Commodity changes affect market conditions

This week we are looking at technology and how the recent commodity pricing changes has affected both the size of organisations as well as their strategies.

Microsoft Tops Exxon as 2nd Biggest Company on Oil Drop

  • Exxon Mobil Corp. (XOM) ceded its title as the world’s second-largest company to Microsoft Corp. after the five-month oil rout cut $47 billion from its market value.
  • Apple (AAPL) Inc., the Cupertino, California-based iPhone maker, retains its rank as the world’s biggest company. Its shares have rallied 41 per cent in 2014, the 33rd biggest gain in the S&P 500, as the company bought back shares and extended a streak of beating analyst earnings estimates to eight quarters.

Read more at Bloomberg.com

The desperate struggle at the heart of the brutal Apple supply chain

  • The most valuable corporation on Earth has the power to make or break a company through its supplier relationships.
  • A $578m deal signed between Apple and GTAT in November 2013 looked as though it would not only bring sapphire screens to iPhones, but also create thousands of jobs in the US, salving a sore point with legislators critical of Apple’s use of foreign assembly for almost all its products, especially the iPhone and iPad.
  •  But it ended in October 2014 with GTAT filing for bankruptcy, hundreds of people put out of work, and GTAT’s chief executive and chief operating officer facing questions about insider dealing after they sold millions of dollars’ worth of GTAT stock before Apple’s iPhone announcement in September.
  • Though it doesn’t actually own any factories, Apple pours gigantic amounts of money – about $12.5bn in the past four quarters – into “plant, property and equipment”, the majority equipping its suppliers to make its products.

Read more at The Guardian

Economic volatility, low commodity prices to hurt mining industry

  • Global economic challenges, the strengthening US economy and an imbalance of supply and demand have had a devastating impact on the commodities market.
  • Current slump in prices was reflecting the cyclical nature of the industry.
  • For gold companies, while the long-term view was above current spot prices, volatility remained the key issue.
  • For base metal producers, a growing global population that would have greater overall need for products such as cars, computers and household goods, had helped support current prices.

Read more at Mining Weekly

Still Avoiding Social Media? You’re Losing Business

  • 74% of adult internet users use social media platforms.
  • Regardless of whether you are a business-to-consumer (B2C) or business-to-business (B2B) organization, your company can utilize the power of social media to see a real return-on-investment (ROI).
  • However, if you are not on social media then you are missing an opportunity to not only increase sales, but also provide better customer service to your existing clients.
  • What Percentage of People are Social Based on Income?
    Less than $30,000/year—79%
    $30,000-$49,999/year –73%
    $50,000-$74,999/year –70%
    $75,000+/year –78%
  • One thing is certain, your target audience is social. However, if your business is not on the social media platforms where potential customers are, then you are simply missing out on opportunity

Read more at Business 2 Community

Accenture previews digital disruption

  • Accenture has promised to continue to enhance digital transformation and business efficiency through the application of relevant solutions and technology.
  •  The rise of social media platforms has changed the game, stressing that data has become another source of revenue for telcos after revenue from voice appears to be peaking.
  • New emphasis on data and new sources of value: attention, identity, reputation, social graph, machine intelligence, robots, genetic modelling, new buyer values, change in control points and a winner takes all phenomena.

Read more at Biztech Africa

G20 climate challenge calls for a rethink of economics

  • Focusing on growth, the Brisbane G20 leaders’ summit has not grappled with three key issues.
  • How much more growth can the planet survive?
  • How can poorer nations raise their living standards to parity with the “developed” world?
  • How can a fairer distribution of the benefits of growth be realised?

Read more at The Conversation