How much are you really worth?

How much are you worth? Average UK procurement salary on the rise

According to The CIPS/Hays Salary Guide and Procurement Insights Report 2015 published last week, the average salary for all UK procurement and supply chain professionals has increased again, and by more than the national average. But what impact will this have in the ‘War for Talent’?

How much are you really worth?

The annual survey, involving more than 3000 procurement and supply chain professionals, looks at salaries and rewards across the profession. In 2015, it found that the average pay award in procurement was 2.5 per cent, considerably higher than the national average of 1.7 per cent.

Top Salaries, No Equality

In real terms, what this means is an average salary for procurement and supply chain professionals of £41,661. When looking at the individual job roles, the average salaries are now:

  • Procurement Director – just over £89,000
  • Head of Procurement – £64,000
  • Category Manager – £42,000
  • Senior Buyer – £35,000
  • Buyer – £27,000

Although salaries are on the increase, there is still a lack of equality between men and women in the profession. At all levels apart from tactical roles, salaries for men were higher than those for women, with the greatest inequality at the advanced professional level, where the difference was as much as £10,300.

The salary also found that professionals who held MCIPS accreditation earned on average 23 per cent more than their peers without the qualification.

Junior Roles on the Rise

What might be surprising to many people is that the biggest annual increase was seen in junior procurement roles. Assistant Buyers gained on average a 4.2 per cent increase in their salaries, while Procurement Directors reported only a 3.3 per cent increase.

The rise in the wages of junior roles highlights an important issue for procurement, even in light of it being one of the fastest increasing professions in the world. A lack of professionals starting in the junior roles means that organisations now have to work harder to attract and retain their employees.

The War for Talent

The ‘War for Talent’, as coined by McKinsey in the 1990s, is still firmly in place in the procurement profession. The number of procurement jobs available has increased significantly, with Hays Recruitment seeing a 40 per cent increase this year alone.

This increase has left many employers struggling to find the right, skilled employees to fill these roles. Of the number of avenues open to organisations when looking to attract new talent to their organisations, social media is one of the most powerful.

Platforms like Twitter, LinkedIn and Procurious can help employers check out potential employees, get to know them in more detail and also be noticed as an ‘employer of choice’ in the industry. But social media is by no means the silver bullet for procurement recruitment. Without new ideas, the work that procurement has done to get to the executive table may be undermined.

‘People’ is one of the key topics at the Procurious Big Ideas Summit on April 30th. Procurious has gathered 40+ of the biggest influencers in procurement and will be getting their ideas on the future for ‘people’ in procurement (among a host of other topics). Join in, ask questions, watch exclusive video content and contribute to all the discussions by here

In the meantime, here are some of the top stories making the headlines in procurement this week.

Exploitative fashion retailers named and shamed

  • Australian fashion companies lack transparency around their supply chain or do not have full knowledge of where their raw materials are being sourced from, leaving workers including children at risk of exploitation, an audit has found.
  • The Australian Fashion Report 2015, launched by  international development organisations Baptist World Aid and Not For Sale, which aims to empower consumers with the knowledge needed to purchase fashion ethically – this year assessed the ethical practices of 219 clothing brands — and found that popular retailers including Rockmans and Lowes are some of the worst offenders.
  • Many brands now produce in Bangladesh, which in recent years has become wildly popular for ready-made garment suppliers and where the wage is approximately $39 a month, 75 per cent cheaper than China.
  • Corporate governance researcher with the University of Technology in Sydney and a researcher with the thinktank Catalyst Australia, Martijn Boersma, said: “For Australia, the bulk of our imports come from the Asia-Pacific region where it is estimated 78 million children are involved in child labour. The deeper supply chains are, the more difficult it is for them to be monitored.”

Read more at Mamamia and The Guardian

Hilton hotels to improve animal welfare in supply chain

  • Hilton Worldwide is to implement new measures to improve the welfare of animals in its global food supply chain. The hospitality company said it would begin to eliminate the use of cages for egg-laying chickens and gestation crates for breeding pigs.
  • All hotels in the Hilton Hotels & Resorts, Waldorf Astoria Hotels & Resorts, Conrad Hotels & Resorts, Canopy by Hilton and DoubleTree by Hilton brands, will ensure that chickens are not confined in cages by 31 December 2017. By the end of the year after that, all pork products will have to be come from suppliers that house breeding pigs in groups, rather than gestation crates.
  • The changes, announced in conjunction with the Humane Society of the United States, will initially apply in 19 countries and will be adopted in other markets as supply becomes available. Jennifer Silberman, vice president, corporate responsibility for Hilton Worldwide,  said the company was committed to addressing key issues throughout its business and supply chain.

Read more at Supply Management

Internet of Things will deliver US$1.9 trillion boost

  • DHL and Cisco have jointly released a new Trend Report focused on the Internet of Things (IoT) at the DHL Global Technology Conference in Dubai. DHL and Cisco Consulting Services are also collaborating on a joint IoT innovation project that will improve decision-making in warehouse operations with near real-time data analytics based on Wi-Fi connected devices.
  • Ken Allen, CEO DHL Express and board sponsor technology, said: “At Deutsche Post DHL Group we have a deeply held belief in the positive powers of global trade. There is huge potential for countries to further increase their connectedness and prosper through trade, integration and technology. We believe the Internet of Things will be a primary enabler of this transformation.”
  • The Trend Report, which estimates that there will be 50 billion devices connected to the Internet by 2020 compared to 15 billion, looks at the potential impact this technological revolution will have on business.
  • The value at stake, combination of increased revenues and lower costs that is created or will migrate among companies and industries when new connections are made, reveals the huge potential when the Internet and networks expand their connections to warehousing, freight transportation and other elements of the supply chain.

Read more at m2mnow

‘SWL Australia’ opens for business

  • Science Warehouse is a leading provider of on-demand procurement and managed catalogue solutions that deliver purchasing efficiencies and control, spend visibility and drive savings. The Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) solution boasts dozens of clients across the UK public sector including higher education and the NHS, as well as corporate clients in the construction sector.
  • During the past 2 years it’s been developing a presence in Australia, working in partnership with the leading Australian spend analytics provider, Purchasing Index ANZ.  The Charles Perkins Centre (CPC) at the University of Sydney has been live with the Science Warehouse solution since 2014 and has already seen CPC users buying from over 2 million live products.
  • In response to very positive feedback from other potential Australian customers, a new subsidiary (SWL Australia) has been formed with offices in Melbourne.
  • Richard Shine, Science Warehouse Sales Director said – “This is a fantastic opportunity for Science Warehouse to really showcase a market-leading solution.”

Cabinet Office procurement plans almost “perverse” and “draconian”

  • Reaction has been swift to a reported move by the Cabinet Office to include two subtle but radical provisions in the government’s Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act which could shake-up local government procurement.
  • The Act, which became law last month, is said to contain two clauses which appear to give the Cabinet Office authority to investigate and challenge local authority procurements. The majority of the Act does not affect procurement, but two clauses appear to have relevance.
  • Responding to the bill’s provisions, the ICT leader at one London local authority said, “At a time when we’re looking to devolve spending decisions and empower local communities the Cabinet Office have introduced provisions which could, somewhat perversely, do exactly the opposite. Not sure why these powers were introduced.”
  • The National Outsourcing Association (NOA) has described the proposals as “almost draconian.” Kerry Hallard, chief executive of the NOA said, “Now that the government has the ability to implement measures relating to public procurement as it sees fit, it is imperative that this new power is not used callously.

Read more at Government Computing