Category Archives: Trending

Your shameful email sending habits have been revealed in a new survey

An independent study into email user habits has revealed that a worrying number of professionals find it hard to drag themselves away from work email.

A new study has found that work-related email is disrupting everything from holidays to funerals as employees struggle to cope with volume and culture of ‘always-on’ working.

GFI Software (the masterminds behind the study) wanted to gauge how employees interact with email and the main obstacles to effective workplace email use.

Of those surveyed, some 47 per cent admit to checking work email at least once a day in their personal time, up six per cent, while 33 per cent admit checking multiple times a day or in real-time through pre-work mornings, evenings, weekends and days off. Furthermore, 43 per cent regularly check their work email after 11pm at night.

Key findings from the survey include:

• Monitoring of work email outside of work hours is inescapable, with 73 per cent of those surveyed regularly checking their work email at weekends.
• A further 58 per cent admit to checking work email while on holiday.
• Almost one quarter (24 per cent) feel compelled to reply to work emails within 15 minutes of receipt.
• In total, 72 per cent of respondents reply to work emails in under one hour, while just under three per cent take more than a week to reply.
• Down five per cent from 2014, the survey found that 23 per cent of workers surveyed use their work email account for personal activities. The drop suggests increased concern over company monitoring of workplace email and Internet use.
• Nearly 29 per cent of work email users surveyed do nothing to organise their email, including archiving, leaving all incoming mail in their Inbox.
• Just under 18 per cent have had an argument at home due to them checking work email during family time.

“Setting and maintaining realistic boundaries between work and personal life is important to health, happiness and productivity. This balance is becoming harder than ever to accomplish due to the growth of tablets, smartphones, and now smart watches and in-car communications – all of which keep people wired into work even after they go home of an evening,” said Sergio Galindo, general manager of GFI Software.

The survey revealed a substantial level of work leaking into personal and family occasions. For example:

• Almost five per cent have checked email during a wedding
• Nearly three per cent have gone through work email while attending an event at their child’s school
• More than one per cent have actively checked email while either they or their partner was in labour
• … and just under one per cent have checked email during a funeral

The research was also conducted among the same survey sample in the US, with broadly similar results. Differences of note did include a higher proportion of users preferring instant messaging (eight per cent), a higher proportion of email checking during funerals (three per cent) and during child birth (four per cent), while fewer (12 per cent) have argued at home over checking work email out of hours.

Tuna supplier calls for improved supply chain visibility

Ecuadorian tuna supplier, Marbelize, and Frequentz form strategic global partnership to ensure supply chain transparency.

Calls for improved transparency in the tuna supply chain

Marbelize, one of the world’s largest tuna suppliers, has entered an exclusive partnership with Frequentz Inc., a global leader and champion of end-to-end visibility, in a strategic move that proactively addresses the coming IUU Task Force seafood traceability action plan.

Marbelize will leverage Frequentz’s robust track and trace technology to build consumer trust and combat the effects of illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing. This sets a seafood industry precedent, as this is the first time a third party has provided a fully integrated supply chain visibility solution from source to retailer.

Andres Cuka, chief operating officer of Marbelize said: “The industry is adapting to the ever-changing demands of consumers while also remaining true to social responsibility and sustainability objectives.”

“We strive to remain an innovative leader within our industry, while delivering value added products to consumers. Kindness to our people and the environment is the foundation upon which our company was built, so for us being as transparent as possible is a very important component to our success. Frequentz’s product tracking software provides us with that transparency and will be essential in pushing the seafood industry forward.”

Frankie Terzoli, vice president for global sales with Frequentz added: “By adding a traceability system to their operation, Marbelize will once again be a pioneer in the industry. They not only claim that their catch is sustainable, but can prove it to be true.”

LEGO announces billion Krone Sustainable Materials Centre

LEGO, the world’s largest toymaker, has announced it will open a new Sustainable Materials Centre as part of the company’s commitment to sourcing more environmentally friendly materials for its packaging and products.

The group’s CEO announced that the commitment of one billion Danish Krone (roughly $150 million USD) marked a significant step in the company’s long-term aspiration of using only sustainable materials in its production by 2030.

The huge cash investment will fund the development of a new Sustainable Materials Centre at the company’s headquarters in Billund, Denmark as well as outposts at various locations across the globe. The company has suggested that its search for more sustainable bricks will directly employ over 100 new specialists.

The LEGO Group owner Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen made the following comment on the announcement:

“Our mission is to inspire and develop the builders of tomorrow. We believe that our main contribution to this is through the creative play experiences we provide to children. The investment announced is a testament to our continued ambition to leave a positive impact on the planet, which future generations will inherit. It is certainly in line with the mission of the LEGO Group and in line with the motto of my grandfather and founder of the LEGO Group, Ole Kirk Kristiansen: Only the best is good enough”.

LEGO's popularity around the world

The LEGO group initially stated its interest in searching for more sustainable product alternatives back in 2012 (the year the 2030 sustainability commitment was made). Since then, the group has conducted research and testing into how it might make its vast production (in 2014 more than 60 billion LEGO bits were manufactured) more sustainable. The new Sustainable Materials Centre is a direct outcome of these steps.

It is expected that LEGO will need to continue to partner with other organisations in order to achieve its lofty ambitions. The group signed a Climate Savers partnership with the WWF in 2013 and has outlined it will continue to look to leverage partners to make its productions methods more sustainable.

Jørgen Vig Knudstorp, CEO and President of the LEGO Group, said:

“What we announce today is a long-term investment and a dedication to ensuring the continued research and development of new materials that will enable us to continue to deliver great, high quality creative play experiences in the future, while caring for the environment and future generations. It is a daunting and exciting challenge.”

How To Spot Supplier Risk During On-Site Evaluations

Visiting your suppliers in person provides a great opportunity to identify potentially risky behaviour. In this article, we explore what you should look for to ensure you’re working with safe, knowledgeable, and reliable suppliers.

Thanks to Spendrix for granting Procurious permission to republish this article. This article is the second in a series on how to identify various types of supplier risk. 

In our last post, we discussed how to spot risky behaviour when communicating with suppliers. The second article in our series on identifying supplier risk explores what to look for during on-site evaluations.

While on-site evaluations aren’t required, visiting your suppliers can help you build better relationships and improve communication. Furthermore, visiting your suppliers on-site allows you to evaluate them for risky behaviours that could potentially affect your company.

Here are some things to look for the next time you visit a supplier on-site:

Training Capabilities

When you vet your suppliers, you make sure they are qualified to do the job at hand, right? A part of this vetting process includes ensuring your supplier’s employees are proficient. Therefore, when you arrive on-site, it’s definitely important to check out your supplier’s training capabilities.

Top suppliers will have dedicated classroom space, a well thought-out training course, and experienced instructors. When you’re on-site, simply ask to review their training course to get an idea of how well it is preparing your supplier’s employees to work with your company. Does the training cover how to properly work with any equipment employees may have to use, how to properly secure and transport goods, how to check and maintain equipment to ensure it’s working properly, or what to do in the case of emergency?

Employees should understand how equipment looks, feels, and sounds when operating properly in order to act quickly if the machine becomes unsafe. Remember, your supplier is only as safe as its employees.

If your supplier can not answer simple questions about their training program or it seems their course lacks substance, you may need to ask yourself if that supplier is the best fit for your company. Overall, your suppliers represent less risk to your business the better their employees are trained.

Properly Stored & Inspected Equipment

Another crucial risk factor to look for during on-site evaluations is how your suppliers store their equipment, spare parts and securement tools. The way that a supplier stores excess equipment can tell you a lot about their attention to detail and the value that they place on having their equipment be in excellent condition.

While on-site with a transportation vendor, have a look at their inspection areas. Inspection areas should be well lit, and have spare chains and straps to replace defective securement.  It’s important that your suppliers are taking all measures to minimise violations and damage when transporting cargo.

In addition to securing cargo, also evaluate how well your supplier’s equipment is being maintained. Are tractors and trailers assessed for potential damage, parked in an organised and safe location, and repair areas kept clean? How promptly are mechanical issues taken care of? Are spare parts well organised and in safe locations for the mechanics to access them?

When visiting a manufacturing supplier, look how they treat their equipment as well. Is all the necessary Personal Protective Equipment available, clean, organised, and stored properly? Also, check their records to see if equipment is being professionally maintained and inspected on a regular basis.

Suppliers that do not properly maintain their equipment can put your company at serious risk. Poorly maintained equipment is one of largest safety concerns when working with suppliers. If your supplier neglects their equipment, this directly impacts your business.

Visual Inspections of Equipment

In addition to how your supplier stores their equipment, do they keep it up to date and safe? When performing an on-site evaluation, take an opportunity to perform your own assessment of your supplier’s equipment for physical damage.  Identify things that could lead to supplier error, and thus, put your business at risk.

When evaluating transportation vendors, check tires for adequate tread and proper inflation. Inspect trailers for any internal or external damages. Also make sure securement equipment is functioning properly. If on-site with a manufacturing supplier, examine equipment for exposed wires, burning smells, abnormal movements, or odd noises. Also, verify that the proper machine guarding equipment is being used.

Ensuring your supplier properly maintains their equipment can help to reduce the potential for errors. Therefore, it is crucial while on-site to inspect your supplier’s equipment, and in turn, protect your business.

Proper Compliance

A final way to minimise risk when performing an on-site evaluation of your supplier is by inspecting how they handle compliance. Does your supplier maintain organised and up to date logbooks? Do they have a detailed understanding of hours of service regulations, and work to avoid violations? Also, have they had any recent drug or alcohol violations? Or even worse, are there any drugs or alcohol on-site?

In addition, are there proper accident prevention signs in visible, high traffic areas? Is there easily accessible first-aid medical equipment in case of an emergency? The first-aid kit should be tailored to your supplier’s specific work environment and associated risks. It can also be necessary to have employees trained in first-aid, CPR, or responsible for certain emergencies.

By evaluating your suppliers for compliance issues, you are communicating your company’s values. You also can spot risky behaviours before they dramatically impact your company.

Overall, on-site evaluations allow you to get a closer look at your supplier’s day-to-day practices, and determine if they are the best fit for your company. If your suppliers do not have an effective training program, properly store or maintain their equipment, or follow proper compliance protocol, it may be time to look elsewhere for your business’s needs.

Ben is a business development professional currently working with Spendrix. He enjoys the challenge of helping a young company grow. Ben is passionate about risk analysis, business administration, and technology issues affecting the transportation and logistics industry.

3 Tips to Get Your Procurement Function Fit for Purpose

When making a purchase, consumer law states that the goods you buy must be fit for purpose..

This blog has been developed and published for Procurious by Proxima.

In short, this means that any goods that you purchase must be able to perform the tasks or functions that they were designed to be able to complete. But, in the wider sense, fit for purpose is also a term used to describe anything (including a business function) that is able to deliver its objectives and provide a satisfactory level of service.

Is your procurement team fit for purpose?

So what constitutes a satisfactory level of service when it comes to procurement? Is a procurement team that focuses solely on squeezing suppliers on price, continually driving bigger and bigger savings (but alienating its suppliers in the process) a satisfactory function? We think not.

Don’t get me wrong – there is no denying that a good procurement team is one that is able to meet savings targets, but a great one, well that’s slightly more complex. A great procurement team is one that recognises the importance and impact of its supply base on its own corporation’s operations. One that collaborates with its suppliers, coaching, motivating and incentivising them all towards the goal of creating a fully engaged supplier base aligned with, and able to contribute towards, the organisation’s wider corporate aims.

By this definition then, there are an alarming number of procurement functions even within some of the world’s biggest organisations that are not fit for purpose.

And with an average of 70% of a businesses’ revenues spent on suppliers, that’s a significant amount of spend that is likely not being used to the best of its ability.

Making the change

Clearly then, ensuring that your procurement team is fit for purpose, can have a dramatic impact, not just on the way that your suppliers view your organisation, but on profitability.

Below are 3 simple tips to ensure your procurement function is fit for purpose:

  1. Upskill your procurement team: With two-thirds of CPOs still citing lack of resource as one of their key challenges, it’s no surprise that the trend towards upskilling is an increasingly popular one. As a recent panel of industry experts discussed, the procurement team of the future will be one that encompasses a diverse set of people from various backgrounds, with a large and varied skill set.
  2. Communicate value upwards: Procurement professionals are no stranger to the often negative perceptions associated with the function. Overcoming this perception problem starts with communicating its true value. Sharing various achievements (outside of savings metrics) in the form of supplier-led innovations or mitigated risks with the wider business will help shift perceptions of procurement away from that of the “savings guys” toward that of a key business function capable of contributing to the corporation’s wider aims and objectives.
  3. Become a strategic partner to the wider business: A recent piece of research by The Hackett Group highlighted that “elevating the role of procurement to a trusted advisor within the business” was the key issue for procurement in 2015. How can this be achieved? Communication is key. Take the time to approach business leaders throughout the organization and learn about their challenges and strategies. By taking the time to listen to other business functions and understand what they need from procurement, you encourage the perception of procurement as a strategic partner.

So, in short, ensuring that your procurement team is fit for purpose is a complex, but achievable task. By taking into account these suggestions for expanding current capabilities, communicating achievements and aligning with the wider corporate agenda, you can elevate your procurement team beyond its conventional role – creating a function that is not just fit for purpose, but one that excels.

What steps are you taking to get your procurement function fit for purpose? Are you building the procurement team of the future or concentrating on changing negative perceptions of the function?

Proxima is a procurement specialist, offering a different approach to in-house sourcing, through close collaboration with clients across a number of industries including manufacturing, retail, financial services, engineering, FMCG, professional services and the public sector.

Airlines to seek legal advice on supplier competition

Willie Walsh, the head of International Consolidated Airlines Group (a parent company of British Airways) announced at the International Air Transport Association’s (IATA) annual meeting earlier this month, that airlines are actively seeking legal advice on the competitive nature of the industry’s supply market.

Two suppliers, Boeing and Airbus, dominate the aircraft production market and it is thought that this duopoly situation has led to airlines paying excessive prices for vital parts.

The airline industry has argued that the pricing disparity can be easily spelt out by comparing the profit margins of these businesses. The IATA reports that airline profits are around 4 per cent. These profit figures are significantly lower than those of the aircraft makers, who regularly report double-digit profit margins.

Mr Walsh said, “If we don’t challenge the restrictive practices that exist, we will be held captive, and costs as we’ve seen before will rise well in excess anything that is justified.”

Walsh outlined further concerns around industry developments that have seen manufacturers produce aircraft that can only accommodate one particular make of engine. In the past it was possible to use different engines in an aircraft, which brought an element of competition into the market. Walsh said the changes were a “a development that we don’t like to see.”

It is not clear whether the investigation will result in legal action; Walsh himself has stated that such measures may not in fact be warranted. He did claim however, that airlines feel they are “not getting a fair deal” from the aircraft manufacturers.

Accenture and Fast Retailing are transforming the future of customer service

Accenture and Fast Retailing want to innovate customer service – here’s how they plan on doing it.

A joint initiative aims to improve the personalised multi-channel experience for Fast Retailing’s customers.

Accenture will help Fast Retailing (who own seven major brands, including UNIQLO, Comptoir des Cotonniers, Helmut Lang, et al) to develop new digital business models that embed customer innovation, data analytics and digitized operations in product development, merchandising, production, logistics, marketing, sales and customer service. The initiative should enable consumers to select, try, purchase and receive products and services anytime and anywhere.

Accenture will help Fast Retailing build a cloud-based technology platform, including supply chain and customer relationship management systems, to collect actionable customer insights that will enable the personalization of the customer experience. The technology, including supply chain and customer relationship management systems, will be fully transformed as a cloud based infrastructure.

“We are pursuing a coherent strategy to establish an innovative business scheme that seamlessly combines real and virtual markets and to take the lead in the changing retail industry,” said Tadashi Yanai, Chairman, President and CEO, Fast Retailing. “Through this collaborative framework with Accenture, Fast Retailing will globally present and introduce the possibility of an innovative business model beyond the retail industry and accelerate developing the world’s leading direct business model. Fast Retailing, partnering with Accenture, will enhance store strategy, create a state-of-the-art supply chain network and develop innovative talent to meet the consumer demands in the era of digitalization.”

Gianfranco Casati, group chief executive – Growth Markets at Accenture, said, “Today’s retail customers are a formidable force with shifting expectations, demanding a seamless experience – whether in stores or online – that is on their terms. Leading retailers know that digital is the key to creating the seamless experience customers want, and we will work with Fast Retailing to ensure they are making smart investment choices to create new value while ensuring efficient and effective operations across their entire organization.”

 

 

Collaborative robots will soon support human workers

The ground-breaking humanoid robot will increase safety, efficiency and productivity in the workplace.

Development of one of the world’s most advanced collaborative robots begins today as part of an EU-wide initiative involving Ocado Technology and four of Europe’s leading technology research institutions.

Under the SecondHands project, Ocado Technology is coordinating a consortium of universities to create an autonomous humanoid robot. It will use artificial intelligence, machine learning and advanced vision systems to understand what human workers want and offer assistance with difficult maintenance jobs. For example, it will hand tools to human maintenance technicians and manipulate objects like ladders, pneumatic cylinders and bolts, abilities which cannot be found in any commercial robot. The objective is to increase safety, efficiency and productivity in the workplace.

“The ultimate aim is for humans to end up relying on collaborative robots because they have become an active participant in their daily tasks,” explained Dr Graham Deacon, Robotics Research Team Leader at Ocado Technology. “In essence the SecondHands robot will know what to do, when to do it and how to do it in a manner that a human can depend on.”

The initiative, which will span five years, and is expected to use seventy two person years (equivalent to 855 person months) of research effort to complete, aims to break new ground in robotics. Key areas of focus, include: 

  • Proactive assistance: the robot developed under the SecondHands project will have cognitive and perceptive ability to understand when the operator is in need of help, understand how this help can be given and provide relevant assistance
  • Artificial intelligence: The team will enable the robot to progressively acquire skills and knowledge needed to provide assistance. In fact, it will even anticipate the needs of the maintenance technician and execute the appropriate tasks without prompting
  • 3D perception: Advanced 3D vision systems will allow the robot to estimate the 3D articulated pose of humans and offer support when it is needed without being asked
  • Humanoid form and flexibility: A humanoid shape and human-like flexibility will enable natural collaboration between humans and the robot. It will feature an active sensor head, two redundant torque controlled arms, two anthropomorphic hands, bendable and extendable torso and a wheeled mobile platform

The SecondHands project, so-called because the robot will literally provide a second pair of hands to human workers, is part of the European Union’s Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation programme, which includes one of the worlds largest civilian robotics programs.

As coordinator of the project, Ocado Technology will work alongside University College London, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, La Sapienza University of Rome and Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne. The technology firm, which powers Ocado.com, will build a special testing facility in Hatfield where the robot will be subjected to rigorous real-world trials.

UK’s competitive position in advanced robotics research strengthened

The development of one of the world’s first autonomous robots comes amidst research by Boston Consulting Group that identifies the UK as a leading adopter of industrial robots over the next decade. The BCG research complements findings by the International Federation of Robotics, estimating that the global market for industrial robots was worth $9.5bn in 2013.

Ocado Technology taking a lead in robotics research in the UK

The development of this bleeding edge robot puts Ocado Technology at the forefront of companies working on advanced robotics in the UK. The company currently employs ten robotics experts, from leading robotics research institutions, such as The University of Edinburgh and Imperial College London.

‘Soft hand’ grasping skills

In addition to the SecondHands project, Ocado Technology is also working on a second, complementary, Horizon 2020 project: ΣΩMA (pronounced “SOMA”) will see the firm partner with a number of universities to explore new ways for robots to physically interact with their environment. It is hoped this will create a ground-breaking robotic hand which can be used in conjunction with SecondHands.

Emulating a human hand, the robotic gripper will know when to grasp softly – such as when picking an apple – or to grip more tightly, such as when lifting a bottle of water.

I’m French, I’m a woman and I’m not an engineer

Yulia YasPe /Shutterstock.com

Yulia YasPe/Shutterstock.comOr so said Sophie Barthelemy, the Deputy General Manager in charge of Global Strategy for Indirect Purchasing of the Nissan Renault Alliance during her brilliant address to the ProcureCon Marketing 2015 conference audience.

Sophie was addressing some of the challenges she faced in integrating the procurement efforts of two teams, based in very different business cultures.

Finding the ‘red thread’

What began as a speech about combining the marketing efforts of two leading automakers took an about turn. Becoming an examination of the differing business cultures between France and Japan that Sophie admitted, had left her bewildered at times.

That was until she found the ‘red thread’ that unlocked the path to collaboration with her Japanese colleagues. The thread to pull, it turns out, was the Kaizen business methodology. Most of us have heard about Kaizen before, it’s essentially a framework for continuous improvement and has been attributed to the huge success Japanese firms saw through the 80’s and 90’s. As Barthelemy pointed out, Kaizen is a business mentality; it has to be engrained in your everyday decisions and should not be used on a project-by-project basis.

Sophie eloquently outlined that by immersing herself in the (very Japanese) Kaizen approach to business, she found doors starting to opening up with her Japanese counterparts. She highlighted that her approach required a significant departure from the ‘normal’ Renault way of doing things.

Building trust was addressed as being critical to achieving engagement with the alliance partners. Trust, in this instance, was gained by ‘speaking with data rather than with words’ and developing frameworks that ensured that success could achieved quickly and that everyone had visibility of the process.

Once Sophie had changed her perspective and starting thinking more Kaizen (she got better at drawing her problems than explaining them), she found that her voice was being heard more loudly within the organisation.

When she presented a Kaizen infused proposal to the CEO around how the alliance may readdress its approach to procurement, she unsurprisingly received buy-in. The projects and RFPs that resulted from her suggestions allowed the alliance to centralise its purchasing and reposition the way it managed spend. This resulted in double-digit savings, improvements in the quality of service the firm received and reduced the time spent on managing spend.

Cross-cultural learnings

Towards the end of her speech and during the question time, Sophie highlighted some great points about managing and succeeding in cross cultural business situations. She advised:

  • Accepting stereotypes, they are surprisingly accurate she said. Sophie suggested keeping only the positive elements of stereotypes and learning to adapt to the negative elements.
  • Communicating simply using pictures and data to explain your challenges and goals.
  • That the only way to gain trust is to ‘do what you said you’d do’.
  • As the title of this article suggests, Sophie suggests that humour is a great was to disarm a crowd.
  • If you are working with Japanese colleagues, you shouldn’t expect direct feedback but you should learn to read the weaker symbols of positive and negative feedback.
  • Silence is important. Take time to consider you response; don’t fill the air with noise.

And finally, if you are in Japan, don’t sit in the chair nearest to the door. That’s for the secretary.

Technology and Talent: A Match Made in Heaven

Procurement teams compete for talent, it’s as simple as that.

Thanks to Zycus for granting Procurious permission to republish this article. 

We compete with finance, we compete with operations and we compete with other procurement teams. Unfortunately we don’t often win this ‘war for talent’.

Ask the graduates of the country’s leading business schools where their preferred destination post college is and you receive answers like consulting, finance, banking and more recently technology firms.

Procurement generally fails to crack a mention, but that is starting to change and the function is being recognised for the critical role it plays in the success of organisations. High profile CEOs with a procurement background, like Tim Cook of Apple, are also helping the function being viewed in a more positive light.

Technology got us this far

The acceptance of procurement as a relevant, if not leading, business function has been driven by the significant runs the function has been able to put on the board over past decade or so. Procurement has moved from an administrative function to a truly strategic business partner.

These achievements and that of procurements remit growth has been fuelled largely by advances in technology. Electronic auctions have enabled procurement teams to achieve to better price points for our organizations and more recently, spend analysis and supplier relationship management tools have allowed us to improve our competitiveness hugely.

Technology is future

Not only does technology hold the key to procurement’s past success, it also holds the key its future. Procurement technology is critical in attracting top talent to the function.

Why?

Because technology facilitates movement, it facilitates change and it facilitates progress, and these points are critical for young professionals looking to make their first mark in the corporate world.

Technology allows workers to quickly process vast fields of data into information, enabling them not only to make smarter business decisions, but also to track the impact of these decisions. This tracking allows staff to directly show their value to the business.

With the aid of technology, workers are now able to understand their operations and the broader business environment in more depth than ever before. This insight means that companies that have made solid technology investments are better adapted to the rapidly changing nature of modern markets.

Technology advances have meant that small emerging firms can now directly compete large established firms, something that was impossible as little as two decades ago. In short technology enables more people to achieve more in a shorter period of time.

Generation Tech

The next generation of professionals fear nothing more than being stuck in the same job doing the same menial tasks over and over again. Job security is less important to this generation. Opportunity far outweighs security as a motivating factor, and young workers know that technology promotes opportunity.

Not only are the next generation motivated and enticed to join companies with solid technology platforms, they are ready for the challenge. This is a generation that has grown up with games consoles, tablets, smart phones and high speed Internet. A generation that learnt to read and add up on computers. In fact the first generation of workers never to have lived in a world without Google (those born after 1998) are about to enter the workforce for the first time.

Technology is more than a lure to this generation… it is an expectation.

The message here for hiring managers and CPO’s alike is, when hiring new recruits it is critical to emphasis, promote and sell the importance and availability of technology within your business.

By doing this, whether it be through investment in spend analysis technology, commitment to big data mapping, in-house social media platforms, technology training programs or bring-your-own-device initiatives, you’ll go a long way to attracting the cream of the new crop.

Zycus is a leading global provider of Source-to-Pay procurement performance solutions. The organisation works with clients across a number of sectors including Manufacturing, Banking and Finance, Oil and Gas, Food Processing and Electronics, and aims to help procurement create greater business impact.