they happen.

We’ll also be live-tweeting from the event. Join in by following along with our tweets, and Tweet us @procurious_ using #BigIdeas2015 so we can pick your questions up!

Facebook user? We’ll be updating Facebook throughout the day with photos of key moments and our Influencers in action.  You can like Procurious on Facebook here.

Keeping the discussion going: Following the event we’ll be posting footage from our sessions, and our Influencer’s very own 3-minute ‘Big Ideas’ videos.

Once again, the only way to access these videos will be to join the Group.

Invite others: The more people that join the discussions and get involved, the better!

Use the Procurious ‘Build your Network’ feature to send invitations to your LinkedIn and email contacts. Tweet your Twitter followers (remembering to use #BigIdeas2015), post to your LinkedIn network, or Facebook news feed.

Who are procurement‘s most influential thinkers?

 

Are these the most influential people in procurement?We’ve just announced the world‘s first digitally-led event for procurement and supply chain professionals. Missed it? You can get up to speed with all of the details here.

During this one-of-a-kind event we’ll be talking and exploring Big Ideas around three core topics – namely, risk, people and technology.

We’re bringing together some of the smartest Procurement thought leaders for a packed day full of interviews, debates and panel sessions.  Don’t worry, we’ll be capturing all of the day’s events on video so you’ll be able to see how all the discussions unfold.

You can submit your questions now, along with your own Big Ideas by becoming a Digital Delegate. Do so by joining this group, and Tweet your Big Idea using #BigIdeas2015

Who will be attending Big Ideas Summit 2015?

Peter Smith – Spend Matters

Peter is Managing Editor of Spend Matters Europe, part of the world’s leading family of procurement websites. He has an MA in Mathematics from Cambridge University, and worked for the Mars Group, where he first held procurement management positions, then was Procurement Director for Dun & Bradstreet Europe, the Department of Social Security, and the NatWest Group.

Chris Sawchuk – The Hackett Group

Mr. Sawchuk has nearly 20 years of experience in supply management, working directly with Fortune 500 and midsized companies around the globe and in a variety of industries to improve all aspects of procurement.

Mr. Sawchuk is a regular contributor to business publications, a frequent presenter at industry events and co-author of ePurchasingPlus. He has been recognized by Supply & Demand Chain Executive magazine as one of its “Pros to Know.”

David Noble – CIPS

David Noble was appointed Group Chief Executive of The Chartered Institute of Purchasing & Supply on 1 June 2009. Previously he was Group Supply Director at IMI plc, a FTSE 250 UK multinational company specialising in advanced engineering technology and responsible for c£1billion spend.

Although the majority of his career has been in manufacturing, he also has experience of the public sector, the distribution industry and large scale turnkey power station projects.

Sigi Osagie – Author

Sigi Osagie is a leading expert on effectiveness in Procurement & Supply Chain Management. He helps organisations and individuals achieve enhanced performance growth to accomplish their business and career goals. Sigi has extensive leadership experience across most Operations and Supply Chain areas, and previously held senior executive and board roles with several blue-chip multinationals and SMEs. He is the author of the highly-acclaimed book Procurement Mojo – Strengthening the Function and Raising Its Profile.

Giles Breault – The Beyond Group

Co-founder and Principal of The Beyond Group, a specialised advisory firm providing transformation guidance to commercial and procurement teams, developing learning conferences, and convening industry specific Think Tanks aimed at improving relationships between buyers and sellers.

Before founding The Beyond Group, Mr. Breault was a career productivity, supply chain, sourcing and procurement executive with strategic and operational experience in the pharmaceuticals, electronics, and aviation industries.

Tania Seary – The Faculty, The Source, Procurious

Tania is the Founding Chairman of three companies specialising in the development of the procurement profession – The Faculty, The Source and Procurious.

The Faculty is recognised as one of Australia’s leading advisors on procurement development. Established twelve years ago, The Faculty works with leading organisations to transform and elevate the role of procurement, build high performance procurement teams and create professional knowledge networks.

Tim Hughes – Oracle

Tim Hughes works for Oracle where he owns the Go to Market in the UK for the Cloud Accounting and Procurement solutions. 

He has a passion for Social Media and has a community of 100,000 followers on Twitter.  That enables him to work with customers to gain business outcomes and competitive advantage by using Social, Mobile, Big Data and Cloud across their Accounting and Procurement processes.

Jules Goddard

Dr. Jules Goddard is a distinguished academic and commercial innovator, and is the Big Ideas Summit facilitator for 2015.

He is the the Creator of Strategy, Innovation and Leadership Programmes for a wide variety of global companies, including Rolls-Royce, Roche, Rio Tinto, Vinci, Prudential, Microsoft, BG Group and Hewlett-Packard.

Chris Lynch – Rio Tinto

Chris has nearly 30 years experience in the mining and metals industry. He has been Director of Rio Tinto since 2011 (non-executive) and has served as chief financial officer since 2013.

He spent 20 years with Alcoa Inc. where he was vice-president and chief information officer based in Pittsburgh, and chief financial officer Alcoa Europe in Switzerland. Chris spent seven years at BHP Billiton, where he was chief financial officer and then executive director and group president – Carbon Steel Materials.

Olinga Ta’eed – Professor

Olinga is an entrepreneur, investor and social activist who has worked in over 50 countries, and is committed to global perspectives in blended solutions across public/private/third/community sectors.

In January 2013 Olinga founded and became Director of the Centre for Citizenship, Enterprise and GovernanceSince the age of 40, Olinga has led a number of high profile social enterprises which led to his appointment as Impact Investment Advisor to Big Society Network,  the UK government strategic partner.

What’s your Big Idea? Discover more at www.bigideassummit.com, join our Procurious group, and Tweet your Big Idea using #BigIdeas2015

The digital delegate and rise of the virtual summit

Much has been said about the rise of the digital economy continues, with organisations such as Airbnb and Uber cited as major disruptors in their industries. In business eLearning and social media are changing the way we learn and network. Are conferences next in the digital revolution?

The rise of the digital conference

As organisations become more geographically dispersed and look to reduce costs associated with meetings and conferences, webinars and virtual meetings have become much more common. Websites like Go To Meeting and Any Meeting allow anyone in the world to set up a webinar and connect with others without having to leave their desk.

Upgrade your presentations

And it’s not just meetings either. Presentations can be given a new lease of life by having them in a virtual environment. Presenters don’t have to stand up in front of a room of strangers, polls and surveys can be done in real time to provide instant feedback and by linking a hashtag to the meeting, the conversation can continue on social media.

Are Conferences Next?

So we come back to our original questions – are conferences next in the digital revolution? The technologies exist to allow this to happen. Google+ Hangouts on Air is just one of them. The service allows individuals and organisations to schedule content for broadcasting and subsequently publish the videos on YouTube.

Add to this the ability to have interactive conversations in real time, control who sees what and add banner advertising, and this becomes a real opportunity for reaching a wider audience. And to top it all off, the service is free.

It makes sense for conferences to investigate how to leverage technologies like this to expand their audience. Conversations can start before the event, speakers can get all the questions in advance (saving the awkward silence as everyone lets others go first in the Q&A) and social media can track thoughts and opinions long after the event has finished.

And this is what Procurious intends to do in April this year.

Big Ideas Summit 2015

Procurious is throwing open the doors to the world’s first digitally led conference for the procurement profession – Procurious Big Ideas Summit 2015. Planned as a unique think tank event, our Big Ideas Summit will draw on 40 of the world brightest minds from established thought-leaders, senior business leaders and commentators to discuss outside-of-the-box cost solutions.

The aim of Big Ideas is to inspire a new generation of business intrapreneurs to drive innovation and change in large organisations. Structured around three topics – RISK, PEOPLE and TECHNOLOGY – the event aims to change the world’s mind about cost and tease out solutions that will drive competitive advantage, agility in unstable markets and long-term value for organisations.

All the ideas and content will be amplified through Procurious. We’re welcoming more than 4,500 procurement professionals from across the globe to submit questions to speakers in advance as well as tune in, learn and participate in real time.

How you can take part

It doesn’t matter where you are in the world – we want you to help shape the agenda – register your attendance at our Procurious Big Ideas Summit Group.

You can also submit your questions on Twitter by tweeting us here: @procurious_ #BigIdeasSummit2015.

As a ‘digital delegate’ you’ll also be able to access a rich collection of supporting material including; articles, interviews and video content post 30 April.

For more information about the day head on over to our bespoke event site: http://www.bigideassummit.com.

Meanwhile, here’s what’s happening elsewhere in the world (we promise you it’s conference-free!)

Fast-fashion retailer Cotton On gears up for expansion

  • Cotton On Group has revealed plans to add 227 jobs in Australia and overseas this year as the Geelong-based value fashion retailer embarks on another expansion phase aimed at maintaining its five-year record of 20 per cent-plus sales growth.
  • Cotton On Group’s sales are forecast to rise 22.5 per cent in 2015 to $1.51 billion and the privately owned company is budgeting for 20 per cent-plus growth in 2016 by opening more than 100 stores and expanding e-commerce with new online sites, improved digital content and click and collect options.
  • COG, wholly-owned by Mr Austin and Ashley Hardwick, usually shuns publicity however have agreed to ‘lift the lid” and answer what they feel is unwarranted criticism of its supply chain and employment practices. It has a fully vertically integrated direct sourcing model and fast replenishment systems that rival those of global fast-fashion chains such as Inditex’s Zara, Sweden’s H&M and the Arcadia Group’s Top Shop.
  • Products are designed by a team of more than 60 designers and trend forecasters based at the global headquarters in North Geelong and at four hubs overseas. Products are manufactured by 170 suppliers at 330 factories, mainly in China and Bangladesh, and are sent two to eight weeks later, depending on the category, to seven distribution centres in Melbourne, Brisbane, South Africa, China, Singapore, California and New Zealand.

Read more at BRW.com

Supply chain threatened by ‘perfect storm’ as talent leaves industry

  • The global supply chain is heading for a perfect storm of rising demand, an ageing workforce, expanding skillset requirements, faculty shortages and an image problem, according to a white paper sponsored by DHL Global Forwarding.
  • Similar to the acute shortage of truck drivers blighting the US and Europe in particular, the gap between demand and availability of supply chain professionals is only going to get worse, states the report, with between 25 per cent and 33 per cent of the workforce “at or beyond retirement age”.
  • The white paper, entitled ‘Solving the Talent Crisis’, is based on research by Lisa Harrington, a senior research fellow at the Supply Chain Management Center, University of Maryland. It is specifically focused on the burgeoning automotive sector, where the problem is arguably more acute, but should be required reading for every supply chain executive.

Read more and download the white paper at The Loadstar

Scotland’s oil and gas supply chain sees ‘record’ sales

  • Sales from Scotland’s oil and gas supply chain grew by 11 per cent to a record £22.2bn in 2013, according to figures released by Scottish Enterprise. The sector recorded sales of about £7bn through international subsidiaries, up from £6.3bn in the previous year.

  • Direct exports from Scotland grew by 13 per cent over the same period, reaching a total of £4.2bn. Domestic sales for Scottish-based supply-chain firms were also up, from £9.9bn to £11bn.

  • North America continued to be the top region for international sales, followed by the Middle East and Asia Pacific.

  • Singapore, Qatar, the Netherlands, Iraq and the UAE all joined the top 10 country rankings for international sales during the year.

Read more at BBC.co.uk

Sports Direct responsible for fifth of all zero hour contracts in retail sector

  • Sports Direct is responsible for employing nearly one in every five workers in the retail and wholesale sector on a zero hours contract, official data suggests.
  • The revelation comes as a senior employment lawyer warned that the company, owned by the billionaire Mike Ashley, may have broken rules on consultation by giving staff at its USC fashion house only 15 minutes’ notice before they lost their jobs on 13 January.
  • The retailer’s chairman, Keith Hellawell, was grilled by MPs last week over the collapse of USC, which left 83 redundant.
  • He was also questioned about the company’s use of zero hours contracts. Sports Direct employs  nearly 15,000 on terms that guarantee no set hours each week. Mr Hellawell claimed that Sports Direct uses the contracts no more than any other retailer, but data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) appears to cast doubt on this.

Read more at Independent.co.uk

‘Made in UK’ electrics firm hits £5m mark

  • Tapping into the new found popularity of ‘Made in the UK’ is boosting the fortunes of an Aldridge electronic components specialist. One-LUX, which designs, assembles and supplies LED lighting control solutions, is on course to hit the £5m mark for the first time in its seven year-history after reshoring the manufacture of two new products.
  • “We’ve always designed our products in-house but previously offshored high volume lines to the Far East to ensure we remained competitive against our rivals,” explained Glynnis Murray, who founded the business in 2008. “However, in the last year we had noticed a desire from our customers to buy British made products and this, when combined with demand for shorter lead times, made us consider exploring manufacturing closer to home.”
  • She continued: “Working with the Business Growth Service’s Manufacturing Advisory Service (MAS), we mapped out our supply chain requirement and then got signposted to a number of firms who could meet our requirements. “We were pleasantly surprised at how competitive local suppliers were and, combined with the greater control we now have over lead times and quality, is going to be a major bonus as the demand for OMNI-LED and UNITY-LED will be significant.

Read more at Business Quarter

Join the world‘s first digitally-led event for procurement professionals

Procurious Big Ideas Summit 2015

Announcing the Procurious Big Ideas Summit 2015

We‘re throwing open the doors to the world’s first digitally-led conference for the procurement profession: The Procurious Big Ideas Summit 2015.

Planned as a unique think tank event, our Big Ideas Summit will draw on 40 of the world brightest minds from established thought-leaders, senior business leaders and commentators to discuss outside-of-the-box cost solutions.

What’s the Big Idea behind it?

The aim of Big Ideas is to inspire a new generation of business intrapreneurs to drive innovation and change in large organisations. Structured around three topics – RISK, PEOPLE and TECHNOLOGY, the event aims to change the world’s mind about cost and tease out solutions which will drive competitive advantage, agility in unstable markets and long term value for organisations.

The face-to-face component of the event will take place in London on 30 April 2015, however, with ideas and content amplified through Procurious, we’re welcoming more than 4,500 procurement professionals from across the globe to submit questions to speakers in advance as well as tune in, learn and participate in real time.

Who will be speaking?

We’ve secured a high calibre of thought leaders and keynote speakers, including:

  • David Noble, Group CEO, CIPS
  • Chris Sawchuk, Principal and Global Procurement Advisory Practice Leader, The Hackett Group
  • Professor Jules Goddard, London School of Business
  • Professor Olinga Ta’eed, Director Centre of Citizenship, Enterprise & Governance
  • Giles Breault, Founder and Director, The Beyond Group

How you can take part

The Big Ideas Summit is open to all Procurious members. It doesn’t matter where you are in the world – we want you to help shape the agenda – register your attendance at our Procurious Big Ideas Summit Group.

On Twitter? You can also submit your questions by tweeting us @procurious_  #BigIdeas2015

For more information about the day head on over to our bespoke event site www.bigideassummit.com

Why take part?

As savvy social networkers you’ll already be of the mind that social media can be used to create a global stir. We want to amplify these Big Ideas throughout the global procurement community, connect with one another, start meaningful conversations, and ultimately drive change.

All keynote sessions will be captured on film and offered exclusively to registered attendees.  As a ‘digital delegate’ you’ll also be able to access a rich collection of supporting material including; articles, interviews and video content post 30 April.

Who’s sponsoring it?

For an event that explores the biggest trends impacting procurement we thought it only necessary to bring onboard similarly hot-ticket sponsors. The Big Ideas Summit 2015 is proud to be sponsored by the Chartered Institute of Procurement & Supply (CIPS) and The Hackett Group.

Register your attendance today

Who’s responsible for writing a specification or brief?

With over 300 questions and over 1000 answers, the Procurious Discussion forum is one of the most active on social media. But there is always room for more. If you have a question, please hop over to the forum and post it up!

By way of thanking you for your continuing support, we’ve picked a particularly popular topic from the last month:

Who’s responsible for writing a specification or brief?

Procurement has been tagged as the responsible party for the generation of a specification or brief but I believe this to be incorrect. What has been your experience?

This was an interesting question from Sarah Lees, providing some diverse answers from the community. Responsibility for writing specifications or briefs can vary depending on industry, company or how it has been done in the past.

Although there was no overall consensus on the responsibility, there was agreement that procurement needed to play a role in the process, whether that was facilitation, clarification or writing the document.

A number of the responses highlighted the need for a cross-functional or multiple stakeholder led approach, where procurement facilitated a group including the end user, requester, departments such as engineering or sales, as well as potentially preferred suppliers.

Involving the supplier can allow for clarification on requirements before quotation and supply, while also opening up opportunities for innovation or alternative solutions. Suppliers may play a role as a key stakeholder and, as such, it is worth considering them to be part of the group.

Key to the discussion was the idea that ‘they got what they asked for’ was no longer an acceptable excuse. In order to ensure that the right product is sourced first time, procurement can question and evaluate requirements – does the product need to be bespoke, will an off the shelf version work, is this actually required – and ensure that suppliers are getting a specification that they can understand and respond to.

If you’re still unsure, check out Procurious’ video on developing a Scope of Work. This shows the SOW and Specification as two distinct documents, gives an overview on formats of specifications (functional or descriptive) and highlights what role procurement plays.

How do you define trust in the supply chain?

Following on from our examination into the Siemens bribery scandal,  we’ve compiled some of the excellent community discussion on the subject of trust in the supply chain.

frankie’s/Shutterstock.com

How do you define trust in the supply chain?

Trust is a major factor when choosing suppliers, as well as staying with them for years. In a prior discussion on Procurious, trust, follow through and understanding of your industry were some of the top factors you all shared choosing and staying with your suppliers. 

So how do you define trust? And what components of trust are most important when it comes to setting up your supply chain?

Thanks to Hannah Broaddus for this question, following up on one previously asked (and wrapped) on Procurious. Trust as a concept is hard to define, can take months or years to build up within relationships, and can be destroyed by one stray comment or action.

As seen in the recent situation in Australia with Nanna’s Frozen Berries, consumer trust can be lost through issues in a supply chain and will take time to be earned back.

The idea that trust had to be earned on both sides was cited more than once. Trust is built through interactions and discussions over a period of time. At the beginning, there needs to be the belief that both parties are working towards the same goals and that the other party has your company’s or customers’ interests in mind.

Trust is built by being open and honest. Companies that are good at generating trust will share information freely. This can be sales and operations data, forecasts or critical data that will ultimately benefit both sides.

One answer highlighted Mari Sako, professor at the University of Oxford. Sako states that there are three types of trust that we must all go through & earn from the other party.

  • Contractual Trust – prove you can do what you say you can (we both look for failure here)
  • Competence Trust – when I believe that you can do what you say you will
  • Goodwill Trust – we both do things for the good of the relationship

Finally, we’d like to leave you with the immortal words of Ernest Hemingway, “The best way to find out if you can trust somebody is to trust them.”

Wise words to live by, even if this is perhaps easier said than done in business.

Here’s something else the community has discussing at length:

Is your company’s procurement department strategic, or purely operational?

What is the best way to add value and make your Management aware of its strategic importance?

The question of whether procurement has a seat at the executive table is often asked. What is less apparent is whether procurement departments are conducting purely operational work in organisations. This question from Pedro Semprine asks just that.

A widely held belief is that most senior executives spend less than 3 per cent of their time on strategic tasks. One answer in this discussion highlighted an 80/20 split in time – where procurement leaders spend 80 per cent of their time on strategic matters and 20 per cent on the daily tasks, while juniors were the opposite.

A common thought was that procurement, depending on the task, had to be both strategic and tactical. Day-to-day materials would require a tactical approach, whereas critical or bottleneck items would require a more strategic focus. Tactical procurement activities contribute towards the overall strategic goals of both the procurement department and the organisation.

There was also the idea that all activities might be viewed as operational, unless procurement was seen as a strategic advisor in the organisation. One option to counter this was to be proactive, writing strategy documents and quantifying examples with data, for example cost savings or production times, so management would be able to see the value added.

Procurement could utilise a results oriented approach, publicising successes where value had been generated for the organisation. Organisation impacting activities, such as core product changes, cost reduction and process improvement could be laid out with future plans in order to show continuing value generation.

The tips were nicely summed up into three points:

  1. Speak to influencers and key senior management figures – ask them what are their pains are
  2. Conduct a group presentation to all of them to demonstrate how your plans can help meet their goals
  3. Leave the emotive categories alone for now. These include stationery, car leases and most of all, travel.

Receiving too many notifications? Show your inbox who’s boss!

We’ve had a few emails from Procurious members asking how to better tailor email notifications to suit their preferences. Take control back and customise the notifications you see by following our quick tips.

We provide you with the option (by default) to be notified whenever a fellow Procurious member invites you to connect, accepts your invitation to connect, or sends you a message.

Obviously you are free to silence some or all of these as you please, and it only takes a second to put the changes into action…

How to turn your notifications on or off

To do this look towards your Procurious header bar and open the drop-down menu under your profile picture/name. From here click ‘Settings’.

Scroll down until you locate your ‘Email Notifications’ (they’re right below the ‘Change Password’ area).

Procurious notifications

To stop receiving a specific notification just untick the relevant box, making sure to click ‘Save Changes’ to make good your choices.

What about weekly Procurious newsletters?

You can also control the arrival of our Procurious newsletters that pop into your inbox on a weekly basis. We currently publish two: a best of the blog where we highlight some of our favourite editorial from the past week, the other focuses on a news story that is making the headlines that week.

Read more about our weekly newsletters here.

Know someone who is curious about Procurious? Share our ‘What is Procurious?’ video

As a member of Procurious, you have shown yourself to be one of the first-movers of the procurement and supply chain profession: You’re globally connected, you’re innovative, you’re influential and you’re in-the-know.  

We want to send out a big thank-you for being a part of Procurious – a healthy community thrives on its members, their knowledge, curiosity, and desire to share. Without your support this widespread procurement community of ours would still be lost, we hope that since becoming a member you’re of the belief that Procurious is helping to fix the disconnect inherent in our profession.

But perhaps you’ve struggled to explain the Procurious concept to your peers? Well we’ve just finished the wrap on our ‘What is Procurious?’ animated video – a video we’d love you to share with others!  It conveys all of the benefits that will already be well-known to you – our Procurious ambassadors.

We wanted to make our video fun, friendly and informative – and we certainly enjoyed putting it together, so we hope you love it as much as we do!

Want to tell others about this exciting community you’re a part of? Instead of reeling off a sales-pitch, why not direct them to the video and let the pictures do the talking!

Procurious fast facts

You have helped to push the number of our members to 4000+, and collectively you hail from more than 100 countries worldwide. This just goes to show that procurement is truly global!

  • You represent the world’s leading organisations including: Apple, IBM, Microsoft, Starbucks, Shell, Rio Tinto, Qantas, HSBC, SAP, NHS, British Airways and many, many more
  • You’ve started over 230 discussions and contributed 1000 answers, making Procurious a ‘braintrust’ for the brightest minds
  • Thanks to you we have amassed almost 2000 followers across our other social media channels including Twitter (@procurious_ ), LinkedIn, Facebook and Google+
  • With our collection of 50+ bite-sized e-learning videos from the world’s best trainers – we’re learning new skills together 
  • Procurious is home to a daily news service and guest blogs from leading global procurement experts (your peers)

If you’re reading this you’re probably already a Procurious member, so why not share the video with your peers, friends, family, the other businesses that share your building… Tweet the link, stick it on Facebook, post it on LinkedIn and spread the word!

Enjoy the video, and thanks for watching – after-all, we couldn’t have done this without you! Procurious HQ

How to use Filters to find exactly what you’re looking for

Using filters to get tailored search results

Use search filters to find what you're looking for

Nope we’re not talking water filters, Instagram filters, or the type of filters needed for your broadband – let us introduce you to the filters that will turbocharge your search experience on Procurious (and you thought filters were boring…!)

No matter where you are on the site,  the Procurious search bar is always within easy reach. You can use it to search for people, events, articles, discussion topics, or learning materials (videos).

Give it a go right now – fire something into the bar (‘CIPS’ for example) and see what it returns.

You’ll notice that the results page allows you to filter out your search results by type (all of which we touched on above). This proves invaluable when sorting those Procurious members with CIPS accreditation from CIPS-related articles (like our recent explainer on the CIPS Risk Index for instance).

More interested in growing your network and expanding your influence? If the search box isn’t returning the results you wanted, use the filters present on the ‘Build your network’ page to hone in on Procurious members that more closely align with your interests.

Build your network search filters

Here you can target your search and use filters to break down search results by country, industry, or category.

Whether you want to find people who work in Government, health care, mining (or any one of the 30+ other industries listed), want to list Procurious members by country, or by a particular category (commodities, logistics, utilities etc.) – you can use the filters as you see fit.

Of course you can also combine search filters for very precise hits: want to find members in the defence industry, looking after IT in Afghanistan? Yep, you can do that.

Why not give it a go now, and see what you’ve missing out on?

What’s procurement like in your part of the world?

At the time of writing Procurious boasts members from 100+ countries, is yours represented?

We’re truly global

Yes we may keep a map of the world on the wall at Procurious HQ… What of it?

From Azerbaijan to Zambia, Procurious members circle the world! If you’re just casually browsing the site, why not join up and stake a claim for your part of the world?

We want to hear your stories! How well is procurement represented, what’s it like being a procurement professional – how does it differ from elsewhere in the world? Drop us a line if you’d like to be featured, just like Helen, Happymore, Hal, and Sergio below:

Exciting times ahead for Scotland

We asked Helen Mackenzie about procurement in Scotland:

“Not sure about the Scottish private sector but public procurement in Scotland is really buzzing at the moment.  The Scottish Government’s just got the new Procurement Reform Act through the Parliament and so sustainable procurement is high up on our agenda.  

There’s never been a better time to be in public procurement.  At last many of us are getting to take up our seat right in the heart of corporate management and decision making.”

Click here to read the rest of Helen’s piece.

Procurement in the USA? A different beast

Flying the flag for the US, Hal Good could only estimate when quizzed on the number of working professionals throughout the 50 constituent states:

“In 2008, according to the Department of Labor, there were 68,000 “purchasing mangers” employed in the US.  The latest Bureau of Labor statistics estimated 504,600 “jobs” for Purchasing managers, buyers and purchasing agents.”

How does it differ exactly? “Contractors doing business with the US Federal Government, are committed to utilization of the FAR program which gave rise to the National Contract Association (NCMA) and its educational programs and credentials.  

This has spawned a difference in terminology and to some extent practices within the profession in the USA itself, as well as with the rest of the world.  That is probably due to the vast influence of CIPS in the international arena.”

See Hal’s answers in full.

What does procurement mean to developing countries?

Procurious member Happymore Mambondiani previously spoke to us about some of the challenges procurement poses in his home country – Zimbabwe:

“Currently procurement is undertaken by unqualified personnel in the majority of organisations in the country be it in the public or private sector.

In Zimbabwe (unlike other countries where procurement has grown as a profession), procurement has not yet developed into a function. Instead it has been lumped into a wing under the finance department – this is true except for all but the biggest firms like Tangaat Hullets (a sugar producing company) in the South East Low veld of Chiredzi/Triangel.

At a National level procurement is undertaken by the State Procurement Board which is under the Ministry of Finance. The State Procurement Board should be a ministry dedicated to the handling of government purchases of goods and services.”

See more of what Happymore has to say here.

Italy: home to some of the best negotiators in the world…

Procurious’ greatest Italian advocate – Sergio Giordano, explains how procurement has been split into two:

“Once Procurement in Italy was ’emotional price negotiation’ the Italian Procurement professional was one of the best negotiator in the world … but nothing else. Today in Italy things are partially changed, there are two distinctly separate worlds in procurement management – 

  • The large national and multinational companies in which the concept of Procurement has evolved (not just negotiating the price but the TCO, the knowledge of local and global market, management of the relationship with suppliers, the use of e-Procurement, Lean Procurement approach, etc…) they use the same “tools” and strategies of the most competitive and advanced European nations.
  • SMEs (92% of the Italian companies). Today SMEs are realising that joining in network can help to become competitive to the market as large companies and things are changing also in the Procurement management.

However, in Sergio’s opinion one distinctive difference will always remain: “during the negotiations Italians tend to play ‘Poker’ instead of ‘Bridge’…”

Hear more from the great man – view his comments in full.