Category Archives: technical procurement

A Cross-Industry Look At Direct vs Indirect Spend

Vishal Patel explores the difference between direct and indirect spend across three different industries…

By jirawat phueksriphan/ Shutterstock

The most fundamental spend categorisation in procurement is the line between direct and indirect spend, but one effort that transcends this split is supplier management. This includes supplier information management, supply chain risk management/mitigation, and supplier performance management.

Whether spend is direct or indirect, supplier information should be maintained centrally and with a high level of accuracy. Who is the supplier, who are the points of contract, what are the terms of service or delivery? How much spend does the company have with the supplier and for what? As long as indirect suppliers are meeting expectations, they are doing what is required. Direct spend suppliers, on the other hand, must deliver a different level of ROI. Meeting expectations is the foundation for strategic partnership and collaboration.

Manufacturing

In manufacturing, materials, components and assemblies that will be sold to customers are direct spend while facilities, equipment, consumable supplies and MRO are indirect.

Direct suppliers often become strategic partners because the company’s collaborative efforts with them have a direct impact on innovative potential. They make it possible to develop products that lead to the expansion of market share and profit margin, both through their product offerings and their ideas. They sometimes participate in the R&D process, adding their IP to the company’s own.

Because of the key contributions these supply partners make to corporate performance, procurement needs to pay far more attention to risk and quality issues – whether they are present in the supplier or in their supply chain. Ensuring continuity of supply is far more critical when a supplier is a strategic partner and difficult to replace.

Most indirect supplier relationships are far more transactional, although services and deliveries still have to be dependable. Customer orders can’t be filled on time if machines don’t run, safety supplies are out of stock or facilities are poorly maintained. While procurement might not consider these relationships strategic, they are critical nonetheless. What you don’t necessarily want to do is separate your direct and indirect supplier information, risk and performance management efforts, ideally, you want to be able to look across all suppliers and spend.

Financial Services

One could make the case that financial services firms have no direct spend. Since salaries are beyond procurement’s purview, nothing the company ‘buys’ is resold to customers. That said, supplier information and relationship management are still high priority efforts. Risk and regulatory compliance requirements span nearly all categories of spend, and address global, high-profile concerns such as bribery, corruption, and data protection and privacy. We’ve all heard of KYC (know your customer) initiatives in banking for example. KYC has now gone beyond verifying and monitoring customers of the financial institution and now also often includes suppliers that provide IT solutions that touch the FI’s infrastructure (and thus their customers) called know-your-suppliers (KYS). For instance, a key piece of information that is often difficult to find but critical is knowing the ultimate parent of a supplier.

Although the vast majority of a financial services company’s spend is indirect, it can still affect the top line. In the case of banks, for instance, property management is critical to securing and maintaining customer loyalty and reinforcing brand identity. The remainder of indirect spend includes the ‘usual suspects’ like office supplies, travel and IT/telecom but often with a heavy services procurement need

Healthcare

Not unlike financial services, procurement teams in healthcare organisations are predominantly focused on indirect spend. The primary exceptions are the equipment and facilities that patients come into contact with. These indirect spend items have a direct impact on patient satisfaction despite not being resold. Machines must be running, supplies must be plentiful, and facilities must be spotless.

For the rest of indirect spend, Group Purchasing Organizations (GPOs) are common, based on the fact that the vast majority of transactional purchases are common across institutions. There are cases, however, where physicians need to have additional selection authority. These non-standard items, often referred to as Physician’s Preference Items (PPI), can present a challenge in terms of finding a qualified source and managing the cost and supply of the items. Those purchases, while indirect, do justify closer and more strategic supplier relationships, similar to a direct materials supplier

Supplier management is spend management – although the information, risks, and relationships vary by category and industry. Procurement’s challenge is knowing which supplier relationships are strategic and deserving of additional effort and which are not (but still knowing who they are) – regardless of the type of spend in question. Overall, having a strong supplier management capability and technology can work as a solid foundation to accelerate and improve digitisation and transformation efforts in all areas of procurement.

Ivalua is sponsoring the upcoming Procurious London CPO roundtable on 29th May. If you’re a CPO and would like to attend one of our roundtables in person please contact Olga Luscombe via [email protected] to request an invitation.

What Every Procurement Professional Needs To Know About Music

How much should you pay for using music in a commercial?

By PopTika/ Shutterstock

Around 70 per cent of TV commercials use music in one form or another. That is a lot of music. And a lot of money being paid by brands and their agencies to the music industry.

Procurement departments ask us three questions:

  • Can you explain to me why we are paying so much for music?
  • Where can we make savings without compromising creativity?
  • How do we know that the music we are paying for works?

Library music (with their regulated rate cards) still often feels like the poor relation to the agency creative team. Fees for commissioned music and new productions can be as creative as the music itself. And copyright owners don’t have rate cards because it is forbidden by law.

So, to a Brand and their procurement departments, negotiation on music rights can feel like operating blindfold. The underlying challenge is that the parties involved all have a different agenda. Procurement needs to work within the budget. The creative teams don’t want to know about budgets – they just want the track that they believe works with their brilliant visuals. And the TV producers have a harder job than David Davis at the Brexit table with a deal that works all round. No wonder there is tension between the will of the agency and the chequebook of the brand.

Giving a straight answer to a brand about buying music usually demands more questions:

  • Do you have a full breakdown of your music spend, beyond a total amount spent?
  • Do you know where you are spending your money and with whom over the last three years?
  • Do you or the people who buy music on your behalf have a music-buying strategy that you have seen and approved?
  • Do you have centralised buying of music across all agencies and all media?
  • Do you ever test the music you buy which goes beyond ‘like’ and ‘dislike’?

It is still common practice for music to be a one-off consideration for each campaign and for each agency production department to negotiate and buy music. Very often, final decisions about the music are left to the last minute in the editing suite, when the creatives make up their minds what works best. But when things are left to the last minute, people are under pressure to negotiate.

And when things happen this fast it is harder to justify taking time to test the resonance of a track with the desired target market.

But these two apparently small steps have vital ramification on the final outcomes. I know of a brand where the music was changed in the editing suite for the sake of saving €15,000. Six months and €7.5 million later, when consumer testing did take place, the brand was mortified to discover that the last-minute music change meant that consumers missed the point of the ad completely – in hindsight, a very expensive cost saving.

It’s natural for people to spend money on the things they care about, whether they are fully aware of it or not. In business, however, we have to be aware and strategic. If buying music is still seen as a one-off transaction and the discussions about the costs feels like one from ‘Groundhog Day’, then something has to change.

There is not one solution for all companies, but having a music-buying strategy is a good starting point. It removes ambiguity and puts measurable systems in place. For the above – mentioned brand, it meant ongoing savings of 25 – 30 per cent year on year with commercials that scored well in post-production testing.

If music is not to be regarded as an expensive indulgence, we need to liberate those involved in the creative process and hand it over to people who are not, but still have all parties’ interests clearly in focus.

Ultimately, having real figures about music spend will make it easier for planning, production, and marketing teams to justify their budget requirements. That will be good news all round.

This article was originally published on Sound Lounge

Rush Hour: High Risk, Hidden Costs and Unexpected Travel Spend

Travel is complex, costly, affects the vast majority of your organisation’s employees, and everyone has an opinion on best practice. It is also one of the most “mature” categories managed by procurement professionals. So why so many challenges?

Travel was one of the very first categories ever formally managed by procurement.  It is what I like to call a “mature category”, which means we should have it well and truly under control…. however…

An eye watering $1 trillion is spent on corporate travel every year. 

It is a category in which the scope has mushroomed to cover not just air travel, transport and accommodation, but also expense management technology, teleconferencing, events – the full end to end complexity of corporate travel. 

Nestled within that, is the specific category of ground transportation. 

The transport industry has changed dramatically over the past fifteen years. The number of daily, corporate rides being booked has increased by 10 per cent since 2010, while personal bookings have increased by 58 per cent.

It is a category notorious for its administrative burden! And therefore, for procurement professionals, it is a category ripe for disruption. As it stands currently, travel costs are 10 per cent of total spend but 90 per cent of the headache. In some cases, it takes approximately 10 minutes to process a single travel expense claim and with an average of 7 receipts per person submitted per month – that’s a lot of wasted time!

By 2020, half of all these business trips will be done by employees expecting a B2C style user experience – online, on-demand, seamless and consistent.  

Blanketed over the broad scope this corporate travel category are some very serious concerns – sustainability, employee safety and cybersecurity.

And so today, as a corporate travel manager, you need to concern yourself with a whole new set of factors including:

  • employee safety
  • technology implementation
  • quality of service
  • sustainability
  • total cost optimisation
  • maverick spend

All this to manage, and we haven’t even mentioned pacifying your CEO’s when they’re bumped out of first class, or their chauffeur doesn’t turn up on time!

In our latest webinar Rush Hour: High Risk, Hidden Costs and Unexpected Travel Spend we explored the different aspects of how to manage the total cost of ownership within this complex, emotional category.

Sign up to listen now as we discuss:

  • Managing the total cost of ownership within this complex category 
  • How AI, IoT, Blockchain and other innovative technologies are transforming the way procurement pros work – improving transparency and mitigating risk in business travel
  • How to ensure corporations deliver a high quality and personalised serviceon a global scale
  • Why sustainability is coming to the forefront of global travel

FAQs

Is the Rush Hour webinar available to anyone?

Absolutely! Anyone & everyone can register for the webinar and it won’t cost you a penny to do so. Simply sign up here.

How do I listen to the Rush Hour webinar?

Simply sign up here and you’ll be able to listen to the on-demand. 

Why wait when you can have it now?

No one wants to wait more than five mins for anything these days – least of all for a taxi – or an on-demand webinar recording!

Luckily, Rush Hour: High Risk, Hidden Costs and Unexpected Travel Spend is now available on demand.

Click here to listen as we discuss: