Category Archives: Supplier Relationship Management

Suppliers: Who And Where Are Your 1%?

You might think that your most strategic suppliers are the ones you spend the most with. But supply chain crises may shine a light on which suppliers are actually strategic.


Modern-day supply chains are truly global, highly complex and getting longer and longer. 20 years ago, most of a company’s suppliers were probably within a very short radius. Today they could be on the other side of the world.

The reality is that organisations have more difficulty than ever keeping track of their entire supply chain – from Tier 1 all the way down to the smallest supplier organisations. This poses enough challenges for organisations when it comes to issues like environmental performance or modern slavery, let alone with supply chain efficiency or continuity of supply.

With so many suppliers to keep track of, organisations have to make decisions about who their strategic suppliers really are. Traditionally, organisations (and their procurement departments) have fixated on the suppliers with the largest spend volumes. In reality, they should be most concerned about a supplier’s risk profile.

This risk profile is thrown into light at times of crisis in global supply chains. This may come from volcanic eruptions disrupting global flights and travel, or from a global pandemic, such as COVID-19.

What Does the 1% Look Like?

All suppliers are unique, bringing different things to an organisation beyond the goods and services they provide. When assessing which suppliers to manage as ‘strategic’, procurement departments have traditionally focused on their visible suppliers. This usually is defined by spend profile and determined using traditional methods such as the Pareto 80:20 principle.

However, it’s the less visible, hidden suppliers that are often the most strategic. These are the 1%.

This group is made up of the suppliers who are easiest to ignore as they supply something low-cost and apparently trivial to the organisation. In truth, this trivial component may be manufactured from an expensive or rare raw material, be a proprietary item, or come from a supplier who has a monopoly or dominance in the market. Despite this item costing very little, the likelihood is that it is difficult, if not impossible to replace. This makes the potential impact on the supply chain huge should the supplier fail to deliver.

Assessing these suppliers using another procurement favourite, the Kraljic Matrix, they would fall into the ‘non-critical’ or ‘bottleneck’ categories (see below).

Figure 1 – Kraljic Matrix via Forbes.com

However, in many cases, the risk aspect of supply is downplayed or removed entirely, leaving the focus solely on profitability. This is where the issues with your 1% lie.

The Role of Technology

In times of supply chain crises, every supplier – even your ‘transactional’ and ‘bottleneck’ suppliers – need the same attention in order to ensure you’re not missing something. What may have once seemed like an impossible and highly inefficient task has been aided considerably by the advancements in procurement solutions and technology.

Organisations have gone from a reliance on their transactional systems, such as their ERP, and the knowledge and experience of their procurement teams to manage their suppliers. This has left organisations exposed through a lack of data to define and manage strategic suppliers, as well as the loss of knowledge when people leave to join another organisation.

Procurement technology and solutions have developed to the extent that they can help provide the necessary foundation for tracking an entire supply base. This has moved the profession from a position of weakness, to a position of strategic responsibility. In the current climate, people are now actively talking about supply chains and procurement’s role now and in the future.

Therefore, the profession cannot undermine itself by failing to manage its 1% effectively. Even big organisations, with highly developed supply chains can be caught out, as we can see below.

Real World #1 – Keeping Supplies Zipped Up Tight

The fashion industry has taken some very public, very high-profile hits for its supply chain. Organisations have a uniquely complex situation to contend with – finding suppliers who are flexible, reactive and usually low cost on one hand, while on the other ensuring that the highest ethical standards are still achieved.

Suppliers can frequently be small, family-owned and geographically challenging too. However, you might consider an everyday item on many items of clothing a product of a 1% supplier – the zip.

You might overlook it, but a zip is a critical item for manufacturers and designers. The market is dominated by two major suppliers, YKK and SBS, but there are other players there too. However, the majority of these are geographically focused in Asia – specifically Japan and China. Switching supply is unlikely to be easy, so all it takes is a supply chain crisis in this region, say a lack of key raw materials or alloys for production, and supply could be disrupted, without viable alternatives.

Low value compared to other items in the fashion design process, but very high risk.

Real World #2 – Bearing the Risk

Manufacturing is another industry with highly complex and multi-layered supply chains to manage. In automotive manufacturing, supply chains have moved towards the ‘Just-in-Time’ method pioneered by Toyota, making continuity of supply and supplier reliability critical at all times. It’s no use having 99% of the parts available to use, when the 1% is stuck in its factory, two tiers down your supply chain.

As such, a greater focus on quality over price is required, but even this is not fool proof. Fiat Chrysler announced in February that it was halting production at one of its factories in Serbia as it couldn’t get parts from China. Manufacturers who would traditionally hold minimal stock to remain competitive and agile are faced with a situation where that very strategy could pose a huge risk to their organisation.

As the impact of COVID-19 related factories closures around the world continues to grow, even large manufacturers may actually stock out before there’s a chance to re-align. And these items could be as simple as ball bearings for wheels – very low value, but huge risk at this time.

De-risking the 1%

Is there a solution that overworked procurement professionals can take advantage of in the face of a supply chain crisis? When it comes to supplier risk, there are a number of actions that may be taken immediately in order to reduce this.

According to KPMG, these can include setting up a response team to manage the flow of information across key stakeholder groups, reviewing key contracts with customers and suppliers to understand liability in the event of shortages, and conducting a full risk assessment to provide a list of actions to take, which may include shortening supply chains and assessing alternative options.

In the long-term, however, the focus needs to be more on supplier management and the creation of truly ‘strategic’ relationships, built on risk profiles rather than value. This should be done across the entire supply chain and aim to go down through the various Tiers that exist in it. This is defined as ‘Holistic Supplier Management’, a concept explored in more detail by JAGGAER in their latest whitepaper.

JAGGAER’s research uses a similar model to the Kraljic Matrix for supplier positioning, but with the key difference that it focuses on risk and cost to the business (rather than cost of supply) in the event of supplier failure.

Figure 2 – JAGGAER Supplier Positioning Matrix

A concept is all very well but being able to deliver Holistic Supplier Management and manage suppliers on risk and cost requires being able to access data on current performance, the impact of an individual supplier on your organisation, as well as the value that they deliver. This is where technology comes to the aid of procurement and it’s what is offered within the JAGGAER Supplier Management solution.

The solution not only provides the data and analysis that is required by procurement for key decision-making, but also gives a deeper understanding of suppliers to help construct better contracts that deliver greater value to the organisation. By using technology like this, procurement can effectively and efficiently de-risk their supply chains, keeping them better prepared for managing crises when they inevitably hit.

Don’t Get Caught Out

The key message, as every procurement professional knows, is that good communication is key to maintaining a strong and stable supply chain. However, as supply chains grow more and more complex, geographically dispersed and multi-tiered, individual procurement professionals and departments need to make use of all the resources at their disposal.

Holistic Supplier Management can help procurement be better prepared, mitigate risks and start to understand what strategic procurement and strategic suppliers really are. You can find more information on the JAGGAER website, or by downloading their latest whitepaper, ‘How To Achieve Holistic Supplier Management: Orchestrating Supplier Management for Maximum Benefit’.

No matter how safe you think you are, how stable you believe your supply chain is and how strong your links are with your strategic suppliers, there is always an inherent risk within that 1%. By being better prepared and truly understanding your supply chain, you can avoid being caught out in time of crisis.

What You Need To Know About Supplier Payments, Bankruptcies And The Financial Impact Of COVID-19

Considering this macro-economic turmoil, new research shows that most contracts and supplier partnerships held strong during the pandemic


The early days of COVID-19 were financially tumultuous and incredibly stressful. For most business executives, uncertainty ruled the day: Would my contracts hold? Will I get paid on time? And will I have enough funds to pay my team and suppliers?

The issue is exacerbated in the supply chain, where late payments and cancelled contracts in one part of the world create chaos for unrelated businesses located millions of miles away. Of course, these short-term concerns were ultimately trumped by even bigger issues relating to bankruptcies, business closures and unemployment.

Considering this macro-economic turmoil, Procurious’ latest research shows that most contracts and supplier partnerships held strong and stood up to the stress test – which is a major testament to procurement’s response and the strength of existing buyer-supplier relationships.

Our survey of 600-plus procurement and supply chain leaders found that nearly 60% of organisations (58%) are still operating and paying their suppliers per their contract. In fact, 14% of organisations are speeding up payments to suppliers and 6% are providing direct financial support. On the other end of the spectrum, 10% said they are delaying payment to all suppliers, and another 11% said they were delaying payments to non-strategic suppliers. Overall, this is positive news – for buyers, suppliers and the broader economy.

However, the longer the crisis plays out, the more financial strain it will cause. Despite the positive news on payments and contracts, there has already been substantial financial hardships and fallout among suppliers. Our research found that as of May 12, 2020:

  • 6% of organisations said they had a key supplier go out of business
  • 11% said they had multiple key suppliers go out of business
  • 20% said they had a supplier declare fore majeure on contract obligations

Our analysis shows that the companies hit the hardest by COVID-19 were more than 50% likely to have multiple key suppliers go out of business compared to other organisations.

The Economic Forecast: Cloudy with 100% Chance of Unpredictability

Predicting what’s next economically is difficult, and possibly even an exercise in futility. We’ve heard it all from the experts, with projections changing by the day: V-shaped recoveries, U-shaped recoveries… and even the swoosh.

What’s not hard to predict: regardless of how fast the economy recovers, the response from procurement teams will continue to play a critical role in ongoing business continuity and financial resiliency. During the pandemic, 65% of organisations had to source alternative supplies for affected categories. Procurement responded quickly and effectively – with 53% able to lock down new suppliers in less than three weeks, and 18% finding new suppliers in a week’s time.

Post-pandemic, it will be interesting to watch if and how contracts evolve, and the weight put behind different conditions and KPIs. We are already expecting macro supply chain strategy shifts , which will naturally impact sourcing decisions and contract negotiations. Expect to see even more emphasis put behind collaborative supplier relationships, and new investments in predictive analytics and supplier risk monitoring, specifically as it relates to financial viability.

The financial picture remains uncertain at best. How are procurement and supply chain leaders responding? Get the latest in our “Supply Chain Confidence and Recovery” Report.


Navigating The Next Normal With Outsourced Service Providers

What are the decisions to make when planning for the next normal in outsourced services?


As we slowly and cautiously, masks on and two meters apart, think about emerging from the COVID-19 crisis, there is quite a bit of uncertainty about what the world will look like when we step back outside. Knowing there is no cure or vaccine on the near horizon means workplaces will be different. The economic impact of the virus has changed the corporate landscape. What we thought was temporary just may be permanent.

For procurement teams managing outsourced services categories, there are more questions than answers. While we grapple with this uncertainty in our own companies and careers, we must also set expectations with suppliers. It’s a double challenge.

Early in the crisis, the focus in services was enabling a transition to work from home. While that may have been a small speedbump for office roles in developed countries like the US and Australia, certain offshore locations faced additional challenges. Offshore service centres scrambled to enable workers who used fixed desktop computers and worked in clean room environments to ensure data security. MSA waivers were given to service providers, and large firms compromised a bit on standards as we rushed into what appeared to be a short-term fix.

For the most part, providers managed to keep the virtual lights on; while reports varied, most services were stabilised within two weeks. Providers of voice services struggled a bit more, but end-consumers also adapted and accepted an online solution as a sufficient substitute for a call. We dug in and started to think about the next stage – what if the virus infected so many people that a significant percentage of workers were out sick or caring for loved ones? We talked about talent resiliency and resource continuity planning. Save for a few heavily impacted areas (New York City, Mumbai), the lockdown worked, the curve was flattened, and there has been no significant productivity drop (yet). In fact, some buyers and suppliers are claiming productivity is up in this new work from home world, and that’s changing how we view the future.

So, what’s next? At Everest Group we see two paths in play: a scramble to reduce costs and prop up financials in light of the recessionary environment, and a reset to what we call the “next normal” in outsourcing and offshoring. Where your company and your procurement team fall on these paths will vary quite a bit by industry, corporate strategy, and even timing.

The coronacrisis is changing outsourcing and offshoring very quickly


Shoring up cost structures

While some industries were hit exceptionally hard by the crisis (retail, travel, energy), some seem to be weathering the storm with a more limited impact (banking, food and beverage, life sciences), and others are thriving (high tech, home media). Regardless, the drop in consumer spending and high unemployment will have a ripple effect across all markets.

Smart CEOs and their boards have started to buckle down. In a late April 2020 survey, 71% of companies were looking at operational costs, while 62% were addressing external spend. Since then I’ve had contacts in procurement say “I thought our costs were competitive, but my leadership wants more.” Outsourced services spend tends to be a significant cost, so expect to hear that knock on your door if you haven’t already.

Where to start with cost cutting? We shared tips to optimise and modernise delivery in our “5 Cost Levers To Pull Right Now With Your Outsourced Services” webcast on Procurious. That advice still stands, and you can hear more directly from our pricing assurance practice leader in this new session on “Outsourcing Pricing: Key Opportunities to Improve Costs Now”. As we said in both sessions, this is not a time for hard line, tactical negotiation. It’s a time to look at modernising your model and making structural changes that benefit both buyer and service provider. Regardless of where you are in the term of your contract, it’s a time to arm yourself with knowledge of the market and have a serious conversation with providers about how to take costs out of the system.

What are you doing to prepare for the “next normal” (or to return to some sort of business as usual)?

Everest Group 2020

Planning for the next normal

The other path is nearly universal to all organisations: navigating next steps as we struggle to emerge from the crisis. While these decisions stand on their own, they are also deeply intertwined with cost takeout initiatives. Through many conversations with service providers and buyers we have outlined six key areas of focus. No one knows all the answers to these questions yet, but for each component there are targeted questions to ask within your organisation and to your service providers.

Sourcing strategy and provider portfolio

  • Do we need to prune our portfolio to strengthen the core?
  • Shall we consolidate providers or diversify our portfolio?
  • Which activities should be brought in-house?
  • Which new activities could be outsourced?
  • Are there changes in the scope of our agreements we should consider?

Solution design

  • Should we shift more work onshore or offshore?
  • Where are we too geographically concentrated?
  • Which countries would diversify our portfolio?
  • Where do we need multi-location mitigation plans?
  • How will office space restructuring affect service centre output?
  • Will remote work be allowed or encouraged by providers?
  • What new skills are required? Where is retraining needed?

Pricing and cost

  • How should we change our pricing model?
  • Are we paying the right rates?
  • Are we getting enough value?
  • Where can innovation reduce operational costs?

Performance management

  • How do we measure productivity in a remote environment?
  • How do our SLAs and metrics need to change?
  • What new relationship management techniques are required?
  • How do we build in incentives for innovation?

Policy and contracting

  • How do we ensure information security and compliance in the new environment?
  • What policies need to change to support this new strategy?
  • What flexibility needs to be built into contracts?
  • How has liability changed for either party?

Risk management

  • How should our business continuity planning change?
  • Which new data sources do we need to improve monitoring and mitigation planning?
  • How can we enable more agile sourcing decisions?

Decisions to make when planning for the next normal in outsourced services


In our recent discussions, the greatest focus has been on planning for solution design, risk, and governance. Of course, the path for each of these areas will dictate cost models and price. A few significant decisions set the foundation for others and seem particularly tricky. The first is partner strategy. Balancing a multi-country strategy to mitigate risk seems to contradict the desire to bring down costs by concentrating work with fewer providers. While this seems counterintuitive, we’re at a point where everything is on the table. It makes sense to reconsider location models while reassessing the partner portfolio.

Even the concept of pushing for cost reductions feels a bit tacky for some vendor management folks, given these are strategic partners and we’re all weathering the same storm together. That’s why we need to think win-win in modernising delivery and reshaping solutions in a way that benefits both parties. Simply asking for line item discounts for crisis-related shortcomings will not get us there. We often talk about “strengthening the core” – that means letting go of lower-performing providers to focus efforts on high value relationships with strong partners. Keep in mind that most of the top 25 service providers are in a relatively good place financially. While they don’t want to give up margin, they do want to do the right thing for their clients, including structural and digital improvements. They can even enable these initiatives both financially and with a different level of expertise. While these may not be the easy, short term cost take-out tactics we might want, they leave us with a stronger and more cost-efficient portfolio longer term.

I wish I could end this blog post with a very simple recommendation for surviving the crisis and thriving in the next normal, but that just isn’t realistic. There is no one right answer. Of course, it depends on your industry, your current portfolio, and many other factors. You can, as a procurement professional, arm yourself with the tools to facilitate the development of a plan with all stakeholders. Start with the checklist above to make sure you don’t miss critical decisions. Dust off your make/buy model, category strategy, and any previous location analyses. Check in on your rates and contract competitiveness, performance data, and risk profiles. Ask your service providers their proposed plans, see how they mesh with your MSA and policies. Your team has decisions to make, your role is to make sure they are fact-based and all possibilities are on the table. If you’re missing parts of this list or need a sounding board, the Everest Group team is available to help.  

Assistance for services buyers

During the COVID-19 crisis we are offering pro bono assistance to services buyers in the procurement community:

  • A locations data check comparing two global locations on key factors such as size of entry level talent pool, market landscape of providers, financial attractiveness, and operating and business environment risk – consider whether geographic diversification is a smart move.
  • A service provider risk profile covering four key parameters (finance, governance, operations, reputation) –  find out if there are underlying concerns with your provider beyond the immediate crisis.
  • Complimentary price checks on up to three standard roles in three different locations – a pulse check to see if your rates are in line or out of line with the market.
  • A conversation with one of our analysts on any global services related topic – ask questions, test your strategy, or get feedback on what others are doing from our senior team.

The Everest Group team is excited to be working with Procurious, and we look forward to helping members create value for their organisations.

Amy Fong

Vice President – Strategic Outsourcing and Vendor Management
Everest Group

You Ask All Of Your Suppliers For A 5% Discount. What Can Possibly Go Wrong?!

What does best practice supplier relationship management look like? Not like this…


With sales at her company in freefall due to the Covid-19 crisis, the pressure was on for Sally’s* procurement team to reduce costs. In a desperate pitch to do what she could, Sally decided to issue a letter to all suppliers, asking for an overall price reduction of 5%. In exchange, Sally dangled the carrot of ‘to-be-determined’ commitments that the business would fulfill post-Covid. These could include, she thought, accelerated payment terms, additional volumes, or contract extensions.  

What could possibly go wrong, she thought, as she hastily finalised the letters and forwarded them on. Even if most say no, some might say yes and procurement will be lauded as heroes. 

We’ve all been in Sally’s position – or if we haven’t, we certainly can imagine being put in it. When faced with the pressure that a crisis brings, isn’t it always the best idea to at least try to reduce costs by asking for a discount? On the surface, it seems like a logical approach – all you need is for one supplier to agree and your effort pays off. But is it possible that taking such a black-and-white approach can end up costing you more than it saves you? 

Issue 1: Vague notions of success can’t be measured 

In Sally’s situation above, you could argue that ‘success’ looked like one supplier agreeing to discount. But what if they agreed to a 1% discount, would that suffice? Or if they agreed to a 5% discount without complaint, would you ask if you had done more? 

The problem with a strategy of ‘doing something and hoping for the best’ is that there really is no benchmark for what ‘the best’ is and whether it has been achieved. This leads to issues with measuring success internally, and naturally, the same question is always asked: how has procurement added value here? 

Issue 2: No discount is as simple as asking – negotiation will be required 

If achieving a 5% discount was as easy as sending a letter, then procurement would likely be out of a job. Herein lies another problem with Sally’s strategy – it’s unlikely that vendors would respond with a simple ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ leaving her to need to negotiate for whatever she could get. 

And these negotiations would not be simple. Those suppliers who may be inclined to agree would expect more clarity and certainty on any future commitments from the company, which could turn discussions sour, quickly. 

Those on the other end of the spectrum, however, may feel the need to explain why they can’t offer a discount, and may enter the conversation feeling defeated or exposed. 

Whichever way these discussions transpired, they would certainly be time-consuming. In an environment where time is money, you have to ask yourself what the small percentage gains you might secure are really worth. . 

Issue 3: Your supplier is in a crisis, too 

Supplier Management 101 tells us that we should treat our suppliers like we’d like to be treated. But is sending out a generic request the way we’d like to be treated, especially if we’re in crisis too? 

The answer is a resounding and obvious no. Any suppliers that Sally is dealing with would also be deep within this crisis, and may in fact be considering a price increase to save themselves. On top of this, a lack of personalised correspondence could be perceived as insulting to the relationship. The request might net a discount, but it would cost far more than that in future relationship capital. 

If Sally’s plan wouldn’t work, then what would? 

Step 1: Shore up your fundamentals 

In times of crisis, and indeed, in ordinary time procurement must have a clear goal and an execution plan for what is needed for the business operations to continue undisrupted (or minimally impacted) and more importantly, for creatively increasing value to the organisation. 

These are essentially the fundamentals required to maintain a strong supplier base and elevate procurement. From a pure supplier relationship perspective, engaging strategic suppliers to assess their crisis preparedness and ability to continue to serve the organisation is the first step. 

Step 2: Creatively and empathetically engage your suppliers

Once you’ve got your fundamentals organised, you need to engage your suppliers in strategic conversations about how to creatively increase efficiency, optimize processes quickly, reduce waste (of time, resources and costs), and where possible, decrease costs and deliver additional value. 

Beyond this, you also need to discuss with them what value is added,  how much, for how long, what are the contingencies. This will help you establish a win-win approach with short and long term impact. 

The idea is that a continuation of a growing partnership will drive the right behaviours, not just during this crisis but in the future. Supplier-driven innovation should always be a top priority to both procurement and the entire organisation. 

After you’ve finished your initial discussions (and note, these type of discussions should always be ongoing) use learnings from them across all other supplier segments. The behavior you want to drive here is ensuring suppliers not only want to continue doing business with you but are eager to strategize with each other during the crisis.

Going back to Sally’s situation, this approach works for a number of reasons. Even if suppliers couldn’t immediately offer reductions they will be clear on expectations and will be committed to perform at a high level and produce ideas for the company, while increasing supplier engagement and value as a byproduct. Suppliers will be willing to explore solutions to avoid disruption, which is exactly what the business needs. In addition to this, the effort expended is targeted so no time will be wasted and in fact, the time spent may even produce market intelligence that can be brought back to the business to refine their own mitigation strategies. 

Also, finally and perhaps most importantly, the role of the procurement will be elevated to a truly strategic function (with lasting impact) to the organisation.

Continue supplier relationship best practice? 

For procurement professionals that realised early that Sally’s approach wouldn’t work, none of the advice here on how to rectify it should come as surprise: it is, quite simply, supplier relationship best practice to treat your suppliers in this way. 

In fact, for organisations that already implement supplier relationship best practice, they may not even need to take these steps – throughout this crisis, their suppliers may already be knocking on their door with creative mitigation strategies. They may even be using this crisis to bring the relationship to the next level. 

But for those who are yet to establish supplier management best practice, this example provides the perfect reason why you need to. Supplier relationships are a key enabler to business success, and when they are strong, the risk of business disruption is greatly reduced. 

What have you done to strengthen supplier relationships throughout this crisis? Let us know in the comments below. 

5 Cost Levers To Pull Right Now With Your Outsourced Services

At times of enormous disruption to global supply chains, it’s easy for procurement only to think about direct spend. But it’s just as critical to ensure value is delivered in outsourced service contracts.


“Today’s health and economic crisis, as a result of coronavirus, means that typical approaches to cost management will need careful consideration as business’ key focus has to be staying in business” Lorna Brown, Former CPO, Global Financial Services

We live in an ever-changing world, where what had been predicted as a prosperous year for a business could turn into a fight for survival thanks to something that it has no control over. As the world pulls together to combat COVID-19, businesses face the challenge of reduced revenue forcing them to tighten their belts and search for further savings.

In times of crisis, most organisations will fall into the same pattern and focus their cost reduction effort on direct spend categories. After all, your first thought in a crisis or risk management situation is more likely to be ensuring the stability of your production supply chain, rather than identifying the cost savings you can secure from the organisations delivering your HR or IT Support services.

But why is this the case? Organisations may consider their direct categories as more business critical, or believe that they can release greater value from them with closer management of their global supply chain.  For an increasing number of organisations, however, outsourced services form the core of their business. And by focusing on the right cost levers, review of these service contracts  could deliver just as much in terms of savings as direct spend.

Pulling on the Cost Levers

Structuring a contract for the procurement of services is can appear to be a different beast to one for the procurement of goods. Many procurement professionals will go their entire careers without creating a single RFQ, tender or contract for an outsourced service.

The reality is, however, that there isn’t a great deal of difference beyond what is delivered by the supplier. Procurement still needs to know that suppliers are able to meet an organisation’s requirements. A robust contract needs to be put in place to ensure that services are delivered efficiently and effectively.

And when it comes to cost levers, there’s no need to start with a blank sheet of paper when proven procurement strategies will still fit the bill. Everest Group, a consulting and research company with an established history in the outsourced services space, has conducted extensive research on this topic. Amy Fong, Vice President in Everest Group’s strategic outsourcing and vendor management practice, is clear that this research has highlighted five key cost levers for procurement to use right away when it comes to their outsourced services: “we see a lot of common themes where buyers can do a better job.”

1. Pay the Right Price

Former CPO in Global Financial Services, Lorna Brown, believes that organisations need to be “a bit curious and engage with the supplier to understand how they are delivering the services.” This will allow for a greater understanding of how the service is built up, but also what is driving the costs, and consequently the price in the market.

Services in high demand, but with a lower supply where there are fewer people capable of providing a quality service will cost organisations a premium.  In the  IT services market, this premium has been charged for everything from basic digital skills all the way up to large-scale, highly complex data analytics over the years. The availability of labour with these skills is the key cost driver.  With each ebb in the requirement for these skills, rates for outsourced services will come down.

Being clear about how the cost of labour has influenced your price is a great way to pull this particular cost lever.

2. Understanding Total Cost

Procurement’s consideration of cost needs to go beyond the ticket price that is paid. There are other factors to take into account such as quality of support and adherence to Service Level Agreements (SLAs). It’s all about Total Cost of Ownership.

Got a great price for your basic service agreement? Great! But did you discuss and agree a price for ongoing support? Or agree how many people are assigned to your contract? Or how much you are paying for secure data storage? It’s critical to understand the whole picture beyond the basic price.

If you are just looking to drive savings on the bottom line price by whittling down your supplier’s margin, they will look to move or hide costs elsewhere. No matter how good a deal you think you have at the outset, if you aren’t tracking TCO you’re probably losing any savings you may have initially achieved and leaving this cost lever un-pulled.

3. Find the Right Deal Structure

One of the key decisions an organisation will have to make regarding its services is which model or structure their deal is going to take. In outsourcing of services, a fully Managed Service can be very attractive to an organisation with day-to-day operation provided by an external specialist, with the business free to focus time and effort elsewhere.  

However, organisations using a Managed Service have to accept the fact that they will hand over a level of control, which in turn raises their risk.  Procurement still needs to understand what’s happening throughout the outsourced service provider’s supply chain.

Organisations may also choose to use on-demand outsourcing, where they pay for support based on the number of times it is used, or a ‘Break/Fix’ service where it pays for just the work that is done. There is no right or wrong answer as this will differ from organisation to organisation. What’s important is picking the right option.

4. Innovation

When it comes to cost savings, innovation is a key part of the puzzle that cannot be missed. And when it comes to pulling the innovation cost lever for outsourcing services, the focus should be on “Big I” Innovation (i.e. digital transformation), rather than “Little i” innovation (i.e. continuous improvement activities).

As with the other cost levers we have shown, innovation that is being looked at in other areas of the business can just as easily be applied to outsourcing too. Consider all the current industry favourites such as Robotic Process Automation (RPA), AI and Machine Learning – these can have an impact on costs.

However, despite the fact that there is increasing importance placed on innovation in outsourcing, many organisations are still missing the mark. There’s a lot that can be achieved from deploying this cost lever in the right way at the right time.

5. Financial Engineering

Cost lever number 5 takes the modernisation and digital transformation found in the innovation space one step further: when it comes to the concept of innovation not just about the business scoping out activities for different areas of its categories, but more about how it modernises the entire solution.

It’s important to use financial engineering to have the impact on profit that is required as the initial outlay or investment across the board will be significantly higher than a service that doesn’t include these types of outcomes.  Organisations may choose to look at alternative sources of finance, assess potential Joint Ventures or Managed Services with flexible margins (in line with traditional Financial Engineering). Using this cost lever is about getting creative and perhaps walking the path less travelled for success.

Pull the Levers with Care

The 5 cost levers for outsourced services represent an individual and collective strategy for cost savings in the outsourced services space.  Pulling one alone would be effective, and using all of them in some way could deliver also deliver great results.

To find out more about these cost levers, and to access expert advice on how to use them, register for the Everest Group sponsored webinar 5 cost levers to pull right now with your outsourced services, to be broadcast on Thursday May 7th 2020 at 2:30pm GMT. To find out all the information you need, including how to sign up, visit the Procurious website or click here.

Supplier Motivation, A Key Component of Supplier Management

Motivate your suppliers rather than merely manage them


As we have already seen in a former blog, enterprises often fail at maximizing the value of collaborating with smaller companies. Convinced that their sizes and brands will attract suppliers anyway, they entrench themselves behind the gates of rigid procurement processes. They miss the huge opportunity of co-innovating with these businesses, especially startups, by failing to take a differentiated approach. This multi-channel strategy tailored to suppliers’ capabilities is what differentiates best-in-class from a peer group as a report from The Hackett Group reveals.

On the other hand, let us not forget a wise piece of advice from Procurement Management expert, Natacha Trehan, in her keynote last year at Ivalua NOW –  every customer wants to collaborate with the best suppliers, which means that, eventually, the supplier chooses who they want to work with. This translates into a powerful lesson learned for Procurement: motivate your suppliers rather than merely manage them.

This is a method medium-size companies have already integrated in their supplier innovation strategy.

I was lucky to attend an inspirational presentation on the subject by Virginie Favray, Urgo Healthcare’s CPO, at a Procurement roundtable event, before the lockdown. Urgo is a leading international healthcare group which specializes in advanced wound care and self-care. Their €640m turnover qualifies them as a medium-size company, especially if you compare them to pharmaceutical giant Sanofi with its €35b revenue.

Even taking a cautious approach to comparing figures, I cannot help but notice that Urgo’s revenue growth rate is more than double some of its larger peers. Is a strong supplier innovation strategy the key to additional growth points? It certainly contributes and we will dig into Urgo’s methodology.

This methodology was new to most Procurement peers attending due to both its philosophy and the way it translated into concrete actions.

When it comes to the philosophy, Urgo decided to play a different tune compared to its larger peers. They cannot leverage the massive spend volumes that the pharmaceutical giants can. Additionally, if their brand awareness is strong in France, it has limited traction on international markets. That is why, the group fully plays the trust card.

How do you build such an asset and how does it turn into better innovation?

It all starts with building up a transparent relationship. What are they transparent about? They share Urgo’s business strategy, how it drives Procurement objectives and finally how strategic suppliers are valuable stakeholders of it. As I have often highlighted, there is a prerequisite for that to happen: Procurement practitioners must enlarge their focus to embrace the full strategy of their company, which often they do not. At Urgo, they do.

Establishing trust in a relationship is a safe place to start. However, it will not last long if no long-term relationship management is applied. This is something Urgo has perfectly understood. As most Procurement organizations do, they evaluate their suppliers. Nevertheless, they do not satisfy themselves with this one-way view. In fact, they ask suppliers to assess Procurement too. Due to this 360-degree assessment, their relationship trust index reaches high scores. The postulate here is that detecting and solving inevitable business frictions on a regular basis allows a healthier relationship on the long run.

In order to turn this healthy relationship into a thriving partnership, they have developed a supplier award program which recognizes suppliers’ efforts. In the HR realm, expressing gratitude is widely acknowledged as a powerful means to foster motivation. Why would it be different for suppliers? Each year, Urgo acknowledges three suppliers for direct and for indirect spend. They are rewarded with a “best supplier of the year” certificate, some Urgo products and a personal note from the CPO.

Once such a favorable environment has been set up, initiatives aiming at capturing co-innovation with suppliers can be implemented. Urgo employs a wide range of tools to do so.

First, they have a suggestion box concept for suppliers to submit. This is a method that is proving more and more efficient to boost innovation according to procurement consulting group AgileBuyer. On Urgo’s suggestion form, suppliers may recommend new products or improvements to existing ones. They must be as specific as possible about their idea (investment cost, timeline, potential savings…). If the idea generates savings, these are shared between Urgo and the supplier. Buyers receive about a thousand forms per year and commit themselves to responding in a reasonable period of time.

Second, every two years they organize a supplier-buyer speed dating event, focused on indirect spend. As a result of these encounters based on a specific theme, two or three new processes are designed. For example, last year’s topic was about digital marketing. They created a commercial through a crowdsourcing process instead of using traditional communication agencies. Indeed, some preparation is necessary before this innovation event: fifty new suppliers were sourced and only ten were selected for speed dating.

Third, they have an annual two-day innovation workshop which mixes stakeholders from Urgo as well as direct suppliers and even tier 2 and tier 3 suppliers. These workshops focus on specific topics that are prepared ahead to get the most of this workshop. Last year, sixty concepts emerged from the discussions which eventually shortlisted into three projects.

Finally, buyers also spend time on their strategic suppliers’ premises. This is not to discuss day to day operations or business or pain points but rather serve as a vehicle to discuss long term strategy, find synergies in situ and foster innovation ideas.

Obviously, this is not an approach you can replicate with every supplier you work with. This is why, Urgo applies a supplier attractivity matrix which identifies the partnerships they really want to nurture. Only strategic suppliers are part of this matrix. A supplier becomes strategic when it ranks high in a wide range of criteria: margin level, market share, supply chain criticality, procurement annual review score, ethics and innovation rating. Suppliers are then positioned against a second axis: the maturity of the relationship with Urgo. Combining these two filters brings to focus the suppliers that are core to the business and which innovation proposals can truly be beneficial.

All these are smart and actionable ideas which can easily be replicated into any large enterprise. Let’s get started!

20 Ways To Get Job-Ready for 2020

This is the most popular month to make a career change, which means there’s even more competition – if you want to stand out from the crowd, it pays to be prepared.

Job-seeking is not a numbers game – all you need is one great job offer.

So, get yourself ready to be open to the right opportunities. Follow my list of 20 ways to get job-ready.

1. Don’t set goals – you will be setting yourself up to fail or to make a bad choice

If you set yourself a target of finding a new job by March, say, or earning a particular salary, you will be putting pressure on yourself to accept a job offer even if it is not the best career move for you. 

2. Think about why you’re leaving – just to be sure

Moving jobs takes time and is risky – you have little job security for the first 2 years. 

So work out why you are dissatisfied with your current role.

Need more flexibility? Ask to work a day a week at home.

Want to learn a new skill? Then put in a request. 

You’ve nothing to lose if you are planning to leave anyway. 

3. Make it a positive choice – desperation is not a good look 

Not only will you be in danger of accepting any job rather than the right one, hiring managers want to recruit someone who is positive and passionate about the job, not someone who is disgruntled and oozes negativity.

4. Focus on what you’ll gain – it will energise you

Change your mindset by focusing on what you want to gain, not what you want to leave behind. 

Make a list of all the positives you want from your new role.

For example, if you are stuck in a rut with no prospect of promotion, then training and development and opportunities to progress should be a priority in your job search. If you hate your commute, the location will be key. 

This list will help narrow your search – and help motivate you to make a change.

5. Be patient – it might take time 

Remember, it will probably take until Easter (at the earliest) before you start a new role, so don’t rush into the wrong decision.

6. Remain loyal – it will pay off 

Yes, it’s hard to give your best when all you can think about is leaving – however, don’t relax just yet because you will want a good reference and you might be working in your current role for some time. 

Never badmouth your employer. It could get back to the boss (awkward) or make future employers wary of hiring someone who is obviously so discontented.

7. Identify your strengths – and weaknesses 

You need to be clear about what you can offer future employers. 

To discover what your ‘brand’ is, ask trusted friends and colleagues to list the 5 or 10 things they think you do well – perhaps you have good technical skills or are good at being collaborative?

Then ask if there are any aspects of your personality or performance that they think need work – maybe you are not so good at organisation?

8. Search online for keywords that will sell you 

Next, match what you have to offer with the jobs you are interested in. A quick scan of job boards to see what recruiters are looking for will identify the keywords you need to include in your job applications – from ‘collaborative’ to ‘commercial’. 

Make a list. Then rephrase your skills so they fit these descriptions – for example, ‘ambitious’ could be ‘target-driven’. 

9. While you are looking, is there anything you are missing? 

If nearly every job spec is asking for a particular skill, then perhaps it’s time to get a qualification. 

For example, if the spec says ‘must be proficient in data analytics, including Excel’ and you use Excel but don’t have a certificate, go online and do a quick course. If there are any glaring gaps in your skills, perhaps you need to invest in a professional qualification. 

Also, check out the Procurious Training & Learning section.

10. Update your CV – only a generic one at this stage

Pay attention to the style: No more than two sides of A4.

Start with a personal statement. List jobs with the most recent first and avoid giving your entire life history. Focus on what you can do rather than what you have done. 

Include some examples of where you have met/exceeded expectations using the STAR (situation, task, activity, result) approach. This will clearly demonstrate you are up to the job without appearing arrogant. 

Don’t be tempted to invent hobbies and interests to make yourself appear more interesting or to lie (dates, job titles etc. are easy to check). 

And don’t forget to double-check grammar and spelling.

11. Remember to tailor your application/CV to each role 

When you get to the stage of applying, carefully read the job specification and include all of the keywords listed – using the exact same wording. 

Look through your list of skills and keywords that sell your brand and include those that are required or you think will add value to the job. Remember, at this stage, you need to show that you are an obvious fit for the job.

12. Have a professional photo taken

While many recruiters hate photos on CVs, they do like to see them online – either on your own website (if you have one) or your online profiles. 

A really good photo (remember to smile or at least look approachable) is, therefore, a must. At the very least, avoid holiday or party selfies.

13. Get your online presence ready – LinkedIn in particular

Think of this as your shop window – a potential employer or recruitment consultant might come across your profile and at the very least will check it. 

Ask a few key contacts if they will provide you with a recommendation and add a bit of personality by posting a few blogs or sharing some newsworthy links. Also, boost your network by requesting others to join it – the more senior the better.

14. Use Procurious as a resource

Make sure your Procurious profile is more than just a bland description of your current job. 

Use phrases like ‘passionate about’, ‘driven’ and/or ‘highly experienced’ and really sell yourself – don’t forget a photo. 

Also, click on ‘Build your network’ and start to reach out to professionals in key positions – someone might even approach you to offer you a job. 

15. Don’t forget to clean up your social media 

An inappropriate image or even just liking a less-than-tasteful joke can rule you out of a job.

16. Get signed up to job boards 

Get the apps (you can search on your daily commute) and sign up for job alerts (so you don’t miss an opportunity).

17. Identify your ideal employers 

Make a list of the firms you would like to work for and start researching them – you will want to talk their language in your job applications and be prepared for interviews. 

Also, check out glassdoor.co.uk to see how existing employees rate them – to avoid making a bad move.

18. Engage in strategic networking 

Find ways to network with staff who work for your ideal employers to find out what it is like to work there. 

You can then ask them if they have a referral scheme (existing employees are often given a bonus for recommending a new employee) or to let you know if there are any opportunities. 

19. Encourage approaches – a bit like putting up a ‘For Sale’ sign

Many job movers don’t ever apply for a new role. Instead, they are approached. 

Go to LinkedIn and click on ‘Show recruiters you are open to job opportunities’. (Don’t worry – you can control who sees this, so the boss won’t necessarily find out.) 

Also, get on the books of recruitment consultants specialising in your area so they can put your name forward for any relevant jobs.

20. Practise your pitch – it will keep you positive

Some people find it awkward to self-promote while others just come across as arrogant.

So practise telling stories that showcase how you have met a challenge, achieved a target or developed a skill – you can use these on application letters, when networking and in interviews.

It’s also a very self-affirming – and will help you deal with the disappointment when employers don’t even bother to acknowledge your application or reject you. 

So keep these 20 tips in mind to boost your spirits while job-hunting – and increase your chances of success. Good luck!

And if you want to move up in your career, change industries, or even need some extra motivation for the new year (and new decade!), start 2020 off with a bang in our upcoming webinar – Don’t Quit Your Day Job. Register here for free.

How to Manage Unwanted Supplier Gifts

In days gone by, Christmas gifts from suppliers were the norm. Now it’s no longer the case. But how do you turn them down without offending anyone?

unwanted gifts
Photo by Porapak Apichodilok from Pexels

Way back, towards the end of the last century, year-end gifts from suppliers were not only abundant but also expected. It was common practice for suppliers to spend serious money on lavish trips, dining out and sports tickets for their procurement friends.

Sometimes they would send you a fridge or a TV to your home address. In return, it was expected that they would receive preferential treatment.  Gift policies, if they existed, were generally ignored.

Fast Forward to Today 

Most companies have a gift policy or at least a code of conduct which provides guidance on the acceptance of gifts from suppliers. Amazingly, these vary widely from zero tolerance to those which are too loose and therefore left open to interpretation. 

Some companies allow staff to accept nothing, not even pens and calendars.  Some are more realistic where luxury food items, flowers and low-value branded gifts are acceptable, usually up to a fixed value.

Julian Friedland, a US ethics professor and philosopher, believes that ethical businesses tend to succeed better over the long term. He says, “If you don’t have one [a gift policy], then you open yourself up to a credibility, liability problem. Whatever product you happen to be selling, whether it’s a service or actual object of any kind, can be compromised by the appearance of some conflict of interest.”

“A good policy will preclude employees from accepting anything that increases their self-worth—such as cash, stocks and shares, or expensive presents.”

Communicate the Gift Policy

Ideally, every organisation should clearly communicate its gift policy to any external party that could influence procurement behaviour. This includes not only current suppliers but aspiring suppliers, potential employees, consultants, business advisors and other associates.

A firm communication should have the effect of at least limiting the problem. However, it may be too late for the upcoming silly season.      

Managing Unacceptable Gifts

Despite the above, unacceptable gifts will arrive.  There are quite a few options here, each has its problems:

  • Return the gift to the supplier

Emphasise that, regretfully,  your policy precludes you from accepting this wonderful gift. (Did they know about the policy?). This action may run the risk of souring the future relationship a little, but too bad.

  • Share the spoils between members of the procurement team

This should have the effect of ensuring that no-one is influenced to act in favour of the supplier. The risk here is that end-users and any subject matter experts (SME) could be aggrieved and upset at being excluded. It becomes even more complicated when the procurement team is decentralised.  

  • Raffle the gifts internally and donate the proceeds to a chosen charity

Ideally, the charity or NGO should be one that is already supported by the organisation.  It is best not to choose the CEO’s favourite animal shelter or any unregistered charity or one with only minority support.

  • Donate the actual goods to a charity that would directly benefit and advise the supplier of your actions

This may conflict with your corporate social responsibility policy so check first.  This action could even have some upside for the supplier who could claim this as a form of sideways philanthropy.      

Review your Gifts Policy

It may be too late for this round but let’s do it. The gift policy should state whether employees are allowed to accept gifts both within and outside of the work premises.

If a gift is allowed, the policy should define the acceptable top value and type of gift permissible. It should also note any exceptions that need the approval of a more senior-level employee. 

“A good policy will preclude employees from accepting anything that increases their self-worth – such as cash, stocks and shares, or expensive presents.”

Top Tip: Keep a centralised record with details of all gifts accepted and make it open for reference. This keeps everyone honest. 

5 Ways to Thank a Supplier this Holiday Season

Gifts are fairly common this time of year. But are you doing anything to recognise and thank your suppliers for their hard work this year?

thank you
Photo from Gratisography on Pexels

Let the gift basket parade begin!

It is the holiday season. The cheese trays, cards, fruit towers, yeti coffee cups pour in from suppliers at this time of year. Savvy sales teams and account managers might even take the time to hand write a card thanking you for the business relationship and surprise you with a very thoughtful gift. 

Of course, these gifts are then shared, according to the policies and practices of ethical receipt of gifts, around the office, increasing the festive mood for everyone. 

As in any great, or even good, relationship, the gifts are exchanged – both ways.  Therefore, I am perplexed by the one-way exchange of gifts between suppliers and their customers.  Maybe that is because traditionally the gift from the customer was their business? 

However, what if we changed that this year and offered the gift of recognition and appreciation to our high performing and high potential suppliers?  Just like anyone else, a simple gift of appreciation motivates, builds trust, and breaks down barriers in the relationship. 

Here are 5 simple ways to do just that.

1. Write a thank you note

What if each year in October you performed a quick review of suppliers, noting the ones who performed exceptionally well this year?  Then, the category teams would acquire some thank you cards and write notes of gratitude to those suppliers. 

This simple act would be something that the suppliers would find as extraordinary. And therefore, would be motivated to give their best to you in the new year. 

2. Ask them how you could help them and then do it

Great suppliers love to help you. Often sharing expertise, insights into the marketplace, and solutions to complex business problems. 

At the same time, suppliers could also benefit from the same from their clients.  What if we asked our high performing and high potential suppliers how we can help them?  First of all, the supplier will not be accustomed to this. 

Once they realise the sincerity of the question and the help is received, there will be a bond formed with that supplier, open lines of honest communication are achieved, and more innovative solutions offered. 

3. Pay on time

Seems simple enough, right? (This made me laugh.) 

After working on these processes for most of my career within Procurement, this is a constant struggle for most. Then, you layer in some of the cash flow practices around the end of the year that some do, and the late payments escalate. 

How impressive would it be if, for your best suppliers, there was a proactive review of the accounts every autumn to ensure the accounts were paid up current by the end of the year. Wow! 

Not only would that make the suppliers extremely happy, but it would get Procurement and Accounts Payable resources out of the woods on those accounts for a while heading into the new year.

4. Facilitate an introduction

Suppliers always want to meet people who you know. These people could be within your company, or external within your networks.  Facilitating the introduction would be a great way to recognise a job well done. 

It shows you trust the supplier to perform well and that you are willing to share the success with others.

5. Give them a social media shout out

Of course, you will have to check on your internal policies on this one, but there is a large trend on social media platforms like LinkedIn to recognise suppliers for outstanding performance. 

This trend creates a perfect win-win scenario – often showing off some project that the buy side organisation is implementing, the supplier who helped them achieve success, and how they partnered together to get it done.  Sometimes these are large achievements, and sometimes they are small day to day ones like providing outstanding safety to employees. 

Suppliers love this type of shout out, as it gives them instant access to your network of contacts and a vote of confidence from you at the same time.

As Procurement organisations are looking to add value well beyond cost, your ability to create trusted, value adding, innovative relationships with your suppliers takes centre stage. Often big changes like the shift Procurement is going through, start with simple steps forward. 

So, this holiday season, let’s be grateful to those suppliers who achieved excellence this year by saying thank you. 

The Secret of Successful Supplier Selection

Still using cost as a primary criteria for supplier selection? Our latest webinar shares all the secrets you need for success.

Have you been tasked with running a selection process for a new supplier but don’t know where to start?  Perhaps you’ve been using the same routine for years but feel it’s time to freshen it up?  Are the old ways just not delivering the outcomes you need?

In our recent Procurious-Ivalua Webinar, Critical Success Factors for Supplier Selection, our panel of experts revealed the secrets to how they get the outcomes they want from their sourcing processes. 

Here are five great take-aways from that discussion.

Supplier Selection – Get the Balance Right

Our panel reported that many organisations are not yet on a path that leads away a cost-driven focus.  Tech tools that are available to help with future cost modelling mean procurement can go to the market with uncertainty about this type of risk reduced.  When cost risk is managed this leaves the way clear for the road to value. 

A great example quoted in the discussion was a utility contract. The focus was on value rather than cost. It led to costs being reduced and also meant a more sustainable outcome was delivered. This lowered usage and introduced measures to promote sustainability. 

Can you introduce a selection process that balances cost, value and your organisation’s wider sustainability goals to select a supplier who is right for you?

Remember, One Size Doesn’t Fit All

Making sure a supplier is a good cultural fit for the organisation is a key requirement that all our panel members stressed.  Think about the impact of a cultural misalignment on your organisation’s reputation or brand.  

Cultures vary across the world and getting a cultural fit when you’ve got a global supply chain is hard. However, there are many things on which the buyer and supplier can agree. How about meeting with your supplier’s leadership team as part of the sourcing process? This would allow you to assess their management ethos to make sure that the cultural fit is there right from the start?

The unknown unknowns

Managing external factors and risks, particularly those that are not yet known, are something that supplier selection process is often expected to address.  All panel members reported the challenge of grappling with the unknown unknowns in the current period of global upheaval and change. 

The advent of technology-driven real time data is something panel members welcomed to manage supplier and supply chain risk.  It’s also a great way to check and monitor supplier financial health. 

Make use of the new tools that are available to ensure your organisation is prepared and have a backstop position to allow a response when situational or supplier risks change.

Be a customer of choice

When it came to the supplier-buyer relationship our panel had very clear advice.  Whether we’re a supplier or a buyer, we’re all looking of a return on the investment in the relationship we’re about to have.  Focus clearly on the outcomes both sides are trying to achieve. 

Make sure you put yourself in the seat of your supplier’s sales director – how can a contract with your organisation provide a supplier with the opportunity for fair value earnings or a sustainable revenue stream?

Start the conversation

Changing the way your organisation selects suppliers will not happen overnight.  When you’re engaging with stakeholders our panel advises you to talk in their terms not the language of procurement. 

Will the change you’re proposing add value?  Why will it improve customer experience?  Why could it safeguard or improve reputation?

So, go ahead and pick one of the secrets that the webinar panel shared as being critical factors for success and start that conversation with the business today.

A recording of the Procurious-Ivalua Webinar – Critical Success Factors for Selecting Your Suppliers with panel members Gordon Tytler, Rolls Royce, Stephen Carter, Ivalua, Fred Nijffels, Accenture and host Tania Seary, Procurious is available here.