Category Archives: Supply Chain

C’mon Procurement Pros – Pucker Up And Get Your Tech Dollars Now

NOW is the time to start a robust process to select, fund and implement a new technology system. 


Your CFO needs some love right now – supply chain isn’t something they’ve had to worry about much before…because you had it all covered!!  For the first time in their careers they’ve had to get into the details of how you keep it all going.  Your poor pandemic-battle-scarred CFO is now looking for some new ways to mitigate future business continuity risks.

Procurement and supply chain leaders around the world have the answers to future potential business disruption woes – what’s needed is some serious investment in technology!

COVID-19 has placed the risk of future global supply chain disruptions at the top of the C-suite’s agenda. Not wanting to be caught out again, company leaders are desperate for a better, faster way to recover the next time a crisis strikes.

Their eyes are firmly fixed on supply chain.

So, it’s time to wipe the dust of all those technology business cases – and get on Zoom, pucker up to the c-level and ask for the cash.

It’s the right time

The pandemic caught us out. It stripped away the luxury of time, revealing the real supply chain risks that we knew had been lurking just below the water line for years.

The tide went out and our weaknesses were exposed – a lack of visibility into our multi-layered supply chains, an overdependence on single geographies and single supply source and a lack of agility to pivot and close the supply gaps.

As we move forward, supplier risk, supplier collaboration, value analysis, cost reduction, quality, and compliance will be more important than ever. 

NOW is the time to start a robust process to select, fund and implement a new technology system. 

How to pucker up

But how can you make sure you select the right system and construct a convincing business case, especially when budgets are being slashed across the board?

Here’s your guide to technology selection and adoption, pulled together from years of experience.

Step One – make sure you meet the business needs

It starts with understanding needs. As procurement and supply chain pros, we all know how to run a solid needs analysis….so I don’t need to labour this point.

To decide what works for your company and suppliers, remember the 80/20 rule.  For example, if 80% of your spend is on contingent labour, you are better off looking at a system that specialises in that functionality. 

What system is best?

Once you know your company needs, it’s time to narrow down the provider playing field.

This can get confusing, because you might pick your top three and accidentally end up comparing apples to oranges. One system could be a full end-to-end suite, and you’re comparing it to a contract management point solution and a sourcing tool!

It’s easy to get overwhelmed; there are literally hundreds of e-procurement technology suppliers in the marketplace right now.

About 10 years ago we saw a big push towards ‘best of breed’ solutions. There were very few fully-integrated suites that were intuitive and easy to use. Plus, a lot of companies had budget limitations, so they looked to point solutions for contracts, P2P, sourcing, supplier management, analytics, etc. 

That worked for a while, but then it became a nightmare to maintain all those integrations and the systems lacked true interoperability.  

Then came the race for fully integrated suites, which led to the likes of SAP Ariba, Coupa, Ivalua and Jaggaer who emerged to lead the pack today.

Will the strong preference for the fully integrated suites continue? That remains to be seen. One thing is for sure, we will see a thinning out of the market as some of the best of breed start-ups struggle for cash.

But only you will know what’s right for your company.

Finding the love…and the cash

Once you’ve chosen your tech system, it’s time to get senior-level buy-in. How can you make your case convincing?

It comes down to giving a clear, compelling ‘why’. Why now? Why this system? What will it mean for the company?

Some great messaging that would resonate with the c-suite right now would be:

  • Systems give transparency
  • Systems give control
  • Systems give confidence

As well as these overarching messages, you should tailor specific business case messaging and justification for investment in your system for different members of the c-suite.  For example:

Chief Executive Officer – mitigate business continuity risk and future profitability

Chief Financial Officer – cost control and visibility

Chief Marketing Officer – reputation risk, protecting brands and fostering innovation

Head of Operations – efficiency and continuity

Financial Controller – well, it’s obviously about control!

Another tip for developing your business case messaging is to reach out to your online peer community and look through social media, to find stories that support your reasons for investing in tech.

There’s nothing the c-level likes more than to do better (or avoid the same mistakes) than the competition. Your stories and examples on how peers are handling problems will be a powerful tool for motivating your senior leadership team to invest in your recommended technology. 

Keep a c-suite huddle

It’s critical to ensure you have a wide base of support across the senior leadership team so that your project has strong foundations.

Stay close to the c-suite throughout the project.  Don’t ever assume the support you secure today will endure. Keep them regularly updated to ensure your technology project stays top of mind (and the corporate strategic priority list!).

Also, beware the trophy-seeking sponsor who could be using your supply chain technology project as a pawn in their political power play. It is always difficult to pick these people, but the wrong choice could threaten your project’s success. You don’t want everything to go down the drain when your board sponsor’s career bets don’t pay off. 

Ensure change management isn’t funded out of small change

Business cases for tech have always focussed on headcount reductions (hard numbers based on FTEs taken out of Accounts Payable, administration etc) and efficiencies (more of a soft number) on the value side, and licensing and implementation on the cost side for investment in technology. Don’t forget to also factor in the total cost of ownership. Customisation costs, implementation, and productivity losses and gains are all important financial considerations.

All of these cost and other benefits are important, but you must ensure you include a significant budget for change management, training, user implementation.

As a profession, we have not had enough focus on how to implement technology; that’s our weak point. It’s difficult to ensure the organisation is gaining the full benefit of the system they have invested in – and for the most part, we do a pretty lousy job of it.

That’s because these are change management projects, not technology projects. It’s so little about systems and so much about the people who use them.

Too often, the implementation budget is the first thing to go when CFOs want a quick financial win. Don’t fall prey to their argument that people will work it out, or that it’s all straightforward. That logic is precisely how and why many technology projects fail.

Fiercely guard your change management budget, and make sure you have a dedicated project team to make it a success.

You can do this

This is your chance to step up and lead, showing your potential for a more senior role.

Given the high failure rate of these systems right now, it may be a high-risk strategy to take on the leadership of a procurement or supply chain technology implementation. But with risk comes reward; your successful project will be a great asset to your career progression and increase your visibility.

More importantly, it will prove that you understand the business and know how to solve complex issues.

As we work our way through this latest supply chain disruption, we are (sadly) capturing the real costs of this pandemic and will have much stronger financial proof points for investment in technology.

If this kind of disruption happens again, we know the magnitude of what it is going to cost. So we must put systems in place that will respond much faster to mitigate these potential losses.

Now is the time to step up and put forward your argument for investment. We may never have such a fertile and receptive audience as we do right now.

Act now, while the spotlight is on supply chain.  Don’t waste a crisis.

This blog is an excerpt from a talk given by Procurious founder Tania Seary, as part of the SIG Procurement Technology Summit. Want even more expert advice on choosing and implementing a new procurement technology system? Register for Matt Stewart’s podcast series

Procurement Technology – What It Can And Can’t Replace In A Manufacturer’s Journey Towards Supply Chain Resilience And Agility

A review of the key elements in supplier management for manufacturers and how Source-to-Pay procurement technology can support the journey towards supply chain resilience and agility in times of crisis.


As the COVID-19 pandemic disrupts global supply chains, procurement organizations around the world are scrambling to react. There are many supply chain management lessons to learn from the Covid-19 crisis.  However, some organizations are better prepared to weather this storm than others. Many of these organizations are already using Source-to-Pay technology and are now realizing more than ever that technology is a “must have” to ensure their supply chain remains resilient and agile throughout a crisis. In this article we’ll review how supplier management capabilities in Source-to-Pay technology can free-up and enable a manufacturer’s direct material procurement team to do what they do best to ensure the supply chain remains resilient and agile: be creative and strategic.

Supplier Data Quality & Management in Decision Making

It may be the most basic level, but data management may also be the most daunting for some organizations. Supplier Data is at the core of every procurement activity, and it is critical for those dealing with direct materials in manufacturing. Often, what procurement teams end up with are multiple collections of data stored in tiny, disconnected data silos, such as: spreadsheets, MS Access databases, email and even the dreaded manila file folder and sticky note.

Obviously, these methods of capturing and recording data have limitations, and these limitations can hamper decision making in several ways, and ultimately impact the management and resilience of the organizations supply chain. Some of these challenges include limited:

  • Ability to collaborate, identify opportunities or issues and act
  • Transparency, or ability to scale data, across an organization
  • Ability to enrich data sets with other, related data sets.

These challenges in the direct material supply chain pose a real threat, especially in a time of crisis and let’s face it, there is no shortage of events that could jeopardise and/or disrupt a business, potentially impacting their profitability, business continuity, image, and reputation. Often, organizations try to band-aid the data problem, which can cause long term problems and inefficiencies long into the future. This is where Source-to-Pay systems can help – by providing procurement teams with a system that centralizes information and ensures data quality meets a high standard. This in turn enables procurement teams to better evaluate a situation, make decisions and act.

Managing a complex network of direct material suppliers

Manufacturing supply chains are notoriously complex, and this fact has been a common topic of the news media throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s a manufacturing organizations’ procurement team that is on the front lines fighting for the supply chain’s survival. However, procurement teams often lack consistent visibility beyond their tier 1 strategic suppliers for each product line, and this limits a company’s ability to ensure the materials and processes required to produce a product are consistently available.

It’s not uncommon for direct materials procurement teams to capture information on sub-tier 1 suppliers. However, organizing and making sense of this data is so challenging that it is uncommon for all but the most critical product elements in the most mature procurement organizations. This is where Source-to-Pay (S2P) technology can help, by enabling procurement teams to capture important information across the entire supply chain so they can identify potential issues early, initiate collaboration with the necessary parties and take action to support suppliers and mitigate potential issues.

Risk & Performance Management

The evaluation of direct material suppliers is often nuanced and complex depending on the final product, regulatory concerns, and other requirements. However, it is up to the procurement team to find a way to ensure that suppliers:

  • Are not risky;
  • Perform well over time;
  • Meet quality & regulatory requirements;
  • Maintains the right certifications, and more; and
  • Meet Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) expectations.

Empowered with all this information, procurement teams can ensure supply chain continuity and resiliency, and that value is maximized for the company. But it just isn’t possible to achieve the levels of organization and collaboration necessary to collect all the data from suppliers, 3rd party data providers and internal business processes to give buyers a complete picture of each supplier across the supply chain without a serious database and supporting processes. To get started and keep the process more manageable, many companies focus on a smaller subset of key suppliers.

Source-to-Pay technology can help procurement teams establish and organize campaigns to collect & update supplier information and receive real-time supplier risk management updates on important risk factors (e.g. Financial, etc.). Furthermore, these solutions can help procurement collect feedback from stakeholders, track and maintain certifications and more. With this information, procurement can rapidly identify and classify issues and then collaboratively work with suppliers on improvement plans.

Developing Suppliers: Establishing & Implementing Supplier Strategies

One of the benefits that effective supplier development programs have in common is they establish mutually beneficial partnerships between the supplier and buying company. These programs enable bilateral feedback, opportunities for product and service innovation, access to new markets and investment. The key to the success of these strategies begins with communication and transparency, both of which are also essential in times of crisis. Additionally, manufacturers with mature supplier development strategies in place tend to have:

  • Access to reliable data,
  • The ability to identify critical suppliers across all tiers of the supply chain,
  • Capabilities to monitor and manage supplier risk and performance,
  • The ability to closely collaborate with the supplier, often including commercial, operational and technical strategies and plans.

Accomplishing and maintaining each of these elements over time is often a challenge for all but the most mature procurement organizations, but it is never too soon to lay the foundation. Source-to-Pay technology can help procurement lay the foundation, by fostering communication, collaboration and better visibility across the global supply chain. 

Supply Chain Resilience and Agility

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the world is now painfully aware that even the best run supply chains can encounter significant challenges. However, some supply chains will recover faster than others because of their resilience and agility. What the best performing supply chains most likely have in common is a procurement organization with a strong data foundation to support effective decision making, the ability to collaborate and communicate with and support all tiers of their supply chain, monitor and track risk and performance and effective supplier management and development strategies that has produced close partnerships.

Throughout each of the elements described in this article, Source-to-Pay technology replaces much of the manual, non-strategic effort necessary to support and manage supplier relationships. The result is a foundation that empowers procurement teams to add more value to the organization and be better prepared to manage their supply chain through times of crisis.

What’s Under The Hood? Identifying Potentials Gaps With P2P Providers

4 must-have requirements for your next P2P solution 


Finding the best Procure-to-Pay (P2P) solution to meet your organization’s needs and goals is no small feat. The ideal P2P solution will take the entire organization to the next level through improved realized savings, compliance, and operational efficiencies.

So, how do you identify a best-in-class P2P solution? To start, I’ve outlined these must-have characteristics below.

4 must-have requirements for your next P2P solution 

1. A single data source.

The best P2P solutions host all information in a single database. A single, searchable data source enables a consumer-like online shopping experience that end users and suppliers will embrace. Having a unified data hub:

  • Decreases total cost of ownership
  • Provides one portal where suppliers and vendors can collaborate
  • Improves user adoption by allowing users to quickly find, compare, and purchase across multiple suppliers in one interface

2. Process and data flow visibility.

Visibility enables procurement teams to strategically source goods and services to expand cost saving efforts. Procurement can use data to negotiate better supplier terms and drive effective purchasing behaviors.

Best-in-class P2P solutions have robust analytics with both automated reporting capabilities and the ability to produce ad hoc reports. Users gain strategic insights into and control over real-time savings, spend by supplier, and spend by region, to name a few. In addition to spend analytics, behavioral data on the most popular items purchased, top search terms being used, and search terms with no resulting products are available within a click of a button.

3. Intelligent workflow capabilities.

A best-in-class P2P solution should allow you to trigger workflows based on user profiles. Intelligent, automated workflows in next-generation P2P solutions minimize time spent on manual processes, and can even make existing automated processes more effective.

Many organizations waste time chasing down invoice discrepancies (missing details, quantities do not match, misalignment with purchase orders). Best-in-class systems automate this process with business rules triggered by missing information. Administrators construct and configure the business rules to reconcile the inconsistency, deny the invoice, send it to an employee with AP permissions, or push it through without changes.

Intelligent workflows do more than automate workflows. Data and insights collected on employee efficiencies can reduce tactical labor and better allocate head count accordingly.

4. Dynamic cloud-based software.

When analyzing a best-in-class P2P solution, it’s important to understand how the software will be implemented into your environment. Why? Because how the software is implemented will directly affect your total cost of ownership.

Break down prospective P2P software into these four categories:

  • On-premise: Software is a single instance, built on-premise behind the company’s firewall. IT owns the licensed software and codebase, so only they can make configurations and customizations to the software. Most ERPs exist in this manner.
  • Hosted Cloud (SaaS model): Code is still designed for hosting on-premise, but lives in the cloud. Vendors are responsible for making any changes to the codebase.
  • Built for the Cloud: This is a self-service software. No code needs to be written to make any changes. The business owns the system, making it easier to maintain.
  • Living and Breathing Cloud: This type of software has all the benefits of “Built for Cloud,” but also leverages all of the benefits of the cloud provider (such as Amazon Web Services) to expand and contract. This technology is built for maximum performance, extremely fast loading times, and scales to handle maximum traffic on the system.

The technical capabilities of any P2P solution are obviously important, but don’t overlook these questions during the evaluation process:

  • What do customer references say about this vendor?
  • Will this vendor help lower total cost of ownership (TCO)?
  • Will this solution easily integrate with other solutions in the P2P landscape?
  • How will this vendor support the procurement team and company’s vision?
  • What is the pricing model and fee structure? Does the model allow for growth?
  • What is the implementation plan, and what is the support structure for post go-live? 

When you’re choosing a Best-in-Class solution for your organization be sure to look for signs of integrity and trust. They may not be on your list of requirements, but you’re choosing a partner for your organization, and when the going gets rough you’ll need an organization you can trust above all.

This article was originally published on LinkedIn on 24 April 2020 by Katie McEwen. It has been republished here with permission.

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Fake Masks And False Cures: The Dark Side Of COVID-19

Criminals exploit COVID-19 fear with fake medical equipment. Here’s how world governments are fighting back.


COVID-19 means huge opportunities for criminals.

They are taking advantage of essential goods demand by flooding the market with their own shoddy versions – exploiting public fear.

Here’s a look at the most common (and concerning) fake products on the market.

Fake goods in the EU

Counterfeit pharmaceuticals and healthcare products are everywhere, according to Europol, the European Union’s law enforcement agency.

In a recent report, it listed the most worrying fake items they’ve uncovered:

Medical equipment: face masks, virus test kits, gloves

Disinfectants: alcohol-based hand sanitiser, disinfectant cleaning wipes

Medicine: choloroquine (an anti-malaria drug initially thought to help treat the Coronavirus), other fake cures

Europol says the fake goods are sold through online stores created just to profit from the pandemic. Some even target victims through messaging apps like Telegram.

The goods originate from ‘frequently changing addresses in Asia’, making it extremely difficult to trace.

Europol is concerned these inferior goods could put people at serious risk.

“Counterfeit goods sold during the corona crisis do not meet the required quality standards and pose a real threat to public health and safety,” says Europol Executive Director Catherine de Bolle in the report.

“People who buy these fake products have a false sense of security, while they are in fact left unprotected against the virus.”

Substandard masks in the North America

And it’s not just Europe. The pandemic is keeping United States’ Homeland Security busy, with more than 200 criminal investigations related to COVID-19 so far.

One woman was caught selling illegal pesticide on eBay, claiming it could provide immunity from the virus.

Another man allegedly tried to sell 100 million facemasks to the government, despite not actually having any.

The man claimed his stash came straight from 3M, one of the biggest healthcare equipment manufacturers in the US.

3M responded with a lawsuit, saying: “3M’s legal team is taking strong action to protect 3M and the public against the conduct of those who seek to exploit 3M’s brand and reputation and defraud others during this time of emergency and crisis.”

3M is also suing a Canadian company for re-selling 3M masks at five times the retail price, vowing to “[put] a stop to those who are trying to cash in on this crisis.”

Another worrying trend in inferior products is testing kits.

The University of Washington School of Medicine spent thousands exporting kits from Shanghai, only to find some of the tests were tainted with bacteria.

The university has since recalled all tests to be on the safe side.

Seizing test kits in Australia

Australia has similar issues with shoddy test kits, according to Zoran Kostadinoski, Head of Border and Biosecurity at the Customs Brokers and Forwarders Council of Australia (CBFCA).

He said the border force has intercepted hundreds of dubious testing kits and personal protective equipment (PPE).

Even though members of the CBFCA aren’t directly responsible for checking the authenticity of goods, they warn importers and exporters to be diligent.

“Procurement professionals need to ensure they source PPE from reputable manufacturers that provide quality products and meet the health standards of the importing country,” he warns.

“Until there is a global regulation of such products that provides certification, the issue of counterfeit goods in the supply chain will continue, as some look to make quick profit based on demand of such products due to COVID-19.”

China pledges to clean up

Authorities are doing their best to help people identify goods that meet safety standards.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention even set up a website with photos of the most common counterfeit face masks.

Nevertheless, the question remains: why isn’t there greater effort to stamp out fakes before they are ever exported?

It’s complicated, as LA Times journalist Alice Su explains.

“It’s common for Chinese suppliers to export a product under one licensed company’s name but to source their products from second, third or fourth factories, like a chain of Russian nesting dolls, with little to no traceability down the chain of supply,” she writes in an article.

She also points out not all suppliers set out to produce inferior products. Many factories shifted to PPE production at the government’s request without knowing the proper quality controls.

Regardless, the Chinese government is making a concerted effort to shut down offending manufacturers and revoke their export licenses.

Fighting online crime in the UK

That process isn’t happening quick enough for people like Sarah Stout, however.

She’s the CEO of Full Support Healthcare Ltd, a supplier to the UK’s National Health Service.

Recently, she shared on LinkedIn that her company gets dozens of offers every week from manufacturers of the sought-after N95 mask.

95% of the masks are fake with forged certificates, she says.

“When I informed one supplier that I knew their certificates were fake, they said to me, “[O]k, if I give you real certificates for other product will you place an order?’” she writes.

Her experience isn’t unique. UK authorities say they’ve taken down 2000 Coronavirus scam websites so far, including 471 fake online shops.

Many of these websites were discovered through spam emails. One common email appears to come from the World Health Organization and offers COVID-19 health tips in exchange for personal password information.

James Brokenshire, UK Minister for Security, urged people to be aware of the many ways criminals exploit technology like email to gain advantage.

“It’s despicable that they are using the coronavirus outbreak as cover to try to scam and steal from people in their homes,” he wrote in a press release. “We all have a part to play in seeing they don’t succeed.”

In response, the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre is asking for people to send them any suspicious emails.

It’s not just a UK problem, though. Pandemic spam mail is a global headache, with Google detecting 240 million COVID-19 related spam messages so far.

How to tackle it

Even though technology is used for exploitation, it’s also a key to stopping Corona crime.

One company in the fight is Systech, which lets you check if PPE product is authentic by simply scanning the product’s barcode with a smartphone.

The company uses blockchain technology to trace the product journey throughout the entire supply chain.

Similarly, Zuellig Pharma, an Asia-Pacific pharmaceutical giant, utilises SAP’s blockchain platform to verify authenticity.

Customers can scan a barcode on the package using the eZTracker app, and know instantly if the medicine is a legitimate Zuellig product.

This use of technology, along with the efforts of governments and the vigilance of the public, go a long way to combat the dark side of COVID-19.

However, until essential goods supply can match global demand, criminals will find a way to cash in.

Want to keep up with the latest coronavirus and supply chain news? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news in a content series via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. We’re stronger together. Join us now.

Out is In: an Outline of the Outlook for the Outsourced

There are ample opportunities for savings in outsourced services implementing the right models for balanced success.


Just over six months ago, I left my role in a well-established procurement advisory firm to take a deep dive into the outsourced services category. My spend management sense told me this category was still untapped by procurement. Now, amidst an unexpected crisis affecting nearly every business in the world, my instincts have been confirmed.

As a baseline, it’s important to understand that indirect service categories tend to get less attention than direct categories or indirect goods, which tend to be more visible. Many indirect services happen in the background, while we’re off at night, despite filling an important need.

To quantify the gaps, we’re running a study on the capabilities and outcomes procurement teams are using in services categories. It’s still open for a few weeks more, so please click here to benchmark yourself in areas like analytics, talent, category management, and value delivered across services categories. I look forward to sharing detailed results with participants as we all try to focus our efforts where we’ll have the most impact.

Outsourcing as a spend category

Specifically, what do we mean by outsourced services? Over the last 30 years, both non-core and core activities have been shifted outside of the organization. While the original goal was cost savings through labour arbitrage in lower cost regions, objectives broadened as provider capabilities developed and companies served increasingly global markets. These days, outsourcing projects are as much about digital transformation as they are about cost cutting.

Many industries rely heavily on outsourcing partners. For example, a typical financial services organisation could spend 5 per cent of its revenue on business services, and more than half of its IT spend could come from services, not software or hardware. That shift means business processes, engineering services, and IT sourcing make up hundreds of millions of dollars of spend for organisations.

As a procurement advisor and consultant for the last 15 years, and a practitioner and services buyer for many years before, I know how tightly procurement has squeezed savings out of every spend category possible. The whole concept of category management is predicated on the idea that savings will flatten over time, and procurement must become a trusted advisor to enable stakeholders in delivering higher forms of value from the supply base. For most categories, price benchmarks are hard to come by, RFPs across multiple suppliers drive pricing down, and relationships can be transactional for all but the most strategic items.

Outsourced services are different. There may only be a couple of suppliers to choose from, and switching costs are high. Service providers are serving as extensions of company operations, sometimes in customer- and employee-facing roles with sensitive information.

At Everest Group, an analyst firm focused on the global services market since 1991, we see untapped opportunities for procurement to better manage outsourced services categories. More suppliers than buyers are accessing the wealth of information on service providers, best practice contract terms, and cost models. The components for strong category planning exist, but procurement teams are just starting to access them. Price and contract benchmarks are readily available, and most projects reveal double-digit opportunities to improve costs. Like many other strategic categories, these are dynamic relationships that benefit from strong category management tactics: quality market intelligence, collaboration with stakeholders, well informed negotiations, supplier partnering, and risk management. There’s so much opportunity for value in these categories as buyers become more educated about the market.

Global services during the COVID-19 pandemic

Of course, we can’t have a conversation about global services in 2020 without talking about the impact COVID-19 is having on the world. My colleagues and I have been busy speaking with service providers and buyers, and crunching the data to help companies emerge from this crisis stronger and better prepared. Check out our COVID-19 resource center for ongoing posts, reports, and even a dynamic tracker to see impact to global service delivery by country.

Optimising costs and modernising value delivery

There’s never been a better time to address cost improvement opportunities in outsourced spend. In our upcoming webinar with Procurious – “5 Cost Levers To Pull Right Now With Your Outsourced Services” – we’ll talk about opportunities to optimise costs and modernise value delivery.

This is not about pushing suppliers to the brink to cut costs while compromising their ability to survive and sustain good services. In fact, as a thought leader focused on driving procurement organizations to create higher value, it pains me a bit to allude to cost savings in the webinar title. As a function, we need to resist the urge to revert to 2008-style high-pressure cost cutting. This is about working with service provider partners to ensure we have the right models in place for balanced success. Our success post-crisis is dependent on having the technology, service levels, and terms in place to operate in a digital world. In fact, service providers prefer to work with educated customers, and, so, prefer small adjustments every few years rather than large corrections when an uninformed customer learns they were wasting money throughout a five-year contract.

During the webinar, we’ll talk in depth about the following improvement levers:

  1. Paying the right price – market rates in services can be quite dynamic; it’s important to understand cost drivers and adjust rates regularly.
  2. Understanding total cost – it’s never just about rates: there are hidden cost drivers everywhere and we need to know where to look.
  3. Deal structure – there are several ways to structure an outsourcing engagement; none are right or wrong for all situations. We’ll talk about what to consider and what to avoid.
  4. Innovation – Innovation and digital transformation is becoming a priority in outsourcing, but we often miss this while focusing on costs.
  5. Financial engineering – there are creative ways to fund productivity. We’ll give a few examples of recent deals that shift the paradigm for buyer and supplier.

Whether you manage a small amount of outsourced spend or multi-million-dollar contracts, or are just curious to learn about a new category, please join us for an interesting and educational conversation.

Assistance for services buyers

During the COVID-19 crisis we are offering pro bono assistance to services buyers in the procurement community:

  • Complimentary price checks on up to three standard roles in three different locations – a pulse check to see if your rates are in line or out of line with the market.
  • A service provider risk profile covering four key parameters (finance, governance, operations, reputation) –  find out if there are underlying concerns with your provider beyond the immediate crisis.
  • A conversation with one of our analysts on any global services related topic – ask questions, test your strategy, or get feedback on what others are doing from our senior team.

Our team at Everest Group is excited to be working with Procurious, and we look forward to helping members create value for their organizations.

Amy Fong

Vice President – Strategic Outsourcing and Vendor Management
Everest Group

To find out more about these cost levers, and to access expert advice on how to use them, register for the Everest Group sponsored webinar 5 cost levers to pull right now with your outsourced services, to be broadcast on Thursday May 7th 2020 at 2:30pm GMT. To find out all the information you need, including how to sign up, visit the Procurious website or click here.

5 Cost Levers To Pull Right Now With Your Outsourced Services

At times of enormous disruption to global supply chains, it’s easy for procurement only to think about direct spend. But it’s just as critical to ensure value is delivered in outsourced service contracts.


“Today’s health and economic crisis, as a result of coronavirus, means that typical approaches to cost management will need careful consideration as business’ key focus has to be staying in business” Lorna Brown, Former CPO, Global Financial Services

We live in an ever-changing world, where what had been predicted as a prosperous year for a business could turn into a fight for survival thanks to something that it has no control over. As the world pulls together to combat COVID-19, businesses face the challenge of reduced revenue forcing them to tighten their belts and search for further savings.

In times of crisis, most organisations will fall into the same pattern and focus their cost reduction effort on direct spend categories. After all, your first thought in a crisis or risk management situation is more likely to be ensuring the stability of your production supply chain, rather than identifying the cost savings you can secure from the organisations delivering your HR or IT Support services.

But why is this the case? Organisations may consider their direct categories as more business critical, or believe that they can release greater value from them with closer management of their global supply chain.  For an increasing number of organisations, however, outsourced services form the core of their business. And by focusing on the right cost levers, review of these service contracts  could deliver just as much in terms of savings as direct spend.

Pulling on the Cost Levers

Structuring a contract for the procurement of services is can appear to be a different beast to one for the procurement of goods. Many procurement professionals will go their entire careers without creating a single RFQ, tender or contract for an outsourced service.

The reality is, however, that there isn’t a great deal of difference beyond what is delivered by the supplier. Procurement still needs to know that suppliers are able to meet an organisation’s requirements. A robust contract needs to be put in place to ensure that services are delivered efficiently and effectively.

And when it comes to cost levers, there’s no need to start with a blank sheet of paper when proven procurement strategies will still fit the bill. Everest Group, a consulting and research company with an established history in the outsourced services space, has conducted extensive research on this topic. Amy Fong, Vice President in Everest Group’s strategic outsourcing and vendor management practice, is clear that this research has highlighted five key cost levers for procurement to use right away when it comes to their outsourced services: “we see a lot of common themes where buyers can do a better job.”

1. Pay the Right Price

Former CPO in Global Financial Services, Lorna Brown, believes that organisations need to be “a bit curious and engage with the supplier to understand how they are delivering the services.” This will allow for a greater understanding of how the service is built up, but also what is driving the costs, and consequently the price in the market.

Services in high demand, but with a lower supply where there are fewer people capable of providing a quality service will cost organisations a premium.  In the  IT services market, this premium has been charged for everything from basic digital skills all the way up to large-scale, highly complex data analytics over the years. The availability of labour with these skills is the key cost driver.  With each ebb in the requirement for these skills, rates for outsourced services will come down.

Being clear about how the cost of labour has influenced your price is a great way to pull this particular cost lever.

2. Understanding Total Cost

Procurement’s consideration of cost needs to go beyond the ticket price that is paid. There are other factors to take into account such as quality of support and adherence to Service Level Agreements (SLAs). It’s all about Total Cost of Ownership.

Got a great price for your basic service agreement? Great! But did you discuss and agree a price for ongoing support? Or agree how many people are assigned to your contract? Or how much you are paying for secure data storage? It’s critical to understand the whole picture beyond the basic price.

If you are just looking to drive savings on the bottom line price by whittling down your supplier’s margin, they will look to move or hide costs elsewhere. No matter how good a deal you think you have at the outset, if you aren’t tracking TCO you’re probably losing any savings you may have initially achieved and leaving this cost lever un-pulled.

3. Find the Right Deal Structure

One of the key decisions an organisation will have to make regarding its services is which model or structure their deal is going to take. In outsourcing of services, a fully Managed Service can be very attractive to an organisation with day-to-day operation provided by an external specialist, with the business free to focus time and effort elsewhere.  

However, organisations using a Managed Service have to accept the fact that they will hand over a level of control, which in turn raises their risk.  Procurement still needs to understand what’s happening throughout the outsourced service provider’s supply chain.

Organisations may also choose to use on-demand outsourcing, where they pay for support based on the number of times it is used, or a ‘Break/Fix’ service where it pays for just the work that is done. There is no right or wrong answer as this will differ from organisation to organisation. What’s important is picking the right option.

4. Innovation

When it comes to cost savings, innovation is a key part of the puzzle that cannot be missed. And when it comes to pulling the innovation cost lever for outsourcing services, the focus should be on “Big I” Innovation (i.e. digital transformation), rather than “Little i” innovation (i.e. continuous improvement activities).

As with the other cost levers we have shown, innovation that is being looked at in other areas of the business can just as easily be applied to outsourcing too. Consider all the current industry favourites such as Robotic Process Automation (RPA), AI and Machine Learning – these can have an impact on costs.

However, despite the fact that there is increasing importance placed on innovation in outsourcing, many organisations are still missing the mark. There’s a lot that can be achieved from deploying this cost lever in the right way at the right time.

5. Financial Engineering

Cost lever number 5 takes the modernisation and digital transformation found in the innovation space one step further: when it comes to the concept of innovation not just about the business scoping out activities for different areas of its categories, but more about how it modernises the entire solution.

It’s important to use financial engineering to have the impact on profit that is required as the initial outlay or investment across the board will be significantly higher than a service that doesn’t include these types of outcomes.  Organisations may choose to look at alternative sources of finance, assess potential Joint Ventures or Managed Services with flexible margins (in line with traditional Financial Engineering). Using this cost lever is about getting creative and perhaps walking the path less travelled for success.

Pull the Levers with Care

The 5 cost levers for outsourced services represent an individual and collective strategy for cost savings in the outsourced services space.  Pulling one alone would be effective, and using all of them in some way could deliver also deliver great results.

To find out more about these cost levers, and to access expert advice on how to use them, register for the Everest Group sponsored webinar 5 cost levers to pull right now with your outsourced services, to be broadcast on Thursday May 7th 2020 at 2:30pm GMT. To find out all the information you need, including how to sign up, visit the Procurious website or click here.

DOS And DON’Ts For Supply Chain Pros Right Now

DOs and DON’Ts specifically for supply chain professionals that you should consider during coronavirus


There has never been a moment in time since the second world war, that there has been so much global awareness and need for resilient and dynamic supply chains, and the qualified professionals to manage them; in a single strategic battle toward a common enemy. The COVID-19 outbreak was initially concerning to firms with established supply chains embedded throughout China, but it’s clear now, that it’s effects are going to be far more reaching on a global scale, and felt throughout the months and year(s) ahead.

In my job, I have the privilege of constantly speaking with dedicated supply chain professionals globally. From the woman director controlling over a half a billion dollars worth of global spend in the fast-moving consumer goods industry in the ‘big city,” to the little guy ordering replenishment stock for a small chain of regional tire repair shops in Piqua, Ohio. Lately, they’ve been asking the same question: “What are we going to do?”

So whether you are quarantined and idle at home, or your employer is an essential service and you’re confined to toiling behind a desk at work, here are some DOs and DON’Ts specifically for supply chain professionals that you should consider – NOW.

DOs

Identify how your firm’s production capability and equipment can be retooled to produce hand sanitizers, gloves, gowns, face masks or shields, medical supplies or other vital equipment. There is still a need, and will be for quite some time.  Who knows, by doing so, you’ll not only be helping front line workers and healthcare providers, you could also get your firm re-classified as an essential service, kick starting idle production lines, and help your fellow employees get called back to work and earning a steady income again.

Identify where in the supply chain your firm may have spare capacity, to assist in National/Regional relief efforts. It’s not only physical commodities that are in need, it could also be transportation, distribution, or even warehousing related space or activities to move vital supplies and equipment around.

Review your entire supply chain – top to bottom, to evaluate where problems are arising and you’re vulnerable, opportunities which may be presenting themselves, and develop a status report and comprehensive supply chain action plan for management. 

Revisit your disaster contingency plan and develop a new one, specifically including virus and pandemic related situations. (This wasn’t our first, and certainly won’t be the last pandemic.)

Review your firm’s supply chain exposure and resiliency to recover from natural disasters and pandemics, and the preventative measures that you can design and implement now, to cope with swings in stock availability, transportation, and security issues and evaluate potential recovery times. 

Review all your existing contracts for force majeure (unforeseeable circumstances) clauses; and determine which of your suppliers may be in a position to try to enforce them – leaving you vulnerable to disruption and stock outs. Develop solutions.

Check to see if your firm has insurance protection covering any losses, should your supplier(s) not be able to fulfil their contractual obligations.

Reassess your current supply chains in China, India, and other global hot spots. Consider other possible regional opportunities for the future (such as Vietnam, Bangladesh, etc.), as contingencies, as these countries have been working to improve working and business environments recently.

Increase your level of communications and collaboration with overseas suppliers to understand not only their challenges, but monitor ongoing labour, discriminatory wage practices and health and safety regulations as well. These have led to manufacturing, transportation, and other related strikes and protests. Keep in mind that political protests that disrupted business recently were not limited to strictly Hong Kong and China, but also happened in Latin America, Middle East, Brazil, India and Mexico as well. 

(Yes, do a deeper dive and move toward becoming a ‘Geopolitical Specialist’ when analyzing regional risk in your global supply chain.)

Ask all vendors about their plans on dealing with demands and changing capacity, and how swings may impact their stock availability, quality, increased production and delivery times, and their labor force.

Sharpen the saw.  Take the time to invest in yourself and consider taking online courses in the Supply Chain field, offered by your favourite professional association.  They can help with strategies and possible solutions to supply disruptions during challenging times. Perhaps use the time to finally finish your study toward the Supply Chain Management Professional (SCMP) accreditation?  

Catch up on your supply chain reading with issues of your favourite trade magazine.   Why reinvent the wheel, when you can learn practical information from the titans of industry themselves; who are guiding their firms and making a difference in the supply chain community. 

DON’Ts

Don’t wait to step up or be asked for your supply chain expertise, your firm’s production abilities and it’s logistical capacity and how they can be used to keep critical supplies and support services open to front line workers and healthcare providers struggling in your communities.

Don’t take a ‘wait and see’ attitude and hope that another major disruption to your supply chain doesn’t occur again in the future… it will. Learn from today, plan and prepare for tomorrow.

Don’t lessen your due diligence when sourcing urgently needed supplies -via new or potentially alternative sources of supply away from China, Asia, or other parts of the globe experiencing problems.  Beware that counterfeit markets thrive in times of crisis; and quality and social responsibility risks should also be considered in addition to simply cost and immediate availability. Now is the time to increase efforts to protect your firm and supply chain; not lessen or weaken it with quick or cheaper sounding alternatives.

Don’t forget the potential to accidentally involve your firm in forced and/or child labor, poor working conditions, other human rights abuses or environmental concerns; when pre-qualifying any new and potential vendors. Practice responsible and ethical sourcing.

Don’t immediately threaten legal action against suppliers (local or distant) caught in a bad situation and who attempt to enforce the force majeure clauses within their contracts. Work with them to determine a reasonable course of action instead.  Right now cooler heads should prevail and honest transparency about their situation and capabilities, shared with you – as partners and lenders, is of paramount importance, if you’re going to get through the storm.

Don’t participate in the hoarding, resale, or profiteering from food, cleaning and medical goods, protective equipment and other essential items which could be redirected and used in the production of medical supplies for front line workers in your community.  Whether personally or on behalf of your employer – it’s just not right.

Don’t wait for authorities to enact and enforce new sweeping regulations controlling the supply chain.  Lend your knowledge and expertise and see how you and your firm might participate in regional supply chain coordination units, to ensure the public’s safety and the continuance of a strong and resilient supply chain of much needed food and medical goods and services. 

This article was originally published on LinkedIn on 29 March 2020 by Tim Moore , Canadian Supply Chain Recruiter. It has been republished here with permission.

Want to keep up with the latest coronavirus and supply chain news? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news in a content series via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. We’re stronger together. Join us now.

How 4.0 Tech Is Cracking The COVID-19 Code: Procurement News

How to use Industry 4.0 technologies to weather the Covid-19 crisis


Industry 4.0 technologies have come into their own in helping combat COVID-19.

China confronted the virus with a futuristic mix of artificial intelligence, machine learning, and robots.

Now that the epicentre has moved to the western world, leaders look to China for clues to stop the spread.

Here’s a look at how China’s use of 4.0 tech is now influencing the way America and Europe identify, treat and track the virus.

Predict

A voice of warning

Speed and accuracy of information are everything in a crisis.

The first global warning of the virus didn’t come from the World Health Organization (WHO) or the US government.

No, it came from artificial intelligence. A Canadian company named BlueDot used an algorithm to identify the possible outbreak days before WHO made its announcement.

BlueDot uses AI to analyse news reports and internet data to detect the spread of infectious diseases. The algorithm predicts where diseases will spread, based on millions of flight itineraries.  With this information proving invaluable, BlueDot is now working with countries in North America and Southeast Asia to predict virus hotspots.

Diagnose

Faster testing

There are widespread complaints of testing shortages.

On top of that, there are concerns about the long process of taking a sample, analysing it in a lab and reporting the result.

Luckily, necessity remains the mother of invention. Several companies are racing to invent easier, faster ways to test.

Researchers at UK universities are trialling a smartphone app that can give results in just 30 minutes. The app is linked to a small device that analyses a nasal or throat swab. No lab necessary.

And an invention from an American-based company can give positive results in five minutes using a device the size of a toaster.

Managing supplies

It’s no surprise that supply chains are still recovering from the shock of the pandemic.

Hospitals are experiencing a testing swab shortage, owing to supply chain disruptions from suppliers in Italy and China.

Several hospitals are making their own test swabs with the help of 3D printers. One medical provider in New York, called Northwell, is printing 3,000 swabs a day. Side-by-side test results show the 3D-printed swabs are just as reliable as the traditional swabs.

There’s also a swell of companies using 3D printing to make facemasks and other personal protective equipment (PPE).

Fever pitch

Authorities in China found a safer way to take temperature: augmented reality (AR) glasses.

Someone wearing the glasses can identify a person with a fever from 10 feet away.

To finish reading this article, join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. 

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The World Is Running Out Of PPE. What Can We Do?

Could we have prevented the shortage through better supply chain management?


If we’ve learnt anything from the past few months, it’s that one supply chain matters more than almost all others, and that’s medical supply and Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) one. Yet, it also seems to be the one that isn’t functioning half as well as it needs to be, with devastating stories emerging worldwide of doctors and nurses forced to wear bandanas for masks and rubbish bags for gowns. Many on the front line are also gravely concerned for their own welfare, and devastatingly, over 100 doctors and nurses have now died fighting the virus.

As procurement professionals, we look at these statistics, shake our heads and immediately ask ‘what could we have done better?’ But realistically, could we have prevented this? Is there anything we can do right now to change it? And what important lessons do we need to learn now that we can apply to our supply chains, forever more? 

Could we have prevented the shortage through better supply chain management? 

On the issue of preparedness, many in hospital procurement roles are facing the tough questions right now. Saskia Popescu, a US epidemiologist, recently told Vox that the issues we’re currently experiencing is something we all should have foreseen: 

‘Whenever we have done exercises for pandemic preparedness, supply chain issues were a well-documented challenge. It’s surprising that we let it get this bad.’ 

While some countries are taking drastic action to ‘catch up’ from a supply chain perspective, including in the US where Donald Trump has invoked the Defense Production Act to order companies to produce everything from ventilators to masks and hand sanitizer, many argue that it’s too little, too late – and that reactionary measures never quite work when it comes to supply chain management. 

Supply chain shortages now have life and death consequences 

Shortages of PPE equipment causes significant issues for our health systems. Hospitals around the world right now are approaching, at or over peak capacity, meaning that any nurse or doctor who gets infected is one less to treat patients who are already sick. Sick doctors and nurses have a domino effect and may threaten the ‘flattening of the curve’, which is something we all know we need to do in order for our health system to cope.

In a nutshell, sick doctors and nurses create even more fear within the health system community, and may lead others to refuse to come to work. This, in turn, creates a shortage of health staff when they are needed most. Val Griffeth, an emergency doctor who is leading the new movement #GetUsPPE, sums it up perfectly: 

‘If you have health care workers who don’t feel safe, you may very well have people who don’t come to work.’ 

‘Worse, you have people who come to work, get infected, and end up in the hospital taking up a bed and also not seeing patients that day, that week, or that month.’ 

But how did we get here? 

Many procurement professionals looking at the current issue with PPE point to the drastically increased demand we’re now experiencing as the key issue that broke the camel’s back, so to speak. But when you dig under the surface, that’s not the whole story. 

As with the virus itself, the issue began with China. As the world’s primary producer of face masks (China produces more than half of the world’s total supply), the Chinese themselves originally needed what they produced, so instead of exporting, they began to produce masks, and then hoard them. Around the world, the hoarding continued, with some countries, such as Germany, swiftly banning PPE exports. The problem, then, became one of supply and demand – as demand rose world-wide, there were already supply issues with the world’s major suppliers as they had effectively used what they would otherwise export. 

When the epidemic turned quickly into a pandemic, the demand side of the supply chain also suffered a major hit as the public soon began buying masks en-masse. Despite the fact that medical authorities have repeatedly suggested that masks aren’t needed for healthy people, they continue to be purchased in almost every country, meaning that demand is at an almost all-time high. In a situation like this, is it almost inevitable that a supply chain would fail? 

What should we do about it?

With the real life-or-death situation we as procurement professionals find ourselves in, the question now is not what we should have done but we can do.  According to Matt Stewart from RiseNow, the situation we find ourselves in isn’t inevitable. Matt believes that technology can be our ‘secret weapon’ to create the kind of supply chain agility we need to respond to events such as the coronavirus:

‘Technology integration inside your organization (and that of your trading partners), along with the ability to onboard new datasets and suppliers, can actually help you respond almost instantaneously to non-forecastable events, such as the current pandemic.’

Although this type of integration certainly sounds like supply chain nirvana, Matt also believes that a number of factors need to be in place to achieve the level of supply chain agility you’d need to respond to something as serious and sudden as we’re currently experiencing: 

‘Effective supply chain agility begins with developing one or more plans of action based on simulations to any potential supply chain threats, then determining their impact.’

‘To do this, you need an extremely high level of data integration. You also need an early warning detection program, and then, once a threat is identified, you need to retrieve a predetermined action plan, and modify it if need be.’

Also key to supply chain agility, Matt says, is the ability to increase sourcing and detect consumption-side threats: 

‘You need the ability to speed up sourcing, and quickly, which can be achieved through your technology system – but critically, your “data source of truth” must be clean, conditioned, harmonized and accessible.’ 

‘You also need to understand consumption threats, so you’ll need to understand acceptable substitutes, distribution capacities, and the ability to retask existing assets (as we’re seeing with the US at the moment).’ 

Finally, Matt says that logistics flexibility is the final key area you need if you want to respond in almost real-time to large, unexpected supply chain interruptions: 

‘Flexibility within the logistics environment is required as decisions may need to be made to change product offerings and warehouse assets and systems will need to respond to new locations to ensure that productivity stays as high as possible.’ 

Onward and upward? 

Although manufacturers worldwide are working harder than ever to resolve the current shortage of PPE equipment, it’s already proven to be a disastrous, life-or-death problem. But while we can’t change what has happened in the past, supply chain professionals have every opportunity to learn from this pandemic, and to do whatever we can to ensure we protect our supply chains – and the lives of our fellow countrymen – now and into the future. 

Want to keep up with the latest coronavirus and supply chain news? Join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news in a content series via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. We’re stronger together. Join us now.

Will Mexico Overtake China As The World’s Biggest Manufacturer?

Will Mexico soon overtake China as the world’s largest manufacturer of goods? Find out here.

With supply chains the world over now disrupted and many of us now scrambling to find a plan b, c and beyond in order to produce or procure goods, there hasn’t been much room for asking ourselves the big questions. But with life in China now quickly returning to normal, and some European countries already planning to lift restrictions, it’s time we did. If our supply chains can be broken so easily, so quickly, should we continue to trust China with almost all of our manufacturing? But if we move, where should we move? 

Many experts believe that China’s dominance is so well-established that moving elsewhere is simply infeasible. Yet others disagree, and Mexico is quickly becoming a favoured location for plan b – or potentially plan a – manufacturing for a number of reasons. Forbes even went as far as to say that Covid-19 will end up being the final curtain on China’s nearly 30 year role as the world’s leading manufacturer.

Given the monopoly China has had on our manufacturing to date, it’s sometimes hard to imagine an alternative. But many experts believe we have to, and now is the time to do just that. So when the crisis fades, will we all continue manufacturing in China as we’ve always done, or will we be forced, or will we want to, explore what a better alternative might look like?

Mexico has free trade

Ever since their manufacturing boom started nearly four decades ago, China has had various versions of near free-trade agreements with most countries. But in the US at least, that all changed when Trump became president in 2018. Trump, who had long accused China of unfair trading practices, promptly placed tariffs on more than USD $360 billion worth of Chinese goods, with the aim of encouraging Americans to buy local. China retaliated, and many US goods were also heavily taxed. 

Although the two countries are in continued negotiations and some tariffs have been removed, the US and China are far from reverting to anything close to a free-trade agreement. This, from America’s perspective at least, makes Mexico a very attractive prospect for manufacturing. Owing to the existence of NAFTA (the North American Free Trade Agreement), goods manufactured in Mexico don’t attract a tariff if imported. 

But Mexico’s advantage is broader than just with the US, says Diego De La Garza, Senior Director Global Services and Delivery, Corcentric. He believes that Mexico has an advantage not just with the US, but with the world:

To finish reading this article, join our exclusive Supply Chain Crisis: Covid-19 group. We’ve gathered together the world’s foremost experts on all things supply chain, risk, business and people, and we’ll be presenting their insights and daily industry-relevant news via the group. You’ll also have the support of thousands of your procurement peers, world-wide. 

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