Hamish Petrie asks ‘can you plan your career?’

In this first part of a two-part article, Hamish Petrie – former VP of People and Communications for resources giant Alcoa – offers advice to professionals at all stages of their career by encouraging the use of ‘career anchors’.

Hamish currently writes for the Business Times in Melbourne. Read more about his story here.

Career planning discussions start at an early age now during high school years as young people struggle with the question about what they want to do with their lives. This is an impossible struggle as no one can conceive how seemingly minor events will change their lives.

When I first started working as a shift metallurgist in a small tin mine on the west coast of Tasmania, I could never have conceived that 32 years and 20 jobs later, I would be sitting in a corner office on Park Avenue in Manhattan as Vice President of the world’s largest metals company. Life is full of twists and turns and chaos, so how can you prepare yourself to manage your career?

Planning your career by Hamish Petrie

Today, there are some generally accepted models for career planning that can be very helpful in starting the thinking process about your career. Generally, these models have four steps that include knowing yourself and your life priorities, exploring alternatives, deciding on a direction and then acting to implement this plan. The very first step in determining your life priorities is the most important, and it can be the most difficult. Aside from thinking about your personal values and strengths, it really forces you to think about what sort of job design and people interactions suit you the most.

While working at MIT’s Sloan School of Management in the 1970’s, Professor Edgar Schein developed the concept of career anchors, where the anchors represented an amalgam of personal values, talents, and preferences. These anchors shape the decisions that you will make about what is most important to you, in both your career and life.

This model has evolved now to define nine career anchor themes including technical or general management competence, autonomy, security, creativity and lifestyle. When I reflect on my career, I lacked the specific technical competence for any of my last fourteen jobs so it is very obvious that my career anchors were creativity and general management competence. Luckily, my family supported me with the frequent relocations necessary to take on each new career opportunity. The key outcomes of analysing your own career anchor is that you are most likely to be happy and satisfied when you can work in a job which is aligned with your personal anchor.

If you are on the flip side of this process, where you are making decisions about candidates for a job, then it is well worth exploring each candidate’s career anchors. Technical competence is very important in some jobs, like brain surgery, but for many jobs, it is not the most important factor, so taking a risk with a candidate can be very rewarding. Luckily, I had many bosses who were prepared to take a risk with me although I lacked specific knowledge about their job.

What your profile picture says about you

When God created man he made everybody equal. He also saw to it that no two people looked the same (well apart from identical twins, but stay with us here).

Uploading a profile picture helps other Procurious users put a face to a name, and makes them more inclined to learn more about you. No face, no dice.

It’s easy to achieve too. If your profile is currently sans face, just click on that sad empty placeholder and select ‘Edit profile’ (alternatively click on your name to uncover the just-as-handy drop-down menu).

From here you are free to select a picture at your leisure, and upload it for the rest of the community to see. So choose your best winning smile and away you go!

The importance of profile pictures
Oh hey! You don’t have a face?! Me too!

A strong profile picture can open all sorts of doors for you, but make sure it’s not a misrepresentation – after-all, the carpet should match the drapes…

What not to do

That teasing slither of flesh might help you make new friends, but maybe not in the way you intended… Same goes for those ‘come hither’ bedroom eyes, practice your smouldering, steely gaze for sure, just make sure the only protection other Procurious users need is for their browser.

Hello Mr X, I’ve not been expecting you (because I don’t know what you look like).

Been hitting the gym? Yes you might have a beach body but this isn’t Tinder people, the only thing you should be showing off is your bulging contact book.

Love pets? Of course you do. But that doesn’t mean you should take on the likeness of Mr Bumblepuss. The same goes for pictures of your newborn – adorable as their cheeks may be, it’s just not appropriate OK?

And while abstract pictures and pop-culture icons are nice, you don’t want to be left waiting for Walter White to knock…

Why anchoring matters in negotiation

Welcome to the second article in a monthly series from John Viner-Smith.

Have you ever looked at all the perfectly good, almost brand new cars on the forecourt at a car dealership and wondered where they came from? If you haven’t noticed what I mean, let me give you an example. If you search a certain Prestige manufacturer’s website for an “Approved Used” example of their best-selling model you’ll find you can have a choice of around 200 cars, all under six months old with around five thousand miles up, priced 15-20 per cent lower than the cost of an identically specified brand new car. So who are all these people who buy brand new cars and return them before the first service is due? Someone has to be losing money here, right? Or is something else happening?

Joerg Huettenhoelscher/Shutterstock.com

A friend of mine used to work for a company that had a particularly odd company car policy. He had, at any given time, two brand new premium brand cars on his drive. He would keep them for three months or six thousand miles and, when either of those milestones was reached, drop the car off at the dealer and pick up another one. Coincidentally, my friend’s employer was a wholly owned subsidiary of the car manufacturer whose products he drove. See where this is going?

So here’s a question; why would a car manufacturer build cars to just to run them themselves for a few months and sell them at a big discount?

The answer, if you haven’t guessed, is to maximize the margins they can make on all the cars. The manufacturer makes a decent margin selling the car at the “nearly new” price. If they didn’t, they stop making so many cars. But they need to sell cars at the “brand new” price point for two reasons. Firstly, because there are people who will pay it (this is particularly perverse when you consider that those people typically have to wait for the car they ordered to be built rather than drive a car away from stock). Secondly, the existence of the “brand new” price point gives the “nearly new” buyer the satisfaction of feeling they got a great deal. If the narrative in the buyer’s head is something like “Wow! This car is basically brand new and I’m getting 17 per cent”, they will be satisfied. If that buyer doesn’t believe that they are getting a great deal, they will push harder for even deeper discounts. The price of the new car acts as an anchor – setting the expectation of the buyer and offering them the satisfaction of a deal if they secure a discount on that price.

Why does this matter to us procurement folk? Well, it turns out that anchoring is one of the oldest and most effective techniques in negotiation and the processes, technologies and strategies we have adopted have made us extremely vulnerable to it. To understand how, it helps to revisit the basics.

Even the simplest negotiation has a range of possible outcomes. The buyer comes to the table with a maximum price that they are prepared to pay. The seller comes to the table with a minimum price that they are prepared to accept. These are their respective walk away points. Be clear on this; your walk away point is your worst case scenario deal. You would do that deal, but it represents a bad day at the office. What you really want to do is get the best possible outcome, which, in a simple price negotiation is the deal as close as possible to the other person’s walk away point. Too many buyers lose sight of this, and one of the reasons for that is the extent to which they become anchored on the seller’s price. When that happens, the buyer stops thinking about how they are going to get to seller to accept the lowest possible price and starts thinking instead about how they are going to get the Seller to come down to a price they, the buyer, can live with. Instead of focusing on getting more, they’re relieved to get just enough.

Procurement’s reliance on the tender process makes us particularly vulnerable to this. We offer the seller the opportunity to put their price on the table first and they gladly accept it. When the proposals come in they’re typically more than the Buyer wants to or can pay. So the buyer’s goal becomes to secure the best supplier at a price they can live with.

Procurement people do a lot of benchmarking. Again, this process can be extremely damaging if you fall into the trap of benchmarking un-negotiated prices. If you assume that all bidders open with a price that is inflated to give themselves room to move and offer you “deal satisfaction”, then the “benchmark” price may merely be least ambitious opening position. I know plenty of buyers who have been happy with “saving” 5 per cent by getting the highest quality bidder to contract at the price of the lowest quality bidder. I’ve seen that change in price described as a cost avoidance saving of 5 per cent. But if, as is perfectly possible, the successful bidder’s walk away point was 10 per cent lower than their opening bid, then the truth is that the buyer overpaid.

How, then, do we combat this? Here are three simple steps;

  1. Get them anchored on YOUR price.

Put your price on the table first. You will get more from your negotiations if your vendor is lying awake at night wondering how they’re going to move you from a place where they can’t close the deal to a place where they’re getting just enough to do a deal.

Some buyers will feel that, by opening the negotiation and putting the lowest price they can imagine the seller taking on the table first they will make themselves vulnerable and they are right. If you open your negotiation at the lowest price you think the seller will accept, you will probably end up paying more. Firstly because your assumptions will probably be wrong. Typically, negotiators (on both sides of the table) underestimate how much room the other party has to move before they reach their walk away point. Go with your best guess and you’ll probably open at a price that is better for them than their walk away point, and any concession you make from that opening will move you closer to your walk away. The answer is to open your negotiation at a position you know they can’t do. But that’s another post.

2.  If they open first, don’t anchor on their price.

Their opening position typically has nothing to do with their walk away point. If they are any good; they have chosen their opening position based on their understanding of your walk away point. They should put a price on the table that they do not believe you can do, because they want you to be relieved when they offer you a deal that represents just enough for you. So ignore their first offer and make your extreme opening proposal. Anchor them on your best outcome.

3.  Play a different game.

Negotiation academics call this style of negotiation “positional” negotiation. In a single variable negotiation (e.g. when you’re only talking about price), the only strategy available to you is to negotiate this way. You have nothing to trade but the other party’s satisfaction. If you want to negotiate differently, accept that you will need to find other things to trade.

In an interest-based or collaborative negotiation, you prepare by figuring out both parties’ interests in the deal and use this information to consider the full range of negotiable variables that could be brought to the table and traded. Identify the things you believe they value that cost you, comparatively, less. Identify the things you value highly that you believe cost them, comparatively, less. Finally, identify the things that are of equal cost and value to both parties. For example, if you know that your counterparty needs to book a big deal before their year-end, you may choose to make timely contract signature and (depending on how they choose to account for deals). Contract duration variables in the negotiation because they are things that cost you nothing, but are key to the deal meeting their interests.

Preparing and executing an interest-based negotiation is not something you can do ad hoc. If you believe that this is going to be the appropriate strategy to help you get the most from the deal, you need to consider how you position, open and leave room to trade on all the conceivable variables in your sourcing process. There are four distinct negotiating strategies available to you. The details of each, and the framework for assessing which is appropriate and when, will be the subject of a subsequent post.

Finally, what good is this going to do you next time you go shopping for a premium branded German automobile? Think about preparing differently.

Start by checking out the prices of almost new, ultra low mileage examples of the car you want to buy on the dealer forecourt and use those as the benchmark price for a new car. You may not get the new car at that price, but you will get more than you thought possible.

The logistics behind Zurich 2014 European Athletics Championships

This guest post was penned by Sarah Robey. Sarah represents a UK-based logistics finding service.

22nd European Athletics Championships - Day Three

Making the magic happen

The 22nd European Athletics Championships in Zürich last month was a splendid success, both in terms of attendance and their overall social goals. The CEO of Zürich 2014, Patrick Magyar, said that in the final analysis they managed to increase children’s and young people’s interest and participation in athletics. Equally important, at least from a financial perspective, the games were an excellent opportunity to increase the visibility of Zürich in general, and assist in the marketing of the 2000 year old financial centre as a tourist destination and as a place of business.

As you surely know, staging an event such as this with world-wide aims and aspirations is no small feat of logistics. Six large evening and afternoon events, ten stadium sessions (and just shy of 81 per cent of sold out at that), six-figure crowds at the road races and a City Festival with nearly a quarter million attendees – Zürich 2014 was no small exploit, and the organisers should be proud.

CEO Magyar thanked his volunteer team for the hard work they did rising to the logistical challenge, as well as the local police, the City and Canton of Zürich, the Protection and Rescue Service and the Swiss Armed Forces. A few very important organisations were left out of the spotlight though. An event of this size could not take place without thousands of hard working logistics specialists and dozens of 3PLs and other logistics organisations. I’d like to give just one example of a company that helped make this event happen.

Organisation of one particular logistics company 

Conceptum Sports Logistics, a German logistics company, was Zürich 2014’s official logistics partner. Over the course of the games, more than 1400 athletes and thousands more coaches and personal support personnel converged on Zürich. Conceptum was there to get participants, coaches, gear and equipment where they needed to be and when they needed to be there. Organising chaos is a logistics organisation’s bread and butter, and Conceptum Sports Logistics performed at least as well as the winning athletes. Maybe CEO Magyar could have spared a bit of praise for them?

Then again, the perfect logistics professional is a bit like the perfect butler – out of sight and out of mind, managing events behind the scenes and only visible when they are needed. Perhaps the fact that Conceptum didn’t feature is another testament to their skill. If so, I have no doubts that their performance at Zürich this year will keep them in clients for some time to come.

So what about your logistics needs? Perhaps you won’t be spending £23 million putting on a sports festival this year. Perhaps you only need to find a better LTL carrier for the extra orders you expect this Christmas. Perhaps you need a better place to store inventory. Britain boasts thousands of 3PLs and logistics companies that would be thrilled to help.

Sarah Robey represents www.whichwarehouse.com. Whichwarehouse offers a logistics finding service that carries listings of many logistics providers from all over the UK.

MasterCard & Basware create new platform to speed-up supply chain payments

Hungry for your weekly news fix? Join us as we reveal what’s been happening in the world of procurement during the last seven days.

Basware and MasterCard launch an automated supply chain finance platform

  • Basware has the largest electronic invoicing network in the world — one million organizations generating 80 million transactions a year, worth $500 billion, and growing at 50 per cent annually. MasterCard has one of the largest payment networks, and it is fully global.  They’ve joined forces and created Basware Pay.
  • The solution connects buyer’s and supplier’s payment processes through the Basware Commerce Network which provides an open and interoperable network that only authenticated buyers and sellers can use. Once the invoice is approved by the buyer it becomes available for payment through a virtual MasterCard account number. The combination automates invoice processing and ties the invoice information to the payment, all within a secure, closed environment using MasterCard’s single-use Virtual Account Numbers (VANs) for protection.
  • Hany Fam, President, MasterCard Enterprise Partnerships, said the opportunity is huge: “This market is nascent and in size it is bigger than the entire consumer market. It is very under-penetrated electronically. While the consumer space is 85 per cent non-electronic, this is north of 90 per cent.”
  • “MasterCard is global and none of the others operated globally. We can offer a global solution.” MasterCard is brand agnostic — it will accept payments from Amex and Visa, wires, or even cash, and it works with other business networks, like SAP ’s Ariba.

Read more on Forbes.com

Gartner reveals best regional supply chains

  • Gartner has published its annual list of leading supply chains in Asia Pacific with ten regional companies making the list.
  • Gartner Research Director James Lisica says that Asia Pacific supply chain leaders continue to create agile and lean supply chains capable of dealing with regional challenges. “We have observed some key themes across most industry segments that include building customer-centric supply chains, aligning to local markets while still serving global customers, strengthening risk management processes, improving cross functional communication, driving operational excellence to achieve fiscal discipline and prioritising talent management programs,” he says.
  • The top three is made-up of the likes of Samsung, Lenovo, and Toyota.

View the list in full at Techday.com

Jamaica to benefit from regional procurement system

  • The Regional Integration Electronic Public Procurement System, which is to be implemented across Caricom member states, is geared towards the liberalisation and integration of the regional market for trade in goods and services. This involves establishing and maintaining a regime for the free movement of goods and services within the CSME. The programme is being implemented by Caricom, with funding support from the European Union.
  • Ivor Carryl, programme manager for the CSME at the Caricom Secretariat, disclosed that a regional approach to public sector procurement, supported by a regional procurement system, can bring many benefits to the Caribbean region, and can be one of the key pillars for the advancement of the Caribbean integration process and the CSME.
  • “You are looking at a market that is somewhere in the vicinity of US$17 billion annually and for a region of five and a half million people (with the exception of Haiti). That’s a lot of money,” he added.

Read more on Jamaica Observer

Is Apple’s supply chain a risk to the company?

  • If the rumors are to be believed, Apple‘s newest product, the iWatch, will be announced at its Sept. 9 event but possibly won’t ship until 2015 because of supply chain issues. This was originally reported by Apple analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, and subsequent memos have pushed back the launch date from October to early next year.
  • Based on a thorough analysis of Apple’s supply chain, Kuo has been relatively accurate on delays. He predicts a delay in Apple’s larger-size version of its newest iteration — the iPhone 6, a 5.5-inch “phablet” model — pushing the release date for that unit back to 2015 as well.
  • A slightly ironic point is that these issues seemed to crop up after Tim Cook took the reins. Widely considered a “supply chain maven” among the analyst crowd, Cook started his Apple career as a senior vice president for worldwide operations. Through a relentless focus, he quickly fixed the supply chain, eliminating lags from months to days. Cook was promoted to chief operating officer before becoming the company CEO in the wake of Steve Jobs’ declining health.

Procurement has traditionally had ‘low status’ in UK government

  • The National Audit Office (NAO) said the government “fails to recognise the value of contract management” and “it is doubtful that the government can improve its capability to be able to have the best contract managers on all its contracts”.
  • In Transforming government’s contract management the NAO said current reforms were “going in the right direction” but there is “a lot still to be worked out”. “Too often contract management has been seen as delivering the deal that was agreed when the contract was signed. This has meant that contract management has been seen as a way to avoid things going wrong, rather than unlocking value,” said the report.
  • Amyas Morse, head of the NAO, said: “For several decades, governments have been increasing their use of contracts with the private sector to provide goods and services. This has produced successes but also thrown up major new challenges, which are not easy to surmount. “Not the least of these is the need to build up the commercial skills of contract management staff, both in departments and in the centre, and enhance the status and profile of their role.

Read more on Supply Management

Businesses urged to register for supply chain programme (Durham, UK)

  • NEPIC’s BASME (Business Acceleration for SMEs) programme was set up in 2012 to help regional firms which are keen to increase sales to companies within the sector.
  • So far the programme, which is financed by the Regional Growth Fund, has supported the creation of 450 direct and indirect jobs in the North East and 360 businesses have registered to be part of it.
  • Felix O’Hare, BASME Project Manager at NEPIC, said: “NEPIC launched BASME to help SMEs in the process industry supply chain to develop their sales to the sector. Using a mentoring approach with some of the sector’s most experienced managers, businesses are able to learn more about what companies look for when sub-contracting work so they can be in the strongest possible position to succeed.

Read more at BDaily

Following in the footsteps of Richard Branson…

The words of Sir Richard Branson were ringing in his ears when Ben Briggs accepted a job offer a few years ago. He really wasn’t sure how he would ever be able live up to expectations, but wanted nothing more than to give it a shot.

Ben Briggs wanted to be the next Richard Branson

So, he fronted up on the first day as the global commodity role at General Motors in Detroit, aged 27, and began working. He was one of the youngest managers in the company. It was huge, by anyone’s definition.

“I remember Sir Branson saying that if someone offers you an amazing opportunity and you’re not sure you can do it, say yes – then learn how to do it later. And that’s what I did.

“Despite having strong technical skills, I believed at the time I was short on leadership skills, predominantly due to my age. This was not the case however, but when you’re 20-something, you often doubt your own abilities – or at least question them.”

Saying yes has seen Ben rise to the role of head procurement honcho at Melbourne’s Crown Resorts, where he’s working to improve cost efficiencies, quality, delivery and technological benefits to one of Australia’s largest entertainment groups. He’s been in the profession 15 years and has worked on both the cost and revenues sides of the operation.

Ben describes procurement as a dynamic and fast-paced industry with significantly varying stakeholder requirements, which creates daily challenges.

But juggling his first child with his role managing a major restructure to better align procurement operations is easily his biggest achievement to date. “Both were occurring at the same time, and each had their challenges,” he muses.

Crown Resorts is a fantastic place to work, he says.

“You’re constantly challenged. What’s also interesting is we’re now playing a pivotal role in finding ways to improve revenue uplift via our sourcing activities, creating new skills and creative thinking in the team.”

Ben loves overseas travel to experience different cultures. He also competes in marathons in his spare time.

“In all aspects of your life, I believe it’s important to back yourself, be committed, have passion and be a good listener, as these key traits will greatly steer you to success in whatever you do – at whatever age.”

Will augmented reality change the manufacturing industry?

According to recently published figures – only 17 per cent believe that augmented reality is going to change manufacturing in the future.

But first a primer: what is augmented reality?

Dmi T/Shutterstock.com

People often confuse augmented reality (AR for short) with virtual reality, the two are wholly different beasts but it’s easy to see the logic. Virtual reality transports the user into a carefully constructed 3D, virtual world. It’s a full-blown immersive experience – and it needs to be, in order to create and sustain the illusion. Whereas augmented reality relies on digital data being overlaid on a live view of the world outside. Text, graphics and sound fill your field of vision, adding a useful extra layer of data to your immediate surroundings. In technology terms we’re talking Google Glass and Sony’s Smart EyeGlass, rather than Oculus Rift and Project Morpheus.

Factories of the future

Today there is very little practical, real-world use of augmented reality in the field. Despite being AR is still very much in its infancy many industries and professions are wising-up to the benefits the technology can afford.

Not to mention, the use of AR could expedite training – negating the use of offsite sessions and bringing it in-house instead. Similarly it has applications within the medical world, providing the surgeon with overlays of essential patient information.

Boeing, BMW and Volkswagen are working on implementing AR into their assembly lines to smooth the manufacturing process.

There’s a strong case for the use of AR within the retail and commerce space. Want to see what’s inside a product’s packaging without opening it? You can do that, sure.

How about using it to help battle immoral practice in the workplace? Google Glass is now able to detect whether someone’s happy, sad, nervous, angry or excited with the help of an app. This could help boost productivity, ensuring workers remain in a healthy state of mind, and identifying emotional strain before it fully takes hold.

Incidentally SCM World currently carries a survey on the future of manufacturing – you can take part and submit your thoughts here. The results are due to be published in October, so we’ll be keeping a careful eye on this one.

Have you got the eye of the tiger?

When people bang-on about training, your first thought usually turns to this…

As empowering and utterly brilliant that may be, we’re here today to talk about something that can do for you what Survivor did for Rocky in the ring.

Procurious has an ever-growing collection of fine training videos and learning materials for your consumption. What’s more, they’re bite-size, so you can graze as much as you like without ever having too much.

Browse our selection of educational videos

Our Learning page can be accessed from anywhere on the site – here you’ll be presented with a selection of videos (we call them ‘featured classes’) to browse.

You might have noticed that some videos are listed as free, while others carry a charge. If you’re not looking to spend there’s still a healthy selection to choose from, but some of the more specialised lessons will require you to dip into your pockets.

How will I know if a lesson is for me?

Never fear, each paid video provides a short second sampler (anywhere from 25-45seconds), so you can watch and decide if it’s really for you. If you like what you see – just click the ‘Add this class to cart’ button, and proceed through the checkout process.

Purchasing lessons on Procurious

You can opt to have your billing information saved for future purchases if you so choose – just tick the respective box before making your payment.

Changed your mind? You can remove the class from your shopping cart in two ways: Either click the ‘X Remove from cart’ prompt, or select the ‘Clear cart’ command from the Your Cart screen. You can access this at any time, just click the shopping trolley icon next to your mailbox and notifications.

Exploring the lessons tree

Training videos on Procurious

After selecting lesson, the next thing you’ll want to do is watch the thing. In the player view you’ll also see the Lessons tree – this can be used to navigate between the different sections of the video (if the lesson is split into parts).

A (tricky) lesson learnt

Each class also carries its own difficulty rating. These range from videos suitable for all levels, through to the more advanced/intermediate where prior knowledge of the topics covered is advised.

Armed with this knowledge, go forth and explore the Learning available on Procurious! Alternatively if you’d like to talk to us about adding your training materials to our collection, please get in touch here.

Social network faux pas

If you’ve got even a smidgen of a presence on social media then you’re in the public spotlight. Don’t damage your carefully constructed image by falling foul of these common faux pas.

Inappropriate material

When we refer to inappropriate material, we’re not just talking about the sort of content that caused upset for Hollywood’s superstars… Insensitive opinions, jokes in bad taste, photos from that party, in-fact anything that makes you look the opposite of ‘ha ha’ silly should be pretty much avoided.

Don’t ever post anything that could harm your image, or cause major embarrassment. You never know who’s watching. Your career might thank you for it later. The Internet never forgets you know…

Changing your name

It’s all very well to hide behind a clever alter ego, but when you replace your surname with nonsense it really goes beyond the pail…

Matt ‘Twinkletoes’ Jones doesn’t imply a healthy sense of humour, it makes you look a twerp.

Game invites

This one only really applies to Facebook but it’s a humdinger… If we want to play a life-sucking, cutesy (yet mildly addictive) online game then we’ll do it of our own accord. We don’t want spurious invites and intrusive notifications cajoling us to join your sad existence.

Oh it has cute fluffy cats? OK, maybe just for a few minutes…

The written word

Are your social networking accounts wanted for crimes against the English language?

Do you flout a flagrant disregard for sentence structure, needlessly employ CamelCase in the Very Middle of Sentences, make serious spelling errors, or babble in incomprehensible text-speak? These are just some of the offenders on our list.

To all those that answered ‘yes’ – just stop it. Stop it now.

Laziness

Social networks are communication tools, let’s not forget this… But there are times when you can’t help but wonder whether this is really the right platform for your verbal diarrhoea.  It really comes to something when you’re holding conversations with your nearest and dearest when they’re in the same room.

By all means like a photo, or share an amusing anecdote but don’t use social media as an alternative to meaningful, real life interactions. Far-fetched? Nope, we’ve seen it play out on Facebook and the results made us reach for the ‘hide’ button.

Hashtags

Ah the humble hashtag (#). Hashtags have their uses, but in the wrong hands they can turn into weapons of mass annoyance. Don’t litter your status updates with the things, instead employ a shred of common sense. A general rule of thumb is stick to a maximum of 2-3 in one Tweet. Plus, stop using them on Facebook (although the social network added support for them, the experience remains mediocre at best). Stick to Twitter and Google+ for your hashtag fix.

Arguing in public

Don’t air your dirty laundry in public. All of the major social networking platforms offer private or direct messaging functionality – use them instead of causing a social media storm. It also looks wholly unprofessional, so keep your diatribe private.

Social networks

Validation services

We all need validation… Twitter validation services however are a trifle unneeded if you’re anything but a large company trying to weed out armies of zombie accounts.

If you’re on social media you should be fully aware of who’s following you, liking your pages, and interacting with your ‘brand’. Therefore leaving it to an automated tool like TrueTwit or TweetDeck (for instance) almost feels like missing the point. You shouldn’t be doing it.

Saying that, there is nothing wrong with TrueTwit  (and others of its ilk) but if you’re just starting out on social media we’d encourage you to cultivate personal connections first.

LinkedIn embarrassment

Ever receive those emails from LinkedIn telling you to ‘congratulate’ Bob Mills on his work anniversary?

In this fast-paced modern world, roles and functions change all the time, so there’s every likelihood the poor sap you’re being told to shower with glad tidings has been moved on. Maybe send condolences to Bob in the form of flowers instead?

Commitment

If your heart’s not in it then it soon becomes blindingly obvious to the people sitting at the other end. No matter your social network of choice, people ultimately choose to follow you for a reason – so don’t let them down. Post often, be friendly, engaging, and show some personality will you? A dormant account is a waste of everyone’s time and network.

Join an entirely new online network – Procurious.com
Follow us on Twitter
Like us on Facebook
We’re even on Google+

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Responsible sourcing: top 500 ranking

You can pack a great deal under the responsible sourcing umbrella – from businesses practicing sustainable procurement, specialists in environmental and ethical trading, thought-leaders in social impact, to those organisations sharing strategies and solutions.

The leaderboard is arranged by social media clout – those with massive influence undoubtedly sit nearer the top, indicating that meaningful interactions via social media channels count for a lot here.

The list is compiled by McClelland Media Ltd, and UK retail giant Marks and Spencer.

We’ve provided a small sample below, but we suggest you head on over to https://www.leaderboarded.com/responsible-sourcing to view the top 500 in its entirety.

You can pack a great deal under the responsible sourcing umbrella – from businesses practicing sustainable procurement, specialists in environmental and ethical trading, thought-leaders in social impact, to those organisations sharing strategies and solutions.  The leaderboard is arranged by social media clout – those with massive influence undoubtedly sit nearer the top, indicating that meaningful interactions via social media channels count for a lot here. The list is compiled by McClelland Media Ltd, and UK retail giant Marks and Spencer.   We’ve provided a small sample below, but we suggest you head on over to https://www.leaderboarded.com/responsible-sourcing to view the top 500 in its entirety.  See something missing? We’ve been told it’s possible to nominate organisations (or people) for consideration. Best visit the publisher’s website for more information.

We’d also recommend bookmarking the page, as it updates weekly every Friday.

See something missing? We’ve been told it’s possible to nominate organisations (or people) for consideration. Best visit the publisher’s website for more information.